155th National ACS Meeting, San Francisco March ... - ACS Publications


Monday Morning, Apr. 1 .... School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, ... J. Raynor Churchill, Aluminum Co. of America, P. 0. Box ...
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ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

NEWS

155th National ACS Meeting, San Francisco March 31 to April 5, 1968 Monday Morning, Apr. 1

ANALYTICAL DIVISION of the American Chemical So­ T HE ciety has planned a full week of stimulating and varied

technical sessions for the 155th National American Chemical Society Meeting in San Francisco. Nearly 240 papers will be given m special symposia and general sessions sponsored by the Analytical Division alone or in conjunction with other divisions. Joint symposia will be held with the Polymer Division, the Division of Fluorine Chemistry (the whole of its program consists of sessions on instrumental and chemi­ cal analysis of fluorine-containing molecules), and the Di­ vision of Water, Air, and Waste Chemistry. Included in the program will be special symposia honoring the ACS award winners in analytical chemistry; chromatography and elec­ trophoresis; and instrumentation. Analytical Chemistry Division sessions will all be held at the Civic Auditorium with the exception of the joint sessions with the Division of Water, Air, and Waste Chemistry which will meet at the Fairmont Hotel, April 3 and 4. This special symposium, "Instrumental and Automated Methods for Chemical Analysis for Water Pollution Control," has par­ ticular relevance to our national problems concerned with water quality and should be of interest to many chemists. Titles of the sessions are : Water Quality Parameters ; Water Quality Monitoring Systems; In Situ Analysis; and Auto­ mated Analytical Techniques. Other special symposia of particular interest will be held on analytical calorimetry (joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry), microwave spectroscopy, and physical chemical applications of gas chromatography. L. G. Longsworth, winner of the ACS Award in Chroma­ tography and Electrophoresis (sponsored by Lab-Line In­ struments, Inc.) will speak at the Monday afternoon session of the symposium on electrophoresis. He will discuss optical methods in electrophoresis, diffusion, and sedimentation. The symposium on developments in metallurgical analysis, which honors J. R. Churchill, winner of the ACS Award in Chemical Instrumentation (sponsored by Ε. Η. Sargent & Co.) will also be held Monday. J. R. Churchill will address the Monday afternoon session on metallurgical analysis— wet and dry. L. B. Rogers, winner of the ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry (sponsored by the Fisher Scientific Co.) will be honored by a special symposium Wednesday, April 3. Selectivity and resolution in gas-solid chroma­ tography is the subject of his address, which will be pre­ sented at the Wednesday afternoon session. The California Section, ACS, and the American Chemical Society are sponsoring the chemical exposition which will be held April 2 to 4, in Brooks Hall, Civic Auditorium. Chemicals, equipment, instruments, publications, and ser­ vices will be displayed in 185 booths. The detailed program of the Analytical Division sessions and special symposia is given below. Chairman of the Division is E. C. Dunlop, Experimental Station, E. L du Pont de Nemours, Co., Wilmington, Del. 19898. James C. White, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn. is Secretary-Treasurer. Chairman-Elect is Fred MoLafferty of Purdue University. Chem. Eng. News, Feb. 12, page 54, gives the complete Na­ tional ACS meeting program.

Section A SYMPOSIUM ON ELECTROPHORESIS (In Honor of L. G. Longsworth, Winner of the ACS Award in Chromatography and Electrophoresis) Milan Bier, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. M. Bier 9:05 Clinical Applications of Protein Electrophoresis. C. I. L u p u , Clinical C h e m i s t r y L a b o r a t o r y , T u c s o n Medical Cen­ ter, P. O. Box 6 0 6 7 , T u c s o n , Ariz. 8 5 7 1 6 9:35 Analytical and Preparative Disc Electrophoresis. R. H a n s e l , Jr., Canal I n d u s t r i a l C o r p . , 5 6 3 5 Fisher Lane, Rockville, M d . 2 0 8 5 2 10:05 Urea Starch Gel Immunoelectrophoresis of Proteins and M e m b r a n e Antigens. M. D. Poulik, T h e Child Re­ search C e n t e r of M i c h i g a n , 6 6 0 Frederick St., D e t r o i t , Mich. 4 8 2 0 2 10:35 Electrophoresis Detection a n d Characterization of Macromolecular Interaction. J . R. C a n n , Dept. of Bio­ physics, U n i v e r s i t y of C o l o r a d o , Medical Center, Denver, Col. 80220 11:05 Electrophoretic Behavior of Microheterogeneous Pro­ teins. J . F. Foster, H. N. B h a r g a v a , Purdue U n i v e r s i t y , Lafayette, I n d . 4 7 9 0 7 11:35 Electrophoresis in Endless Fluid Belts. Alexander K o l i n , Dept. of B i o p h y s i c s , U n i v e r s i t y of C a l i f o r n i a , Los Angeles, Calif. 9 0 0 2 4

Section Β SYMPOSIUM ON DEVELOPMENTS OF METALLURGICAL ANALYSIS (n Honor of J. R. Churchill, Winner of the ACS Award in Chemical Instrumentation) B. F. Scribner, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. B. F. S c r i b n e r 9:05 Optical Emission Spectrometry. Charles H. Ander­ s o n , A p p l i e d Research L a b o r a t o r i e s , P. O. Box 1 7 1 0 , Glendale, Calif. 9 1 2 0 9 9:35 X-Ray Spectrometry. M. F. Hasler, A p p l i e d Research L a b o r a t o r i e s , Hasler Research Center, 9 5 La Patera Lane, Goleta, Calif. 9 3 0 1 7 10:05 Combustion and Plasma Flame Techniques for Metallurgical Analysis. V e l m e r A. Fassel, I n s t i t u t e f o r A t o m i c Research a n d D e p a r t m e n t of C h e m i s t r y , Iowa State U n i v e r s i t y , A m e s , Iowa 5 0 0 1 0 10:35 Spark Source Mass Spectroscopy—Recent Develop­ ments and Present Capabilities. E d w a r d B. Owens, Massa­ c h u s e t t s I n s t i t u t e of T e c h n o l o g y , Lincoln Laboratory, P. O. Box 7 3 , L e x i n g t o n , M a s s . 0 2 1 7 3 11:05 Activation Analysis of Metals. V i n c e n t P. G u i n n , Gulf General A t o m i c Inc., P. O. Box 6 0 8 , San Diego, Calif. 92112 11:35 Electrochemical Methods. J o h n K. Taylor, N a t i o n a l B u r e a u of S t a n d a r d s , W a s h i n g t o n , D. C. 2 0 2 3 4

Section C GENERAL P. Gam, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. P. Garn 9:05 Sorption Isotherms on Liquid-Coated Adsorbents. I. Acetone on Diatomaceous Earth Supports Coated with Tri-O-Tolyl Phosphate a n d Squalane. Paul U r o n e , YoshiVOL. 40, NO. 3, MARCH 1968 ·

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NEWS hiro Takahashi, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo. 80302; George H. Kennedy, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colo. 80401 9:25 Modified Glass-Bead Columns. J. G. Nikelly, Phila­ delphia College of Pharmacy and Science, Philadelphia, Pa. 19104 9:45 Programmed Temperature Gas Chromatography (PTGC) at High Sensitivities and in Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry (GC-MS). R. L. Levy, T. S. Hermann, Midwest Research Institute, 425 Volker Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 64110 10:05 A Sensitive Gas Chromatographic Method for De­ termining Trace Amounts of CO in Aqueous Solutions. J. W. Swinnerton, V. J. Linnenbom, C. H. Cheek, Code 8330, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D. C. 20390 10:35 Microestimation of Succinylcholine and Decamethonium by Gas Chromatography. Sandra I. Lamb, Donald J. Jenden, Israel Hanin, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 10:55 A Comparison of 30 mHz and 2450 mHz Plasmas for Gas Analysis. C. David West, Occidental College, 1600 Campus Rd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90041 11:15 Practical Aspects of Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring with the Hydrogen Flame Ionization Detector. R. Wayne Ohline, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, Ν. Μ. 87801; Edwin Thall, Institute of Polymer Science, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44304 11:40 An Evaluation of Gas Chromatographic Column Pa­ rameters. John Q. Walker, Clarence J. Wolf, McDonnell Douglas Corp., Lambert-St. Louis Municipal Airport, Box 516, St. Louis, Mo. 63166

Monday Afternoon, Apr. 1 Section A SYMPOSIUM ON ELECTROPHORESIS (In Honor of L. G. Longsworth, Winner of the ACS Award in Chromatography and Electrophoresis) Milan Bier, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks 2:05 Stable-Flow Free-Boundary Electrophoretic Studies of Cells and Other Biological Particles. Howard C. Mel, Division of Medical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 94720 2:35 Dielectrophoretic Detection and Selection of Living and Dead Cells. Herbert A. Pohl, Dept. of Physics, Okla­ homa State University, Stillwater, Okla. 74074 2:55 Immunoelectrophoretic Analysis (IEA) in Studies of Protein Synthesis. Curtis A. Williams, Rockefeller Uni­ versity, New York, Ν. Υ. 10021 3:20 Immunologic and Clinical Studies on Idiopathic Para­ proteinemia. William J. Hammack, Medical College of Alabama and Veterans Administration Hospital, 700 South 19th St., Birmingham, Ala. 35233 3:40 Continuous Recovery of Antibody by "InVivo" Elec­ trophoresis. J. G. Watt, Regional Transfusion Centre Edinburgh, Scotland; M. Bier, Veterans Administration Hospital, Tucson, Ariz. 85713 4:20 Introduction. M. Bier Award Address—ACS Award in Chromatography and Electrophoresis sponsored by Lab-Line Instruments, Inc. OPTICAL METHODS IN ELECTROPHORESIS, DIFFUSION, AND SEDIMENTATION L. G. Longsworth, Rockefeller University, New York, N.Y. 10021 Section Β SYMPOSIUM ON DEVELOPMENTS IN METALLURGICAL ANALYSIS (In Honor of J. R. Churchill, Winner of the ACS Award in Chemical Instrumentation) B. F. Scribner, Presiding

2:00 2:05 86 A

Introductory Remarks. B. F. Scribner Introduction. M. F. Hasler ·

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Award Address—ACS Award in Chemical Instrumentation sponsored by E. H. Sargent & Co. METALLURGICAL ANALYSIS, WET AND DRY J. Raynor Churchill, Aluminum Co. of America, P. 0 . Box 722, New Kensington, Pa. 15068 3:30 Determination of Trace Elements in High-Purity Plati­ num by Isotope Dilution, Spark Source Mass Spectrometry. Robert Alvarez, Paul J. Paulsen, Spectrochemical Analysis Section, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 20234 4:00 Atomic Absorption Determination of Ferrites. S. L. Levine, IBM Corporation, P. O. Box 390, Poughkeepsie, Ν. Υ. 12602

Section C GENERAL J. G. Nikelly, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. J. G. Nikelly 2:10 Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography of Ca Hydrocarbons. Dale L. Fanter, John Q. Walker, Clarence J. Wolf, McDon­ nell Douglas Corp., Lambert-St. Louis Municipal Airport, Box 516, St. Louis, Mo. 63166 2:30 Study of Gaseous Products from Thermal Decompo­ sition of Minerals and Ocean Sediments by Repetitive Gas Chromatographic Analysis. Paul D. Garn, Gaylord D. Anthony, University of Akron, 150 Center St., Akron, Ohio 44304 2:50 Calculation of Distribution Coefficients in Inorganic Gel Chromatography. Dennis Saunders, Robert L. Pecsok, University of California, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 3:10 Analysis of Tall Oil by Gel Permeation Chromatogra­ phy. Teh-Liang Chang, American Cyanamid Co., Stamford Research Lab., Stamford, Conn. 06904 3:40 Separation of Metal Ions on Microcrystalline Cellu­ lose Columns. James S. Fritz, Mark A. Peters, Ames Laboratory, USAEC, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 4:05 Extraction of Rare Earths With Methylenebis(dialkylphosphine Oxides). Jerome W. O'Laughlin, Deanna F. Jensen, Ames Laboratory, USAEC, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 4:30 Cation Exchange in Dimethylsulfoxide Media. Gil­ bert E. Janauer, John T. Carrano, Harold Van Wart, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, Ν. Υ. 13901

Tuesday Morning, Apr. 2 Section A SYMPOSIUM ON PHYSICAL CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY D. T. Sawyer, Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. D. T. Sawyer 9:05 The Study of Diffusion in Dense Gases Using HighPressure Gas Chromatography. J. C. Giddings, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 9:35 Reaction Kinetics in the Gas Chromatographic Col­ umn. Stanley H. Langer, Joanne Y. Yurchak, James Patton, Chemical Engineering Department, University of Wis­ consin, Madison, Wis. 53706 10:00 Physical Interactions in Liquid Mixtures of Aliphatic Hydrocarbons: An Investigation Using Medium-Pressure, Packed-Column GLC. A. J. B. Cruickshank, B. W. Gainey, C. L. Young, School of Chemistry, Bristol University, Bris­ tol, England 10:35 Second Virial Coefficients of Some Hydrocarbon Mix­ tures from Gas Chromatography. R. L. Pecsok, M. L. Windsor, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 11:00 A Thermodynamic Study of Hydrogen-Bonding by Means of Gas—Liquid Chromatography. Daniel E. Martire, Peter Rield, Georgetown University, Washington, D. C. 20007 11:30 Gas Phase Chromatography and Chain Molecule Models. Hartland H. Schmidt, University of California, Riverside, Calif. 92502

NEWS Section Β

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GENERAL V. P. Guinn, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. V. P. Guinn 9:05 Trace Element Survey Analysis of Biological Materials by Spark Source Mass Spectrometry. George H. Morrison, C. A. Evans, Jr., Cornell University, Ithaca, Ν. Υ. 14850 9:25 Chlorine Isotopic Ratios by Negative Ion Mass Spec­ trometry. James W. Taylor, Eric P. Grimsrud, University of Wisconsin, 112 W. Johnson St., Madison, Wis. 53706 9:45 The Computer Analysis of Microanalytical Data Ap­ plied to the Determination of Formulae of Chemical Com­ pounds. Joel S. Miller, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024; Stanley H. Kravitz, Stanley Kirschner, Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich. 48202 10:05 Analytical Applications of the On-Line Digital Com­ puter in Fast-Sweep Derivative Polarography. S. P. Perone, Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. 47907; J. E. Harrar, F. B. Stephens, Roger Anderson, Lawrence Radiation Lab­ oratory, Livermore, Calif. 94550 10:40 Some Analytical Chemical Applications of the General Electric Time-Sharing Computer System. Max Tochner, General Electric Co., Silicone Products Dept., Waterford, Ν. Υ. 12188 11:00 Quantitative Analysis of Unresolved Gaussian Peaks. L. Endrenyi, Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, Toronto 5, Ontario, Canada 11:20 Simplex Optimization of Chemical Reactions. Duane E. Long, Chemical Division, Dugway Proving Ground, Dugway, Utah 84022 11:40 Automated Calculation of Carbon-14 and Sulfur-35 Radioactivity in Biological Samples by External Standard­ ization and a Computer Program. Sanford K. Figdor, Medical Research Laboratories, Charles Pfizer & Co., Inc., Groton, Conn. 06340

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Section C GENERAL R. L. LeTourneau, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. R. L. LeTourneau 9:05 The Determination of Iron in Nitrogen Tetroxide by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. C. E. Wilson, T. T. Bartels, J. H. Taylor, McDonnell Co., Box 516, St. Louis, Mo. 63166 9:25 The Determination of Trace Level Copper in Sodium by Colorimetry and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. James M. Scarborough, P. O. Box 309, Canoga Park, Calif. 91304 9:45 The Determination of Piperazine Rings in Ethylene Amines, Poly(ethylenamine) and Polyethylenimine by In­ frared Spectroscopy. H. L. Spell, B-1217, Dow Chemical Co., Texas Division, Freeport, Texas 77541 10:05 Infrared Multiple Scan Interference Spectroscopy. M. J. D. Low, New York University, University Heights, New York, Ν. Υ. 10453 10:40 Internal Reflection Spectroscopic Study of Surface Adsorption. Vakula S. Srinivasan, TRW Systems, Redondo Beach, Calif; Theodore Kuwana, Nicholas Winograd, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 11:00 Precipitation from Homogeneous Solution by Photo­ chemical Action. M. Das, A. H. A. Heyn, M. Z. Hoffman, Boston University, Boston, Mass. 02215 11:20 Homogeneous Precipitations Using Radiolytically Generated Hydrochloric Acid. Hisashi Kubota, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830

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Section D SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF FLUORINE-CONTAINING MOLECULES NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE (Joint with the Division of Fluorine Chemistry) E. G. Brame, Jr., Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. E. G. Brame, Jr 9:05 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Fluorobutadienes. S. L. Monatt, M. T. Bowers, J. A. Miller, Jr., Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif. 91103; W. D. Cumming, R. A. Beaudet, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90007

For additional information, ask for Bulletin AC-3GLC-IT Circle No. 171 on Readers' Service Card VOL. 40, NO. 3, MARCH 1968

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NEWS 9:40 NMR Spectroscopy of Fluorinated Organic Molecules Containing Oxygen. Wallace S. Brey, Jr., University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.; Paul D. Schuman, Ε. C. Stump, Peninsular ChemResearch, Inc., P. O. Box 14318, Gaines­ ville, Fla. 32601 10:15 NMR Studies in the Gas Phase. C. D. Cornwell, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 53706 10:50 Fluorine NMR Spectra of Poly(hexafluoropropylene Oxide). Thomas E. Beukelman, Jackson Laboratory, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., P. 0. Box 525, Wilmington, Del. 19899 11:25 NMR Fluorine-Containing Polymers. Charles W. Wil­ son III, Physics Department, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44304 Tuesday Afternoon, Apr. 2 Section A SYMPOSIUM ON PHYSICAL CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY D. T. Sawyer, Presiding

2:00 Gas Chromatographic Measurements of Stability Constants. J. H. Purnell, D. Cadogan, Department of Physical Chemistry, University College, Swansea, Wales, U. K. 2:40 Separation of Enantiomers by Gas Chromatography with Optically Active Stationary Phases. E. Gil-Av, Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovoth, Israel 3:10 Substituent Effects in Gas-Liquid Chromatography. Barry L. Karger, Yusef Elmehrik, William Andrade, North­ eastern University, Boston, Mass. 02115 3:40 Thermodynamic Studies of Organic Molecules with Salt-Modified Aluminas and Porous Glass Beads. Donald T. Sawyer, David J. Brookman, Arthur F. Isbell, University of California, Riverside, Calif. 92502 4:10 Thermodynamic Data for Gas-Solid Adsorption from Gas Chromatographic Measurements. L. B. Rogers, Pur­ due University, Lafayette, Ind. 47907 4:30 Gas Chromatographic Studies of the Thermodynam­ ics of Adsorption and of Molecular Interactions. A. V. Kiselev, M. V. Lomonosov, State University of Moscow, Moscow, USSR

Section Β GENERAL G. H. Morrison, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. G. H. Morrison 2:10 Standardization of Alpha Emitting Actinide Element Tracers for Low Level Analysis: A Comparison of Meth­ ods. R. A. Wessman, R. D. Szidon, Tracerlab, 2030 Wright Ave., Richmond, Calif. 94804; A. C. Angel, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. 2:30 Analysis of 241Am, 242Cm, and 117Pm in Fallout. R. A. Wessman, R. D. Szidon, M. P. Hunt, Tracerlab, 2030 Wright Ave., Richmond, Calif. 94804 2:50 Separation and Determination of Plutonium-239 by Liquid Anion Exchange and Liquid Scintillation Counting. Donald J. Gross, Shell Development Co., 140053rd St., Emeryville, Calif. 94608 3:10 Neutron and Gamma-Ray Interaction Corrections in Fast-Neutron Activation Analysis. George H. Andersen, ATC0R, Inc., 360 Bradhurst Ave., Hawthorne, Ν. Υ. 10532; Vincent P. Guinn, Gulf General Atomic, P. O. Box 608, San Diego, Calif. 92112 3:40 Neutron Capture Gamma Ray Activation Analysis Using a Lithium Drifted Germanium Semiconductor De­ tector. S. M. Lombard, T. L. Isenhour, University of Wash­ ington, Seattle, Wash. 98105 4:05 An Analytical Function for Describing Gamma-Ray Pulse-Height Distributions in Nal(Ti) Scintillators. B. R. Kowalski, T. L. Isenhour, University of Washington, Seat­ tle, Wash. 98105 4:30 A Transpiration Method for the Determination of U(lll) in Radioactive Molten Salt Reactor Fuel. J. M. Dale, R. F. Apple, A. S. Meyer, Jr., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830 Section C SYMPOSIUM ON ANALYTICAL CALORIMETRY (Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry) J. F. Johnson, Presiding 88 A

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ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

2:00 Introductory Remarks, J. F. Johnson 2:05 Calorimetric Studies of the Fusion of Linear Poly­ ethylene. J. F. Jackson, L. Mandelkern, Department of Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Biophysics, Florida State University, Tallahasse, Fla. 32306 2:30 Measurement of the Heat of Fusion of Crystalline Polymers by a Calorimetric Melting Point Depression Tech­ nique. J. R. Knox, Avisun Corp., Post Rd., Marcus Hook, Pa. 19061 2:55 Calorimetry of FNA Treated Polyethylene Samples. Gustav K. Meinel, A. Peterlin, Research Triangle Institute, P. O. Box 12194, Research Triangle Park, N. C. 27709 3:20 The Thermodynamic Dissolution Temperature of Sus­ pensions of Polyethylene Single Crystals by DTA. Η. Μ. Schleinitz, Plastics Department, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Del. 19898 3:45 The Equilibrium Melting Temperature and Surface Free Energy of Polyethylene Single Crystals. H. E. Bair, T. W. Huseby, R. Salovey, Bell Telephone Labs., Inc., Mur­ ray Hill, N. J. 07971 4:10 Melting Behavior of Linear Polyethylene Fractions. R. W. Ford, J. D. Ilavsky, R. A. Scott, Research and De­ velopment Laboratory, Dow Chemical of Canada, Ltd., Sarnia, Ontario, Canada Section D SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF FLUORINE-CONTAINING MOLECULES VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY (Joint with the Division of Fluorine Chemistry) J. E. Katon, Presiding

2:00 Vibrational Spectroscopy of Fluorine-Containing Mol­ ecules: General Survey. Foil A. Miller, University of Pitts­ burgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15123 2:45 Laser Excited Raman Spectra of Fluorocarbons and Other Fluorine-Containing Compounds. Ellis R. Lippincott, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742 3:15 Applications of Far Infrared Spectroscopy to the Analysis of Fluorine-Containing Compounds. William G. Fateley, Frank E. Dickson, Mellon Institute, Carnegie-Mel­ lon University, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15213; Neil McDevitt, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 3:45 The Infrared Spectra of Inorganic Fluorine-Contain­ ing Molecules and Ions. D. W. A. Sharp, Department of Chemistry, The University of Glasgow, Glasgow, W. 2, Scotland 4:20 Vibrational Analysis of Fluorinated Polymers. J. L. Koenig, F. J. Boerio, M. J. Hannon, Division of Polymer Science, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

Wednesday Morning, Apr. 3 Section A SYMPOSIUM HONORING L. B. ROGERS, ACS AWARD WINNER IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY D. N. Hume, Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. D. M. Hercules 9:05 Theory of Linear Scan Voltammetry. Harry Keller, W. H. Reinmuth, Columbia University, New York, Ν. Υ. 9:25 A Single Scale for Ion Activities and Electrode Po­ tentials Independent of Solvent? Orest Popovych, Aloys J. Dill, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, Ν. Υ. 11210 9:45 The Electrochemistry of the Halopyridines. Ronald F. Evilia, A. James Diefenderfer, Lehigh University, Beth­ lehem, Pa. 18015 10:05 Luminescence of Ruthenium Chelates. Fred E. Lytle, David M. Hercules, Massachusetts Institute of Tech­ nology, Cambridge, Mass. 02139 10:25 Luminescence of Some Imine Chelates of Group VIII Metal Ions. David W. Fink, Kenneth R. Wunschel, Jr., William E. Ohnesorge, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pa. 18015 10:45 Environmental Effects on the Luminescence of 8Hydroxyquinoline and 8-Quinolineboronic Acids. E. L. Wehry, M. L. Goldman, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind.

NEWS 11:05 Interferences Affecting the Atomic Fluorescence Flame Spectrometry of Calcium and Magnesium. Donald R. Demers, David W. Ellis, University of New Hampshire, Durham, Ν. Η. 03824 11:25 Measurement of Circular Dichroism Using Polariza­ tion Modulators. Jack J. Duffield, Ahmad Abu-Shumays, Cary Instruments, 2724 South Peck Rd., Monrovia, Calif. 91016 11:45 Titrations of Aldehydes and Ketones in Nonaqueous Solvents. Richard Ledesma, Charles A. Reynolds, Uni­ versity of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. 66044

GENERAL J. M. Dale, Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. J. M. Dale 9:05 A Comparison of Packed, Capillary and Coated Capil­ lary Columns. Elimelech Grushka, W. D. Cooke, Cornell University, Ithaca, Ν. Υ. 14850 9:25 Standardization of a pD Scale. Maya Paabo, Roger G. Bates, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 20234 9:45 Two New Standards for the pH Scale. Bert R. Staples, Roger C. Bates, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 20234 10:05 Microstandards for Analytical Chemistry. David H. Freeman, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 20234 10:40 A Comparative Spectrophotometric Study of Methods for the Determination of Traces of Boron. H. K. L. Gupta, J. Samuels, D. F. Boltz, Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich. 48202 11:00 Spectrophotometric Determination of Tantalum. Robert E. Daniel, Department of Chemistry, Samford Uni­ versity, Birmingham, Ala. 35209; James L. Kassner, Sr., 3434 Laclede Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63103 11:20 Spectrophotometric Determination of Tetrafluoroborate with Ferroin. Vernon S. Archer, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyo. 82070; Franklin G. Doolittle, Laramie Petroleum Research Center, Bureau of Mines, Laramie,

VERSATILE DESICCANT DRIERITE is α low-cost, all-purpose anhydrous calcium sulfate used in desiccators, U-tubes, drying columns, drying tubes and large drying cabinets to dry air and gases. DRIERITE is also ideal for drying organic liquids in either the liquid or vapor phase. The moisture remaining in a gas after drying with DRIERITE amounts to only 0 . 0 0 5 mg per liter.

9:00 Introductory Remarks. R. S. Porter 9:05 Isothermal Crystallization Behavior of Polypropylene from Differential Scanning Calorimetry. J. R. Knox, Avisun Corp., Post Rd., Marcus Hook, Pa. 19061 9:30 Analysis of Polystyrene Samples in the Liquid Phase by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. James A. Currie, Malcolm Dole, Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, III. 60201 9:55 Transition Studies of Poly(2, 6-Dimethyl 1-4, Phenylene Ether). F. E. Karasz, Goessmann Laboratory, Uni­ versity of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass.; J. M. O'Reilly, Xerox Research Laboratory, Webster, Ν. Υ.; Η. Ε. Bair, Bell Telephone Labs, Murray Hill; N. J.; R. A. Kluge, General Electric Research & Development Center, Sche­ nectady, Ν. Υ. 10:20 Melting Point Relationships for Poly(ethylene Terephthalate) Systems. P. E. Slade, Monsanto Co., Technical Center, Pensacola, Fia.; T. A. Orofino, Chemstrand Re­ search Center, Inc., Inc., Durham, N. C. 27702 10:45 Thermal Analyses of Polymers. I. Aromatic Poly­ esters. G. W. Miller, Mobay Chemical Co., Penn Lincoln Pkwy. West, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15205 11:10 Calorimetric Studies of Drawn Polyethylene Terephthalate. J. L. Koenig, M. D. Mele, Division of Polymer Science, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 11:35 Crystallization of Poly(ethylene Terephthalate). David M. Cates, Ernest L. Lawton, Jr., North Carolina State University, Raleigh N. C. 27607

PERMANENT VISCOSITY STANDARDS Now available! A complete range of viscosity standards. These fluids are provided in containers of nominal one pint capacity. All available standards are silicone fluids and are permanently stable Standard Viscosity in and Newtonian. Packaged with Fluid Centipoises L-l . 10 each standard is a calibration 100 L-2 . report for viscosity at 25°C. GuarL-3 . . 1,000 anteed accuracy is ± 1 % . Select R-l . . 12,500 the one or more that best suit R-2 . . 30,000 your equipment or requirements H-l . . 60,000 from the chart shown at right. H-2 . . 100,000

REGULAR DRIERITE is constant in volume, inert except toward water, insoluble in organic liquids and refrigerants, non-disintegrating, non-wetting, non-poisonous, non-corrosive, re­ peatedly regenerative, and non-channeling. INDICATING DRIERITE has all of the properties of Regular DRIERITE, but is impregnated with C.P. cobalt chloride a n d , hence, makes a clearly visible change from blue when dry to pink when exhausted. SOLIDSLIQUIDSGASES SOLIDS LIQUIDS GASES SOLIDS

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DRIERITE is a v a i l a b l e in two forms — Regular or Indicating — from all leading Laboratory Supply Dealers.

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Section C SYMPOSIUM ON ANALYTICAL CALORIMETRY

R. S. Porter, Presiding

Section Β

W. A. HAMMOND DRIERITE CO.

Wyo. 82070; LaVerne M. Young, Eastern Wyoming Col­ lege, Torrington, Wy. 82240 11:40 Spectrophotometric Determination of Tartaric Acid with /3-Naphthol. Gary D. Christian, Department of Chem­ istry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506

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Brookfield ENGINEERING LABORATORIES, INC. STOUGHTON 28, MASS.

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VOL. 40, NO. 3, MARCH 1968

·

89 A

NEWS Section D SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF FLUORINE-CONTAINING MOLECULES MASS SPECTROMETRY (Joint with the Division of Fluorine Chemistry) J. H. Futrell, Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. J. H. Futrell 9:05 Recent Advances in Molecular Mass Spectrometry. F. W. McLafferty, Department of Chemistry, Purdue Uni­ versity, Lafayette, Ind. 47907 9:50 Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry. Frank H. Field, Esso Research and Engineering Co., P. O. Box 45, Linden, N. J. 07036 10:35 Mass Spectrometric Studies of Inorganic Fluorides. John L. Mangrave, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77001 11:05 The Decomposition of Partly-Fluorinated Compounds Under Electron Impact. K. R. Jennings, The University, Sheffield S3 7HF, England 11:35 Analysis of Fluorine Compounds Using A Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometry Combination. Alfred A. Ebert, Jr., Jackson Laboratory, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., P. O. Box 525, Wilmington, Delaware 19899 Section Ε SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND AUTOMATED METHODS OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS FOR WATER POLLUTION CONTROL (Joint with the Division of Water, Air, and Waste Chemistry) Water Quality Measurement Criteria Κ. Η. Mancy, Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. Κ. Η. Mancy 9:05 The Hierarchy of Water Quality. Daniel A. Okun, Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 9:30 The Analytical Chemistry of Water and Wastewaters— A Point of View. Charles N. Reilley, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 10:00 Environmental Quality Characterization—Outlook of the Past, Present and Future. Harry P. Kramer, Manpower Liaison Officer, U.S. Public Health Service BDPEC, Wash­ ington, D. C. 20201 10:30 Advances in Environmental Analysis—Limits of Measurement. Philip W. West, Coates Chemical Labora­ tories, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La. 70803; Foymae K. West, Gulf South Research Institute, Baton Rouge, La. 11:00 Water Quality Standards—Present Capabilities for Chemical Analysis. A. A. Rosen, Federal Water Pollution Control Administration, 4676 Columbia Pkwy., Cincinnati, Ohio 45226 11:30 Considerations in Stream Water Quality Evaluation. John J. Gannon, School of Public Health, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104 Wednesday Afternoon, Apr. 3 Section A SYMPOSIUM HONORING L. B. ROGERS, ACS AWARD WINNER IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY E. C. Dunlop, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. E. C. Dunlop 2:05 The Use of Water as a Stationary Phase in the GasLiquid Chromatographic Separation of Hydrocarbons. Barry L. Karger, Arleigh Hartkopf, Howard Posmanter, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass. 02115 2:25 Differential Thermal and Differential Scanning Calorimetric Analysis of Liquid Crystal-Forming Materials. Ed­ ward M. Barrall, II, Julian F. Johnson, Chevron Research Co., P. O. Box 1627, Richmond, Calif.; Roger S. Porter, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 2:45 Metal-Amine Complexes as Adsorbents for Gas Chro­ matography. Alan G. Altenau, Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., 1200 Firestone Pkwy., Akron, Ohio 44317 3:05 Surface Area Study of Pretreated Silica Gels. M. F. Burke, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz.; A. K. Moreland, 90 A

·

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

L. B. Rogers, Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. 47907 3:20 Determination of Amino Acids in Proteins—A New Approach. A. B. Caragay, R. J. Bruni, P. L. Levins, Ζ. Β. Papanastassiou, J. T. Funkhouser, Arthur D. Little, Inc., 15 Acorn Park, Cambridge, Mass. 02140 3:40 Catalytic Effect of Some Impurities on Graphite Oxi­ dation. E. A. Heintz, Airco Speer Research Lab., Packard Rd. and 47th St., Niagara Falls, Ν. Υ. 14302 4:00 Plutonium—The Analytical Chemist's Greatest Chal­ lenge. J. T. Byrne, Dow Chemical Co., P. 0. Box 888, Golden, Colo. 80402 4:20 Introduction. D. M. Hercules. Award Address—ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry sponsored by Fisher Scientific Co. SELECTIVITY AND RESOLUTION IN GAS-SOLID CHROMATOGRAPHY L. B. Rogers, Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind.

47907

Section Β GENERAL W. B. Schaap, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. W. B. Schaap 2:10 The Effect of Metal Ions on Pyruvate Dimerization: Equilibrium Studies with Ni(ll) and Zn(ll). D. L. Leussing, D. E. Tallman, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 2:30 A Spectrophotometric Method for the Analysis of Cerebroside Sulfate After Reaction with Azure-Α. Edward L. Kean, Laboratory for Ophthalmic Research, Case West­ ern Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 2:50 Mixed Ligand Chelates of Copper(ll) with 8-Quinolinol and Some Arylhydroxycarboxylic Acids. Stephen G. Schulman, Herman Gershon, Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Yonkers, Ν. Υ. 10701 3:10 Mixed Ligand Effects in Spectrophotometric Deter­ mination Using Sulfur Ligands. I. Improved Copper De­ termination Using Dithizone and Triphenyl Phosphite. Donald G. Hicks, Georgia State College, 33 Gilmer St., SE, Atlanta, Ga. 30303; John A. Dean, University of Ten­ nessee, Knoxville, Tenn. 37916 3:40 Mixed Ligand Effects in Spectrophotometric Deter­ minations. .III. Spectra and Molecular Weights of Some Metal—Dithizone Complexes. Donald G. Hicks, Georgia State College, Atlanta, Ga. 30303 4:05 Reactions of Antimony(lll) Chelates in Aqueous Solu­ tion. Ulviye Yucelik, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey; R. F. Bogucki, Purdue University, La­ fayette, Ind. 47907 4:30 Enhancement by Zirconium of Extraction of Cations by Organophosphorous Acids. I. Monoacidic Phosphonates. Boyd Weaver, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830 Section C SYMPOSIUM ON ANALYTICAL CALORIMETRY (Joint with the Division of Polymer Chemistry) F. W. Karasz, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. F. W. Karasz 2:05 Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Polyurethanes. W. J. MacKnight, Michael Yang, Tisato Kajiyama, Polymer Research Institute, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 01002 2:30 Glass Transition Temperature Measurement of Elas­ tomers. John J. Maurer, Enjay Polymer Laboratories, P. O. Box 45, Linden, N. J. 2:55 The Temperature Dependence of the Grueneisen Ra­ tio of Polymeric Materials as Determined by Thermal and Ultrasonic Sound Velocity Measurements. Sister Rosalie Urzendowski, Arthur H. Guenther, James R. Asay, AFWL (WLREX), Kirtland AFB, Ν. Μ. 87117 3:20 Thermal Properties of Inorganic Polymer Systems. Mark B. Myers, Research Laboratories, Xerox Corp., 800 Phillips Rd., Webster, Ν. Υ. 14580 3:45 Thermal Effects in Ion-Exchange Reactions. G. E. Boyd, Oak Ridge National Lab., P. O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830 4:10 Use of Microcalorimetry for Determination of Order in Polymers. S. H. Maron, F. E. Filisko, Division of Polymer

NEWS Science, Case Western Reserve University, University Cir­ cle, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 Section D SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF FLUORINE-CONTAINING MOLECULES

TRI-VALUABLE MODERN METHODS OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS By ROBERT L. PECSOK, University of California at Los Angeles; and L. D O N A L D SHIELDS, California State College at Fullerton

GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY

A thorough and detailed explanation of the methods used by modern chemists to measure and to determine composition and structure. Applications to organic chemistry and to bio­ chemistry are emphasized, together with basic p r i n c i p l e s of m o d e r n chemical analysis, the types of information obtained, and the inter­ pretations of the results. Among the analytical methods considered are chromatography, spectrophotometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, electro­ chemistry, kinetics, and acid-base chemistry. Intended for students who have already com­ pleted course work in introductory chemistry. 1968 In press

(Joint with the Division of Fluorine Chemistry) C. E. Bennett, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. C. E. Bennett 2:05 Metal Analysis by Gas Chromatography Using Fluo­ rine-Containing /3-Diketonate Chelates. Robert E. Sievers, Joseph W. Connolly, Ashley S. Hilton, Mary F. Richardson, James E. Schwarberg, Aerospace Research Labs, ARC, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433; William D. Ross, Mon­ santo Research Corp., Dayton, Ohio 45407 2:45 Gas Chromatography of Fluorine-Containing Organic Compounds. J. Robert Martin, Jackson Laboratory, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., P. O. Box 525, Wilmington, Del. 19899 3:10 A Comparison of the Response Characteristics of the Thermal Conductivity, Flame Ionization, Flame Photo­ metric, Electron Capture, and Argon Detectors to Selected Fluorine Compounds. T. S. Hermann, R. L. Levy, L. J. Leng, Midwest Research Institute, 425 Volker Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 64110 3:35 A Gas Chromatographic System for the Analysis of Impurities in Chlorine Trifluoride. W. A. Nichols, R. A. Hagstrom, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp., 275 Winchester Ave., New Haven, Conn. 06504 3:50 Improved Techniques for Corrosive Fluoride Gas Chromatography. William S. Pappas, John G. Million, ORGDP Laboratories, Union Carbide Corp., Nuclear Divi­ sion, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830 4:10 Automatic Process Gas Chromatographs for Corro­ sive Fluoride Gases. John G. Million, William S. Pappas, ORGDP Laboratories, Union Carbide Corp., Nuclear Divi­ sion, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830 4:30 Round Table Discussion of All Participants. Ques­ tions Answered.

EXPERIMENTS IN MODERN METHODS OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS Edited by R. L. PECSOK, University Los Angeles

Section Ε

(Joint with Division of Water, Air, and Waste Chemistry)

Thursday Morning, Apr. 4 Section A

at

Offering a new approach to analytical methods of organic and biochemistry, this laboratory m a n u a l p r e s e n t s m a t e r i a l p e r t i n e n t to that course and also to other courses which the stu­ dent may be taking. Applications are immediate, and the subject ceases to be merely an exercise in patience, perseverance, and strict attention to detail. Instead, this manual proceeds from a study of phase transition to the various forms of chromatographic separations, to a group of ex­ periments in modern spectroscopy (including nmr and mass spectrometry), to equilibrium studies in aqueous and non-aqueous solvents ( of which many pertain to the study of kinetics ). Throughout, the authors emphasize the deter­ mination of molecular structure by modern ana­ lytical methods and, conversely, the effect on molecular structure of chemical reactions.

SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND AUTOMATED METHODS OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS FOR WATER POLLUTION CONTROL

Session: Water Quality Monitoring System 2:00 Considerations in Designing a Water Quality Monitor­ ing System. James J. McKeown, National Council for Stream Improvement, Tufts University, Medford, Mass. 02155; Russell O. Blosser, National Council for Stream Improvement, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore. 2:30 Automated Water Quality Monitoring—Current Sta­ tus. D. G. Ballinger, Division of Pollution Surveillance, Federal Water Pollution Control Administration, 1014 Broadway, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 3:30 An Integrated Monitoring System for Water Quality Management in the Ohio Valley. Willian L. Klein, Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 4:00 Measurement of Turbidity. Sidney A. Hannah, Jesse M. Cohen, U.S. Department of the Interior, FWPCA, CWRL, 4676 Columbia Pkwy., Cincinnati, Ohio 45226 4:30 The State of the Art of Turbidity Measurement in Water. Clifford C. Hach, Hach Chemical Co., P. O. Box 713, South Duff, Ames, Iowa 50010 5:00 Application of Recent Developments in Analysis In­ strumentation to Water and Waste Water Monitoring and Control. F. C. Snowden, Environmental Sciences Division, Leeds and Northrup Co., 4901 Stenton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19144

of California

1968

In press

NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE: A Film Written by R. L. PECSOK, C. S. FOOTE, J. L. SUDMEIER, and M. L. WINDSOR, all of the University of California at Los Angeles Using animation, sound, and color to heighten the impact of its information, this film vividly demonstrates the basic working principles of nmr, operation of the analytical instrument, and the interpretation of data by means of simple illustrated examples. Running time: 28 minutes $300.00

JOHN

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605 Third Avenue, New York, Ν. Υ. 10016

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GENERAL S. P. Perone, Presiding

Circle No. 80 on Readers' Service Card

VOL.

4 0 , NO. 3, MARCH 1908

·

91 A

NEWS 9:00 Introductory Remarks. S. P. Perone 9:05 New Fluorometric and Electrochemical Methods for the Analysis of Enzyme Systems. G. G. Guilbault, Louisi­ ana State University in New Orleans, New Orleans, La. 70122 9:25 Electrochemical Preparation of a Dimer of Diphosphopyridine Nucleotide. Robert W. Burnettt A. L. Under­ wood, Emory University, Atlanta, Ga. 30322 9:45 Electrochemical Reduction of /3-Di ketones in Dimethylsulfoxide. Raymond C. Buchta, Dennis H. Evans, University of Wisconsin, 1112 W. Johnson St., Madison, Wis. 53706 10:05 Electrochemical Behavior of l-Hydroxypyridine-2Thione. A. F. Krivis, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44304; E. S. Gazda, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp., New Haven, Conn. 10:40 Ultramicrocoulometric Determination of Ammonia in Serum, Plasma, and Blood. Fredric J. Feldman, Instru­ mentation Laboratory, Inc., 9 Galen St., Watertown, Mass. 02172; Gary D. Christian, University of Kentucky, Lexing­ ton, Ky. 40506 11:00 Electrochemical Kinetics of the Ferri-Ferrocyanide Couple on Platinum. Christie G. Enke, Peter H. Daum, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich. 48823 11:20 Application of the Potentiostatic Method. Determina­ tion of the Rate Constant for the Dissociation of Acetic Acid. Ronald R. Schroeder, Wayne State University, De­ troit, Mich. 48202; Irving Shain, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 11:40 Iron(lll) Perchlorate as an Analytical Oxidant in Acetonitrile. Byron Kratochvil, Robert A. Long, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Section Β SYMPOSIUM ON MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPY H. W. Harrington, Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. H. W. Harrington 9:10 What is Microwave Spectroscopy? James E. Wollrab, McDonnell Douglas Corp., Research Division, Lambert-St. Louis Municipal Airport, St. Louis, Mo. 63145 9:55 The Intensity of a Microwave Absorption Line. Howard W. Harrington, Hewlett-Packard, 1501 Page Mill Rd., Palo Alto, Calif. 94304 10:50 Qualitative Analysis of Gas Mixtures by Microwave Spectroscopy. William F. White, NASA Langley Research Center, Langley Station, Hampton, Va. 23365 11:25 Analyses of Low Deuterium Concentrations in Water by Microwave Spectroscopy. Klaus Ernst, Lawrence Radia­ tion Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, Calif. 94550 Section C SYMPOSIUM ON ANALTICAL CALORIMETRY (Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry (continued) A. F. Findeis, Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. A. F. Findeis 9:05 Differential Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry of Waxes. Robert G. Craig, John M. Powers, Floyd A. Peyton, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104 9:30 Calorimetric Studies of Milk Fat by Differential Ther­ mal Analysis. Robert A. Yoncoskie, Dairy Products Labora­ tory, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, 14th & Independence Ave., Washington, D. C. 20250 9:55 Thermal Studies of Solid Solutions in Fats. John W. Sherbon, Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, Ν. Υ. 14850 10:20 Measurement of the Kinetics of Dissociation of Dicyclopentadiene Derivatives with the Differential Scanning Calorimeter. W. E. Franklin, C. H. Mack, S. P. Rowland, Southern Regional Research Lab., P. O. Box 19687, New Orleans, La. 70119 10:45 Thermal Analysis of Kaolin Clay: Correlation with X-Ray Crystallinity Data. Donald E. Koopman, Central Research Division, The National Cash Register Co., Dayton, Ohio 45409 11:10 Calorimetric Measurements on Metal Sulfates and Their Hydrates: Thermodynamic Electrode Potentials for Iron, Copper, Zinc, and Cadmium. John W. Larson, Uni­ versity of Louisville, Louisville, Ky. 40208; Loren G. Helper, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15213 11:35 Enthalpimetric Analysis. Joseph Jordan, Peter W. 92 A

·

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Carr, Pennsylvania State University, 212 Whitmore Labora­ tory, University Park, Pa. 16802 Section D SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF FLUORINE-CONTAINING MOLECULES MICROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS (Joint with the Division of Fluorine Chemistry) E. W. D. Huffman, Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. E. W. D. Huffman 9:15 The Determination of Fluorine in Organic, Organometallic, and Inorganic Compounds. Otto Schwarzkopf, Francine Schwarzkopf, Schwarzkopf Microanalytical Labora­ tory, 56-19 37th St., Woodside, N. J. 11377 9:45 Determination of Fluoride by a Modified "Kirsten Hot Flask" Combustion Technique. Howard J. Francis, Jr., Pennsalt Chemicals Corp., 900 First Ave., King of Prussia, Pa. 19406 10:15 The Microanalysis of Fluorine in Organic Compounds by Potentiometric Titration Using a Fluoride Electrode. Truman S. Light, Richard F. Mannion, Foxboro Co., Re­ search Center, Foxboro, Mass. 02035 10:40 Comparison of Titrants for Fluoride Using Fluoride Ion Electrode. James R. Kerns, University of Cincinnati, AFML (MAYA), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 11:00 The Simultaneous Microdetermination of Carbon and Fluorine in Organic Compounds by an Oxyhydrogen Flame Method. J. G. Gagnon, P. B. Olson, 3M Co., Central Re­ search Lab., 2301 Hudson Rd., Saint Paul, Minn. 55119 11:30 Determination of Oxygen in Fluoro-Organic Com­ pounds. Otto Schwarzkopf, Francine Schwarzkopf, Schwarzkopf Microanalytical Laboratory, 56-19 37th Ave., Woodside, Ν. Υ. 11377 Section Ε SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND AUTOMATED METHODS OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS FOR WATER POLLUTION CONTROL (Joint with Division of Water, Air, and Waste Chemistry) Session:

In Situ Analysis

A. Loven, Presiding

9:00 Applications of Internal Reflectance Spectroscopy to the Problems of Pollution Analyses. Harry B. Mark, Jr., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104; James S. Mattson, Department of Environmental Health, Uni­ versity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104 9:30 Factors in the Transient and Steady State Response of Crystalline and Amorphous Membrane Electrodes. R. P. Buck, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 10:00 The Application of Specific Ion Electrodes to Water Pollution Monitoring. Martin S. Frant, James W. Ross, Jr., Orion Research Inc., 11 Blackstone St., Cambridge, Mass. 02139 10:30 Fluoride Analysis in the Pamlico Estuary Using the Selective Ion Electrode. J. Donald Johnson, David Daugherty, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 11:00 Direct Measurement of Chemical Species of Bio­ chemically and Geochemically Reactive Elements in Natu­ ral Aquatic Systems. Dayton E. Carritt, Wayne R. Maison, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass. 02139 11:30 Application of Semipermeable Ion Exchange Mem­ branes to Trace Analysis of Metal Ions by Electrochem­ ical and Neutron Activation Techniques. Harry B. Mark, Jr., Uri Eisner, J. Mark Rottschafer, Francis J. Berlandi, James S. Mattson, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104 Thursday Afternoon, Apr. 4 Section A GENERAL D. G. Peters, Presiding

NEWS 2:00 Introductory Remarks. D. G. Peters 2:10 Voltammetric Investigation of Water Complexes of Copper(ll) in Nonaqueous Media. Stanley E. Manahan, Harold Jackson, Judy A. Altermatt, University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 65201 2:30 Voltammetry at the Lead Dioxide Electrode: Anodic EDTA Currents. Calvin O. Huber, David R. Tallant, De­ partment of Chemistry and Surface Studies Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wis. 53201 2:50 Polarography of Aquodiethyllead(IV) Cation. Michael D. Morris, Pennsylvania State University, 212 Whitmore Laboratory, University Park, Pa. 16802 3:10 Electrolysis at Twin Dropping Mercury Electrodes. Larry B. Anderson, Michael L. Rose, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 3:40 Resistance Compensation and Precise Polarography in Glacial Acetic Acid. William E. Thomas, Jr., Plastics Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Orange, Texas 77630; Ward B. Schaap, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. 47401 4:05 Reduction of Pentakismethylisonitrilecobalt(ll) Ni­ trate at the Dropping Mercury and Platinum Electrodes. Michael E. Kimball, William C. Kaska, University of Cal­ ifornia, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93106 4:30 Polarographic Analysis of Ferrous and Ferric Iron in Sulfuric Acid. George R. Supp, Italo A. Capuano, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp., 275 Winchester Ave., New Haven, Conn. 06504 Section Β SYMPOSIUM

ON MICROWAVE

SPECTROSCOPY

H. W. Harrington, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. H. W. Harrington 2:10 Analytical Applications of Microwave Spectroscopy. George F. Crable, Chemical Physics Research Laboratory, Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Michigan 48640 2:50 High Temperature Methane-Oxygen Reaction Study by Microwave Spectroscopy. Marvin Abrams, Warren Wright, Ronald Machlis, General Dynamics, Pomona Divi­ sion, Pomona, Calif. 91766 3:35 Intensity Measurements in Microwave Spectroscopy.

Edgar A. Rinehart, Department of Physics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyo. 82070 4:00 A Determination of the Number of Measurements Necessary for a Microwave Spectroscopic Identification of a Gas in a Mixture. Larry R. Grillot, Gordon E. Jones, Physics Department, Mississippi State University, P. O. Box 5167, State College, Miss. 39762 4:25 Problems in the Compilation of Microwave Data: Research and Analytical. William H. Kirchoff, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 20234 4:55 Final Remarks. H. W. Harrington Section C SYMPOSIUM ON ANALYTICAL CALORIMETRY (Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry) G. H. Brown, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. G. H. Brown 2:05 A Simple Generalized Theory for the Analysis of Dy­ namic Thermal Measurements. Allan P. Gray, PerkinElmer Corp., Main Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 06852 2:30 Thermal Analysis of Mesophases. Reinhard D. Ennulat, U. S. Army Electronics Command, Night Vision Laboratory, Fort Belvoir, Va. 22060 2:55 Determination of Purity and Phase Behavior by Adiabatic Calorimetry. Edgar F. Westrum, Jr., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104 3:20 Instrumentation Considerations for Thermal Methods of Analysis. Arthur F. Findeis, National Science Founda­ tion, Washington, D. C. 20550 3:45 Differential Enthalpic Analysis as a Calorimetric Method: . Evaluation by a Statistical Design. Robert F. Schwenker, Jr., Personal Products Co., Milltown, N. J . 08850; John C. Whitwell, Textile Research Institute, Princeton, N. J. Section D SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF FLUORINE-CONTAINING MOLECULES GENERAL SESSION

New Double Beam UV Monitor U V I S C A N No other U V Monitor offers all t h e s e a d v a n t a g e s . . . • Optical bench, amplifier and power sup­ ply in a single housing—only 7 lbs. · Sensitivity better than .01 O.D. · Linear or logarithmic output · Interchangeable in­ terference filters f o r 240, 260 or 280 mu range · Solid state, modular construction

Uviscan III combines high sensitivity with a unique double flow cell design. Because of its light weight, it can be mounted directly on a fraction collector. It identifies compounds by comparing the intensity of light transmitted through an absorbing substance in one of its flow cells with that of a buffer solution flowing through a reference cell. In the logarithmic mode, highly absorbent compounds remain on scale without a loss of sensitivity for low absorbent compounds. With the Uviscan III it is possible to monitor such compounds as nucleatides, proteins, hormones, steroids, enzymes, vitamins and many others. For further information, request Technical Bulletin AC3-5060.

LABORATORY

Uviscan III shown with Buchler linear fraction collector and recorder.

A P P A R A T U S • PRECISION

INSTRUMENTS

BUCHLER INSTRUMENTS, INC. 1 3 8 7 Circle No. 101 on Readers' Service Card

1 6 T HS T R E E T .

F O R T

L E E . N E W J E R S E Y

See us at the Federation Show, Booth # W 1-3.

0 7 0 3 4

Sec ACS Laboratory Guide for All Products/Sales Office VOL. 40, NO. 3, MARCH 1968

·

93 A

NEWS (Joint with the Division of Fluorine Chemistry) J. R. Kerns, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks, J. R. Kerns 2:05 An "F NMR Study of Some Group IV MF4- 2 (Donor) Complexes. D. S. Dyer (MAYA), Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433; Ronald O. Ragsdale, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 2:35 The Use of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry in the Analysis of Fluorine Containing Compounds. The Metabolism of Fluorinated Compounds. G. W. A. Milne J. Holtzmann, National Heart Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. 20014; P. Goldman, National In stitute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, NIH, Bethesda Md. 20014 3:05 Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Mixtures Contain ing Fluoroalkyl Alcohols, Their Esters, and Acrylic Acid Ralph C. Raisor, Thiokol Chemical Corp., Box 524, Brig ham City, Utah 84302 3:30 Fluoride Microanalysis by Linear Null Point Poten tiometry. Richard A. Durst, National Bureau of Standards Washington, D. C. 20234 4:00 Chemical Analysis of Iridium Hexafluoride-Uranium Hexafluoride Mixtures. Kenneth J. Jensen, Alice M. Es sling, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne, III. 60439 4:30 Application of Nuclear Activation Methods for the Analysis of Fluorine. James R. DeVoe, S. S. Nargolwalla, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 20234 Section Ε SYMPOSIUM ON INSTRUMENTAL AND AUTOMATED METHODS OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS FOR WATER POLLUTION CONTROL (Joint with Division of Water, Air, and Waste Chemistry) Session:

Automated Analysis

J. D. Johnson, Presiding

2:00

Automated Analyses in Support of Water Pollution

KLETT PRODUCTS

K L E T T COLONY MARKER AND TALLY. For the rapid and accurate counting of colonies. Marks and records at the same time, leaving per­ manent record for rechecking. When all of the colonies in an area or dish have been marked, the tally is read and then is reset to zero with the reset knob. Plates that would be considered too crowded for counting by the usual method can be counted easily with this instrument. The counting opera­ tion can be interrupted at any point without caus­ ing errors. Complete with pen and extension cord. For operation on 115 volt, A.C., 60 cycle.

94 A

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Research. Robert T. Williams, Lawrence J. Kamphake, Federal Water Pollution Control Administration, 4676 Co­ lumbia Pkwy., Cincinnati, Ohio 45226 2:30 The Application of Automated Methods of Analysis in Chemical Oceanography. Neil R. Andersen, J. Richard Jadamec, Naval Océanographie Office, Washington, D. C. 3:00 Sensor for Bacteria in Water. J. W. Boyd, F. W. Thomae, Jr., M. H. Bengson, J. A. Geating, Valley Forge Space Tech. Center, General Electric Co., King of Prussia, Pa. 19406; A. B. Hearld, Aerospace Medical Research Labs, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 3:30 Automated Luminol Chemiluminescence for the Detection of Microbial Water Pollution. W. S. Oleniacz, M. A. Pisano, M. H. Rosenfeld, R. L. Elgart, Department of Biology, St. John's University, Jamaica, Ν. Υ. 11432 4:00 Determination of Phosphate in Natural Waters by Activation Analysis of Phosphotungstic Acid. Herbert E. Allen, Box 640, U. S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48107; Richard B. Hahn, Wayne State Uni­ versity, Detroit, Mich. 48202 4:30 Investigations of Transition Metal Valence States in Water Environments. John J. Heise, School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. 30332 Friday Morning, Apr. 5 Section A GENERAL

SESSION

Byron G. Kratochvil, Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. Byron G. Kratochvil 9:05 Chronopotentiometric Determination of Halides and Analysis of Halide Mixtures with Silver Anodes. Dennis G. Peters, Akio Kinjo, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. 9:25 Influence of Double-Layer Charging in Chronopotentiometry. Richard S. Nicholson, Michael L. Olmstead, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich. 48823 9:45 A Potential Sweep Chronoamperometric Method for the Determination of Microgram Amounts of Uranium. R. A. Smith, E. J. Ellenburg, J. J. McCown, Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory, P. O. Box 2028, Jackass Flats, Nev. 89023

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NEWS 10:05 Disproportionation of Electrochemically Generated U r a n i u m ( V ) in Molten LiF-BeRr-ZrF 4 at 5 0 0 ° C . Gleb Mamantov, Department of Chemistry, University of Ten­ nessee, K n o x v i l l e , T e n n . 3 7 9 1 6 ; D. L. M a n n i n g , A n a l y t i c a l C h e m i s t r y D i v i s i o n , Oak Ridge N a t i o n a l L a b o r a t o r y , Oak Ridge, T e n n . 3 7 8 3 0 10:40 Rapid Determination of Lanthanide Ion Concentra­ tions. K. D. Roettger, Parsons College, Fairfield, Iowa 5 2 5 5 6 ; Paul G. A b a j i a n , U n i v e r s i t y o f V e r m o n t , B u r l i n g ­ t o n , Vt. 11:00 The Potentiometric Determination of Molybdenum in Ferrous and Nonferrous Materials by Reduction with Iron. J . E. D e n n i s o n , W e s t e r n Electric Co., E n g i n e e r i n g Research Center, P. 0 . Box 9 0 0 , P r i n c e t o n , N. J . 0 8 5 4 0 11:20 An Approximately Cylindrical Mercury Microelectrode for Voltammetry. . Edwin F. O r l e m a n n , U n i v e r s i t y o f Cal­ i f o r n i a , Berkeley, Calif. 9 4 7 2 0 ; Peter F. L i n d e , San Fran­ cisco, Calif. 9 4 1 3 2 ; Gerard C h i - N g W o n g , D e p a r t m e n t of B i o c h e m i s t r y , U n i v e r s i t y of C a l i f o r n i a , Davis, Calif. 95616

The ANALYST A

monthly International Publication dealing

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G. R. Supp, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. G. R. Supp 9:05 Application of a Liquid Cation Exchange Electrode in a Study of Complexes of Calcium with Tetraphosphate. J a m e s I. W a t t e r s , 8 8 West 1 8 t h A v e . , Ohio State Univer­ sity, C o l u m b u s , Ohio 4 3 2 1 0 ; Ronald C. M a c h e n , S u n Oil Co., M a r c u s H o o k , Pa. 9:25 Use of Sodium Cerium EDTA for the Titrimetric De­ termination of Metallic Elements with EDTA. Stanley Y a m a m u r a , I d a h o N u c l e a r Corp., P. O. Box 1 8 4 5 , Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401 9:45 Arsenazo III as a Metallochromic Indicator for the Direct DTPA Titration of Lanthanons in Alumino-Silicate Zeolites. W i l l i a m W. M a r s h , Jr., S u n Oil Co. P. 0 . Box 4 2 6 , M a r c u s H o o k , Pa. 1 9 0 6 1 10:05 Rapid Determination of Organic Nitrogen with a Coulometric Detector. I. J . Oita, A m e r i c a n Oil Co., 2 5 0 0 New Y o r k A v e . , W h i t i n g , I n d . 4 6 3 9 4 10:40 Determination of Trace Sulfur in Hydrocarbons. L. L. Farley, R. A. Winkler, C h e v r o n Research Co., P. O. Box 1 6 2 7 , R i c h m o n d , Calif. 94802 11:00 Synergic Extraction of Gallium with Thenoyltrifluoroacetone and Tetraphenylarsonium Chloride. M. S. Rah a m a n , H. L. F i n s t o n , B r o o k l y n College, B e d f o r d A v e . , a n d Ave. H., B r o o k l y n 1 0 , Ν. Υ. 11:20 Electrochemistry and Electron Spin Resonance of Cation Radicals of Thio-Substituted Ethylenes. D. H. Geske, M. V. M e r r i t t , C o r n e l l U n i v e r s i t y , I t h a c a , Ν. Υ. Section C SYMPOSIUM

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F. H. Stross, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. F. H. S t r o s s 9:05 Thin Film Thermocouples for Differential T h e r m a l Analysis. W. H. K i n g , J r . , C. T. C a m i l l i , Esso Research a n d E n g i n e e r i n g Co. P. O. Box 1 2 1 , L i n d e n , N. J . 0 7 0 3 6 ; A. F. Findeis, U n i v e r s i t y o f A l a b a m a , U n i v e r s i t y , Ala. 9:30 Purity Determinations Using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter. G. L. D r i s c o l l , I. N. D u l i n g , Research a n d D e v e l o p m e n t , S u n Oil C o . , M a r c u s H o o k , Pa. 1 9 0 6 1 ; F. M a g n o t t a , 6 2 6 Copley R d . , U p p e r Darby, Pa. 9:55 The Use of Dynamic Differential Calorimetry for Ascertaining Thermal Stability of Polymers. S t u a r t M. E l l e r s t e i n , T h i o k o l C h e m i c a l Corp., 7 8 0 N. C l i n t o n A v e . , T r e n t o n , N. J . 0 8 6 0 7 10:20 Thermal Analysis of Friction Materials. M i c h a e l G. J a c k o , B e n d i x Research L a b o r a t o r i e s , 2 0 8 0 0 10-Vè Mile Rd., S o u t h f i e l d , M i c h . 48075 10:45 Heats of Reaction for Carbonate Mineral Decomposition. Keith L. Reddick, S u n Oil Co., 5 0 3 N. C e n t r a l Expressway, R i c h a r d s o n , Texas 75080 11:10 Study of the Thermal Behavior of Solid Rocket Propellents by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. George D. S a m m o n s , R o c k e t d y n e , S R D . Division o f N o r t h A m e r i c a n Rockwell C o r p . , Box 5 4 8 , McGregor, Texas 11:35 Analysis of Highly Exothermic Reactions by DSC. A. A. D u s w a l t , H e r c u l e s , Inc., Research Center, W i l m i n g t o n , Del.

"Supplement to O f f i c i a l , Standardised and Recommended M e t h o d s of A n a l y s i s " containing more recently standardised methods of analysis and a completely re-written bibliography (44 Sections) to other official and standard methods. The index also covers the original ( 1 9 6 3 ) main volume. PP. xiv + 4 2 4

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VOL. 40, NO. 3, MARCH 1968

·

95 A

NEWS

Conference on Modern Trends in Activation Analysis The National Bureau of Standards will host the 1968 International Con­ ference on Modern Trends in Activa­ tion Analysis, October 7 to 11. The planned program will be useful both to those without experience in activation analysis and those who have studied specialized areas in detail. Both in­ vited and contributed original papers will be included. The titles of invited lectures are: Practical applications of activation anal­ ysis Nuclear reactions and principles used in activation analysis Standardization of activation analysis Radiochemistry in activation analysis Radiation detectors in activation analy­ sis Computation and handling of data in activation analysis

In addition to technical sessions, there will be a social program and op­ portunity for informal contacts among the participants and a ladies' program. The proceedings will be published by the National Bureau of Standards and mailed each registrant as soon as pos­ sible after the meeting. James R. DeVoe of the National Bu­ reau of Standards heads an organizing committee composed of members from the U. S., England, and Europe. Further information on this meet­ ing may be obtained from the Analyti­ cal Chemistry Division, Institute for Materials Research, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 20234.

Conference on Competing Spectrochemical Techniques A conference on Competing Spec­ trochemical Techniques will be held at The University of Keele from July 10 to 12, 1968. The meeting will high­ light areas of overlap between spec­ trochemical techniques and compare and contrast alternative techniques. Examples are optical emission vs. x-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the de­ termination of major constituents in common metals, and neutron activa­ tion analysis vs. mass spectrometry for the determination of trace impurities in high purity materials. Further information on this meet­ ing is available from the Meetings Officer, The Institute of Physics and The Physical Society, 47 Belgrave Square, London, S. W. 1, England. 96 A

·

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

A O A C Award Nominations The Association of Official Analyti­ cal Chemists invites nominations for its 1968-1969 AOAC Scholarship Award and for the 12th AOAC Har­ vey W. Wiley Award. The Scholarship Award, established in 1965, consists of $300 for each of two years to an undergraduate college student majoring in a scientific area important to agriculture or public health. The nominee should have at least a " B " average grade, should be ready for the last two years of un­ dergraduate study, should have good character and need financial assistance. Any interested person in North Amer­ ica may nominate candidates. The Harvey W. Wiley Award is pre­ sented every year for contributions to analytical chemistry. Nominees or nominators need not be AOAC mem­ bers. The purpose of this $750 award is to recognize an outstanding scien­ tist or scientific team for contributions and achievements in analytical meth­ odology of interest to agricultural and public health scientists. Further information on both these awards and forms may be obtained from Luther G. Ensminger, Associa­ tion of Official Analytical Chemists, Box 540, Benjamin Franklin Station, Washington, D. C. 20044. Nomina­ tions for the Scholarship Award are due by May 1, and those for the Har­ vey W. Wiley Award, April 1, to qual­ ify for this year's awards.

International Analytical Chemistry Symposium The Midlands Section of the Society for Analytical Chemistry is organiz­ ing an International Symposium at the University, Birmingham, England, which will be held July 21 to 25, 1969. The program will include invited and contributed papers covering a broad field in analytical chemistry, social events, and a ladies' program. General information on the meeting may be obtained from D. M. Peake, Research Dept., Imperial Metal In­ dustries, Ltd., P. O. Box 216, Witton, Birmingham 6, England. Information on the scientific program may be ob­ tained from Dr. W. I. Stephen, Dept. of Chemistry, The University, Bir­ mingham 15, P. O. Box 363, England.

Industry Items Subject to approval by stockholders, Cook Electric Co., Morton Grove, 111., and Laboratory For Electronics, Inc., Waltham, Mass., will merge. Fisher Scientific Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa., and Jarrell-Ash Co. of Waltham,

Mass., have agreed in principle to merge the two firms early in 1968. The agreement between the respective boards of directors is subject to Jar­ rell-Ash stockholder approval. Geoscience Nuclear, 2335 Whitney Ave., Hamden, Conn., a newly formed division of Geoscience Instruments Corp., will design, manufacture, sale, and service nuclear instruments. This division will supplement the firm's present line of large detector-grade semiconductor crystals, and germanium and silicon detectors. In addition to servicing its own equipment, the divi­ sion will offer repair, calibration, and maintenance service on all systems of individual instruments made by Tech­ nical Measurement Corp. and others. Nester/Faust Manufacturing Corp., Newark, Del., has established European sales and service headquar­ ters at Spalentorweg 20, 4055 Basel, Switzerland. Orion Research, Inc., 11 Blackstone St., Cambridge, Mass., has acquired Geochron Laboratories, Inc., also of Cambridge, Mass. Orion is a major manufacturer of specific ion electrodes and pH/specific ion instruments. Geo­ chron provides potassium-argon and carbon-14 dating services to the archeological and geological communi­ ties. Picker X-Ray Corp., White Plains, Ν. Υ., has changed its name to Picker Corp. The new name reflects the company's growing diversification into industrial, nuclear, and other fields in addition to x-ray equipment. Schwarz BioResearch, Inc., a di­ vision of Becton, Dickinson and Co., has opened a new sales office in Rockville, Md., to service the Washington, D. C. area. Address of the new loca­ tion is 354 Hungcrford Dr., Rockville, Md. 20950. Headquarters for Schwarz BioResearch is in Orangeburg, Ν. Υ. Sales and service of the Unicam line of spectrophotometers and the W . G. Pye line of liquid and gas chromatographs will be handled in the U. S. by Philips Electronic Instruments and its authorized dealers. Home of Philips is 750 S. Fulton Ave., Mount Vernon, Ν. Υ. 10550. Vickers Instruments, Inc., 15 Waite Ct., Maiden, Mass. 02148, has been appointed by H. Struers Chemiske Laboratorium of Copenhagen, Den­ mark, as sole importers and distributors of its complete line of metallurgical specimen preparation equipment in the U. S. and Canada.

NEWS

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98 A

·

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Information is given in the following order: date, n a m e of course, location of course, professional p e r s o n ( s ) in charge of course, a n d / o r sponsoring organizations and Contact (numbers in parentheses refer to addresses a n d telephone n u m b e r s given a t t h e b o t t o m of the list of scheduled courses). Mar. 2 to 4—Electron Spin Resonance. Pittsburgh, Pa. John E . Wertz, James Bol­ ton. Contact (1) Mar. 5 to 6—Science of Color Measurement. Charlotte, N . C. I D L . Contact: (#) Mar. 8 to 9—Interpretation of Mass Spectra. Baltimore, Md. Fred McLafferty, George Van Lear, Maurice Bursey. Contact: (1) Mar. 8 to 10—Bioanalytical Techniques Workshop. Hopatcong, N . J. Alan Fleischman. Contact (3) Mar. 11 to 15—Mass Spectrometry "Workshop. Hopatcong, N . J. J. F . Gollob. Contact (3) Mar. 11 to 15—Two Separate Courses: Gas Chromatography; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Philadelphia, Pa. Sadtler Research. Contact (4) Mar. 12 to 13—Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Los Angeles. Perkin-Elmer. Contact: C. Keller, 433 West Foothill Blvd., Monrovia, Calif. 91016. T e l : (213) 359-2549 Mar. 13 to 15—Gas Chromatography. Houston, Texas. Varian Assoc. Contact (5) Mar. 14 to 16—Electron Spin Resonance. Knoxville, Tenn. John E . Wertz, James Bolton. Contact (1) Mar. 15 to 17—Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds. Richmond, Va. Robert M. Silverstein, G. Clayton Bassler. Contact (1) Mar. 16—Gas Chromatography Workshop. Dayton, Ohio. Cincinnati-Dayton Gas Chromatographv Discussion Group. Contact: Roger C. Hoyer, 3306 Eastside Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 45208 Mar. 18 to 22—Luminescence Techniques Workshop. Hopatcong, N . J. G. G. Guilbault. Contact (3) Mar. 18 to 22—Infrared Interpretation, P a r t I. Philadelphia, Pa. Sadtler Research. Contact (4) Mar. 20 to 21—Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Chicago. Perkin-Elmer. Contact: C. Pampel, 2205 Curtiss St., Downers Grove, 111. 60515. T e l : (312) 964-3600 Mar. 25 to 29—Two Separate Courses: Infrared Interpretation, P a r t I I . Instru­ mentation for Managers. Philadelphia, Pa. Sadtler Research. Contact (4) Mar. 25 to 29—Industrial TJse of the Polarizing Microscope. Chicago, 111. McCrone Research Institute. Contact (β) Mar. 25 to 29—X-Ray Spectrochemical School. Milwaukee, Wis. General Electric. Contact: (7) Mar. 28 to 29—Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Norwalk, Conn. Perkin-El­ mer. Contact: P. Heneage, Main Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 06852. T e l : (203)7626658 Mar. 28 to 29—Science of Color Measurement. Houston, Texas. I D L . Contact: (2) Apr. l to 5—Photomicrography. Chicago, 111. McCrone Research Institute. Contact Apr. l to 5—Thermal Analysis School. Buckinghamshire, England. Thermal Analysis Group of Society for Analytical Chemistry. Contact: The Thermal Analysis School, Cement and Concrete Association Training and Conference Centre, Fulmer Grange, Slough, Bucks, England Apr. 2—Internal Reflection Spectroscopy Workshop. Houston, Texas. Wilks Scien­ tific. Contact (8) Apr. 3—Combined Gas Chromatography and Infrared Spectroscopy. Houston, Texas. Wilks Scientific. Contact (8) Apr. 8 to 10—The Use of Operational Amplifiers in Instrumentation. Oakland, Calif. Richard G. McKee. Contact: Richard G. McKee, McKee-Pedersen Instruments, P. O. Box 322, Danville, Calif. 94526 T e l : (415) 837-9349 Apr. 8 to 12—Identification of Small Particles. Chicago, 111. McCrone Research Institute. Contact (β) Apr. 9 to 10—Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. San Francisco. Perkin-Elmer. Contact: J. Kerber, 851 Hinckley Rd., Burlingame, Calif. 94010. T e l : (415) 692-3595 Apr. i s to 17—Operational Amplifier and Analog Computers Workshop. Hopatcong, N . J . Galen W. Ewing. Contact: (3) Apr. 15 to 19—Gas Chromatography Institute. Canisius College. Contact: Canisius College Gas Chromatographv Institute, Buffalo, Ν . Υ. 14208. T e l : (716) 883-7000, Ext. 262 Apr. 15 to 19—Crystallography 1. Chicago, 111. McCrone Research Institute. Con­ tact (6) Apr. 15 to 19—Two Separate Courses: Infrared Interpretation, P a r t I; Gas Chro­ matography. Philadelphia, Pa. Sadtler Research. Contact (4) Apr. 15 to May 10—Radioisotopes in Research. Oak Ridge, Tenn. Contact: Special Training Division, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P. O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830 Apr. 22 to 26—Two Separate Courses: Techniques of IR Spectroscopy; Thermoanalysis Workshop. Philadelphia, Pa. Sadtler Research. Contact: (4) Apr. 22 to 26—Infrared Interpretation, P a r t I. West Coast. Sadtler Research.. Con­ tact: (4) Apr. 22 to 26—Crystallography 2. Chicago, 111. McCrone Research Institute. Con-· tact (6) Apr. 23—Internal Reflection Spectroscopy Workshop. Norwalk, Conn. Wilks Sci­ entific. Contact (8)

NEWS Apr. 24—Combined Gas Chromatography and Infrared Spectroscopy. Norwalk, Conn. Wilks Scientific. Contact (8) Apr. 24 to 26—Gas Chromatography. Louisville, K y . Varian Aerograph. Contact: (0) Apr. 25 to 26—Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Washington, D . C. PerkinElmer. Contact: B. Kosciesza, 8555 16th St., Silver Spring, Md. 20907. T e l : (301) 588-9111 Apr. 26 to 28—Spectrometry Identification of Organic Compounds. Philadelphia, Pa. Robert M. Silverstein; G. Clayton Bassler. Contact: (1) Apr. 29 to May 3—Microscopy in the Pharmaceutical Industry. Chicago, 111. McCrone Research Institute. Contact (β) May 1 to 3—Gas Chromatography. Minneapolis, Minn. Varian Aerograph. Con­ tact : (9) May 6 to 10—Special Methods in Microscopy. Chicago, 111. McCrone Research In­ stitute. Contact (6) May 6 to 10—Two Separate Courses: Ultraviolet Spectroscopy; Electronics and Analytical Instrumentation. Philadelphia, Pa. Sadtler Research. Contact: (4) May 13 to 17—X-Ray Spectrochemical School. Milwaukee, Wis. General Electric. Contact : (7) May 14 to 15—Science of Color Measurement. Princeton, N . J. I D L . Contact: (2) May 15 to 17—Gas Chromatography. Toronto, Canada. Varian Aerograph. Con­ tact: (10) May 20 to 24—Two Separate Courses: Infrared Interpretation, P a r t I; Gas Chro­ matography. Philadelphia, Pa. Sadtler Research. Contact (4) May 22 to 24—Gas Chromatography. Edmonton, Canada. Varian Aerograph. Con­ tact: (10) May 27 to 29—Analytical Titrimetry Workshop. Hopatcong, N . J. Saul Gordon. Contact: (3) May 27 to 31—Two Separate Courses: Infrared Interpretation, P a r t I I ; Mass Spec­ trometry. Philadelphia, Pa. Sadtler Research. Contact: (4) June 3 to 7—2nd Annual Bioanalytical Techniques Workshop. Hopatcong, N . J. Alan Fleischman. Contact: (3) June 4 to 16—Design of Experiments. Rochester Institute of Technology. Chemical Division of American Society for Quality Control and R I T . Contact (11) June 9 to 28—Digital Computers in Chemical Instrumentation. Purdue University. Contact: S. P. Perone, Chemistry Dept., Purdue Universit3', Lafayette, Ind. 47907 June 10 to 14—Modern X - R a y Spectroscopy Clinic. Albany, Ν . Υ. Contact: Henry Chessin, State Universitv of New York at Albanv (SUNYA), Department of Phys­ ics, 1223 Western A v e , Albany, Ν . Υ. 12203 June 10 to 21—17th Annual Statistics Course. University of British Columbia, Van­ couver, B. C. William Mendenhall, J. Stuart Hunter. Joint Sponsors: Technical Section, Canadian Pulp and Paper Association and Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry ( T A P P I ) . Contact: H. O. Teeple, T A P P I , 360 Lexington Ave, New York, N . Y. 10017 June 12 to 14—Gas Chromatography. Montreal, Canada. Varian Aerograph. Con­ tact: (10) June 12 to 21—Statistical Techniques. Rochester Institute of Technology. Chemical Division of American Society for Quality Control and R I T . Contact (11) June 17 to 21—7th Annual Thermoanalysis Institute. Hopatcong, N . J. Saul Gordon. Contact: (3) June 17 to 21—Techniques of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy. UCLA. W. J. Lehmann, H. J. Sloane. Contact: (12) June 17 to 28—The Electron Microanalyzer and Its Applications. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. R. E . Ogilvie. Contact: (13) June 20 to 21—Science of Color Measurement. Los Angeles, Calif. I D L . Contact]: (2)

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E d u c a t i o n Secretary, American Chemical Society, 1155 16th St., N . W., W a s h i n g ­ ton, D . C. 20036. T e l : ( 2 0 2 ) 7 3 7 - 3 3 3 7 2 J a m e s Shearer, I n s t r u m e n t D e v e l o p m e n t Laboratories, 67 Mechanic S t , Attleboro, M a s s . 02703. T e l : (617) 222-3880 3 Saul G o r d o n Associates Center for Professional Advancement, Box 66, H o p a t c o n g , N.J. 07843. T e l : ( 2 0 1 ) 3 9 8 - 7 1 1 0 4 Sadtler Research Laboratories, Inc., 3316 Spring G a r d e n S t , Philadelphia, P a . 19104. T e l : (215) 382-7800 £ Bernie Jagielski, Varian Aerograph, 6400 Southwest Freeway, Houston, Texas 6 M r s . M i r i a m L. Fallert, M c C r o n e Research I n s t i t u t e , 451 E a s t 31st St., Chicago, 111. 60616. T e l : (312) 842-7105 7 P a u l H a l t e r , Jr., General Electric, 4855 Electric A v e , Milwaukee, Wis. 53201 8 Wilks Scientific C o r p , 140 W a t e r St., South Norwalk, Conn. 06856. T e l : (203) 838-4537 9 H u g h H a r p e r , V a r i a n Aerograph, 205 W . T o u h y A v e , P a r k Ridge, 111. 60068 10 P e t e r Leigh-Mossley, Varian Aerograph, U n i t 10, 1040 M a r t i n Grove R d , R e x dale, Ontario, C a n a d a 11 P a u l a Collins, Rochester I n s t i t u t e of Technology, P . O. Box 3404, Rochester, N.Y. 14614 12 University of California Extension, 10851 Le C o n t e A v e , Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 13 J. M . Austin, D i r e c t o r of the S u m m e r Session, R o o m E-19-356, M a s s a c h u s e t t s I n s t i t u t e of Technology, Cambridge, M a s s . 02139 Circle No. 92 on Readers' Service Card

VOL. 40, NO. 3, MARCH 1968

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THERMOLYNE laboratory

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Apparatus for:

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS Mar. 4 to 8

Nineteenth Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry a n d Applied Spectroscopy. Cleveland, Ohio. Contact: John O. Frohliger, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pa. Page 54 A, F e b .

Mar. 25 to 27

Seventh Advanced Research Conference on Gas Chromatography. University of California, Los Angeles. Contact: H. L. Tallman, Engineering and Physical Sciences Extension, Room 6266 Boelter Hall, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024. T e l : (213) 478-9711, Ext. 7178. Page 75 A, Jan.

Mar. 31 to Apr. 5

155th National ACS Meeting. San Francisco, Calif. Includes An­ alytical Division Sessions. Contact: E. C. Dunlop, E . I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Del. 19898. Page 85 A Mar.

Lv^ MOTION

Apr. 17 to 19—Conference on Structure Analysis: Thermal Vibrations, Disorder, and Phase Transitions. University Coming Events of York. Contact: The Institute of Physics and The Phys­ ical Society, 47 Belgrave Square, London, S. W. 1, England. Page 60 A, Aug. Apr. 17 to 19—Fourth Conference on Spectroscopy. Hotel Métropole, Brighton, England. Contact: Institute of Petroleum, 61 New Cavendish St., London, W. 1, England. Page 65 A, JulyApr. 18 to 19—Joint Meeting on Limits of Detection in Analysis. Twente Technological University, Enschede, The Netherlands. Contact: Mr. R. Goulden, Woodstock Agricultural Research Centre, Shell Research Ltd., Sittingbourne, Kent, England. Page 64 A, Aug. Apr. 29 to May 2—Conference on Biochemical Analysis and International Trade E x hibition of Biochemical Analysis. Munich, Germany. Contact: Prof. E . Werle, 8 Miinchen 15, Nussbaumstr. 20, Germany. Page 61 A, Nov. Apr. 30 to May 1—Symposium on The Scanning Electron Microscope—The Instrument and I t s Applications. Illinois Institute of Technology. Contact: Lome B . Alden, I I T Research Institute, 10 West 35th St., Chicago, 111. 60616. T e l : (312) 225-9630. Page 79 A, Jan. May 5 to 9—Spring Meeting of The Electrochemical Society. Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. Contact: The Electrochemical Society, Inc., 30 East 42nd St., New York, Ν . Υ. 10017 May 9 to 10—ACS Central Regional Meeting. Akron, Ohio. Contact: Glenn Brown, Dept. of Chemistry, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio May 9 to 10—Conference on Low Energy Electron Diffraction. Harwell, England. Contact: The Institute of Physics and The Physical Society, 47 Belgrave Square', London, S. W. 1, England May 12 to 17—Sixteenth Annual Conference on Mass Spectrometry. Hilton Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. Sponsor: Committee E-14 on Mass Spectrometry, American So­ ciety for Testing and Materials. Contact: A. B. King, Gulf Research and Devel­ opment Co., P . O. Drawer 2038, Pittsburgh, Pa. 05230 May 13 to 17—Seventh National Meeting of the Society for Applied Spectroscopy. Sheraton-Chicago Hotel, Chicago, 111. Contact: Dr. E . Lanterman, Borg-Warner Corp., R. C. Ingersoll Research Center, Wolf and Algonquin Rds., Des Plaines» 111. 60018. Page 66 A, Aug. May 14 to 18—Gas Chromatography Symposium. East Berlin. Contact: Dr. H . G. Struppe, Underkommission fur Gas-Chromatographie, DDR-705, Leipzig, Permoserstrasse 15, East Berlin. Page 63 A, July June 2 to 5—51st Chemical Conference and Exhibition of The Chemical Institute of Canada. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B . C. Includes Analytical Chemistry Sessions. Contact: The Chemical Institute of Canada, 151 Slater St., Ottawa, 4, Ontario, Canada. T e l : (613) 233-5623 June 10 to 14—MICRO-68, 15th Annual Symposium on Microscopy. Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago, 111. Contact: MICRO-68, 493 East 31st St., Chicago, 111. 60616 June 12 to 14—ACS Northwest Regional Meeting. Portland State University, Port­ land, Ore. Includes Analytical Chemistry Sessions. Contact: Harold Zeh, Reyn­ olds Metals Co., Troutsdale, Ore. 97060 June 13 to 14—ACS Great Lakes Regional Meeting. Sheraton Schroeder Hotel, Mil­ waukee, Wis. Includes Analytical Chemistry Sessions. Contact: D r . Henry J . Peppier, Universal Foods Corp., 433 East Michigan St., Milwaukee, Wis. 53201. Page 63 A, Nov. June 17 to 18—Seventh Conference on Vacuum Microbalance Techniques. Techno­ logical University of Eindhoven, Eindhoven, Netherlands. Contact: P a t Gaskine, Sec'y, Seventh Conference on Vacuum Microbalance Techniques, 7500 Jefferson St., Paramount, Calif. 90723. U. S. A. June 17 to 21—Fourth International Materials Symposium. Berkeley, Calif. Sub­ ject: The Structure and Chemistry of Solid Surfaces. Contact: C. V. Peterson, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Bldg. 62, Room 205, University of California, Berke­ ley, Calif. 94720 June 19 to 21—Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry. Pennsylvania State University. Subject: Computer Assisted Analytical Chemistry. Sponsor: Ana­ lytical Division, ACS and ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. Contact: R. O. Crisler, Ivorydale Technical Center, Procter and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 45217. Page 91 A, Feb. June 20 to 21—Second International Symposium on Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography. Near Amsterdam. Contact: Ram L. Levy, Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, M o . 64110 June 23 to 28—71st Annual Meeting, A S T M . San Francisco Hilton and Statler-Hil#

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NEWS ton, San Francisco, Calif. Contact: American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19103 June 25 to 27—19th T A P P I Testing Conference. Jack T a r Hotel, San Francisco, Calif. Contact: M. A. Burnston, Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry, 360 Lexington Ave., New York, Ν . Υ. 10017 June 25 to 28—International Symposium on Gas Chromatography and Its Exploita­ tion. Copenhagen. Contact: Mr. C. L. A. Harbourn, British Petroleum Research Centre, Chertsey Rd., Sunbury-on-Thames, Middlesex, England. Page 71 A, July July 8 to 11—Second International Symposium on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Sâo Paulo, Brazil. Contact: L. W. Reeves, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências, e Lettres, University of Sâo Paulo, Caiza Postal, 8105, Sâo Paulo, Brazil. Page 75 A, Jan. July 8 to 12—4th Molecular Crystal Symposium. Technical University "Twente," Enschedc, T h e Netherlands. Contact: 3. Kommandeur, Laboratory for Physical Chemistry, The University, Bloemsingel 10, Groningen, T h e Netherlands. July 8 to 26—Second Latin American Chemistry Seminar. Santiago, Chile. Subject: Chemical Kinetics. Contact: Prof. Heitor G. de Souza, P a n American Union, Washington, D . C. 20006. T e l : (202)381-8737 July 10 to 12—Conference on Competing Spectrochemical Techniques. University of Keele, England. Contact: Meetings Officer, The Institute of Physics and The Physical Society, 47 Belgrave Square, London, S. W. 1, England. Page 96 A Mar. July 15 to 19—Second Society for Analytical Chemistry Conference. University of Nottingham. Contact: C. A. Johnson, Second SAC Conference, 1968, 14 Belgrave Square, London, S. W. 1, England. Page 65 A, July July 31 to Aug. 2—Third National Conference on Electron Microprobe Analysis and First Annual Meeting of Electron Probe Analysis Society of America. PickCongress Hotel, Chicago, 111. Contact: C. R. Knowles, University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 60637 Aug. 18 to 23—Second International Conference on Thermal Analysis. Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass. Contact: Prof. Paul D . G a m , University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44304. Page 59 A, Aug. Aug. 21 to 23—Conference on Application of X-Ray Analysis. Stanley Hotel, Estca Park, near Denver, Colo. Contact: G. R. Mallett, Department of Metallurgy, University of Denver, Denver, Colo. 80210. Page 91 A, Feb. Aug. 27 to 30—International Conference on Molecular Luminescence. Lake Shore Campus, Loyola University, Chicago, 111. Contact: Edward C. Lim, Loyola University, Lewis Towers, 820 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 60611 Sept. 3 to 6—International Symposium on Macromolecular Chemistry. Royal York Hotel, Toronto, Canada. Sponsor: I U P A C . Contact: Organizing Committee: International Symposium on Macromolecular Chemistry, Box 932, Terminal A, Toronto, Canada. Page 59 A, Nov. Sept. 3 to 7—23rd Annual Symposium on Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy. Ohio State University. Contact: K. Narahari Rao, Department of Physics, Ohio State University, 174 West 18th Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210. Page 91 A, F e b . Sept. 8 to 13—156th National ACS Meeting. Atlantic City, N . J. Contact: E . C. Dunlop, E . I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Del. 19898. Sept. 9 to 14—4th International Exhibition of Laboratory, Measurement and Automation Techniques in Chemistry. Basle, Switzerland. Contact: Presscdienst I L M A C 68, Postfach CH-4000, Basle 21, Switzerland. Sept. 10 to 15—III Polish Analytical Conference. Warsaw, Poland. Contact: Dr. Adam Hulanicki, Warszawa 22, ul. Pasteura 1, Poland. Page 54 A, Oct. Sept. 16 to 18—Fifth International Symposium on Chromatography and Electrophoresis. Brussels. Sponsor: Belgian Society of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Contact: The Belgian Society of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 11 rue Archimede, Brussels, 4, Belgium Sept. 22 to 27—18th CITCE Meeting. Detroit, Mich. Contact: Dr. Seward E . Beacom, Research Laboratories, General Motors Corp., 12 Mile and Mound Rds., Warren, Mich. 48090. Pago 66 A, Aug. Sept. 23 to 25—Analytical Problems in Production and Testing of Semiconductors. Wiesbaden, Germany. Joint Meeting, Semiconductor Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry Divisions of Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker. Contact: Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker, 6000 Frankfurt (Main), Postfach 9075, Germany Oct 6 to 8—Fifth International Seminar on Gel Permeation Chromatography. Eden Roc Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla. Contact: W. B . Richman, Waters Associates, 61 Fountain St., Framingham, Mass. Oct. 6 to 11—Fall Meeting of The Electrochemical Society, Inc. Queen Elizabeth Hotel, Montreal, P. Q., Canada. Contact: The Electrochemical Society, Inc., 30 East 42nd St., New York, Ν . Υ. 10017. Oct. 7 to 11—1968 International Conference on Modern Trends in Activation Analy­ sis. National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Md. Contact: Analytical Chem­ istry Division, Institute for Materials Research, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C. 20234. Page 96 A Mar. Oct. 13 to 15—ACS Northeast Regional Meeting. Boston, Mass. Contact: Arnet Powell, 65 Woodridge Rd., Rt. 2, Wayland, Mass. 01778. Oct. 14 to 17—82nd Annual Meeting of the Association of Official Analytical Chem­ ists. Marriott Motor Hotel, Washington, D . C. Contact: L. G. Ensminger, AOAC, Box 540 Benjamin Franklin Station, Washington, D . C. 20044 Oct. 21 to 25—Automation in Analytical Chemistry. Wien, Austria, Joint Meeting, Austrian Society for Microchemistry and Analytical Chemistry in the Verein Ostcrreichischer Chemiker, Swiss Society for Analytical and Applied Chemistry, and Analytical Chemistry Division of Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker. Contact: Ges­ ellschaft Deutscher Chemiker, 6000 Frankfurt (Main), Postfach 9075, Germany Oct. 31 to Nov. 1—ACS Midwest Regional Meeting. Kansas State University, M a n ­ hattan, K a n . Contact: Robert M. Hammaker, Dept. of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, K a n . Nov· 6 to 8—ACS Western Regional Meeting. Jack Tar Hotel, San Francisco, Calif. Contact: Shirley B. Radding, Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, Calif.

SPECTROSCOPY

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