181st ACS National Meeting March 29-April 3, 1981 - C&EN Global


181st ACS National Meeting March 29-April 3, 1981. Chem. Eng. News , 1981, 59 (7), pp 36– .... 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W.. Washington, DC 20036. 京...
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Final Program

ATLANTA

V1NVTLV 181st ACS National Meeting March 29-April 3,1981 Technical Program

41

Committee Agenda

Registration

82

Tours and Plant Trips

102

Housing

84

Special Events

103

Local Arrangements

85

Preprints

104

Chemical Exposition

88

Employment

104

Social Events

92

ACS Officers

104

Awards

94

36

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

95

Atlanta will be the site of the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society. More than 400 technical sessions covering a wide variety of topics have been scheduled by 27 ACS divisions, 10 ACS committees, and the Macromolecular Secretariat. These sessions reflect the broad range of research interests and professional, educational, and social concerns of modern chemists. Included among the sessions are ones on advances in coal characterization sponsored by the Analytical Chemistry Division; molecular structure and biological function of carbohydrates and polysaccharides by Carbohydrate Chemistry; state of the art for chemical educators: polymer chemistry by Chemical Education; OSHA cotton dust standards, and reproductive hazards in the workplace, both sponsored by Chemical Health & Safety; physicochemical properties of colloidal particles by Colloid & Surface Chemistry; treatment of water by granular activated carbon by Environmental Chemistry; advances in flue gas desulfurization by Industrial & Engineering Chemistry; electron distributions and the chemical bond by Inorganic Chemistry; hightemperature chemistry by Physical Chemistry; and professional liability problems faced by independent labs by Small Chemical Businesses. A first-time event will be a presidential symposium on Tuesday, March 31, on prudent practices for hazardous chemicals in laboratories. A complete listing of all symposia is on the following pages.

Divisions, other groups are offering diverse technical program Council Committee on Membership Affairs One of a continuing series, symposium on retirement is aimed not only at retired members but those who are making preliminary plans for retirement. Program includes in-depth treatment of financial and estate planning for retirement. Younger Chemists Committee Forum on What a Chemist Needs to Know—Other Than Chemistry explores job functions, skills these functions may require, and mechanisms the student and practicing chemist can use to develop these skills. Agricultural & Food Chemistry Symposium on nitrosamines (joint) provides forum for 27 speakers covering all aspects of this important problem. Symposia on Recombinant DNA Technology, Production and Conversion of Bioresources to Energy (joint), and Leather Chemistry. Analytical Chemistry Major topical symposia deal with combined use of electrochemical and spectrochemical techniques, use of surface science methods to solve analytical problems, and characterization of coal and related materials (joint). Carbohydrate Chemistry Molecular structure and biological functions of carbohydrates symposium describes use of physical methods to correlate the biological activities of macromolecules in the human body to their structure in the solid state and in solution. General session papers include first total synthesis of pentostatine, and synthesis of /3-lactam antibiotics using carbohydrates as chiral templates. Cellulose, Paper & Textile Symposium on Chemical Applications of Lignocellulose covers latest developments in conversion of lignocellulose to chemicals, and is complemented by three silvichemical-related symposia (joint). Three symposia on textile finishing focus on problems associated with formaldehyde release and on new finishes. Chemical Education Polymer chemistry (joint) is subject of state-of-the-art symposium. Symposium on New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Chemistry (joint) discusses the place of polymer topics in the physical chemistry course. Breakthrough and Perspectives Lectures will be presented by Ralph Pearson and John C. Bailar Jr., respectively. Chemical Health & Safety Symposium on OSHA cotton dust standards assesses state-of-the-art and future direction of rule governing cotton dust exposure.

Symposium on toxic chemical lab hood ventilation (joint) probes engineering design, performance testing guidelines, and meaning of health and safety legislation. Chemical Information Highlight is Herman Skolnik Award Address on Technical-Communications Fundamentals in an Era of Technological Change. Laws and government regulations, their effect on scientists, and scientists' actions and reactions to them are examined in a forum on the copyright law (joint) and in a symposium on the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Resource Conservation & Recovery Act (joint). Chemical Marketing & Economics Papers on specialty uses for workhorse commodity fibers—polyester, nylon, and cotton—lead off two-day symposium. Afternoon symposium on markets for specialty fibers rounds out first day. Another symposium (joint) covers outlook for both chemical by-products of the pulp and paper industry and chemicals consumed by them. Computers in Chemistry Formation, reliability, and availability of computerized systems are examined in a symposium on thermodynamic data bases (joint). Speakers from Japan, Canada, England, France, West Germany, and the U.S. discuss technical details and administrative characteristics of operating computerized data bases. Environmental Chemistry Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granular Activated Carbon covers both theoretical and practical aspects, including theory of carbon absorption, structure and surface effects, biological effects, and pilot studies. Symposium on Energy and Environmental Chemistry looks at fugitive hydrocarbon emissions and acid rain. Fuel Chemistry Recently developed methods and some traditional processes are treated in a symposium on Oxidative Degradation of Coal. Role of Hydrogen in Coal Chemistry symposium focuses on various chemistries and mechanisms involved in processes for hydrotreating coal. Symposium on Chromatography of Coal-Derived Products discusses latest research in synthetic fuel separation processes. Geochemistry (Probationary) Symposia on Humic Substances in Coals, Soils, and Aquatic Environments, and on Geology and Geochemistry of Coal will interest chemists and chemical engineers currently working with coals. Advances in Geochemical Techniques for Oil Exploration symposium covers modern techniques and instrumental approaches.

History of Chemistry Monday symposium features the contributions of eminent chemists from the South. General papers feature a presentation and discussion of the evaluation of history of chemistry museums and exhibits. Inorganic Chemistry Electron distributions and the chemical bond are probed in a broad selection of papers in a joint symposium. Solid state subdivision offers a symposium on the surface properties of inorganic compounds at high temperatures (joint). Organic Chemistry Radical and organometallic chemistry, synthetic methods, and target-oriented synthesis symposia head up program. Also featured are symposia on photochemistry and NMR spectroscopy. Pesticide Chemistry Toxicological concerns are explored in symposium on pesticide effects on animals. Symposium on Biochemical Responses Induced by Herbicides deals with interaction with biological entities, physicochemical interplays, and techniques. Petroleum Chemistry Enhanced Oil Recovery symposium (joint) surveys methods of producing some of the 30 to 70% of increasingly precious petroleum left in oil wells by conventional recovery. New methods of sulfur production from high-sulfur crudes and new uses for it are described in Sulfur Recovery and Utilization symposium (joint). Physical Chemistry Major symposia include Equilibrium and Dynamic Properties of Solutions; Critical Points and Tricritical Points of Multicomponent Fluids; and High Temperature Chemistry (joint). Professional Relations Symposium on Compensation for Employed Inventors (joint) looks at patent policies of both large and small companies. Symposium on Education for a Professional Life (joint) is directed toward the senior or graduate student. Macromolecular Secretariat Week-long symposium, joint with six divisions, provides update on developments in molecular characterization of polymers correlated with bulk strengths, surface properties, thermal stability, and resistance to degradation, microcrazing, cracking, and tear propagation. Macromolecules covered range from major industrial polymers such as polystyrene and polyethylene to biopolymer systems such as the sugars and proteins and glycoproteins. Note: These highlights are based on information provided by chairmen about their programs to the ACS Meetings & Divisional Activities Department.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

37

TECHNICAL MEETING SUMMARY MONDAY

AM

I

TUESDAY

PM

I

AM

Prudent practices for handling hazardous Λ Î * - S j chemicals in labs 41

Presidential Symposium |

WEDNESDAY PM

AM

THURSDAY

PM

AM

FRIDAY

PM

K^P^l'-P^^^ ^^W0^SWWW^^f^

AM

I

PM

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COMMITTEES Materials science as curriculumTn chemistry* 41

Chemical Education Chemistry & Public Affairs Copyrights

Funding industrial R&D 41 Documents & data bases 41

I f ! »

Corporation Associates Environmental Improvement Membership Affairs Patent Matters & Related Legislation

Cancer & the environment

B^'ifef^SiiJ'^i^

The retirement decision 41

Compensation for employed inventors 41

Technician Activities Women Chemists

Chemical technicians 41 Reproductive hazards in the workplace 41

Younger Chemists

Education for a professional life 41

Legal & paralegal careers in chemistry 32

Education for a professional life

What a chemist need; to know other than chemistry 42

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I DIVISIONS Agricultural & Food Chemistry AGFD

Funding industrial R&D 41

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Legal & paralegal careers in chemistry Î2

Nutritional availability of iron 42

Production & conversion of bioresources to energy* 42

N-Nitroso compounds* 42

Recombinant DNA technology 43

Leather chemistry 43

General 42 MM*

Analytical Chemistry ANYL

Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules « 43 45 Advances in coal characterization & allied topics* 43 44

Use of surface science techniques in solving analytical problems 44 45 Electrochemistry & spectrochemistry of biological redox components 43 44 45

Divisional fellowship program 43 Chromatography

Standardized materials! for chromatography

Carbohydrate Chemistry CARB

43

award 43

General (atomic spectroscopy) 43

General (electrochemical analysis) 43

Analytical chemistry award 43

General 44

44

45

General (chromatography) 44

Poster session 44

Cellulose, Paper & Textile CELL

General

46

46 Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules 46 47

Chemical applications of lignocellulose 46

Textile finishing with reduced formaldehyde release 46

Functional finishes for cotton cellulose 47

Natural fats, oils & resins 47

Chemical Education CHED

New trends in chemical education for health professions 47

Chemical Health & Safety CHSA

Physicochemical properties of colloidal particles 47

47 Materials science as curriculum in" chemistry 47

Safety in school science laboratory 47

High school chemistry 47

Return of descriptive Perspectives lecture' chemistry to freshman 48 course 48

Breakthrough lecture I I * 47

Courses in chemical Poster session health & s a f e t y - ((advanced undergrad &| integrated labs) 47 47

Courses in chemical health & safety* 41

Reproductive hazards in the workplace* 41

General 48

50

NIOSH epidemiologic studies 49

Material substitution for hazard control 49

Problems in instituting chemical health & safety in colleges & universities 49

48 Academic standards 48 Toxic chemical laboratory hood ventilation* r

49

Procedures & standards for field emergency safety 49

control 49 Thermodynamic data bases

Data & information systems

50

50

Hazardous chemicals control*

Information careers for chemists 50 Professional liability problems faced by independent labs 50

Legal and paralegal careers in chemistry'

50

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General 48

Disadvantaged students

Health effects of ionizing radiation

Hazardous chemicals

Documents & data bases"*

Nontenure-track faculty status 48

48

OSHA cotton dust standards 48 49

':&S&*r-' :': ? ' I

Low wet pick-up finishing 47

State of the art for chemical educators III: polymer chemistry*

New directions in teaching physical chemistry* 47

Chemical Information CINF

In honor of Hermann Flaschka 45

Poster session (chromatography) 45

Molecular structures & biological functions of carbohydrates & polysaccharides 45

General (chromatography) 45

Chemical instrumentation award

NSF-supported R&D in information science applicable to chemistry 50

Toxic substances management programs 50

Underlined symposia titles have joint sponsorship; *after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue of C&EN.

AM Chemical Marketing & Economics CMEC

MONDAY | PM

I J

TUESDAY I PM

AM

Specialty uses for commodity fibers 50

I

WEDNESDAY MA I PM

1 AM

THURSDAY I PM

1 FRIDAY AM

Chemicals & the pulp & paper industry* 50 51 Natural fats, oils & resins 51 Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules

Surface Chemistry COLL

51 General

Kendall award

51

51

52

53 Surface science of catalysis

General catalysis & related topics 51

52

52

Physicochemical properties of colloidal particles*

Physicochemical properties of colloidal particles 51

52

52

Molecular processes at solid surfaces 51

Chemical physics of catalysis 52

52

Advances in coal characterization & allied topics

51

52

Inorganic reactions in organized media

51 Computers in Chemistry COMP Environmental Chemistry ENVT

52

Thermodynamic data bases*

General 53

Energy & environmental chemistry

General

53

53

Award for advances in environmental sciences & technology 53

General

Energy & environmental chemistry

General

54

54

54

Chromatography of coal-derived products

General 55

Treatment of water by granular activated carbon 53

54

Advances in flue gas desulfurization 53

Fuel Chemistry FUEL

Oxidative degradation of coal

Role of hydrogen in coal chemistry

54

54

55

55

54

55

55

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Production & conversion of bioresources 55

Residuum upgrading & coking

Advances in coal characterization & allied topics

Advances in flue gas desulfurization 54

55 Chemistry of enhanced oil recovery 55 Ε. V. Murphree award 55

Geochemistry GEOC

Humic substances in coals, soils & aquatic environments 55

Advances in geochemical techniques for oil exploration

Geology & geochemistry of coal

55

55

56

Chemistry of enhanced oil recovery 55

History of Chemistry HIST

Eminent southern chemists

General

56

56

Industrial & Engineering Chemistry INDE

Perspectives lecture 56 Mass transfer with chemical reactions in two-phase system

Commodity & engineering plastics* 56

57 Recent advances in separation technology*

Advances in flue gas desulfurization* 56

57 R&D/manufacturing interface

Funding of industrial R&D*

56

57

E.V. Murphree award*

Awards

62 Sulfur recovery & utilization 62 Toxic chemical laboratory hood ventilation

Chemical consideration for radioactive waste 5 T ~

Natural fats, oils & resins* 57

57

Inorganic Chemistry INOR

62

Treatability of industrial aqueous effluents

62

Electron distributions & the chemical bond*

62 Roles of transition metal complexes in oxidation of organic substrates*

Inorganic reactions in organized media* 62 Poster session

63

64

65 General (kinetics & mechanisms) '

General (organometallic compounds)

General (catalysis)

General (molybdenum chemistry)

General (transition metal compounds)

63

64

64

65

65

General (solid state)

Perspectives lecture III 64

General (main group chemistry) 65

General (lanthanides & actinides) 65

62 General (bioinorganic systems)

General (photochemical studies)

63

63

64

General (transition metal complexes) 63

Breakthrough lecture II

General (macrocyclic compounds) 64

63

Surface properties of inorganic compounds* 64 65 High-temperature chemistry

63

64

65

ACS creative invention award

Chemical consideration for radioactive waste 64~~

Medicinal Chemistry MEDI

Amino acid neurotransmitters 65

Nontricyclic antidepressant drugs 65

Computer graphics in medicinal chemistry 65

66

Garvan medal award address 66

Recent developments in allergy 66

General 66

In honor of Joseph H. Burckhalter

General

66

66

Underlined symposia titles have joint sponsorship; *after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue of C&EN.

MONDAY | PM

AM Nuclear Chemistry & Technology NUCL

Organic Chemistry ORGN

|

Deep inelastic reaction studies 66

TUESDAY | PM

AM

Heavy ion reaction mechanisms (award)

67 General 67

award 67

Mechanisms of addition & rearrangement 68

67

68

work in synthetic organic chemistry 68

68

69

69

Synthetic methodology

Synthesis

Reactions & synthetic methods

THURSDAY Ί PM

1 FRIDAY AM

I I

67

Ernest Guenther award

Chiral systems

AM

General

Silicon in organic synthesis

Strained & bridged systems 68

I I

Chemical consideration for radioactive waste* 67

Health effects of ionizing radiation*

Synthesis

Heteroaromatics

WEDNESDAY AM | PM Deep inelastic reaction studies 67

67

Fission product transport & release 66

Synthetic methodology

I I

Photochemistry of polychromophoric molecules

Silicon in organic synthesis 70

Spectroscopy 70

70

Nitro compounds & heterocycles 71

New methods & applications of NMR spectroscopy 69

69 Hypervalent species, phosphorus & sulfur compounds 69

68

69

69

Photooxidation & organoborane chemistry 68

Anions, radicals & carbenes

Reaction mechanisms

69

69

Photochemistry

Bioorganic & natural products

Gas phase & thermal reactions

General

70

70

71

70

Roles of transition metal complexes in oxidation of organic substrates 70 Oxygen heterocycles & thermal extrusion reactions 70

Organometallics 69

Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules

Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry ORPL

71

72

Commodity & engineering plastics 71

Plastics for the 1980's 72

72 Cyclopolymers & polymers with chain-ring structures 71

72 Reaction injection molding & fast polymerization reactions

General (new concepts in applied polymer science) 71

71

72 General (new concepts in applied polymer science)

Biological activities of polymers 71

72

72

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Borden award 71

Pesticide

Effects of chronic exposures to pesticides on animals

General

Developments in analytical chemistry

General 73

73

73

PEST

72

Biochemical responses induced by herbicides

73

N-Nitroso compounds

General

73

73

73

Impurities in pesticides

73

General 73

Petroleum Chemistry PETR

Chemistry of engine combustion products 73

Chemistry of enhanced oil recovery*

74

ACS creative invention award* 74

74

Advances in flue gas desulfurization 74 E. V. Murphree award

74

74

74

75

Residuum upgrading & coking*

Advances in separation recovery 74

Lubrizol award

Sulfur recovery & utilization*

74 Chemical physics of catalysis* 74 Transition metal complexes in oxidation of organic substrates 74

75

Surface properties of inorganic compounds and their relation to catalysis 74 75

Physical Chemistry PHYS

Critical & tricritical points of multicomponent fluids 75

Poster (general)

76

Poster (general)

76

77

Peter Debye award

High-temperature chemistry*

75

75

_

New directions in teaching physical chemistry

76

77

Nobel Laureate signature award 76

Poster

Equilibrium & dynamic properties of solutions

75

76

I

77

|

Electron distribution & the chemical bond 75

Polymer Chemistry POLY

76

77 Aqueous polymer systems

Cyclopolymers & polymers with chain-ring structures* 77 Dynamical properties of polymer fluids 77

78

79

78

79

79 Poster (special topics) 78

Dynamical properties of polymer fluids

Polymeric reagents

79

79

State of the art for chemical educators III: polymer chemistry

Witco award 78

78

79

Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules 78

79

80

Commodity & engineering plastics 78

Professional Relations PRFR

Compensation for employed inventors* 80

79 Education for a professional life* 80

Rubber RUBB Small Chemical Businesses SCHB

Legal & paralegal career options in chemistry 80 Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules 80

Compensation for employed inventors 80

Professional liability problems faced by independent labs * 80

True stories of small chemical businesses* 81

Starting up a small business 80

Hazardous chemicals control 80

Macromolecular Secretariat

Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules* 81

Special topics 80

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Technical Program

ATLANTA

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181st ACS National Meeting

PRESIDENT'S SYMPOSIUM Albert C. Zettlemoyer, President

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Falcon Ballroom (Terrace Level) 5:15—President's Symposium "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals In Laboratories"—Discussion of National Research Council

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON COPYRIGHTS

TUESDAY AFTERNOON MONDAY MORNING Forum on Documents and Data Bases: Use or Misuse? cosponsored with Division of Chemical Information (see page 50)

COMMITTEE ON CORPORATION —Dr. Anna J. Harrison, Mt Holyoke ASSOCIATES College —Dr. Howard E. Simmons, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON CHEMICAL EDUCATION J. A. Beel, Chairman

TUESDAY MORNING World Congress Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) Symposium on Materials Science as a Cur­ riculum in Chemistry J. A. Beel, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Materials: Technology or Science? G. R. Thomas. 9:50—2. Materials Research—The Chemistry Graduate. W. J. James. 10:35—Intermission. 10:45—3. The Chemist in Materials Science. K. R. Lawless. 11:20—Discussion.

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON CHEMISTRY AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS H. L. Finkbeiner,

Chairman

L. V. Triggiani, Chairman

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on the Funding of Industrial Re­ search and Development cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chem­ istry joint with Board-Council Committee on Chemistry and Public Affairs (see page 57)

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT D. MacDougall, Chairman

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on Cancer and the Environ­ ment

R. E. Olson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Recent Developments in Human Carcinogenesis. J. Higginson. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—2. Naturally Occurring Carcinogens. B. J. Wilson. 11:05—3. Mechanisms of Chemical Carci­ nogenesis. R. A. Neal. 2:00—4. Asbestos as a Carcinogen. M. Kuschner. 2:50—5. Extrapolation of Carcinogenesis Testing in Animals to Man. R. K. Boutwell. 3:40—Intermission. 4:00—6. The Risk of Cancer. R. Wilson.

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on the Funding of Industrial Re­ search and Development cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chem­ istry joint with Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 57)

W. M. Tuddenham, Chairman

F. H. Owens, Chairman

Albert C. Zettlemoyer, Presiding —Dr. Jerome A. Berson, Yale University

—Dr. Herbert O. House, Georgia Institute of Technology —Dr. Edwin D. Becker, National Institutes of Health —Dr. Bailus Walker, Occupational Safety & Health Administration —Dr. Eugene F. Meyer, Environmental Protection Agency —Dr. Robert W. Parry, ACS President-Elect

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AFFAIRS

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Omni International, Liberty Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) Symposium on the Retirement Decision L. V. Sorg, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—1. Changing Retirement Roles in the 80*s. B. Payne. 2:20—2. Financial and Estate Planning. W. C. Thompson.

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room Β (Meeting Level) 26th National Technician Symposium G. J. Brien, Presiding 9:00—Open NCCTA Meeting. 10:20—6. Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Reso­ nance as a Method for Estimating Oil Shale Yields. S. W. Tyson. 10:45—7. Use of the Streaming Mercury Electrode for Measuring Reaction Rates Between a Thiol and Aqueous Silver Halide Dispersions. G. J. Brien, D. Neuberger. 11:30—8. The Important Role of the Techni­ cian in Accessing the Aquatic Toxicity and Environmental Fate of Chemicals. C. F. Callis, R. Kimerle. 2:00—9. Testing and Evaluation of Resin Systems for Rapid Runway Repair. F. A. Forster.

2:25—10. Heavy-Duty Laundry Powders. G. D. Carpenter.

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON PATENT MATTERS AND RELATED LEGISLATION W. Marcy, Chairman

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Compensation for Employed Inventors organized by Division of Profes­ sional Relations joint with Council Committee on Professional Relations, Divisions of Pro­ fessional Relations and Small Chemical Businesses (see page 80)

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES M. H. Campbell, Chairman D. Wonchoba, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room Β (Meeting Level) 26th National Technician Symposium

G. J. Brien, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Kinetic Studies Using a Batch Micro-Reactor System. J. Henegar. 9:35—2. Chromatographic Analysis With Open Tubular Columns. W. Cathcart. 10:00—Open CTA Meeting. 11:20—3. Laboratory Scale Procedures for Preparation of High Molecular Weight Polymers. L. H. Robertson. 2:00—4. Creatinine in Human Serum by HPLC. J. W. Smith, D. F. Ketchum, R. T. Ambrose. 2:25—5. Glutaraldehyde—A Potent Microbiocide For Industrial Cooling Water Ap­ plications. A. D. Galante, R. G. Eagar, Jr. 4:30—Closed NCCTA Meeting.

2:50—11. Synthesis of 1-Methyl-4-(arylsulfonyl)-methylidene-3,1-benzoxazine-2(1H)ones. W. B. Vreeland, II, M. J. Carmody.

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room Β (Meeting Level) Instrumental Seminar for Chemical Techni­ cians R. L. Julian, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—FT-IR in the Analytical Laboratory— Audio/Visual Presentation. 10:00—12. The FT-IR Technique and Addi­ tional Data Processing. R. L. Julian. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—13. Real Time Analysis of G. C. Ef­ fluents by FT-IR. W. Vidrine. 11:00—14. Library Searching Routines for Spectral Analysis. S. Lowry. 11:30—Discussion. 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—15. FT-IR as an Intelligent Detector for L. C. Effluents. W. Vidrine. 2:30—16. Surface Analysis via ATR, Spec­ ular and Diffuse Reflectance, and Photoacoustic FT-IR—W. Vidrine, S. Lowry. 3:30—Discussion. 3:45—Intermission. 4:00—17. MX-1 FT-IR Practical Demonstra­ tion. R. L. Julian.

WOMEN CHEMISTS COMMITTEE M. Chan, Chairman

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety (see page 49) TUESDAY MORNING Symposium on Education for a Professional Life organized by Division of Professional Relations joint with Council Committee on Professional Relations and Younger Chemists Committee (see page 80)

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

41

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TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section Β

Symposium on Legal and Para-legal Career Options in Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Information, Chemistry and the Law Subdivision joint with Division of Pro­ fessional Relations and Women Chemists Committee {see page 50)

S. Nagy, Presiding

Symposium on N-Nitroso Compounds. I. Chemistry and Metabolism organized by Di­ vision of Agricultural and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Pesticide Chemistry

YOUNGER CHEMISTS COMMITTEE

AGFD DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY I. E. Liener, Chairman C. J. Mussinan, SecretaryTreasurer

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlors Ε & F (1st floor) Symposium on Nutritional Availability of Iron. C. Kies,

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—1. In Vitro Estimation of Food Iron Availability. D. D. Miller, B. R. Schriker. 9:05—2. Assessing Iron Bioavailability in Meat Products by Efficiency of Hemoglobin Regeneration. A. W. Mahoney, D. G. Hen­ dricks. 9:35—3. Food Processing and Iron Chem­ istry. K. Lee. 10:05—4. Bioavailability of Iron from Heat Processed Food Products. J. Miller. 10:35—5. Phytate, Wheat Bran and Bio­ availability of Dietary Iron. E. R. Morris, R. Ellis. 11:05—6. Effects of Physiochemical Prop­ erties of Food on the Chemical Status of Iron. F. M. Clydesdale. 11:35—7. Effect of Phosphorus-Containing Compounds on Iron and Zinc Bioavailability. J. L. Greger.

42

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlors Ε & F (1st floor)

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—8. Composition of Wild and Domestic Onion Flower Volatiles. J. Myerson. 9:25—9. Analysis of Carrot Constituents: Falcarinol and Falcarindiol. S. G. Yates, R. E. England. 9:45—10. Determination of Limonoids in Citrus Seeds using HPLC. R. L. Rouseff. 10:05—11. Photoprotection of Anthocyanins and Other Light-Sensitive Natural Colorants M. D. Frishberg, Chairman in Aqueous Solution. J. G. Sweeney, M. M. Wilkinson, G. A. lacobucci. 10:25—12. A Rapid Method for the Deter­ mination of L-Ascorbic Acid in Infant For­ TUESDAY MORNING mula. F. T. Henry, S. VanAusdal. 10:45—13. Lymphopoietic Action of Vitamin Symposium on Education for a Professional A and Beta Carotene. E. Selfter, S. M. Life organized by Division of Professional Levenson, G. Rettura. Relations joint with Council Committee on Professional Relations and Younger Chemists 11:05—14. Is the Retinoid-Tumor Program Nutritional Research? E. Seifter, G. Committee (see page 80) Rettura. 11:25—15. Using Reflectance for Measuring TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Food Quality. G. S. Birth, J. B. Magee. 11:45—16. Reactions of Aflatoxin-Model World Congress Center, Room 212 (2nd Coumarins with Aqueous Ammonia. M. D. Level) Grove. Forum on What a Chemist Needs to Know—Other Than Chemistry MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A A. W. Verstuyft, Presiding Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlors Ε & F (1st 2:05—Forum on What a Chemist Needs to floor) Know—Other Than Chemistry. A. W. Symposium on Nutritional Availability of Iron. Verstuyft. II. C. Kies, Presiding Section Β Symposium on Legal and Para-legal Career Options in Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Information, Chemistry and the Law Subdivision joint with Division of Pro­ fessional Relations and Younger Chemists Committee (see page 50)

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor G (1st floor) General

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—17. Bioavailability of Iron from Bran in Pigs. W. Fr^lich, A. Lys0. 2:05—18. Effect of Protein on Iron Absorp­ tion in Man. J. D. Cook, S. R. Lynch, T. A. Mork. 2:35—19. Iron Intervention Studies. J. L. Smith. 3:05—20. Iron Fortified Infant Formula as a Source of Iron in the First Year of Life. D. A. Benton. 3:35—21. Vegetarianism and the Bioavail­ ability of Iron. C. Kies, L. McEndree. 4:05—22. Influence of Copper, Zinc and Protein on Biological Responses to Dietary Iron. W. O. Caster. 4:25—23. Bioavailability of Iron and Other Trace Minerals from Human Milk. C. W. Weber, L. A. Vaughn. 4:55—Discussion. 5:15—Nutrition Subdivision Business Meeting. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor G (1st floor) General

A. Pour-El, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—24. Ames Mutagenicity Studies of 3-Deoxyanthocyanidin Quirtone Methides. J. G. Sweeny, G. A. lacobucci, D. Brusick, D. R. Jagannath. 2:25—25. China-U.S. Collaborative Study on Nitrosamines in Common Chinese Foods. J. Chuan, G. M. Singer. 2:45—26. Fate of Nitrites and Nitrates in Human and Animal Diets. G. C. Yang, A. Joshi, E. P. Ragelis. 3:05—27. Protein Hydrolysis Studies on Tree Nuts: Preliminary Results. F. I. Meredith. 3:25—28. Enzymatic Splitting of Lysinoalanine in Kidney Homogenates. J. W. Finley, J. T. MacGregor, D. E. Schwass. 3:45—29. Racemization and Lysinoalanine Levels in Processed Foods. D. E. Schwass, J. W. Finley. 4:05—30. Functional Properties of Edible Protein Concentrates from Alfalfa. Β. Ε. Knuckles, G. O. Kohler. 4:25—31. White Skin Peanut Flour in Food Systems. R. L. Ory, E. J. Conkerton. 4:45—32. Isomeric Derivatives of Solasidine. W. Gaffield, M. Benson, R. E. Lundin. 5:15—Nutrition Subdivision Business Meeting (see Section A for location).

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

R. A. Scanlan, S. R. Tannenbaum, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—33. Activation of Nitrosamines to Bi­ ological Alkylating Agents. C. J. Michejda, M. Kroeger-Koepke, S. R. Koepke, D. H. Sieh. 9:30—34. Chemical and Biochemical Transformations of Nitrosamines. R. N. Loeppky, J. R. Outram, W. Tomasik, W. A. McKinley. 9:55—35. Mechanisms of Alkylation of DNA by N-Nitrosodialkylamines. M. C. Archer. 10:20—36. Metabolism of Heterocyclic Ni­ trosamines. S. S. Hecht, R. Young, C. -h. B. Chen., D. Hoffmann. 10:45—37. Effects of Structure on the Car­ cinogenic Properties of N-Nitrosamines. J. S. Wishnok. 11:10—38. Structure-Activity Relationships Among N-Nitroso Compounds. W. Lijinsky. 11:35—39. Chemical Reactivity of Nitrosamides. B. C. Challis, A. G. Gribble, L. Shuker. 12:00—Discussion. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor G (1st floor) General R. L. Ory, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—40. Histological and Physiological Effects on Xenobiotics on Insect Herbi­ vores. J. H. Samuelian, L. B. Brattsten. 9:25—41. Leaf Surface Chemistry of Normal and Budworm Resistant Tobaccos. R. F. Severson, R. F. Arrendale, O. T. Chortyk, D. M. Jackson, G. R. Gwynn, J. F. Chaplin, A.W. Johnson. 9:45—42. Highly Effective Plant GrowthStimulating Formulations of 1-Triacontanol Containing Ca + 2 and lndole-3-Acetic Acid. A. J. Welebir. 10:05—43. Soybean Peroxidase: Purification and Some Properties. D. J. Sessa, R. L.. Anderson. 10:25—44. Development of a Pilot-Plant Process for the Preparation of a Trypsin Inhibitor-Rich Fraction from Potatoes. E. C. Baker, J. J. Rackis, G. C. Mustakas. 10:45—45. Lectin Activity and Antigenic Properties of Proteins in Grain Sorghum. J. N. Neuceve. 11:05—46. Interactions of Naturally Occur­ ring Potential Antifeedants with Microsomal Oxidases. L. B. Brattsen, L. H. Zalkow. 11:25—47. Bovine Erythrocyte Acetylchol­ inesterase Interactions with the 4-Nitrophenyl Esters of Methyl-, Ethyl-, and Isopropyl(Phenyl)Phosphinic Acid. J. H. Clark, H. G. Meyer, C. N. Lieske, M. A. Lawson, J. R. Lowe, P. Blumbergs, M. A. Priest. 11:45—48. Isolation and Characterization of Free and Membrane-Bound Xanthine Oxi­ dase from Human Colostrum. M. A. Dressel, J. P. Zikakis.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlors Ε & F (1st floor) Symposium on N-Nitroso Compounds. II. Chemistry of Formation and Blocking orga­ nized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Pesticide Chemistry R. A. Scanlan, Presiding 2:00—49. Gas Phase Reactions of N,NDimethylhydrazine with Ozone in Simulated Atmospheres: Facile Formation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine. E. C. Tuazon, W. P. L. Carter, A. M. Winer, J. N. Pitts, Jr. 2:30—50. Possible Mechanisms of Nitrosamine Formation in Pesticides. L. K. Keefer. 2:55—51. Formation and Inhibition of NNitrosamines in Emulsions. B. L. Kabacoff, S. Vielhuber, R. Lechnir. 3:20—52. Role of Bacteria in Nitrosamine Formation. D. Ralt, S. R. Tannenbaum.

3:45—53. Formation of N-Nitroso Com­ pounds in Fonde -I. I. Gray4:10—54. Three Studies on the Formation of N-Nitroso Compounds. S. S. Mirvish, P. Issenberg, D. A. Cairnes, J. P. Sams. 4:35—55. Blocking Nitrosation Reactions In Vivo. W. J. Mergens, H. L. Newmark 5:00—Discussion. 5:15—Food Biochemistry Subdivision Business Meeting.

WEDNESDAY MORNING Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlors Ε & F (1st floor) Symposium on N-Nitroso Compounds. III. Chemistry of Formation and Blocking orga­ nized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Pesticide Chemistry

S. R. Tannenbaum, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—56. Occurrence of Nitrosamines in the Workplace and Living Space. D. H. Fine, D. P. Rounbehler. 9:30—57. Reduction of Human Exposure to Environmental N-Nitroso Carcinogens. R. Preussmann, G. Eisenbrand, B. Spiegelhalder. 9:55—58. Nitrosamines in Beer. M. M. Mangino, R. A. Scanlan, T. J. O'Brien. 10:20—59. Formation, Occurrence and Carcinogenicity of N-Nitrosamines in To­ bacco Products. D. Hoffmann, J. D. Adams, K. D. Brunnemann, S. S. Hecht. 10:45—60. N-Nitrosamine Formation in Soil from the Herbicide Glyphosate and its Up­ take by Oat Plants. S. U. Khan. 11:10—61. Nitrosamine Inhibition in Cured Meats. W. Fiddler. 11:35—62. Reaction of Meat Constituents with Nitrite. R. G. Cassons. 12:00—Discussion.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlors Ε & F (1st floor) Symposium on N-Nitroso Compounds. IV. Analysis and Occurrence organized by Divi­ sion of Agricultural and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Pesticide Chemistry H. Balba, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—63. N-Nitroso Compounds: Diet and Cancer Trends. J. H. Weisburger. 2:30—64. Microecology of Gastric Cancer. P. Correa, C. Cuello, S. Tannenbaum. 2:55—65. Analytical Methods for Nitrosam­ ines. P. Issenberg. 3:20—66. Nitrosamines in Agricultural and Home Use Pesticides. D. Wright, Jr., M. W. Law, W. R. Bontoyan. 3:45—67. Pesticide-Derived Nitrosamines: Occurrence and Environmental Fate. J. E. Oliver. 4:10—68. Reduction of Nitrosamine Im­ purities in Pesticide Formulations. G. W. Probst. 4:35—69. Policy and Regulatory Aspects of N-Nitroso Contaminants in Pesticide Prod­ ucts. G. Zweig, W. Garner. 5:00—Discussion. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting, Crystal Parlor B.

THURSDAY MORNING Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlors Ε & F (1st floor) Symposium on Production and Conversion of Bioresources to Energy organized by Di­ vision of Agricultural and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry J. J. Fritz, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—70. Role of Biomass as an Energy Source in Developing Countries. H. G. Wahlgren. 9:30—71. Alcohol Production by Yeasts Growing on Membrane Processed Con­ centrated Cheese Whey. K. Rajagopalan, F. V. Kosikowski. 9:55—72. Recent Developments in Brazil's Biomass Program. A. Poole. 10:20—73. Recent Advances in Biogas Technology. R. T. Skrinde, K. H. Vause, B. A. Coburn, J. A. Brautigam, S. L. Woods. 10:45—74. Maximizing Utilization of Distil­ lers' Feeds and Other Byproducts of Alco­ hol Production. J. S. Wall, R. Bothast, A. Lagoda, Y. V. Wu, R. A. Anderson, K. Sexson.

11:10—75. Advances in Thermochemical Conversion Processes. A. K. Chatterjee. 11:35—76. Entained Pyrolysis/Gasification of Biomass to Syngas. J. A. Knight, C. W. Gorton, J. H. Murphy, R. J. Kovac, L. W. Elston, D. R. Hurst. THURSDAY

AFTERNOON

Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlors Ε & F (1st floor) Symposium on Recombinant DNA Tech­ nology

T. Richardson, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—77. Molecular Approaches to In­ creasing Carbon Conversion Efficiency on Fermentation Processes. D. Gelfand. 2:50—78. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation. F. M. Ausubel. 3:35—79. Agrobacterium Tl Plasmid As a Vector for Introducing Novel DNA into Higher Plants. A. J. M. Matzke, M. W. Bevan, N. S. Yadav, M. D. Chilton. 4:10—80. Characterization of Actin Genes from the Soybean Genome. D. M. Shah, R. T. Nagao, G. K. Eckenrode, R. B. Meagher. FRIDAY

MORNING

Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Leather Chemistry. I. S. H. Feairheller, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—81. Deterioration of Raw Hides and Skins by Bacteria. K. Uehara, K. Wada, A. Kawamura. 9:40—Discussion. 9:50—82. AminoAcid Racemization in Lim­ ing and its Consequences. H. G. Neiss. 10:20—Discussion. 10:30—83. Mechanism of the Alkaline Unhairing of Hides and Skins. S. H. Feairhel­ ler, M. M. Taylor. 10:55—Discussion. 11:05—84. Composition of Complexes in Chrome Tanning Liquors and its Effect on Heat Resistance. K. Takenouchi. 11:35—Discussion. FRIDAY

AFTERNOON

Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Leather Chemistry. II. S. H. Feairheller, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—85. Natural and Artificial Aging of Sheepskin Collagen and its Importance in Leather Manufacture. K. T. W. Alexander, B. M. Haines, S. G. Shirley, R. L. Sykes. 2:25—Discussion. 2:35—86. Oxidation and Crosslinking in Hide and Leather. E. Heidemann. 3:05—Discussion. 3:15—87. Reactivity of Collagen and its New Industrial Applications. G. Vallet, P. Comte, D. Herbage, B. Vulliermet. 3:45—Discussion. 3:55—Concluding Remarks.

L. S. Ettre, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—1. Factors for the Standardization of Stationary Liquids for Gas Chromatography. E. sz. Kovats. 9:20—2. Reproducibility Studies on Special Liquid Phases for Gas Chromatography. S. L. McKinley, D. Wulff, R. A. Henry. 9:40—3. Factors Affecting Reproducibility in the Manufacture of Capillary Columns. W. G. Jennings, R. H. Wohleb, R. G. Jenkins. 10:10—4. Standardization of GC Col­ umns—Has Anyone Given Any Thought to Problems with Supports? W. R. Supina. 10:35—5. Reproducing the Mobile Phase in HPLC. F. M. Rabel. 11:00—6. Achieving Reproducibility in Packing LC Columns. R. J. McNeil, R. S. Moore, J. A. Attebery. 11:25—7. HPLC Column Reproducibility—An Issue of Column Packing Chemistry and Column Bed Physics. G. J. Fallick, J. P. Helfrich, J. A. Crooks, V. R. Tisdale. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom C (2nd floor) Symposium Recognizing Divisional Fellow­ ship Program T. R. Williams, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—8. ACS Analytical Fellowship Program: Some Views on Its Past, Present, and Fu­ ture. R. A. Libby. 9:40—9. A Strategy to Produce Antibodies Against Transient, Unstable Haptens. F. A. Fitzpatrick. 10:20—Intermission. 10:35—10. Investigation of the Applicability of the Taft II* Solvent Strength Scale to Chromatography. P. W. Carr, J. E. Brady, M. J. Kamlet. 11:05—11. Productivity of Former Analytical Fellowship Winners. T. R. Williams.

Section C Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom A (2nd floor) Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry and Fuel Chemistry E. L. Fuller, Jr., Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—12. Theoretical and Experimental Ap­ proaches to the Carbonization of Coals and Coal Blends. M. Forrest, H. Marsh. 10:00—13. Catalyzed Gasification of Carbon. D. W. McKee. 10:30—14. A Novel Technique for the Char­ acterization of Surface Properties of Coal Powders. E. I. Vargha-Butler, H. Hamza, A. W. Neumann. 11:00—15. Microelectrophoretic Investigation of the Influence of Surfactant Structure on the Zeta Potential of Dispersions of Pow­ dered Coal in η-Heptane and Benzene. S. R. Vasconcellos, R. L. Rowell. 11:30—16. Intrinsic Specific Volume of Pul­ verized Coal Particles. R. L. Rowell, B. J. Marlow.

Section D

ANYL DIVISION OF ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY W. D. Shults, Chairman R. F. Hirsch, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom Β (2nd floor) Symposium on Standardized Materials for Chromatography

Atlanta Hilton, Vienna and Strasbourg Rooms (3rd floor) General I: Atomic Spectroscopy R. F. Browner, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—17. Double Resonance Laser Trace Metal Detection. A. W. Miziolek, R. J. Willis. 9:25—18. Analysis of Trace Metals in Bio­ logical Matrices Using Polarized Zeeman Effect Atomic Absorption Spectros­ copy—A Comparison of Results Obtained Monitoring Both Peak Area and Peak Height. P. A. Pleban, J. T. Pierce. 9:45—19. Analysis of Trace Metals in Bio­ logical Materials by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry. M. S. Black, M. B. Thomas, R. F. Browner, W. M. Artis. 10:05—20. A Modular Approach to Induc­ tively Coupled Plasma Analysis. J. Katzenberger, D. VanSciver, S. Seiler. 10:25—Intermission. 10:45—21. Use of the Atomization Tube for Preconcentration in the Determination of Trace Metals by Furnace Atomic Absorp­ tion. D. A. Bath.

11:05—22. Determination of Arsenic and Selenium by Dry Ashing, Atomic Absorp­ tion Spectroscopy. G. K. H. Tarn. 11:25—23. Some Problems in Using Atomic Absorption Analysis for Transient Species in a Shock Tube. J. R. Marquart, R. L. Belford, L. C. Graziano.

4:00—40. Quantitative Characterization of Coal Minerals by SEM-Based Automated Image Analysis and Mossbauer Spectros­ copy. F. E. Higgins, G. P. Huffman, R. J. Lee. 4:30—41. EXAFS Characterization of Trace Metals in Coal. D. H. Maylotte, J. Wong, F. W. Lytle, R. L. St. Peters.

Section Ε

Section D

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Methods for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

Atlanta Hilton, Vienna and Strasbourg Rooms (3rd floor) General II: Electrochemical Analysis J. Osteryoung, Presiding

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom Β (2nd floor) Chromatography Award Symposium Hon­ oring M. J. E. Golay

L. S. Ettre, Presiding 1:45—Introductory Remarks. 1:55—24. Award Address. (ACS Award in Chromatography sponsored by SUPELCO.) Gas Chromatography with Open Tubular Columns—Past and Present. M. J. E. Golay. 2:25—25. Trace Analysis of Organic Volatiles in Biological and Environmental Samples. A. Zlatkis. 2:50—26. Recent Developments in the Field of Glass Capillary Column Gas Chroma­ tography. S. R. Lipsky, W. J. McMurray. 3:20—27. Surface Characterization and Performance Evaluation of Fused Silica versus Glass Open Tubular Columns. M. L. Lee, B. W. Wright, D. W. Later, P. A. Peaden. 3:50—28. Dispersion of Liquid Chromatog­ raphy Samples by Very Short Tubes. J. G. Atwood, J. DiCesare. 4:15—29. Fast Analysis of Complex Mixtures Using Narrow-Bore Open Tubular Columns. G. Guiochon, M. F. Gonnord. 4:40—30. Design of Gas Chromatography Capillary Columns. R. P. W. Scott. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom C (2nd floor) Symposium Recognizing Divisional Fellow­ ship Program

T. R. Williams, Presiding 1:00—Introductory Remarks. 1:30—31. Reflections of the ACS Analytical Fellowship Program After Ten Years. R. Wade. 2:00—32. Analytical Implications of Bipolar Pulse Conductance Monitoring of Ion Se­ lective Electrodes. T. A. Nieman. 2:30—33. Studies of the Phosphorescence Emission—Excitation Matrix. I. M. Warner, C. N. Ho. 2:45—34. Quenching in Multi-Dimensional Fluorometry. M. P. Fogarty, I. M. Warner. 3:15—35. Resolution of Overlapped Elec­ trochemical Peaks Using the Kalman Filter. T. F. Brown, S. D. Brown. 3:45—Concluding Remarks. T. R. Wil­ liams. Section C Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom A (2nd floor) Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry and Fuel Chemistry E. L. Fuller, Jr., Presiding 1:30—36. A Method of Determination of Chlorine in Organic Combination in the Coal Substance. J. N. Chakrabarti. 2:30—37. Electron Probe Microanalysis: A Means of Direct Determination of Organic Sulfur in Coal. R. Raymond, Jr. 3:00—38. A Critical Assessment of the Ap­ plication of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to the Determination of Functional Groups in Coal. P. C. Painter, R. W. Snyder, M. Starsinic, Μ. Μ. Coleman, D. J. Kuehn, A. Davis. 3:30—39. Novel Methods for Determination of Specific Trace Elements in Coal. R. A. Nadkarni.

1:45—Introductory Remarks. 1:50—42. Theory of Differential Normal Pulse Voltammetry in the Alternating Mode of Totally Irreversible Reactions. J. Oster­ young, T. Brumleve. 2:10—43. Application of Differential Normal Pulse Voltammetry to Irreversible Reac­ tions. J. Osteryoung, R. A. Osteryoung, T. Brumleve. 2:30—44. Spectroelectrochemical Study of the One Electron Oxidation of Chlorophyll A. C. E. Thomas, F. M. Hawkridge, H. N. Blount, III. 2:50—45. Variables in the Electrochemistry of Water Soluble Cobalt Porphyrins and Dioxygen Electrocatalysis at Glassy Carbon Electrodes. R. J-H. Chan, T. Kuwana. 3:20—46. Electrodimerization of Pyridinecarboxylic Acids. J. F. Rusling, M. Carter. 3:40—47. Diffusion-Controlled Currents at Disk Electrodes. J. Osteryoung, K. Aoki. 4:00—48. Physical Properties and Chemical Composition of Various Radio Frequency Plasma Treated Glassy Carbon Electrode Surfaces. C. W. Miller, T. Kuwana. 4:30—49. Preparation and Properties of Ferrophosphorus—Alloy Working Elec­ trodes. M. Williams, N. C. Fawcett.

Section Ε Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Methods for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom Β (2nd floor) Symposium on Electrochemistry and Spec­ trochemistry of Biological Redox Compo­ nents

Κ. Μ. Kadish, Presiding 9:10—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—50. Studies of Biological Redox Sys­ tems by Thin Layer Electrochemical Techniques. W. R. Heineman, C. W. An­ derson, H. B. Halsall, J. M. Johnson, G. P. Kreishman, M. L. Meckstroth, B. J. Norris, C-H. Su. 9:45—51. Spectroelectrochemical Deter­ mination of Heterogeneous Electron Transfer Kinetic Parameters. H. N. Blount, Ε. Ε. Bancroft, F. M. Hawkridge. 10:15—52. Oxidation-Reduction Potentials and Redox Thermodynamics of the Electron Acceptors in Metalloproteins Using ThinLayer Spectroelectrochemistry. V. T. Taniguchi, F. C. Anson, H. B. Gray. 10:45—Intermission. 11:00—53. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy. R. L. Birke, J. R. Lombardi, L. A. Sanchez. 11:30—54. Redox Behavior of Mono and Dinuclear Copper Cryptâtes. M. Gross, J. P. Gisselbrecht. 12:00—55. Synthesis, Electrochemistry and Reactivity of Binuclear Copper(l) Complexes as Mimics of Protein Active Sites. R. P. Kreh, R. R. Gagne. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom C (2nd floor) ACS Analytical Chemistry Award Sympo­ sium honoring F. W. McLafferty M. L. Gross, Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—56. Award Address. (ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry sponsored by Fisher Scientific Co.) Molecular Mass Spectrom­ etry. F. W. McLafferty.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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9:50—57. Desorption Methods in Mass I 3:45—75. Spectroelectrochemistry of Heme Proteins Using Coupled Optical Absorption Spectrometry. M. M. Bursey. and Resonance Raman Techniques. J. L. 10:30—Intermission. Anderson. 10:40—58. A Hybrid Sector Quadrupole 4:15—76. Electrode Reaction of Proteins. F. MS/MS Instrument: Kinetic Energy. Effects Scheller, G. Strnad. and Analytical Applications. R. G. Cooks. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour. 11:20—59. Analytical Applications of Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry. D. F. 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 14 for details). Hunt. Section C

Section Β

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom A (2nd floor) Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry and Fuel Chemistry W. S. Lyon, Jr., Presiding

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom C (2nd floor) ACS Analytical Chemistry Award Sympo­ sium honoring F. W. McLafferty M. L. Gross, Presiding

9:00—60. Characterization of Alkanes in Extracts of Coals, Lignites and Related Fuels. D. W. Jones, K. D. Bartle. 9:30—61. Coal-Derived Product Analysis: Pressure F Itration vs. Soxhlet Extraction. B. R. Utz, N. K. Narian, H. R. Appell. 10:30—62. Composition of Coal Liquid Fractions Separated from SRC-II Heavy Distillate Material. R. G. Ruberto, L. Petrakis, D. C. Young, B. Gates. 11:00—63. Chemical Fractionation and Analysis of Organics in Low BTU Gasifier Effluents. R. L. Hanson, R. E. Royer, J. M. Benson, R. L. Carpenter. 11:30—64. Characterization of Coal-Derived Liquids—The Need for Standardization. H. L. Retcofsky, H. Schultz. Section D

1:30—77. Chemical Analysis Using a Triple Analyzer and a Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometer. M. L. Gross. 2:10—78. Chemical Activation of Field Ion­ ization and Field Desorption Molecules. K. Levsen. 2:50—79. Liquid Chromatography—Mass Spectrometry. M. Vestal. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—80. Contributions of Mass Spectrom­ etry to Specific Problems in Protein Structure. K. Biemann. 4:20—81. Use of Computers in Structure Determination. G. W. A. Milne. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location). 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A for location). Section C Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom A (2nd floor) Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry and Fuel Chemistry W. S. Lyon, Jr., Presiding

Atlanta Hilton, Vienna and Strasbourg Rooms (3rd floor) General III G. Mamantov, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—65. Specific Detection of Environ­ 1:30—82. Coal as Energy in the Steel Indus­ mental Pollutants Using Piezoelectric try. D. P. Manka. Crystals. G. G. Guilbault, M. H. Ho. 2:00—83. Use of X-ray Computerized To­ 9:25—66. Determination of Oxide in Room mography in Coal Characterization. P. G. Temperature Chloroaluminate Molten Salts. Kosky, E. J. Lamby, D. H. Maylotte, C. S. H. Linga, Z. Stojek, R. A. Osteryoung. Spiro, R. L. St. Peters. 9:45—67. Normal Pulse Voltammetric Oxi­ 2:30—84. Electron Optical and Infrared dation of Mercury in the Presence of Cya­ Spectroscopic Investigation into the Car­ nide. E. Kirowa-Eisner, D. Talmor, J. bonization of Coal. J. J. Friel, S. Mehta, D. Osteryoung. M. Follweiler. 10:05—68. Comparison of Furnace AA 3:00—85. Prospects for the Raman MicroTechniques, Utilizing D 2 and Zeeman probe Characterization of Coals. E. S. Background Correction with DPASV in the Etz. Determination of Pb, Cd in Agricultural Crop 3:30—86. Recent Advances in the Charac­ Samples. R. D. Satzger, C. S. Clow, J. A. terization of the Physical and Biological Caruso, F. L. Fricke, K. A. Wolnik. Properties of Coal Fly Ash. G. L. Fisher, C. 10:25—Intermission. E. Chrisp, J. Smith-Sonnebome, L. D. 10:45—69. Statistical Analysis of In Vivo Hansen, T. L. Hayes. Electrochemical Data. W. S. Lindsay, J. D. 4:00—87. Interactions Between Aqueous Salamone, D. B. Neill, J. B. Justice, Jr. Metal Ions and Organic Mixtures Including Coal Conversion Liquids. A. D. Jorgensen, 11:05—70. A Simple Graphical Technique for J. R. Stetter, V. C. Stamoudis. Estimating Fundamental Peak Parameters of Asymmetric Peaks. W. E. Barber, P. W. 4:20—88. Analytical Instrumentation in Coal Carr. Preparation Industry: Current Status and Development Needs. L. N. Klatt, D. 11:25—71. Determination of Rhenium by I Walia. Substoichiometric Pseudoisotopic Dilution Analysis with " T c and Liquid Scintillation 6:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A Counting. R. A. Pacer. for location). 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A for location).

Section Ε

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Section D Characterization of Macromolecules: Elec­ tron Microscopy organized by Macromolec- Atlanta Hilton, Cherokee and Walton Rooms ular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Cellu­ (2nd floor) lose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Poster Session. General IV Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, L. N. Klatt, Presiding Inc. (see page 81) 2:00—89. Lithium Selective Chromogenic Crown Ethers. G. E. Pacey, B. P. Bubnis, Y. P. Wu. TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A 2:00—90. An Immobilized Chelating Resin Based on 1,10 Phenanthroline. J. R. Bacon, Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom Β (2nd floor) E. Ghiamati. Symposium on Electrochemistry and Spec­ trochemistry of Biological Redox Compo­ 2:00—91. Simultaneous Multi-Element Mi­ crowave Plasma Emission Spectrometry nents of Metals Using an Oscillating-Mirror Rapid Η. Ν. Blount, Presiding Scanning Spectrometer. Z. M. Mantay, K. J. Mulligan, J. A. Caruso. 2:00—72. Heterogeneous Electron Transfer Properties of Cytochrome c.E.F. Bowden, 2:00—92. INAA and PIXE Trace Element Analyses of Biological Tissues. W. H. Ellis, F. M. Hawkridge, H. N. Blount. G. S. Roessler, J. W. Swanson, M. D. Wil­ 2:30—73. Binding as a Prerequisite for Rapid liams. Electron Transfer Reactions of Metallo2:00—93. Determination of Lead in Paint by proteins. M. J. Eddowes, H. A. O. Hill. Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence 3:00—74. Electrochemical Studies of Cyto-. Spectrometry. G. S. Kuntz, S. L. Kostzya, chrome c 3 of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, strain R. L. R. Towns. Miyazaki. K. Niki, H. Mizoto, T. Yagi, H. Inokuchi. 3:30—Intermission.

44

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

3:00—94. Determination of Metals as Their Methylated Derivatives Via Atomic Ab­ sorption Spectroscopy. T. W. Brueggemeyer, J. A. Caruso. 3:00—95. ESR Detection of Nitroso Com­ pounds by Means of the Spin-Trap Gener­ ated in the UV Photolysis. A. Joshi, G. C. Yang. 3:00—96. Raman and C-13 NMR Study of the Reaction of Aqueous Formaldehyde with Sulfite and Sulfur Dioxide. B. Meyer, M. Rigdon. 3:00—97. Electrocatalysis Reactions of Allyl and Benzyl Halides with Bis(Bipyridyl) Colbalt(l). B. J. Henné, D. E. Bartak. 3:00—98. Thermodynamic Dissociation Constants and Hydration of Protonated, Aromatic Aldehydes and Ketones in Concentrated Sulfuric and Perchloric Acids. W. R. Vincent, S. G. Schulman. 3:00—99. Thermodynamic Dissociation Constants of the Protonated Hydroxybenzamides and Their Alkyl Ethers: Influence of Hydration on Prototropic Reactivity. M. W. Lovell, S. G. Schulman. 4:00—100. Effects of Variations in Smoking Patterns on Composition of Cigarette Smoke. W. S. Schlotzhauer, R. M. Martin, Ο. Τ. Chortyk. 4:00—101. Determination of Residual Mois­ ture in Freeze-Dried Viral Vaccines: Karl Fischer and Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) Methodology. J. C. May, M. E. Grim, R. M. Wheeler, J. West. 4:00—102. Use of Competitive Inhibitors to Increase the Dynamic Range of the Enzy­ matic Kinetic Assay of Ethanol. W. D. Bostick, J. B. Overton, C. A. Burtis. 4:00—103. Fluorimetric Measurement of Pyrene in Aqueous Solutions of Plasma Proteins. L. B. McGown. 4:00—104. N-Methylporphyrin Free Bases and Zinc Complexes as Fluorometric and Absorption Standards for Chlorophyll De­ terminations. T. McDonough, L. Cioffi, D. K. Lavallee. 4:00—105. Development of a Fiber-Optic Ρθ2 Probe for Physiological Use. J. I. Peterson, R. V. Fitzgerald, K. Breuer. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location). 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A for location). Section Ε Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Nu­ clear Magnetic Resonance organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom Β (2nd floor) Symposium on Electrochemistry and Spec­ trochemistry of Biological Redox Compo­ nents F. A. Walker, Presiding 9:00—106. Electrochemical, Photochemical and Spectroscopic Studies on Metallophthalocyanines. A. B. P. Lever, P. C. Minor, S. Licoccia, B. S. Ramaswamy. 9:30—107. Electrochemistry and Spectros­ copy of Iron Porphodimethenes and Osmochromes [Bis(Ligand)Osmium(ll) Por­ phyrins]. J. Billecke, A. Botulinski, J. W. Buchler, W. Kokisch, K. L. Lay, K. Oesten, P. D. Smith. 10:00—108. Redox "Tuning" of Metalloporphyrin Reactivity. K. M. Kadish, L. A. Bottomley, D. Schaeper. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—109. Electrochemistry of Protopor­ phyrin IX Compared with Synthetic Models. K. Holland, J. Jordon. 11:15—110. Iron(l) and Iron(IV) Porphyrins. C. A. Reed, T. Mashiko, G. Simonneaux, W. Scholz, J-C. Marchon, K. J. Haller, W. R. Scheldt, G. Lang. 11:45—111. Magnetic Resonance of Oxidized Metalloporphyrins. H. A. Goff, M. A. Phillippi, A. D. Boersma, A. P. Hansen.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom C (2nd floor) Chemical Instrumentation Award Sympo­ sium honoring J. W. Amy W. E. Baitinger, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—112. How Do You Decide Where to Place Your Bets?—Information Content of New Techniques. Η. Ε. Weaver. 9:30—113. Instrument Development Through Cooperative Efforts with Customers. R. E. Finnigan, M. S. Story, T. Z. Chu. 10:00—114. A-l Connection: Triumphs, Trials, Trends. Ε. Η. Rogers. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—115. High Technology and the Chemical Industry—An Ideal Marriage. G. L. Kochanny, Jr. 11:15—116. High Technology Instrumentation As Viewed from Washington, D.C. A. F. Findeis.

Section C Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom A (2nd floor) Symposium on Use of Surface Science Techniques in Solving Analytical Problems W. H. Christie, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—117. Comparison of Surface Spec­ troscopic Techniques. D. M. Hercules. 9:50—118. Surface Analysis Problems in Solar Energy Materials. A. W. Czanderna. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—119. Surface Analytical Instrumen­ tation in Nuclear Energy Systems. C. E. Johnson. 11:10—120. Combined Surface Analysis Techniques for Material Analysis Problem Solving. B. F. Phillips. 11:40—121. Industrial Surface Analysis—a View from a Private Laboratory.M. A. Kelley, L. H. Scharpen.

Section D Atlanta Hilton, Vienna and Strasbourg Rooms (3rd floor) General V: Chromatography M. L. Lee, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—122. A Rapid Microcomputer Com­ patible Mass Spectral Search Scheme Using Bit Compressed Fourier Transform Mass Spectra. R. B. Lam, S. J. Foulk, T. L. Isenhour. 9:25—123. Confirmation of Chromatographic Methods by Using GC/MS Techniques. L. W. Yert, J. S. Holler, D. G. Patterson. 9:45—124. Characterization of Reference Materials for Use in Quantitative GC/MS Analyses. J. S. Holler, D. G. Patterson, L. W. Yert. 10:05—125. Development of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometric Methods for Steroid Hormones in a Multianalyte Human Serum Pool. D. G. Patterson, J. S. Holler, E. J. Sampson, D. D. Bayse. 10:25—Intermission. 10:45—126. Comparison of Pyrex and Fused Silica SE-54 WCOT Columns Prepared Using the Superox™-4 Pretreatment and Deactivation Technique. R. F. Arrendale, R. F. Severson, Ο. Τ. Chortyk. 11:05—127. Fused Silica Capillary Column Gas Chromatography with Microwave Ex­ cited Atmospheric Pressure Helium Plasma Emission. P. C. Uden, S. A. Estes, R. M. Barnes. 11:25—128. Use of Matrix Isolation Spec­ troscopy in Gas Chromatographic Detec­ tion. D. M. Hembree, Jr., W. J. Carter.A. Garrison, R. Yokley, G. Mamantov, E. L. Wehry.

Section Ε Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Ana­ lytical Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Fourier Transform Infrared organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (seepage 81)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom Β (2nd floor) Symposium on Electrochemistry and Spec­ trochemistry of Biological Redox Compo­ nents J. L. Anderson, Presiding 2:00—129. Electrochemistry of Diatomic Molecule Complexes of Iron Porphyrins. L. Olson, D. Lançon, C. H. Su, D. Schaeper, K. M. Kadish. 2:30—130. Models of Cytochromes b. 6. The Effect of Unsymmetrically Placed Substitutents on the Redox Potentials of a Series of Iron Tetraphenylporphyrins and Their Bis-N-Methylimidazole Complexes. F. A. Walker, J. A. Barry, G. A. McDermott, V. L. Balke, P. F. Linde. 3:00—131. Bioelectrochemistry of Aliphatic Thioethers. B. R. Coleman, R. S. Glass, W. R. Setzer, G. S. Wilson. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—132. Metabolically Important Redox Reactions of Phenothiazine Drugs. R. L. McCreery, H. Y. Chen, P. H. Sackett, J. S. Mayausky. 4:15—133. Electrochemistry of Reduced Pterin Cofactors. G. Dryhurst, D. E. Serpkenci, L. G. Karber, R. Raghavan. 4:45—134. Electrochemical Studies of Synthetic Models of Dinucleotides. T. Malinski. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom C (2nd floor) Chemical Instrumentation Award Sympo­ sium honoring J. W. Amy W. E. Baitinger, Presiding 1:30—135. Communicating High Technology to the Scientific Community—Spreading the Gospel. Η. Μ. McNair. 2:00—136. Impact of High Technology In­ strumentation on Regulation. W. T. Do­ naldson. 2:30—137. What High Technology Instru­ mentation Means to the Academic Com­ munity—Teaching and Research. L. B. Rogers. 3:00—Presentation of Award. 3:15—138. Award Address. Role of the Uni­ versity in Bringing High Technology In­ strumentation Into the Real World. J. W. Amy.

Section C Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom A (2nd floor) Symposium on Use of Surface Science Techniques in Solving Analytical Problems N. S. Mclntyre, Presiding 2:00—139. SIMS and Auger Techniques in Semiconductor Analysis. C. A. Evans, Jr. 2:45—140. Application of SIMS and XPS to Nuclear Waste Management Studies. N. S. Mclntyre. 3:15—Intermission. 3:35—141. Use of RBS and SIMS to Investi­ gate the Near Surface Region of Laser Annealed Semiconductors. C. W. White, W. H. Christie. 4:05—142. Ion Scattering Spectrometry (ISS): A Versatile Technique for A Variety of Materials. W. L. Baun. 4:35—143. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrom­ etry: Empirical Quantification Techniques and Their Application. W. H. Christie. Section D Atlanta Hilton, Cherokee and Walton Rooms (2nd floor) Poster Sessions—Chromatography J. M. Dale, Presiding 2:00—144. Capillary Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry of the Isomeric Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxins. R. K. Mitchum, W. A. Korfmacher, G. F. Moler, J. R. Althaus. 2:00—145. Measurement of Base Ratios in tRNA Hydrolysates by GC/MS/SIM. B. P. Basile, K. H. Schram, T. Kinoshita, J. A. McCloskey. 2:00—146. Comparison of Fluorijnetric and GC/MS Analyses of Glutamic Acid Decar­ boxylase Activity in Subregions of Rat Brain. M. R. Holdiness, J. B. Justice, J. D. Salamone, D. B. Neill.

2:00—147. Cyclic Ions in the Mass Spectra of TMS Derivatives of Substituted o-Dihydroxybenzenes. R. J. Horvat, S. D. Senter. 2:00—148. Rapid Scanning Spectrometer as a Multichannel Detection for Gas Chroma­ tography. K. J. Mulligan, J. A. Caruso. 3:00—149. Measurement of Nebulization Efficiencies in Atomic Spectroscopy with Applications to Liquid Chromatography Interfacing. D. D. Smith, B. S. Whaley, R. F. Browner. 3:00—150. Application of A Computer Con­ trolled Monochromator for Multielement Analysis of Volatile Hydrides by Plasma Emission Spectrometry. M. Eckhoff, J. McCarthy, J. Caruso. 3:00—151. Determination of EDTA and HEDTA by High Performance Liquid Chro­ matography with Atomic Absorption De­ tection. S. G. Metcalf, J. D. Ingle, Jr. 3:00—152. Rapid Analysis of Halogenated Biphenyls by Electrothermal Vaporization into a Microwave Induced Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopic Detector. J. W. Carnahan, J. A. Caruso. 3:00—153. Portable Field Monitor for PCBs. M. S. Denton, S. R. Dinsmore. 3:00—154. Application of the Solvophobic Theory to the Prediction of Retention Data for the C^Cs N-Alkylbenzamides in Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatography. M. M. Wells, C. R. Clark, R. M. Patterson. 4:00—155. Relationship of Chromatographic Retention to Chemical Toxicity of Organotin Compounds. G. V. Harrison, T. M. Vickrey. 4:00—156. Resolution of Enantiomeric Al­ cohols as the Diastereomeric Esters Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography. G. L. Asleson, P. J. Stout. 4:00—157. High Pressure Liquid Chromato­ graphic Analysis of Polyphenolics of To­ bacco. M. E. Snook, O. T. Chortyk. 4:00—158. Analysis of Extracellular Fluid in Brain Tissue for DOPAC and HVA. L D. Saraswat, J. D. Salamone, D. B. Neill, J. B. Justice, Jr. 4:00—159. Analysis of Urinary Proteins by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. D. L Orti, R. H. Hill, Jr., L. L. Needham. 4:00—160. High Performance Liquid Chro­ matographic Analysis of the Impurities in Technical Methoxychlor. P. R. West, S. K. Chaudhary, R. H. Mitchell, G. R. Branton.

Section Ε Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Poly­ mer Characterization by Chromatographic Techniques organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom Β (2nd floor) Symposium on Electrochemistry and Spec­ trochemistry of Biological Redox Compo­ nents G. S. Wilson,

Presiding

9:00—161. Photosynthetic Energy Trans­ duction: Spectral and Redox Characteris­ tics of Chlorophyll Radicals in Vitro and in Vivo. I. Fujita, M. S. Davis, L. K. Hanson, K. M. Smith, J. Fajer. 9:30—162. Porphyrin and Quinone Model Systems for Photosynthesis and Oxidative Metabolism. P. A. Loach, J. A. Runquist, J. L. Y. Kong, T. J. Dannhauser. 10:00—163. Electrochemical Studies in Iron, Ruthenium and Cobalt Porphyrin Com­ plexes (including Face-to-Face Dimers) and Dioxygen Reduction. J. K. Becker, D. Dol­ phin, G. Domazetis, B. R. James, S. Pickett. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—164. Reaction Chemistry of Super­ oxide Ion in Aprotic Media. D. T. Sawyer, E. J. Nanni, Jr., J. L. Roberts, Jr. 11:15—165. Electrochemistry of Water Sol­ uble Iron Porphyrins and Mechanistic As­ pects in the ec Catalysis of Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide. P. A. Forshey, T. Kuwana, N. Kobayashi, T. Osa. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom C (2nd floor) General VII: Chromatography I. G. Nikelly, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—166. Design Considerations of an Im­ proved Mechanical Pulse Dampener for Liquid Chromatography. J. G. Nikelly. 9:25—167. A System and Applications for Very High-Speed Liquid Chromatography. J. L. DiCesare. 9:45—168. Development of Organo-Silane Treated Silica for Drug Extraction. R. K. Lantz, K. C. Brooks, M. J. Berg. 10:05—169. Sensitive HPLC Analysis for Chloroquine in Body Fluids: Application to Studies of Drug Resistance in Plasmodium Falciparum. M. A. Staiger, F. C. Churchill, II. 10:25—Intermission. 10:45—170. Application of High Performance Liquid Chromatography to the Separation and Quantification of a Homologous Anti­ biotic Complex. S. L. Abidi. 11:05—171. Determination of 2,4- and 2,6Toluenediamine in Boil-in-Bag and Retortable Pouch Extracts Using Ion-Suppression HPLC. R. C. Snyder, C. V. Breder. 11:25—172. Investigation of Separation Mechanisms in the Normal and Reversed Phase Separation of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons on an Amino Bonded Phase Column. D. Karlesky, D. C. Shelly, I. M. Warner.

Section C Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom A (2nd floor) Symposium on Use of Surface Science Techniques in Solving Analytical Problems L. D. Hulett, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—173. Laser Mass Spectrometry of Solids. R. J. Conzemius, H. J. Svec. 9:35—174. Low Energy Positron Spectros­ copy of Solid Surfaces. J. M. Dale, L. D. Hulett. 10:05—Intermission. 10:25—175. Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy. R. C. Jaklevic. 10:55—176. A Potential Role of Free Crystal Electrons in Biological Toxicity. G. L. Fisher, R. W. Hart. 11:25—177. Developing Applications in Raman Microanalysis. F. Adar. Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Vi­ brational Spectroscopy organized by Mac­ romolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom Β (2nd floor) Symposium on Electrochemistry and Spec­ trochemistry of Biological Redox Compo­ nents L. Olson, Presiding 2:00—178. Current Perspectives on Cyto­ chrome Oxidase. G. Palmer. K. Carter, R. Carithers. 2:30—179. Resonance Raman Studies of Cytochrome Oxidase and Its Electron Transfer Intermediates. W. H. Woodruff, N. S. Ferris, R. F. Dallinger, G. Palmer, K. R. Carter, Τ. Μ. Antalis. 3:00—180. Utility of Proton NMR Hyperfine Shifts in Elucidating the Electronic Structure of Horseradish Peroxidase Compounds I and II and their Model Compounds. G. N. LaMar, A. L. Balch, L. Latos-Grazynski. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—181. Redox Chemistry of the 3,5-DiTert-Butylcatecholato and o-Semiquinato Complexes of Metal Ions in Aprotic Media. D. T. Sawyer, D-H. Chin, S. E. Jones, L. Leon, P. Bosserman, M. D. Stallings. 4:15—182. Electrochemistry and Spectros­ copy of Catalytically Active MolybdenumCatechol Complexes. H. O. Finklea, S. K. Lahr, F. A. Schultz. 4:45—183. Electrochemical Studies of Va­ nadium Acetylacetonate Complexes in Dimethyl Sulfoxide. M. A. Nawi, T. L. Riechel. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom C (2nd floor) Symposium in honor of Hermann Flaschka D. C. Paschal, Presiding

1:45—Introductory Remarks. 1:50—184. Biological Monitoring of Pentachlorophenol (PCP) Exposure: Selected Case Studies. J. A. Liddle, L. L. Needham, R. E. Cline. 2:15—185. Separation and Determination of Transition Metal Complexes Using Reverse Phase Liquid Chromatography. S. Yarbro, M. Cirillo. 2:45—186. Determination of Lead in Whole Blood by Electrothermal Atomic Absorp- tion. D. C. Paschal, C. J. Bell. 3:10—187. Determination of Nylon Oligomers by High Performance Liquid Chromatog­ raphy. J. J. Tice IV, L. R. Smith. 3:35—188. Automated Techniques for GC/MS Data Analysis. W. M. Shackel­ ford. 4:00—189. Determination of Fluoride and Total Fluorine at the Part Per Million Level in Organic Compounds. R. L. Barnes. 4:25—190. Use of Continuous Flow Equip­ ment in the Determination of Drug Sub­ stances in Plasma. J. V. Hornstein, W. T. Robinson, H. T. Smith.

Section C Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom A (2nd floor) Symposium on Use of Surface Science Techniques in Solving Analytical Problems R. L. Park, Presiding 2:00—191. Appearance Potential Spectros­ copy. R. L. Park. 2:30—192. ESCA Studies of Metals and Al­ loys: Oxidation, Migration and Dealloying. T. L. Barr. 3:00—Intermission. 3:20—193. Electron Stimulated Desorption and Diffusion in Oxide Glasses. F. Ohuchi, P. H. Holloway. 3:50—194. Environmental and Biological Applications of Surface Analysis Tech­ niques. R. W. Linton, G. E. Cabaniss, D. T. Harvey, J. E. Fulghum. 4:20—195. Modern Surface Analysis as Ap­ plied to Cathode Technology. G. A. Haas.

Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Recent Advances in Specialized Techniques orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (seepage 81).

FRIDAY MORNING Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (seepage 81).

CARB DIVISION OF CARBOHYDRATE CHEMISTRY S. Hanessian, Chairman J. R. Vercellotti, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 206 (Level M) Symposium on Molecular Structure and Bi­ ological Functions of Carbohydrates and Polysaccharides Honoring George A. Jef­ frey

M. Sunderlingham, Presiding Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Theoretical Studies of Stereo­ chemistry of Anomeric Effect. J. A. Pople. 9:50—2. Conformational Behavior of Cyclic and Acyclic Sugar Derivatives in Solution and in the Solid State. D. Horton. 10:30—3. Hydrogen-Bonding Patterns in Carbohydrate Crystal Structures. G. A. Jeffrey. 11:10—4. Theoretical Studies of O-H . . . Ο Hydrogen Bonds: Substitutent Effects, Co­ operative Effects, and the Energetics of Molecular Reorientation. M. D. Newton. 11:40—5. Structural Features at the Anom­ eric Center in Aryl Substituted Pyranosides: The Crystal and Molecular Structure of Paranitrophenyl-«-D-Glucoside. P. Swaminathan. D. W. Jones, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—6. From Mono- to Polysaccharides: How Useful Are Carbohydrates as Models in Polysaccharide Crystallography? A. Sarko. 2:50—7. The Conformations of Some Septanoid Derivatives of Aldohexoses. J. D. Stevens. 3:20—8. Oligosaccharide Conformations: Models for Cardio-Active Steroid Glycoside Structure. D. S. Rohrer, D. S. Fullerton. 3:50—9. Comparison of Crystal Structures of Oligosaccharides and Oligosaccharide Acetates. F. Brisse, R. H. Marchessault. 4:20—10. Applications of Empirical Force Fields to Cellulose Structure Determination. A. D. French, C. Ceccarelli, G. A. Jef­ frey.

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 206 (Level II) Symposium on Molecular Structures and Biological Functions of Carbohydrates and Polysaccharides Honoring George A. Jef­ frey R. H. Marchessault, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—11. Structure of Microbial Polysac­ charides. E. Atkins. 9:50—12. Crystal Structures of CalciumCarbohydrate Complexes. C. E. Bugg, W. J. Cook. 10:20—13. Coupled Torsion Angles in DNA and RNA. S-H. Kim. 11:00—14. Sugar Structures in Dinucleoside Phosphate:Drug Complexes. Η. Μ. Berman, S. Neidle. 11:30—15. From Mono- to Polynucleotides. The Interrelationship Between the Base and Sugar-Phosphate Backbone in Determining the Handedness of Nucleic Acid Helices. M. Sundarlingham.

S. Nyburg, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—16. α-Cyclodextrin Polyiodide In­ clusion Complexes as Models for the Blue Starch · Iodine. W. Saenger. 2:50—17. X-Ray Diffraction Studies on the V-Amylose Iodine Complex. P. Zugenmaier, T. L. Bluhm. 3:30—18. Pig Pancreatic «-Amylase: Crystal Structure and Binding Sites. È. Duee, G. Buisson, R. Haser, F. Payan, N. Darban. 4:10—19. Saccharide Binding to Glycogen Phosphorylase. R. J. Fletterick, E. Goldsmith, S. Spang. 5:30—Divisional Business Meeting. Omni International, Glenmar Β Room.

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 206 (Level II) General H. S. El Khadem, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—20. Reaction of Protected lodo Car­ bohydrates with Magnesium: A New Dimerization of Sugar Derivatives. J. Zemlicka, M. Ariatti. 9:25—21. Products from the Base Treatment of the Tri-O- and Tetra-O-Methane-sulfonyl Esters of «-D-Glucopyranoside. H. B. Sin­ clair. 9:45—22. An Improved Preparation of 3Deoxy-D-Erythro-Hexosulose(l) and Its Reaction with D-Glucose Oxidase. M. A. Madson, M. S. Feather.

46

C&EN Feb. 16, 1981

10:05—23. A General Synthesis of Terminal Diaminodideoxyalditols. D. E. Kiely, J. L. Navia. 10:25—Intermission. 10:30—24. A Facile Synthesis of p-Nitrophenyl 2-0-cv-L-Fucopyranosyl-/3-D-Galactopyranoside. K. L. Matta, C. F. Piskorz, J. J. Barlow. 10:50—25. An Improved Synthesis of NAcetyl-D-Quinovosamine and A/-AcetylD-Fucosamine and Their Simple Glyco­ sides. M. A. Nashed, P. J. Burger, L. An­ derson. 11:05—26. Synthesis and Reactivity of Imidazolylsulfonates—The Design of a Novel and Versatile Leaving Group. S. Hanessian, J-M. Vatele, J. Kloss. 11:30—27. A Synthetic Approach to β-Lactam Antibiotics Based on the Concept of "Chiral Templates" Derived from Car­ bohydrates. S. Hanessian, R. Fortin. G. McGinnis, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—28. Progress Toward the Synthesis of Analogs of the Lipid A Component of Bac­ terial Lipopolysaccharides. L. Anderson, M. A. Nashed. 2:25—29. Synthesis of Ethyl 2-(Daunosaminyl)Acetate. K. J. Ryan, E. M. Acton. 2:40—30. Synthesis of 3-Acetamido2,3,6-trideoxy-D-Ribohexanofuranosyl Chloride. H. El Khadem, D. Matsuura. 3:00—31. 3'-Deamino-3'-Morpholinodaunorubicin: Synthesis and Antitumor Activity. C. W. Mosher, E. M. Acton. 3:15—32. Synthesis of Glycosyl Phosphates from Sugar Orthoesters. M. A. Salam, E. J. Behrman. 3:30—Intermission. 3:35—33. Glucosyl Transferase Inhibitors, Synthesis of Sucrose Derivatives. K. G. Taylor, R. J. Doyle, S. Singh, C. L. Maynard. 3:50—34. Synthesis of Monophospho-Sugar Nucleotides from Sugar Orthoesters. M. A. Salam, Ε. J. Behrman. 4:05—35. L-Ascorbic Acid as a Precursor for Nitrogen Heterocyclic Compounds. E. S. H. Ashry, Y. El Kilany, A. Amer, C. Schuerch. 4:30—36. Analogs of the Charged Termini of AA-tRNA: General Synthesis of 2'(3'O-Aminoacyl Triribonucleoside Diphos­ phates. S. Chladek, G. Kumar, L. Celewicz.

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 206 (Level II) General R. E. Harmon, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—37. Synthesis of 1-(2-Deoxy-DEryf/vO-Pent-1 -enof uranosy l)Cytosine, The First 1',2'-Unsaturated Cytosine Nucleo­ side. R. A. Jones, S. Tarantolo. 9:25—38. One-Flask Reactions for the Preparation of Protected Deoxynucleosides. R. A. Jones, G. S. Ti, B. L. Gaffney. 9:45—39. The Synthesis of C-5 Substituted Orotidines via the Mercuric Cyanide-Nitromethane Procedure. E. P. Heimer. 10:05—40. A Convenient Synthesis of Nu­ cleosides. D. S. Wise, L. B. Townsend. 10:25—Intermission. 10:30—41. Studies Related to the Total Synthesis of Pentostatin: An Efficient, Regiospecific Glycosylation of 6,7-Dihydroimidazo[4,5-d]-[1,3]Diazepin-8-(3H)-one, and Related Homologs. H. D. Showatter, S. R. Rutt. 10:50—42. A Review of HPLC Post Column Derivatives for Detection Enhancement of Carbohydrates. J. C. Hodgin. 11:05—43. Vacuum Ultraviolet Circular Dichroism of Acetylated Glucans. E. S. Ste­ vens, A. J. Stipanovic. 11:20—44. Conformational Analysis of 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-13C Enriched Tetroses, Their Methyl Glycosides and Dimethyl Acetals by 1 H and 13C NMR Spectroscopy. A. Serianni, R. Barker. K. G. Taylor, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—45. Unidirectional Rates of Anomerization of Furanoses by 1H and 13C Satura­ tion-Transfer NMR Spectroscopy. A. Seri­ anni, J. Pierce, S. Huang, R. Barker.

2:30—46. Tautomerization of Sugar Phos­ phates of Biological Interest: A Dynamic NMR Study. J. Pierce, A. S. Serianni, R. Barker. 2:55—47. X-ray Diffraction of ^Scleroglucan. R. H. Marchessault, T. Blûhm, Y. Deslandes. 3:20—48. The Composition of Forage Hemicellulose by HPLC for Representative Warm and Cool-Season Grasses. F. E. Barton II, W. R. Windham, D. S. Hinnelsbach. 3:45—Intermission. 3:50—49. Selective Cleavage of Glycosidic Bonds in Polysaccharides in Cold Anhydrous HF to Produce High Yields of Specific Oligosaccharides. A. J. Mort. 4:10—50. Structural and Physical Studies on Lipopolysaccharides of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D. A. Riley, D. Horton. 4:30—51. Disaccharide Phosphate Oligomers from Hansenula Capsulata OPhosphono-mannan. M. E. Slodki. 4:45—52. Virology—A New Technique for Obtaining Oligosaccharides. G. G. S. Dutton, J. Di Fabio, Ε. Η. Merrifield.

CELL CELLULOSE, PAPER AND TEXTILE DIVISION R. E. Read, Chairman T. L. Vigo, Secretary-Treasurer

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Westover Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Chemical Applications of Lignocellulose-I I. S. Goldstein, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Stability of Monomeric Sugars and Lignin During Strong Acid Hydrolysis at Moderate Temperatures. J. Papadopoulos, C-L Chen, I. S. Goldstein. 9:30—2. Acetic Acid Prehydrolysis of Hard­ woods. A. H. Connor. 10:00—3. Role of Nascent Acid-Catalyzed Hydrolysis in Multi-stage Hardwood Frac­ tionation. E. K. Andrews, H-M Chang. 10:30—4. Conversion of Lignocellulose from Bagasse to Useful Chemicals by Gamma Irradiation. J. D. Timpa, Y. W. Han, Ε. Β. Lillehoj, A. Ciegler. 11:00—5. Chemicals from Wood Via HF. S. Selke, R. Chapman, H. Hardt, M. C. Hawley, S. Mohrlok, D. T. A. Lamport, G. Smith. 11:30—6. Continuous High-Solids Acid Hy­ drolysis of Biomass In A 1 1/2-lnch Plug Flow Reactor. J. A. Church, D. Woolridge. Section Β Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Methods for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (seepage 81) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Omni International, Westover Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Chemical Applications of Lignocellulose-ll H-m. Chang, Presiding 2:00—7. Mechanism of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose. M. Chang, G. T. Tsao. 2:30—8. Enhancement of Enzymatic Hy­ drolysis of Cellulosic Materials by Attrition. M. J. Neilson, R. G. Kelsey, F. Shafizadeh. 3:00—9. Vinylic Monomers from Bioconver­ sion of Wood. R. H. Marchessault, S. Coulombe, T. Hanai, H. Morikawa.

3:30—10. A Process for Chemical Separation of the Three Main Components of Lignocellulosic Biomass. E. G. Koukios, G. N. Valkanas. 4:00—11. Complete Utilization of Biomass. H. F. Funk. 4:30—12. Economic Aspects of Alcohol Production from Wood and Bagasse. L. C. Bratt. Section Β Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Methods for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Westover Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Chemical Application of Lignocellulose-lll E. J . Soltes, Presiding 9:00—13. Characterization of the Lignin Residue from Hydrolysis of Sweetgum Wood with Superconcentrated Hydrochloric Acid. M. H. Winston, C-L. Chen, J. S. Gratzl, I. S. Goldstein. 9:30—14. Separation of Lignins by Ultrafil­ tration. P. H. Claussen. 10:00—15. Hydrocarbons Via Hydrogen Treatment of Pine Pyrolytic Oil. S-C. Lin, E. J. Soltes. 10:30—16. On Methyl Mercaptan During Kraft Pulping. R. Kondo, T. Kondo. 11:00—17. Utilization of Bagasse in New Composite Building Materials. I. O. Salyer, A. M. Usani. 11:30—18. Solubility of Cellulose in Liquid Ammonia/Ammonium Thiocyanate Solu­ tions: Thermoreversible Gelation and a Preliminary Report on Fiber Formation. S. Hudson, J. A. Cuculo. Section Β Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Elec­ tron Microscopy organized by Macromolec­ ular Secretariat joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Omni International, Westover Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Textile Finishing with Re­ duced Formaldehyde Release: Challenge and Reality Β. Α. Κ. Andrews, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—19. Transport of Free Formaldehyde from Treated to Untreated Cotton Fabrics. R. M. Reinhardt. 2:35—20. Cellulose Crosslinking with NMethylol Agents and Formaldehyde Re­ lease: A Delicate Balance. B. A. KottesAndrews. 3:05—21. Formaldehyde Release and Dura­ ble Press Properties of Formaldehyde and Resin Finished Fabrics, W. A. Reeves, M. O. Day, K. McLellan, T. L. Vigo. 3:35—22. Influence of Low Wet Add-on on Formaldehyde Odor Release. J. F. Cotton. 4:05—23. Textile Finishes with Low to No Formaldehyde. J. L. Jerome, M. R. Cusano. 4:35—24. Study of the Variability of Testing Low Levels of Formaldehyde on Permanent Press Knit Goods. J. F. Blanton, W. B. Kaupin. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour. Thornton. Room. Section Β Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Nu­ clear Magnetic Resonance organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

Section C Symposium on Industrial Separation and Processing of Natural Fats, Oils, and Resins (Naval Stores) organized by Division of In­ dustrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Marketing and Eco­ nomics (see page 57) WEDNESDAY MORNING

9:55—34. Kusters Foam Applicator for Dyeing and Finishing. R. S. Blount, III 10:35—35. Advances in the Wet Treatment of Textile Fabrics and Yarns with Foamable Compositions. R. J. Lyons. 11:15—36. Low Product Add-on by Vacuum and Spray Technology. T. B. West.

Section A

Section Β

Omni International, Westover Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Functional Finishes for Cotton Cellulose-I R. D. Gilbert, Presiding

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Vi­ brational Spectroscopy organized by Mac­ romolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—25. Stability of Cellulose-Ether Bonds in Permanent Press Cotton. S. B. Sello, I. E. Pensa. 9:35—26. Polymerization—Crosslinking Reagents for Cotton Cellulose—A Path to Superior Strength/Abrasion Properties in Durable Press Cottons. E. J. Gonzales, S. P. Rowland. 10:05—Intermission. 10:15—27. Response of PrintCloth Woven from Twistless Coverspun Yarn to Dura­ ble-Press Finishing. N. R. Bertoniere, W. D. King, S. P. Rowland. 10:45—28. Use of Alkaline DeCrosslinking Conditions in the Study of the Degradative Effects of the Crosslinking Procedure on Cotton. M. D. Hurwitz, S. L. Cowan.

Section Β Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Ana­ lytical Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Fourier Transform Infrared organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. {see page 81)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Omni International, Westover Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Functional Finishes for Cotton

Section C Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Colloid Science and Papermaking organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 52)

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Recent Advances in Specialized Techniques orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see pages 81)

Section C World Congress Center, Room 305 (Level III) Symposium on High School Chemistry: What the High School Student Should Learn About Energy and Thermodynamics P. J. Smith, Presiding

FRIDAY

MORNING

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

CHED DIVISION OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION, INC. Β. Ζ. Shakhashiri, Chairman J. A. Bell, Secretary

Section Β

Section C Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Colloid Science and Papermaking organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 52) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Westover Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Low Wet Pick up Finishing

B. W. Jones, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—33. Effect of Fiber Content on the Lower Limit of Wet Pick-up in Foam Fin­ ishing. G. M. Bryant, A. P. Jones, R. L. Brown.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—7. A Review of 25 Years of Teaching Physical Chemistry and A View Toward the Future. R. A. Alberty. 9:50—8. Thermodynamics Taught Back­ wards. L. Brewer. 10:35—9. On the Need to Incorporate Poly­ mer Examples in the Teaching of Physical Chemistry. L. H. Sperling. 11:20—10. Polymer Principles in the Teaching of Undergraduate Physical Chemistry. L. Mandelkern. 12:00—High School—College Interface Luncheon (see Section A for details).

Section Β

R. D. Gilbert, Presiding

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Poly­ mer Characterization by Chromatographic Techniques organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical' Chemistry, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 307 (Level IN) Symposium on New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education Inc., joint with Division of Physical Chemistry A. W. Adamson, Presiding

Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Colloid Science and Papermaking organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 52)

Cellulose-ll 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—29. Multifunctional Dihydroxyimidazolidinone Finishing Agents. J. G. Frick, Jr., R. J. Harper, Jr. 2:35—30. Foam Finishing—The Effect of Water Pick-up on Fabric Properties. R. W. Gregorian, C. E. Namboodri. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—31. Methylene-Crosslinked Cottons for Low Formaldehyde Release Durable Press Fabrics. R. M. Reinhardt, B. A. KottesAndrews, R. J. Harper, Jr. 4:00—32. Urethane Prepolymers as Durable Press Finishing. C. Tomasino, T. Wilson.

11:05—5. Individual Tutoring for the Underprepared Students in a Chemistry Course Required for Nurses. E. P. Parker, M. Tre­ blow. 11:20—6. What Is An Appropriate Balance Between Basic Chemical Concepts and Health—Related Applications? J. Genyea. 11:40—Concluding Remarks. 12:00—High School—College Interface Luncheon (see Social Events, ticket 3 for details).

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 308 (Level III) Symposium on New Trends in Chemical Education for the Health Professions

C. L. Stanitski, Presiding

SUNDAY EVENING 7:00—Reception honoring speakers and guests. Atlanta American, Convention Hall Β MONDAY MORNING

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—11. What the High School Student Should Learn About Energy and Thermo­ dynamics. H. A. Bent. 10:00—12. Award Address. (James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching sponsored by Ethyl Corporation.) Teaching a Thermochemistry Unit at a Midwest High School. F. Sturtevant. 10:30—13. Energy: From Hydrocarbons to Radioactive Elements. E. G. Bush. 10:50—14. Energy Budgets for Power Pro­ duction: Learning Activity Packets for High School Science Students. A. Barrett. 11:10—15. The Inclusion of Energy Consid­ erations into High School Chemistry. C. M. Lund. 11:30—Summary of the Symposium. P. J. Smith. 12:00—High School-College Interface Luncheon (see Section A for details).

2:00—Panel Discussion: The Chemistry Course for Health Professions Students. Panel of representatives of health profes­ sional organizations and chemical educa­ tors.

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 308 (Level III) Symposium on New Trends in Chemical Education for the Health Professions M. Treblow, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Students in the Health Science Professions—Who They Are and What They Will Do. C. T. Sears, Jr., C. L. Stanitski. 9:40—2. Non Traditional Students in Allied Health Chemistry Courses—The Prob­ lems—A Solution??? J. M. Daly. 10:10—3. A Day in the Life of a Nurse—A Chemist's Perception. J. L. Sarquis. 10:20—4. Innovation in Gen/Org/Bio Lab. D. F. Dever, N. B. Johnson. 11:00—Intermission.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 307 (Level III) Symposium on New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Physical Chemistry A. W. Adamson, Presiding 2:00—16. Physical Chemistry for Students in the Life Sciences. D. M. Crothers. 2:45—17. Physical Chemistry from the Viewpoint of the Graduate-level Examina­ tion Committee. F. W. Lampe. 3:30—18. Physical Chemistry—Its Place in General Chemistry. New Directions? G. P. Haight, L. L. Jones, S. S. Zumdahl. 4:15—Concluding Remarks and Panel Dis­ cussion Chaired by A. W. Adamson.

Section C World Congress Center, Room 305 (Level III) Symposium and Workshop on Safety in the School Science Laboratory R. Gerlach, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—19. Legal Aspects of Classroom Safety. R. Gerlach. 1:50—Discussion. 2:00—20. Handling of Chemical Reagents. C. C. Houk. 2:20—Discussion. 2:30—21. Labeling of Chemical Reagents. R. Gerlach. 2:45—Label Identification and Preparation by Workshop Participants. 3:05—22. Hazardous Waste Disposal in the Academic Laboratory. J. R. Williamson, J. W. Moore. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—23. Storage and Disposal of Chemical Reagents. R. Gerlach, J. A. Young. 4:00—Storage and Disposal Exercise by Workshop Participants. 4:20—24. Biological Hazards. C. C. Houk. 4:45—Discussion and Evaluation. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 308 (Level III) Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Educators III: Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. F. W. Harris, Presiding 8:30—25. Introduction to Polymer Chemistry. F. W. Harris. 9:20—26. Chain Polymerization, Pt I. J. E. McGrath. 10:10—Intermission. 10:25—27. Chain Polymerization, Pt II. J. E. McGrath. 11:15—28. Step-Growth Polymerization. J. K. Stille. 12:05—Concluding Remarks.

Section Β Symposium on Materials Science as a Cur­ riculum in Chemistry organized by Council Committee on Chemical Education (see page 41). Section C Symposium on Courses in Chemical Health and Safety organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety (see page 49). TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 308 (Level III) Breakthrough Lecture II organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

J. W. Moore, Presiding 1:30—29. Orbital Topology and Reaction Mechanisms. R. G. Pearson. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 307 (Level III) Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Educators III: Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. F. W. Harris, Presiding 2:30—Introductory Remarks. 2:35—30. Molecular Weight and Molecular Weight Distributions of Polymers. T. C. Ward. 3:25—31. Polymer Morphology. P. H. Geil. 4:15—Concluding Remarks. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location).

Section C World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A (Level D Poster Session—Advanced Undergraduate and Integrated Laboratories

C. Katal, Presiding 2:30—32. How Microprocessors

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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47

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Work—An Introductory Experiment. T. R. Wildeman. 2:30—33. Microcomputer-Assisted In­ struction in NMR Spectroscopy. G. E. Palmer. 2:30—34. Computer Graphics Emulation of Chemical Instrumentation. An Application in the Undergraduate Instrumental Labo­ ratory—Absorption Spectrophotometry. D. D. Gilbert, T. T. Mounts, A. A. Frost. 2:30—35. Simulation of Data Acquisition, Digital Filtering and Fourier Analysis on a Microcomputer. G. S. Owen. 2:30—36. Computer-Interfaced StoppedFlow Kinetics Experiment for Advanced Undergraduates. J. W. Moore, K. W. Hicks, S. T. Pittenger, K. Gehring, R. G. Wil­ liams. 2:30—37. A Computer-Based Educational System for the Users of Chemical Instru­ mentation. F. A. Settle, Jr., M. A. Pleva. 2:30—38. A Challenging Mossbauer Exper­ iment. J. L. Resce, J. C. Fanning. ,2:30—39. A Physical Chemistry Experiment in Mossbauer Spectroscopy. B. R. Willeford, W. H. Armstrong, E. E. Dorflinger, O. T. Anderson. 2:30—40. Force-Area Curves from Tensiometer Readings. R. J. Conan, Jr., M. A. Jacobs, J. L. Mullin. C. Kutal, Presiding 3:45—41. A New Application for Radioim­ munoassay: Measurement of Thermody­ namic Constants. C. N. Angstadt, E. J. Barbieri, G. D. Chase. 3:45—42. Hazardous Water Pollutant Iden­ tification Using TLC and Infrared Spec­ troscopy. C. P. Anderson. 3:45—43. Laboratory Projects Integrating Chemistry and Nobel Prize Winners. T. A. Evans, W. A. Hoffman, Jr. 3:45—44. Catalyzed Oxidation of H2C2O4 by HN03—A Student Experiment. J. P. Bibter, M. Mathis, Ν. Ε. Bibler. 3:45—45. Phermone Syntheses via Burch Reduction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment. T. A. Newton, J. M. Coull, M. J. Schofield. 3:45—-46. The Synthesis and Rearrangement of 7-Fluoro-7-Phenylnorcaranes: An Ad­ vanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experi­ ment. E. R. Lovejoy, T. A. Newton, J. H. Markgraf. 3:45—47. A Laboratory Sequence for Ad­ vanced Students in General Chemistry. G. M. Cole, Jr., G. N. Coleman. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location).

by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc.

T. Davidson, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—56. Polymer Rheology. G. L. Wilkes. 9:25—57. Mechanical Properties of Poly­ mers. J. J. Aklonis. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—58. Rubber Elasticity. J. E. Mark. 11:20—59. Thermodynamics and Thermal Analysis of Macromolecules. T. Da­ vidson. 12:10—Concluding Remarks. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Β. Z. Shakhashiri,

Presiding

6:30—Divisional Social Hour. 7:30—48. Divisional Dinner and A ward Ad­ dress (ACS Award in Chemical Education sponsored by Union Carbide Corporation.) Apes and Peacocks Too. D. A. Davenport (see Social Events, ticket 15 for details). WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 308 (Level III) Symposium on the Return of Descriptive Chemistry to the Freshman Course E. L. King, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:45—49. An Integrated Approach to Freshman Chemistry. R. J. Gillespie. 9:15—50. Descriptive Organic Chemistry in the Freshman Course. C. H. DePuy. 9:40—51. Descriptive Chemistry in the First Semester. H. E. LeMay, Jr. 10:05—52. Chemistry is an Experimental Science. W. C. Gottschall, Jr. 10:30—53. Descriptive Chemistry in the General Chemistry Laboratory: A Learning Cycle Approach. D. M. Whisnant. 10:55—54. Descriptive Chemistry as an Aid to Stimulating Formal Thinking Skills. M. W. Hanna. 11:20—55. Descriptive Chemistry in Intro­ ductory Courses at Wisconsin. Β. Ζ. Sha­ khashiri. 11:50—Additional Discussion. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 307 (Level III) Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Educators HI: Polymer Chemistry organized

48

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 307 (Level III) Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Educators III: Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc.

P. E. Cassidy, Presiding

World Congress Center, Room 308 (Level 9:00—Introductory Remarks. III) 9:05—79. Block and Graph Copolymers. J. Perspectives Lecture organized by Division E. McGrath. of Chemical Education, Inc. Joint with Divisions 9:30—80. Organometallic Polymers. C. E. of The History of Chemistry and Inorganic Carraher, Jr. Chemistry 9:55—81. High Strength/High Modulus Fibers S. Kirschner, Presiding from Aromatic Polymers. J. Preston. 10:20—Intermission. 1:30—60. Perspectives Lecture III: Fifty 10:35—82. Ion-Containing Polymers. A. Years of Stereochemical Coordination Eisenberg. Chemistry. J. C. Bailar, Jr. 11:00—83. Interpretations of PolymerPolymer Miscibility. O. Olabisi. Section Β 11:25—84. Polymers for Extreme Service Conditions. P. E. Cassidy. World Congress Center, Room 307 (Level 11:50—Concluding Remarks. III) Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Educators III: Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. W. L. Mattice, Presiding 2:30—Introductory Remarks. 2:35—61. ACS Computer-Based Course on Introductory Polymer Chemistry. J. L. Fleming. 3:00—62. EMMSE—Education Modules for Materials Science and Engineering. S. H. Carr, P. H. Geil. 3:25—63. Aspects of Polymer Education Laboratory Modules and the ACS Corre­ spondence Course in Polymer Chemistry. Ε. Μ. Pearce. 3:50—64. Recommended ACS Syllabus for Introductory Courses in Polymer Chemistry. R. B. Seymour. 4:15—65. Macromolecules in Undergraduate Physical Chemistry. W. L. Mattice. 4:40—Concluding Remarks.

Section C TUESDAY EVENING

Quality: The Pursuit of Scientific Excellence in Academe. G. A. Crosby. 10:35—78. Academic Standards and Public Opinion. P. Block, Jr. 11:00—Panel Discussion: G. A. Crosby, Presiding. B. Andreen, P. Block, R. C. Brasted, S. Ware, D. C. Neckers, S. Y. Tyree, Jr.

World Congress Center, Room 204 (Level ID General I

Section C World Congress Center, Room 204 (Level ID Symposium on Disadvantaged Students: The Minorities, The Physically Handicapped, The Educationally Underprepared L. J . Kotnik, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—85. Accessibility—Teaching Chem­ istry to Physically Handicapped Students. P. K. Helm. 10:00—86. Disadvantaged Students: The Hearing-Impaired Chemistry Student. Β. Ε. Cain. 10:30—87. Applications of a Talking In­ strument as a Laboratory Aid for Visually Handicapped College Chemistry Students. A. Salt, R. Hartness, D. Lunney. 11:00—88. A Titration Experiment for Blind Chemistry Students Using a Talking Mi­ crocomputer. R. J. Terry, R. C. Morrison, D. Lunney, A. D. Salt. 11:30—89. The Care and Feeding of General Chemistry Students. L. Grotz, D. Orz, G. Udovich.

V. Zalkow, Presiding

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

2:30—66. Carbon Monoxide: A Key Industrial Raw Material. K. E. Kolb, D. Kolb. 2:50—67. A Cooperative Undergraduate Research Program in Photosynthesis. L. Harris, K. Eskins. 3:10—68. A Chemistry Course for General Education. M. J. Gilleland. 3:30—69. A Course in Industrial Chemistry. B. A. Howell. 3:50—70. An Unique Format for Offering Beginning-Level Graduate Courses. B. A. Howell. 4:10—71. Quality Instrumentation Courses for Small Colleges. R. L. Neman, W. C. Galegar. 4:30—72. Conceptualizing the Physical Significance of Partial Differentiation for Physical Chemistry Students. A. Tenney. 4:50—73. Integration of the Microcomputer Into the Chemistry Laboratory. H. D. Frame. 5:10—74. Input/Putput Energy Analysis in the Non-Science Majors Course. M. Bishop.

World Congress Center, Room 308 (Level HI) Symposium on Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Status: Uses and Abuses M. Jones, Jr., Presiding

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 308 (Level III) Symposium on Academic Standards

Section A

2:00—90. The Controversial Procedure of Using Adjuncts to Supplement Teaching by Tenure-Track Faculty. S. Fahrenholtz. 2:40—91. Non-Tenure Track Faculty: Per­ spectives of a Large University without Graduate Assistants. A. W. Herriott, Z. C. Martinez. 3:20—92. The Role and Value of a Labora­ tory Coordinator. A. M. Wilson. 4:00—93. Panel Discussion on Non-Ten­ ure-Track Faculty Status. M. Jones, Jr., M. Pickering, S. Rabitz, I. D. Reingold.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 307 (Level III) Symposium on Disadvantaged Students: The Minorities, The Physically Handicapped, The Educationally Underprepared

L. J. Kotnik, Presiding

2:00—94. Teaching the Obvious: What's Really Basic in Basic Chemistry? D. J. Kurland. 2:30—95. Reading Strategies for Chemistry 9:00—Introductory Remarks. Students. P. K. Helm. 9:05—75. On Chemistry Majors: 1961-1979. 3:15—96. The Computer in Chemistry In­ D. C. Neckers. struction—Some Things That Work. J. D. 9:35—76. Reflections on Academic Stan­ Beck. dards in Chemistry Departments, 1941-1 3:45—97. A Study of the External-Internal 1981.S.Y.Tyree,Jr. Relationships of Students and Their Prob­ 10:05—77. Determinants of Educational able Success in Science Courses. L. J. Kotnik.

G. A. Crosby, Presiding

4:15—98. Minority Students Science. R. C. Banks. FRIDAY MORNING

Studying

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 308 (Level Ml) General

C. T. Sears, Presiding 8:40—99. Reducing Anxiety in the Organic Classroom. A. M. Schoffstall, M. C. Schoffstall. 9:00—100. Abilities and Deficiencies Iden­ tified by the Toledo Chemistry Placement Examination. F. Walmsley, R. J. Niedzielski. 9:20—101. A Computer Based Pre-Laboratory Quiz for Organic Chemistry. R. Starkey, D. Kieper. 9:40—102. Chemical Sampling—The Ne­ glected Half of Analytical Chemistry. K. Berry, T. Friberg. 10:00—103. A Model System for Teaching the Analytical Process. N. Radin. 10:20—104. NMR Spectrometry in the Or­ ganic Chemistry Laboratory—Hands-On Experience. S. D. Elakovich. 10:40—105. A Simple Undergraduate Ex­ periment for the Quantitative Spectrophotometric Detection of Amino Acids and Their Derivatives. J. Murphy, R. Rowlett. 11:00—106. Adaptation of a Natural Gas Leak Detector to a Freshman Alcohol Fermentation Experiment. M. D. Murphy, J. Murphy, J. Kaplan. 11:20—107. "Knowledge or Certainty" and Organic Chemistry. F. A. Carroll. 11:40—108. Development of a Science and Technology Course for Undergraduate Nonscience Majors. A. T. Lemley. 12:00—109. Implementation and Evaluation of a Chemical Laboratory Course in the Undergraduate Curriculum. L. J. Nicholls. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 307 (Level III) Symposium on Disadvantaged Students: The Minorities, The Physically Handicapped, The Educationally Underprepared L. J. Kotnik, Presiding 9:00—Panel Discussion: Ethnic Purity vs. Chemical Purity. L. J. Kotnik, Moderator; R. Banks; P. Helm; R. Beck; D. Kirland

CHSA DIVISION OF CHEMICAL HEALTH AND SAFETY L. J. Doemeny, Chairman D. B. Walters, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 306 (Level III) Symposium on OSHA Cotton Dust Stan­ dard—Standards A. Baril, Jr., Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. OSHA Cotton Dust Standard. J. F. Martonik, Jr. 10:05—2. Development of the OSHA Cotton Dust Standard. J. R. Froines. 10:35—Intermission. 10:50—3. Textile Industry and the OSHA Standard. J. G. Trttsch. 11:20—4. OSHA Cotton Dust Standard: His­ torical Significance & Future Prospects. E. Frumin. 11:30—Divisional Luncheon (see Social Events for details.)

Section B World Congress Center, Room 311 (Level III) Symposium on Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Women Chemists Committee H. J. Robinson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—5. Health in the Academic Atmosphere. J. A. Kaufman. 9:55—β. Protecting the Unborn in the Work­ place. K. S. Rao, B. A. Schwetz. 10:35—Intermission. 10:50—7. Linking Genetic Toxicity Mecha­ nisms to Risk Assessment. J. L. R. Chan­ dler. 11:30—Concluding Remarks. 11:30—Divisional Luncheon (see Social Events for details). MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 306 (Level III) Symposium on OSHA Cotton Dust Stan­ dard—Engineering Controls and Measure­ ments J. D. Neefus, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—8. Technology for Pretextile Cleaning of Cotton. W. F. Lalor. 2:55—9. Dust in Cotton Gins—An Overview. A. C. Griffin, Jr., E. P. Columbus. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—10. Measurement of Dust Potential of Cotton. R. V. Baker. 4:00—11. Effects of Washing Cotton on Fiber and Processing Qualities and Dust Gener­ ation. H. H. Perkins, Jr., J. B. Cocke. 4:25—12. Sequential Versus Simultaneous Sampling Strategies: Worker Exposure and Cost Comparisons. F. M. Shofner, J. D. Neefus, M. W. Suh. 4:30—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section Β for location). Section Β World Congress Center, Room 311 (Level III) Symposium on Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Women Chemists Committee H. J. Robinson, Presiding 2:00—13. Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace—The Physician's Vewpoint. J. Spraul, Sr. 2:40—14. Scientific and Legal Aspects of Controlling Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace. D. L. Davis, L. S. Ritts, R. Adler. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—15. Policy Design for the Regulation of Reproductive Hazards: Legal and Ethical Issues. N. A. Ashford. 4:15—Concluding Remarks. 4:30—Divisional Business Meeting. Section C Symposium on Hazardous Chemicals Con­ trol: Toxic Substances Control Act and Re­ source Conservation and Recovery Act or­ ganized by Divison of Chemical Information, Chemistry and the Law Subdivision joint with Division of Small Chemical Businesses (see page 50) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 306 (Level III) Symposium on OSHA Cotton Dust Stan­ dard—Engineering Controls and Measure­ ments D. M. Smott, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—16. Standardized Vertical Elutriator Cotton Dust Sampling. E. Pardue. 9:55—17. Real Time Measurement of Particle Size Distribution of Airborne Cotton Dust by Light Scattering. S. P. Hersh, S. K. Batra, W-W. Lee. 10:20—Intermission.

10:35—18. Laboratory Techniques for As­ sessing Cotton Dust Potential. S. E. Ross. 11:00—19. Review of Textile Machinery— 1981. J. C.Gillispie. 11:25—20. Review of Cotton Waste Handling Technology. D. A. Gillespie. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 311 (Level III) Symposium on Courses in Chemical Health and Safety organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. D. E. LaCroix, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—21. Training Program Concepts in Chemical Health and Safety for Federal Research Laboratories. D. B. Walters, C. L. Hunt, Jr., P. E. Hamrick. 10:05—22. Safety in the Industrial Labora­ tory—A Common Sense Cooperative Ef­ fort. Τ. Ε. Dergazarian. 10:35—Intermission. 10:50—23. Employee Training Programs in a Multi-Product Corporation. J. W. Feuk. 11:20—24. Laboratory Safety and Orientation Program for Summer Students At BARCUSDA. D. E. LaCroix. 11:45—Concluding Remarks.

Section C Symposium on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation I organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology {see page 67) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 306 (Level III) Symposium on OSHA Cotton Dust Stan­ dard—Epidemiology J. A. Merchant, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—25. Epidemiological Observations on Cotton Dust Exposure. J. A. Merchant. 2:35—26. A Prospective Study of Cotton Textile Workers in South Carolina. G. J. Beck, L. R. Maunder, Ε. Ν. Schachter. 3:05—Intermission. 3:20—27. Experimental Trails on Washed Cotton. B. Boehlecke, K. Bragg, L. Petsonk, J. Hancock, J. A. Merchant. 3:50—28. Characterization of Byssinosis and Other Pulmonary Abnormalities in the Cotton Waste Utilization Industry. A. L. Engelberg, M. Petersen, R. E. Piccirillo, J. Zey, J. A. Merchant. 4:20—29. A Survey of Respiratory Signs and Symptoms in the Cotton Gin and Compress Warehouse Industry. M. L. Carlson, G. Piacitelli, J. Hancock, R. Castellan, J. Zey, J. A. Merchant. 6:15—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 12 for details).

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 311 (Level III) Symposium on Material Substitution for Hazard Control

C. S. E. Marlowe, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—30. Material Substitution for Hazard Control—An Overview. C. S. E. Mar­ lowe. 2:05—31. "Switch that Ink!"—Material Substitution in the Converting Industry. C. Bluestein. 2:35—intermission. 2:40—32. Use of Solvent Substitution as a Method for Improving Health and Safety. J. M. Ansell, R. Berni. 3:10—33. Substitution Considerations in the Development of Health Standards. J. Silk, P. H. Buhl. 3:40—Concluding Remarks. 6:15—Divisional Dinner (see Section A for details).

Section C Symposium on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation II organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 67)

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 306 (Level III) Symposium on OSHA Cotton Dust Stan­ dard—Analysis J. G. Montalvo, Jr., Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—34. On the Search for the Causative Agent of Byssinosis. P. E. Sasser. 9:15—35. Botany and Microbiology of the Cotton Industry. P. Morey, R. Rylander. 9:35—36. Histamine in Cotton Dust Deter­ mined by HPLC. J. H. Wall, L. L. Muller, R. J. Berni. 9:55—37. Analysis of the Inorganic Com­ position of Cotton Dusts. R. D. Gilbert, R. E. Fornes, S. P. Hersh, P. A. Tucker. 10:35—Intermission. 10:50—38. Analysis in Cotton Dust by Im­ munological Methods. R. L. Ory, A. A. Sekul. 11:10—39. Fungi which Grow on Cotton Fiber in the Field. P. B. Marsh, M. E. Simpson. 11:30—40. Microbiological Studies of Cot­ ton—A Review. J. J. Fischer. 11:55—Concluding Remarks. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 311 (Level III) Symposium on Problems in Instituting Chemical Health and Safety Education in Colleges and Universities E. I. Becker, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—41. Problems in Bringing Chemical Health and Safety to Undergraduates. J. P. Ranck. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—42. A Flexible Course in Chemical Health and Safety. E. I. Becker. 10:10—Discussion. 10:15—43. A Toxicology Course for Chem­ istry and Chemical Engineering Majors. J. J. Fitzgerald. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—44. Project Teach Safety on TV. D. W. Brooks, T. J. Tipton. 11:20—Discussion. 11:25—45. A Method for Assessing Hazards in Academic Laboratory Experiments. R. Watkins, E. Hudson, R. Bayer. 11:55—Discussion. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

World Congress Center, Room 306 (Level III) Symposium on NIOSH Epidemiologic Studies D. P. Brown, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—46. Dry Cleaner Workers Exposed to Perchloroethylene (PCE)—A Retrospective Cohort Mortality Study. D. P. Brown, S. Kaplan. 2:40—47. Leukemia in Persons Occupationally Exposed to Benzene (Benzol). R. A. Rinsky, R. Young. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—48. Cross-Sectional Medical Survey of a Group of Workers Occupational ly Ex­ posed to Polychloroinated Biphenyls (PBC's) at an Electrical Equipment Manu­ facturing Plant. A. B. Smith, J. Schlomer, L. K. Lowry, A. W. Smallwood, R. N. Ligo, S. Tanaka, W. Stringer, M. Jones, C. J. Glueck. 4:10—49. Preliminary Results and Com­ parison of Japanese, Finnish, and United States Carbon Disulfide Microaneurysm Studies. S. Leffingwell, D. Marsh, B. Al­ bright, S. Lee. 4:50—Concluding Remarks. 5:00—Divisional Wine and Cheese Recep­ tion (see Social Events for details).

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 311 (Level III) Symposium on Problems in Instituting Chemical Health and Safety Education in Colleges and Universities

E. I. Becker, Presiding

2:00—50. Role of a Departmental Safety Manual in Emergency Planning. E. Hudson, R. Bayer. 2:30—Discussion. 2:35—51. Public's Perception of a Chemi­ cally Related Problem May Be More Than the Problem Itself. M. A. Solstad. 3:05—Discussion. 3:10—52. Guidelines for a Complete Safety Audit of the Academic Chemistry Labora­ tory. R. F. Powers, A. J. Shurpik. 3:40—Discussion. 3:45—53. Resources: The Literature of Chemical Health and Safety. J. A. Young. 4:15—Panel Discussion. Moderator: E. I. Becker. 5:00—Divisional Wine and Cheese Recep­ tion (see Section A for details). THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 306 (Level III) Symposium on Toxic Chemical Laboratory Hood Ventilation—Engineering Design, Performance Testing Guidelines, and Impli­ cations of Health and Safety Legislation or­ ganized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry F. H. Fuller,

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—54. Use of Laboratory Fume Hoods by the Scientist. W. C. Drinkard. 9:05—55. Essential Design Features for Laboratory Fume Hoods. R. I. Chamberlin. 9:40—Intermission. 9:55—56. An Exposure-Related Perfor­ mance Test for Laboratory Fume Hoods. K. J. Caplan, G. W. Knutson. 10:40—57. Influence of Room Air Currents on Lab Hood Performance. G. W. Knutson, K. J. Caplan. 11:25—58. Importance of Work Practices to Safe Hood Operation. F. H. Fuller. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 311 (Level III) Symposium on the Growing Need for, and Development of, Procedures and Standards for Field Emergency Safety—The Safety SOP

G. J. Moein, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—59. Evaluation of Hazards, Known and Unknown. R. D. Harbison. 9:45—60. Safe Sampling of Hazardous Waste. J. Blasco, R. D. Stephens. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—61. Technical Aspects—How to Minimize the Hazards to People and the Environment. G. J. Moein. 10:45—Concluding Remarks. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 306 (Level I") Symposium on Toxic Chemical Laboratory Hood Ventilation—Engineering Design, Performance Testing Guidelines, and Impli­ cations of Health and Safety Legislation or­ ganized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry F. H. Fuller, Presiding 1:30—62. OSHA Health Standards for Re­ search Laboratories. L. F. Adamson. 2:10—63. Atmospheric Dilution of Fume Hood Exhaust Gases. J. Halitsky. 2:40—64. Energy Considerations in Labo­ ratory Ventilation Design. Μ. Η. Segner. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—65. Chemical Fume Hoods and Energy Conservation. T. K. Wilkinson, J. H. Smith. 3:50—66. A New Application of Fume Hoods with Energy Recovery. J. P. Fallon. 4:15—Discussion and Concluding Re­ marks.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

49

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2:00—67. Personnel Protection—Clothing, Respiratory, Good Practices, Communi­ cation. J. L. Sutherland. 2:30—68. Records and Other Documentation for Safety and Legal Importance. D. M. Dobbs. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—69. Growing Need For, and Develop­ ment of. Procedures and Standards for Field Emergency Safety—The Safety SOP. A. J. Smith. 3:45—Concluding Remarks.

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FRIDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 306 (Level III) Symposium on Toxic Substances Manage­ ment Programs R. A. Scott, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—70. Air Sampling and Analysis of Trimellitic Anhydride. J. Palassis, J. C. Posner, E. Slick, K. Schulte. 9:35—71. Reduction of Radiation Sickness by Vitamin A. G. Rettura, E. Seifter, F. Stratford, R. Steeves, S. M. Levenson. 10:05—72. Check List for a Chemist Inves­ tigating Possible Exposure to Chemical Toxins. M. A. Solstad. 10:35—Intermission. 10:45—73. Preventing Dioxin Formation in the Manufacture of 2,4,5-T. E. Seifter, G. Rettura. 11:15—74. A Rapid Technique for the Col­ lection and Analysis of Phenol Vapors. G. E. Podolak, R. M. McKenzie, D. S. Rinehart, J. F. Mazur. 1:30—75. Models of Mechanisms for Haz­ ardous Chemical Emissions from Landfills. L. J. Thibodeaux, C. Springer, L. M. Riley. 2:10—76, A Process for Controlling Acci­ dents in Chemical Laboratories. W. L. Oelvin. 2:40—77. Clandestine Laboratory Safety In­ struction. C. C. Moncrief.

CINF

Section Β Symposium on Thermodynamics Data Bases—Formulation, Reliability, and Availability organized by Division of Com­ puters in Chemistry (see page 53) MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Hyatt Regency, York Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on Hazardous Chemicals Con­ trol. Toxic Substances Control Act and Re­ source Conservation and Recovery Act or­ ganized by Division of Chemical Information Chemistry and the Law Sudivision joint with Divisions of Chemical Health and Safety and Small Chemical Businesses Η. Μ. Peters, Presiding 1:50—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—3. Effects of TSCA Regulations on the Chemical Industry. B. Greifer. 2:20—4. Toxic Substances Control Act— Government Viewpoint. D. S. Swink. 2:40—5. TSCA Compliance Systems and Costs. A. B. Jenkins. 3:00—6. Regulations Pursuant to the Re­ source Conservation and Recovery Act. B. Winters. 3:20—7. Resource Conservation and Re­ covery Act (RCRA): Industry Response. G. A. Rusk. 3:40—Forum with above speakers. Section Β Symposium on Thermodynamic Data Bases—Formulation, Reliability, and Availability organized by Division of Com­ puters in Chemistry (see page 53) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, York Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on Information Careers for Chemists C. H. Davis, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—8. Chemists in Library and Information Science—an Educator's View. C. H. Davis. 9:35—9. Chemists in Library and Information Science—a Practitioner's View. L. X. Ba­ sant. 10:00—10. Chemists, Special Library Ser­ vices and Information Science. M. C. Berger. 10:25—11. Employment Opportunities in In­ formation Science and the Opportunistic Employee. J. E. Rush. 11:00—12. Herman Skolnik Award Address: Technical-Communication Fundamentals in an Era of Technological Change. Β. Η. Weil. 12:00—Divisional Luncheon. Speaker: D. H. M. Bowen. Subject: Primary Journal Pub­ lishing Faces the 80's (see Social Events, Ticket 7 for details). Section Β

DIVISION OF CHEMICAL INFORMATION R. E. Buntrock, Chairman B. G. Prewitt, Secretary

Symposium on Thermodynamics Data Bases—Formulation, Reliability, and Availability organized by Division of Com­ puters in Chemistry (see page 53) Section C

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, York Room (Meeting Level) Forum on Documents and Data Bases: Use or Misuse? cosponsored with Joint BoardCouncil Committee on Copyrights

Symposium on Professional Liability Prob­ lems Faced by Independent Testing, Ana­ lytical and R&D Laboratories organized by Division of Small Chemical Businesses joint with Division of Chemical Information Chemistry and the Law Subdivision with contributions by the Independent Laboratories Assurance Company, Ltd. (see page 80)

M. M. Henderson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Photocopying Printed Documents. Β. Η. Weil. 9:30—2. Online Copying from Online Data Bases. J. H. Kuney. 9:50—Reactions: Panel and Committee Members. 10:20—Examination and Directed Discussion: Panel Committee, and Audience 11:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Hyatt Regency, York Room (Meeting level) Symposium on Legal and Para-legal Career Options in Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Information Chemistry and the Law Subdivision joint with Division of Pro­ fessional Relations, Women Chemists Com­ mittee, and Younger Chemists Committee Η. Μ. Peters, Presiding 1:50—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—13. Patent Liaison. W. E. Heyd. 2:20—14. The Chemist as Patent Agent. B. D. Saxe.

50

C&EN Feb. 16, 1981

2:40—15. Career Transition—Chemistry to Patent Law. J. S. Siebert. 3:00—16. Corporate Environmental Regula­ tory Affairs. A. B. Jenkins. 3:20—17. Industry Regulatory Affairs. R. R. Herr. 3:40—18. Effect of Government Regulations on the Food Industry. M. Gilroy. 4:00—19. Occupational Health and Safety—Challenges and Opportunities. N. A. Ashford. 4:20—20. Traditional Preparation for NonTraditional Careers. J. A. Ball. 4:40—Panel Discussion. 5:00—Divisional Social Hour, Lancaster C Room. Section Β Symposium on Thermodynamics Data Bases—Formulation, Reliability, and Availability organized by Division of Com­ puters in Chemistry (see nage 53) WEDNESDAY TERNOON

MORNING

AND

AF­

Hyatt Regency, York Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on Data and Information Sys­ tems with the Potential to Bridge Organiza­ tions in the Private Sector and in Government Technical, Scientific, Legal, Administrative and Political Issues S. Siegel, Presiding 9:00—21. Rationale for the Symposium Content and Structure. S. Siegel. 9:15—22. Present Status and Future Direction of Communication Among Information Resources at the Systems Level and at the Science Level. M. McGill. 9:50—23. Evolution of the Concept of a Toxicology Data Management System (TDMS). S. Siegel. 10:00—24. Toxicology Data Management System (TDMS) of the National Toxicology Program (NTP). A. Konvicka. 10:30—25. Office of Toxic Substances' Computerized Toxicology Data Manage­ ment and Analysis System. B. M. Vasta. 11:00—26. Toxicology Data Management System of the WIL Research Laboratories, Inc. R. S. Hodgdon, Jr. 11:30—27. Chemical Substances Information Network (CSIN). G. Brown. 2:00—28. Panel of Scientists and Adminis­ trators to Address the Technical, Admin­ istrative, Business, Legal and Political Issues Engendered by New Kinds of Infor­ mation Resources. Panel members: M. Williams (chair) and representatives from information industry, chemical industry,, government, and legal community. THURSDAY

MORNING

Hyatt Regency, York Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on NSF-Supported Current R&D in Information Science Applicable to Chemistry

S. N. Rhodes, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—29. Graph Embedding Techniques for Substructure Identification in Organic Molecules. D. P. Agrawal, K. K. Agarwal, M. A. Lassner. 9:35—30. Computer Techniques for Com­ bined Gas Chromatography/Mass Spec­ troscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy. T. L. Isenhour, R. B. Lam, S. S. Williams. 10:00—31. Spelling Error Detection/Cor­ rection for Large Text Files. A. Zamora, J. J. Pollock. 10:30—32. Computer Use of Cutting State­ ments to Improve Retrieval. J. O'Connor. 11:00—33. Query Formulation via Subject Switching for Chemistry Data Bases. R. T. Niehoff, B. J. Brinkman, M. B. Wessells. 11:30—34. Online Searching of Chemical Abstracts on SDC by Users with Differing Experience Levels. R. F. Copeland, M. C. Corcoran, D. D. Clayton.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting zooms

CMEC DIVISION OF CHEMICAL MARKETING AND ECONOMICS S. T. Pender, Chairman J. L. Bevirt, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING Omni International, Jarrett Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Specialty Uses for Com­ modity Fibers

H. B. Tingue, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—1. Specialty Uses for Commodity Fi­ bers. R. M. Dillon. 9:40—2. Technical and Economic Implica­ tions of False Twist Insertion by the Crossed-Belt Technique. J. C. Caban. 10:05—3. Sportswear Fabrics-Denims and Corduroy—The Next Generation. E. Bekaert. . 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—4. Commodity Polyester Fibers in Specialty Industrial Applications. C. E. Hayes. 11:10—5. Specialty Nylon Fibers in the Broadloom Carpet Market. F. J. Horn.

MONDAY AFTERNOON Omni International, Jarrett Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Uses of Specialty Organic and Inorganic Fibers E. Kaswell, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—6. Thermal and Fire Resisting Materi­ als—Use for Military, Civilian and Industrial Applications. N. J. Abbott. 2:30—7. Kevlar—A New Generation of Synthetic Fibers. R. F. Gilbey. 2:55—8. Outlook for Structural Fibers. D. Brookstein. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—9. Graphite Fibers from Pitch. H. Volk. 4:00—10. Novel Uses of Gas Sorbent Fibers. D. Eagles, G. Lopatin. TUESDAY

MORNING

Omni International, Jarrett Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Chemicals and the Pulp and Paper Industry—Outlook for Chemicals from Pulp and Paper Processing—Naval Stores/ Tall Oil/Rosin organized by Division of Chemical Marketing and Economics joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chem­ istry

Ε. Ε. McSweeny, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—11. Rosin Markets, A Global Perspec­ tive. D. F. Stauffer. 9:45—12. Tall Oil FattyAcids—From An Idea to an Important Renewable Resource Re­ ality. D. R. Eagleson. 10:15—13. Turpentine, A By-Product of the Kraft Paper Industry. R. H. Mattson. 10:45—Intermission. Symposium on Chemicals and the Pulp and Paper Industry—Outlook for Specialty Chemical Use in the Pulp and Paper Industry organized by Division of Chemical Marketing and Economics joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division P. Ravenscroft, Presiding 11:00—14. Outlook for Specialty Chemicals as Problem Solvers in Papermaking. R. L. Myers. 11:30—15. Anthraquinone Pulping—New Opportunities for Specialty Chemicals in Pulping. H. H. Holton.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. Section A 9:10—8. Colloidal Properties of Uranium Omni International, Jarrett Room (1st floor, Oxide. P. H. Tewari, D. Cann, A. B. Convention Center) Campbell. Symposium on Chemicals and the Pulp and 9:40—9. Formation and Growth of Wetting SnO-Sn02 Hydrosol. J. A. Emerson, L. Paper Industry—Outlook for Commodity Graham. Chemical Use in the Pulp and Paper Industry organized by Division of Chemical Marketing 10:10—10. Characterization of Colloidal Silica in Suspension by Hydrodynamic and Economics joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division Methods. E. Killmann, J. Eisenlauer. 10:40—11. Preparation of Small, MonodisG. L. Innes, Presiding perse Platinum Particles from Microemul­ 2:00—Introductory Remarks. sions. P. Stenius, M. Boutonnet, J. 2:10—16. Sodium Chlorate in Pulp Bleaching. Kizling. J. M. Gray. 11:10—12. Comparison of Flocculated Clay 2:35—17. Oxygen in the Pulp and Paper In­ Fabrics in Nature and the Laboratory. N. R. dustry. J. G. Santangelo, V. L. Magnotta. O'Brien. 3:00—18. Hydrogen Peroxide Bleaching of 11:40—13. Preparation and Colloidal Prop­ Pulp—The Future is Bright. W. G. Strunk, erties of Fine-Particle Coal Suspensions. P. E. Levesque. A. J. Rubin, P. R. Schroeder. 3:25—Intermission. 3:40—19. Sodium Dithionite in the North Section C American Paper Market. R. W. Barton. 4:05—20. Outlook for Chlorine and Caustic Omni International, Liberty Hall (2nd floor, Soda in the Pulp and Paper Industry. L. Convention Center) Anziano. Symposium on Molecular Processes at Solid 4:30—Concluding Remarks. Surfaces: Chemical Physics and Catalysis of Oxides Section Β M. L. Knotek, Presiding Symposium on Industrial Separation and 9:00—14. Shape Selective Catalysis by Processing of Natural Fats, Oils, and Resins ZSM5 Zeolites. C. D. Chang, A. B. (Naval Stores) organized by Division of In­ Schwartz. dustrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with 9:35—15. Water, Hydroxyl Groups and Hy­ Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division (see drogen in Aluminosilicate Chemistry. G. D. page 57) Stucky. 10:10—16. Dehydration-Induced Triboluminescence in Natural Kaolin-Association with ESR Active Centers and Activity in Producing Condensation Polymerization. L. Coyne, J. G. Lawless, M. Sweeney. 10:30—17. Formation of Gas Phase 7r-Allyl Radicals from Propylene over Bismuth Oxide and 7-Bismuth Molybdate Catalysts. J. H. Lunsford, W. Martir. 11:05—18. Pillared Interlayer Clays and their Sorbent and Catalytic Properties. D. E. W. Vaughan. 11:40—19. Factors that Influence the Activity and Selectivity in Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Mixed Iron Oxide Surfaces. Η. Η. Kung, M. C. Kung. DIVISION OF COLLOID

Section Β

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

COLL

AND SURFACE CHEMISTRY J. A Mann, Chairman E. L. Fuller, Jr., Secretary B. J. Kinzig, Meeting Secretary

Section D Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 43)

Omni International, Swanton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Preparation and Properties of Colloidal Particles T. Sugimoto, Presiding 2:00—28. Effect of Synthesis Conditions on Forms and Crystal Morphology of Colloidal Fe-Oxides. U. Schwertmann. 2:25—29. Reproducibility in Hydrolytic For­ mation of Iron(lll) Hydroxides. P. H. Hsu. 2:50—30. Effect of Grinding on the Surface and Colloidal Particles of Iron Oxide. D, W. Fuerstenau, B. Bilimoria. 3:15—31. Stability of Magnetic Dispersions. A. M. Homola, I. Lerner. 3:40—32. Preparation of Monodispersed Ferric Phosphate Sols. E. Matijevic, R. B. Wilhelmy. 4:05—33. Preparation and Properties of Mo­ nodispersed Cadmium Sulfide Sols. E. Matijevic, D. M. Wilhelmy. 4:30—34. Colloidal Particles of Mercury Sulfide Sols. Y. M. Glazman. Section C Omni International, Liberty Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Chemical Physics and Catalysis of Oxides G. L. Schrader, Presiding 2:00—35. Reactivity of Rutile Surfaces. L. E. Firment, C. G. Frederick, R. P. Groff, R. V. Kasowski, W. H. Manogue, R. H. Tait, H. S. Jarrett. 2:35—36. Computerized Infrared Studies of Mo/AI 2 0 3 and Mo/Si0 2 Catalysts. J. B. Peri. 3:10—37. Surface Chemistry of Cerium Ox­ ides Studies by Photon Stimulated Desorption of Ions and Photoelectron Spec­ troscopy. B. E. Koel, G. M. Loubriel, M. L. Knotek, R. H. Stul, R. A. Rosenberg, C. C. Parks. 3:30—38. Inlet and Outlet Sites for Oxygen in Selective Oxidation Catalysts. G. W. Keulks, T. Matsuzaki, T. Arnold. 4:05—39. Photoelectron Spectroscopic Studies of the Interaction of Small Mole­ cules with Zinc Oxide Surfaces. E. I. Sol­ omon, F. R. McFeely, R. R. Gay, K. D'Amico, M. H. Nodine. 4:40—40. Interaction of Small Molecules with Stepped ZnO Surfaces. H. H. Kung, W. H. Cheng.

Section Ε MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Mimosa Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) General G. L. Haller, Presiding 9:00—1. Theory for CN~ and Ag-C Vibrational Frequency Dependence on Potential: Cy­ anide on a Silver Electrode. A. B. Ander­ son, R. Kotz, E. Yeager. 9:25—2. Small Molecule Thermal Decom­ position on Molybdenum Surfaces. S. L. Miles, S. L. Bernasek. 9:50—3. Kinetics of the Na Order-Disorder Transition on the Sodium Tungsten Bronze (100) Surface. C. J. Schramm, Jr., M. A. Langell, S. L. Bernasek. 10:15—4. Thermodynamics of Binding of Phenols to Inverted Micelles and Microemulsion Aggregates. L. J. Magid, K. Kon-no, C. A. Martin. 10:40—5. Dynamics of Reversed Micelles. K. Tamura, Z. A. Schelly. 11:05—6. Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigations of Aerosol OT Water/Oil Microemulsions. C. A. Martin, L. J. Magid. 11:30—7. Joule-Thomson Effect in Gas-Solid Dispersions. T. R. Rybolt, R. A. Pierotti. Section Β Omni International, Swanton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Preparation and Properties of Colloidal Particles E. Matijevic, Presiding

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Methods for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Omni International, Mimosa Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) General G. L. Haller, Presiding 2:00—20. Re-examination of the Effect of Sorbates on the Raman Spectrum of Gibbsite. K. C. Cunningham, M. C. Gold­ berg. 2:20—21. Temperature and Pressure Effects on the Interaction of Montmorillonite with Lathanide (III) Ions. R. D. Gonzales, S. Miller. 2:40—22. Characterization of Nickel (II) Complexes Adsorbed on Clay Minerals. J. G. Dillard, K. Vlcek. 3:00—23. Adsorption of Colbalt Complexes on Montmorillonite. C. V. Schenck, J. G. Dillard. 3:20—24. Adsorption of Colbalt Amino Acid Complexes on Sediments. D. L. Crowther, J. G. Dillard. 3:40—25. Drug Solubilization and Interactions in Bile Salt Systems. E. J. Fendler, B. L. Russell, N. R. Jones. 4:00—26. Inhibition of Crystallization and Dissolution of Calcium Sulfate Dihydrate. B. Tomazic, G. H. Nancollas. 4:20—27. Micellar Effects on Enzyme Cata­ lyzed Reactions. E. J. Fendler, W. T. Wessell, Μ. Η. Flescher.

Section D Symposium on Inorganic Reactions in Or­ ganized Media organized by Division of In­ organic Chemistry (see page 62)

10:20—43. Adsorption and Chemical Reac­ tion of Lewis Acids and Bases on the Oxi­ dized Mo (100) Surface. P. C. Stair, R. M. Henry, B. W. Walker. 11:00—44. Award Address. (ACS Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry sponsored by the Kendall Co.) The Structures and Se­ lective Catalysis of Hydrocarbons on Plat­ inum Crystal Surfaces. G. A. Somorjai. 12:10—Divisional Luncheon (see Social Events, ticket 8 for details). Section Β Omni International, Swanton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Preparation and Properties of Colloidal Particles J. Ugelstad, Presiding 8:50—45. Preparation of Surfactant-Free Polystyrene Latices with a Wide Range of Surface Charge and Electrical Double Layer on Their Surfaces. K. Furusawa. 9:15—46. Preparation of Large Monodisperse Polymer Particles. J. Ugelstad. 9:40—47. Precipitation Polymerisation of PVC from Vinyl Chloride Monomer. W. D. Cooper, R. M. Speirs. 10:05—48. Polyacrolein Microspheres. A. Rembaum, D. H. Kempner, D. C. Mclntyre. 10:30—49. Extinction Spectra of Polystyrene Latices of Various Sizes in Visible and U. V. Regions in Relation with the Measured Complex Refraction Index of the Bulk Ma­ terial. A. Watillon, F. De Prins, J. Weymeers-Dauchot. 12:10—Divisonal Luncheon (see Section A for location). Section C Omni International, Liberty Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Chemical Physics and Catalysis of Oxides G. L. Schrader, Presiding 9:00—50. Strong Interactions in SupportedMetal Catalysts. S. J. Tauster, S. C. Fung, R. T. K. Baker, J. A. Horsley. 9:35—51. Photoassisted Reactions Involving Modified Titanium Dioxide Surfaces. J. M. White, S. Sato, S. M. Fang. 10:10—52. Intrinsic and Defect Surface States on Metal Oxides: Electronic Struc­ ture and Chemisorption. V. E. Henrich. 10:45—53. Stimulated Desorption Studies of the Chemistry of Oxide Surfaces. M. L. Knotek, G. M. Loubriel, R. Stulen, B. E. Koel, G. D. Stucky, R. A. Rosenberg, A. Green, V. Rehn, C. C. Parks. 12:10—Divisional Luncheon (see Section A for location).

Section Ε

Section D

Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 43)

Symposium on Inorganic Reactions in Or­ ganized Media organized by Division of In­ organic Chemistry (see page 63) Section Ε

Section F Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Methods for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Mimosa Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) Kendall Award Symposium on Interrela­ tionships of Surface Science and Catalysis H. Heinemann, Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 8:50—41. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Studies of Chemisorption and Catalysis on Sur­ faces. J. T. Yates, Jr. 9:35—42. Variability of the Pt-Surface in Oxygen Environment. G. Comsa.

Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 44) Section F Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Elec­ tron Microscopy organized by Macromolec­ ular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Ana­ lytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Omni International, Mimosa Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) General Catalysis and Related Topics J. L. Gland, Presiding 2:00—54. Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of Carbon Monoxide Adsorbed on Supported Rhodium Catalysts. C. A. Rice, S. D. Worley, C. Curtis, J. Guin, R. Tarrer.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN 51

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2:30—55. Readsorption Effects During Temperature-Programmed Desorption from Porous Catalysts. J. B. Kiela, R. K. Herz, S. P. Marin. 3:00—56. Simultaneous Measurement of CO Oxidation Rate and CO Adsorption on Pt/ Al 2 0 3 . D. M. Haaland, F. L. Williams. 3:30—57. Pyrochlore Oxides as CO Oxidation Catalysts. R. N. Castellano, J. B. Goodenough. 4:00—58. Metalloporphyrin Charge-Transfer Complexes in Catalysis, Medicine, and Biology. J. A. Shelnutt. 4:30—59. Polymer Coating Mediated Photoelectrocatalytic Hydrogen Production. R. M. Williams, A. Rembaum, S. DiStefano. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

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Section Β Omni International, Swanton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Preparation and Properties of Colloidal Particles P. H. Tewari, Presiding 2:00—60. Experiment in a Millikan Oil Drop Apparatus with Restoring Forces Based on Growth. H. Reiss, L. Sun. 2:25—61. Preparation in a Flame Reactor and Some Properties of Sn-Sb-0 Solid Solution Aerosols. P. Vergnon, N. Zenaidi, M. Boudeulle, S. J. Teichner. 2:50—62. Quantitative Determination of Crystal Habit of Silver Halide Microcrystals by Dye Adsorption Method. T. Tani. 3:15—63. Driving Forces of Crystal-habit Formation for Monodisperse AgBr Microcrystals. T. Sugimoto. 3:40—64. Physical Aspects of Coagula­ tion—The Effect of Inhomogeneities in Flow Structure, Particles and Particle Dis­ tribution. H. H. Hahn, R. Klute. 4:05—65. Coagulation of Concentrated Dis­ persions at Low Electrolyte Concentrations. C. N. Bensley, R. J. Hunter. 4:30—66. Inner Surfaces of the Ammoniaand Methanol Catalysts. R. Hosemann. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location).

Section C Omni International, Glenmar Β Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Chemical Physics and Catalysis of Oxides M. L. Knotek, Presiding 2:00—67. Reaction Mechanisms on Transi­ tion Metal Oxide Catalysts. W. A. Goddard, III, A. K. Rappé. 2:35—68. FTIR Studies of CO on Highly Dispersed Supported Metal Catalysts. C. L. O'Young, K. Saito, J. R. Katzer. 3:10—69. Reactions and Structures of Water on Clean and Oxygen Covered Pt(111) and Fe(100). A. B. Anderson. 3:30—70. Catalysis by Transition Metal Sulfides. R. R. Chianelli, T. A. Pecoraro, S. J. Tauster. 4:05—71. Transformation of Cobalt Molybdate HDS Catalysts from the Oxide to Sulfide States Using In Situ Raman Spectroscopy. G. L. Schrader, C. P. Cheng. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location).

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Mimosa Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) General Catalysis and Related Topics R. K. Herz, Presiding 9:00—72. Temperature Dependence of Electron Beam Damage During the Titration of Adsorbed Oxygen with Hydrogen on a Ru(001) Surface. J. A. Schreifels, S. K. Shi, J. M. White. 9:30—73. Decomposition of_Ammonia on Rhodium Crystals. A. Vâvere, R. S. Hansen. 10:00—74. Adsorption of N 2 0 and 0 2 on Ag/Rh(100). W. M. Daniel, Y. Kim, H. Peebles, J. M. White. 10:30—75. Observation of an NH3-NO Complex on the Pt(111) Surface. J. L. Gland, B. A. Sexton. 11:00—76. X-ray Excited Auger Electron Spectroscopy (XAES) of Ethylene and Acetylene on Ni(100). B. E. Koel, J. M. White. 11:30—77. Modification of Chemisorptive and Catalytic Properties of Ni(100) by Electronegative Adatoms. D. W. Goodman. Section Β Omni International, Swanton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Preparation and Properties of Colloidal Particles P. Stenius, Presiding 9:00—78. On the Thermodynamics of Double Layer Forces in Open and Closed Systems. E. Ruckenstein. 9:30—79. Dependence of the Stability of Erythrocyte Suspension Layers on Particle Interaction Forces. S. N. Omenyi, R. S. Snyder, D. R. Absolom, A. W. Neumann, C. J. van Oss. 10:00—80. Preparation and Properties of Immunomicrocapsules. K. Makino, M. Arakawa, T. Kondo. 10:30—81. Micellar Growth in Solutions of Bile Salts. J. P. Kratohvil, T. M. Aminabhavi, W. P. Hsu, Y. Mukunoki, R. C. Patel. 11:00—82. Investigations on Ionic Detergents with Unusual Aggregation Behavior. H. Hoffmann, G. Platz, W. Ulbricht. 11:30—83. Calorimetric Studies of the Mi­ celle Formation in Aqueous Media. K. S. Birdi.

Section D Symposium on Chemical Physics of Catal­ ysis organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 74) WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Section D

Section A Omni International, Mimosa Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) General Catalysis and Related Topics A. Vâvere, Presiding

Section Ε

Section F Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Nu­ clear Magnetic Resonance organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

52

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Section Β Omni International, Swanton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Colloid Science and Papermaking organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division A. A. Robertson,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—90. Retention, Drainage and Sheet Formation—Review of Recent Research at SUNY—Syracuse. K. W. Britt. J. E. Unbehend. 2:35—91. Comparison of Hydrodynamic and Colloidal Forces in Paper Machine Headboxes. T. G. M. van de Ven, S. G. Mason. 3:05—92. Some Factors Affecting the Ad­ sorption and Retention of Particles in a Papermaking System. B. A. Nazir, H. Corte. 3:35—93. Surface Chemical Role of Fine Materials in the Papermaking Furnish. J. Marton. 4:10—94. Important Parameters in Devel­ oping Strength with Synthetic Additives. E. Strazdins. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location). Section C Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Poly­ mer Characterization by Chromatographic Techniques organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Or­ ganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly­ mer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) Section D Symposium on Chemical Physics of Catal­ ysis organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 74)

Section C Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Ana­ lytical Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Fourier Transform Infrared organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cel­ lulose, Paper and Textile, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

Symposium on Inorganic Reactions in Organized Media organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 63)

Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 44)

4:00—88. Ammoximation: A General Method for Preparing Oxime Catalytically from NH3, Air and Ketones. J. N. Armor, P. Zambri, R. Leming. 4:30—89. Use of Dynamic Oxygen Chemisorption for the Characterization of Fresh and Coked Hydrotreating Catalysts. S. J. Tauster, K. L. Riley. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour. Glenmar A & Β Rooms.

2:00—84. Zeolite Support Effects on Co-Ru Interactions. D. G. Blackmond, J. G. Goodwin, Jr. 2:30—85. Effect of Chromium Additive on the Properties of Zeolite Supported Platinum Catalysts. L. Tebassi, A. Ghorbel, B. Elleuch, M. Dufaux, C. Naccache, Y. B. Taarit. 3:00—86. Hydrodesulfurization of Thiophene in Naphtha on Titania-Supported Catalyst. M. Takeuchi, H. Okada, S. Matsuda, F. Nakajima, H. Matsushima. 3:30—87. Hydrocracking of Benzene and Thiophene on Iron and Nickel Containing Materials. S. K. Gangwal, W. J. McMichael.

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Mimosa Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Surface Science of Catalysis: Energetics of Surface Reactions L. E. Firment, Presiding 9:00—Opening Remarks. S. L. Bernasek. 9:05—95. Trajectory Studies of Reactions on Solid Surfaces. G. Wolken, Jr. 9:55—96. Chemical Energy Accommodation in Simple Surface-Catalyzed Reactions. B. L. Halpern, D. E. Rosner. 10:30—97. Energy Accommodation and Disposal in the Heterogeneous Recombi­ nation of H and D Atoms. G. Scoles, L. Mattera, T. R. Govers. 11:05—98. Measurement of Product Internal State Distributions for Nitrogen Atom Re­ combination on Iron Surfaces. R. P. Thorman, S. L. Bernsaek. 11:40—99. Angular and Velocity Resolved Scattering of Ar, N 2 and CH4 from Pt and W Surfaces. K. C. Janda. Section Β Omni International, Swanton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Colloid Science and Papermaking, organized by the Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division A. A. Robertson, Presiding 9:00—100. Role of Pine Xylan on the Use of Polyethyleneimine and Cationic Acrylamide Copolymer as Retention and Drainage Aids. P. Barla, C. Strom, P. Stenius.

9:30—101. Novel Dual-Polymer Retention Aids for Newsprint and Groundwood Specialties. R. H. Pelton, L. H. Allen, Η. Μ. Nugent. 10:00—102. Interaction of Sodium Polyacrylate on Calcium Carbonate and Titanium Dioxide in Aqueous Dispersions. A. Foissy, J. M. Lamarche, J. C. Reggiani, A. M'Pandou, J. Persello, G. Robert. 10:30—103. Effect of Pigment Particle Dis­ persion on the Optical Properties of Filled Papers. B. Alince. 11:00—104. Accumulation of Dissolved Solids in Recycled White Water. D. Abson, F. El-Hosseiny, J. F. Yan. 11:30—105. Fiber-Polymer Interactions in Water Saturated Fiber Assemblages. J. D. Krumpos, G. G. Allan. 12:00—106. Effect of Retention Aids on the Ζ Directional Distribution of Fines and Filler in Paper. P. Luner, H. Tanaka, W. Cote. (By title only.) Section C Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Vi­ brational Spectroscopy organized by Mac­ romolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Omni International, Mimosa Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Surface Science of Catalysis: Energetics of Surface Reactions C. Draper,

Presiding

2:00—107. Accommodation of Translational, Rotational and Vibrational Energy of Mo­ lecular Gases at Solid Surfaces. J. C. Tully. 2:50—108. Translational, Rotational and Vi­ brational Energy Accommodation of Mo­ lecular Gases with Seasoned Surfaces. G. M. Rosenblatt. 3:25—109. Laser Studies of Vibrational En­ ergy Transfer at Gas-Solid Interfaces. P. L. Houston, C. N. Plum, J. A. Misewich, R. P. Merrill. 4:00—110. Internal Energy Accommodation of CH3F, CH3CI, SF6 and Cyclopropane with Molybdenum. D. R. Anderson, S. L. Ber­ nasek. 4:35—111. Transients in the Vibrational En­ ergy Relaxation of Polyatomic Molecules at a Surface. D. F. Kelley, B. S. Rabinovitch. Section Β Omni International, Swanton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Colloid Science and Papermaking, organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division A. A. Robertson, Presiding 2:00—112. A Study of Rosin Size Retention by C-14 Labelling of Fumaropimaric Acid. T. Lindstrom. 2:50—113. Physico-chemical Properties of Tropical Hardwood Resin. I. Effect of Electrolytes on the Stability of Pitch Dis­ persions. A. Okagawa, Y. Takayama, M. Takahashi. 3:00—114. Association Colloids and Phase Behaviour of Pitch Components. P. Stenius, H. Palonen, G. Strom. 3:30—115. Measurement of Colloid Mobility by Laser Doppler Electrophoresis: The Ef­ fect of Salt Concentration on Particle Mo­ bility. J. R. Goff, P. Luner. 4:00—116. Continual Measurement of the Streaming Potential of Papermaking Stock. Β. Ε. Evans, S. R. Hemm. Section C Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Recent Advances in Specialized Techniques orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cel­ lulose, Paper and Textile, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

FRIDAY MORNING Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cel­ lulose, Paper and Textile, Organic Coatings and Plastics Cherpistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, lnc.\seepage 81)

COMP DIVISION OF COMPUTERS IN CHEMISTRY C. G. Enke, Chairman D. Edelson, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 204 (Level ID Symposium on Thermodynamic Data Bases-Formulation, Reliability, and Avail­ ability organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical In­ formation

2:00—14. An Off-The-Shelf Software Pack­ age for Networking Laboratory Computers. D. J. Macero, J. J Brosemer, D. S. Holmes, T. M. Banks. 2:20—15. A Novel Template*Program Using Distance Geometry. S. Profeta, Jr. P. K. Weiner. 2:40—16. Gas Chromatography Experiment for Visually Impaired Students. M. M. Cet­ era, R. C. Morrison, D. C. Sowell, D. Lunney. 3:10—17. Use of a Microcartridge Tape for Data and Program Storage on a Talking Microcomputer System for Visually Hand­ icapped. D. C. Sowell, D. Lunney, R. C. Morrison, G. Locklair. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—18. Microcomputer-Based Experiments for the Undergraduate Instrumental Methods Laboratory. D. J. Macero, T. M. Banks, P. V. Passalacqua.

ENVI DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY L. B. Laird, Chairman R. L. Jolley, Secretary

J. R. Morrey, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. The NBS Thermodynamic Data Bases. D. Garvin, V. B. Parker, D. D. Wagman. 9:55—2. Janaf Thermochemical Tables. M. W. Chase, P. A. Andreozzi, J. R. Downey, R. A. McDonald, E. A. Valenzuela. 10:40—Intermission. 10:55—3. Thermodynamics Research Center (Texas A&M). K. R. Hall, R. C. Wilhoit. 11:40—4. Thermodynamic Data Compilation of the Bureau of Mines. L. B. Pankratz.

J. Hilsenrath, Presiding 2:00—5. Physico-Chemical Data Base Efforts in Japan and Our Activities on JUST-AESOPP. K. Yajima. 2:45—6. Thermodynamic Data Bases in the United States: Plans and Progress. D. R. Lide, Jr. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—7. Inorganic and Thermochemical Data Bases in West Europe. T. I. Barry. 4:30—8. The DECHEMA Thermodynamic Data System and Other Data Base Work in Germany. R. Eckermann.

TUESDAY MORNING World Congress Center, Room 204 (Level ID Symposium on Thermodynamic Data Bases-Formulation, Reliability and Avail­ ability organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical In­ formation

C. B. AI cock, Presiding 9:00—9. Survey of Data Activities in the Field of Thermodynamic Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures. H. V. Kehiaian. 9:45—10. PPDS-Physical Property Data Service. E. Beryl. 10:05—11. Compact Storage of Thermody­ namic Data in Computer Files. R. D. Freeman. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—12. An Equation of State for Water. J. S. Gallagher, L. Haar, G. S. Kell. 11:05—13. EQUILIB—A Computer Program to Predict Complex Aqueous Equilibria from 0 to 300°C. J. R. Morrey.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 204 (Level N) General

J. R. Morrey, Presiding

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Searching of Water by Granular Activated Carbon. Theory of Car­ bon Adsorption

I. H. Suffet, Presiding 9:00—1. Treatment of Water by Activated Carbon—Introduction. M. J. McGuire, I. H. Suffet. 9:10—2. Role of Activated Carbon in EPA's Regulatory Program. J. A. Cotruvo. 9:45—3. Adsorption of Multicomponent Liq­ uids from Water onto Activated Carbon: Convenient Estimation Methods. M. Manes, M. Greenbank. 10:05—4. Characteristic Curve for Adsorption from Dilute Solutions on Heterogeneous Adsorbents. A. L. Myers, S. Sircar. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—5. Selective Adsorption of Organic Homologues onto Activated Carbon from Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Solvopriobic Interaction Approach—III Branching and Predictions. G. Altshuler, G. Belfort. 11:10—6. Estimating Single-Solute Equilib­ rium Adsorption from Aqueous Solution. W. B. Arbuckle. 11:40—Panel Discussion.

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Energy and Environmental Chemistry II. Fugitive Hydrocarbon Emis­ sions

D. D. Rosebrook, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—7. Historical Perspective on Control of Volatile Organic Compound Leaks from Processing Equipment. K. C. Hustvedt. 9:25—8. Statistical Treatment of Fugitive Hydrocarbon Emissions Data. L. P. Pro­ vost. 9:50—9. Fugitive Emission Testing at the Kosovo Coal Gasification Facility. R. L. Honerkamp. 10:10—10. Fugitive Hydrocarbon Emissions from Petroleum Production Operations. W. S. Eaton, F. G. Bush, III, J. Coster, J. C. Delwiche. 10:35—Intermission. 10:45—11. Reduction of Fugitive Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions by on-line Maintenance. R. C. Weber.

11:10—12. Response Factors for VOC Ana­ lyzers Used in Fugitive Emission Monitoring. G. E. Harris, B. A. Tichenor. 11:30—13. Airborne Hydrocarbon Emissions from Landfarming of Refinery Wastes—A Laboratory Study. J. L Randall, B. F. Jones, E. W. Cunningham.

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granular Activated Carbon. Modeling and Adsorption Interactions

A. Benedek, Presiding Section C Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-l. FGD Scrubbers and Dry Re­ moval Systems organized by Division of In­ dustrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. {seepage 56) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granular Activated Carbon. Structure and Surface Effects M. J. McGuire, Presiding 2:00—14. Effects of Particle Surface To­ pography on the Adsorption Dynamics of Granular Adsorbents. W. J. Weber, Jr., B. van Vliet. 2:25—15. Slow Adsorption Phenomenon. A. Benedek. 2:50—16. Studies in Some Physico-Chemical Aspects Affecting Carbon Adsorption from the Aqueous Phase. B. R. Puri. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—17. Effect of Activated Carbon's Sur­ face Characteristics on the Adsorption of Chloroform from Aqueous Solution. C. Ishizaki, I. Marti, M. Ruiz. 3:50—18. Carbon-Sulfur Compounds—A Novel Regenerable Adsorbent for Water Treatment. C. H. Chang, D. W. Savage, J. M. Longo. 4:15—19. Effects of Thermal Regeneration on Activated Carbon Properties—A Critical Review of Traditional Physical and Chem­ ical Tests. F. K. McGinnis, III, G. Horwitz. 4:40—Panel Discussion. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) General

R. A. Mi near, Presiding 2:00—20. Total Organic Halide: Occurrence, Stability and Process Control in Drinking Waters. R. K. Sorrell. 2:25—21. Removal of Chemical Carcinogens from Water Using Activated Carbon. W. G. Light. 2:55—22. A Rapid Method for the Analysis of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Soils. J. E. Henderson, R. R. Whitney, C. K. Tanaka, S. C. Madden. 3:20—23. Analysis of a New Class of Poten­ tially Hazardous and Ubiquitous Anthropo­ genic Pollutants jn Drinking Waters. L. H. Keith, R. C. Hall, J. E. Henderson, R. C. Hanisch, R. G. Landolt. 3:45—Intermission. 3:55—24. Chromatographic Speciation of Methylstannanes in the Chesapeake Bay by Element-Specific Detection. J. A. Jackson, W. R. Blair, F. E. Brinckman, W. R. Iverson. 4:20—25. Metabolism of 2,6-Dimethylnaphthalene in Starry Flounder Exposed to Naphthalene and p-Cresol. E. H. Gruger, Jr., J. V. Schnell, P. S. Fraser, D. W. Brown, D. C. Malins. 4:40—26. Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans in the Toxic Rice-Bran Oils Which Caused PCB Poi­ soning in Taiwan. P. H. Chen, Κ. Τ. Chang, Y. D. Lu.

9:00—27. Performance Predictions for Re­ moval of Toxic and Carcinogenic Com­ pounds from Water Supplies by Adsorption. W. J. Weber, Jr., M. Pirbazari. 9:25—28. Controlling Mechanisms for Granular Activated Carbon Adsorption Columns in the Liquid Phase. M. R. Rosene. 9:50—29. Prediction of Activated Carbon Column Performance for Pure Compounds from Equilibrium and Kinetic Batch Data. L. Van der Biest, C. Ishizaki. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—30. Recent Advances in Multicom­ ponent Adsorption Calculation. C. Tien. 10:50—31. Adsorption Equilibrium and Ki­ netics for a Chloroform-Humic Acid Sys­ tem. G. R. Mueller, M. M. Ghosh. 11:15—32. Adsorption Equilibria in Multicomponent Mixtures. B. R. Frick, H. Sontheimer. 11:40—Panel Discussion.

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) ACS Award Symposium for Creative Ad­ vances in Environmental Sciences and Technology in Honor of Philip W. West

L. B. Laird, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—33. Award address. (ACS Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Sci­ ences and Technology sponsored by Air Products & Chemicals.) Essentiality of Contamination and Imperfection. P. W. West. 9:55—34. Determination of Trace (ppb) Levels of Residual Vinyl Chloride Monomer in Polyvinyl Chloride. G. C. Gaeke. 10:25—35. Determination of Atmospheric S0 2 without Tetrachloromercurate II. A Fluorescent Version of the Schiff Reaction. P. K. Dasgupta. 10:55—Intermission. 11:00—36. Occupational Exposure from Phenol and its Evaluation by Means of a Passive Dosimeter. S. L. Sachdev. 11:30—37. Permeation Sampling of Methyl Chloride and Dichlorofluoromethane. K. D. Reiszner.

Section C Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-lll. Thermodynamics and Solid Dissolution organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. {see page 56) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granular Activated Carbon. Biological Ef­ fects

W. J. Weber, Presiding

2:00—38. Comparison of Adsorptive and Biological TOC Removal by GAC in Potable Water Treatment. S. W. Maloney, K. Ban­ croft, I. H. Suffet, P. R. Cairo. 2:25—39. Evaluation of Ozone with Granular Activated Carbon for the Reduction of Or­ ganic Compounds in Treated Delaware River Water. H. M. Neukrug, P. R. Cairo, W. G. Richards, J. T. Coyle, J. P. Santo, J. Section C Ballestero, I. H. Suffet. 2:50—40. Ozone-BAC Pilot Plant Experience Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas with High Total Organic Carbon Ground­ Desulfurization-ll. Liquid Phase Reactions water. P. R. Wood, F. Z. Parsons, R. F. organized by Division of Industrial and Engi­ Lang, H. J. Harween, I. L. Payan, M. C. Ruiz, neering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel E. D. Ravelo, J. DeMarco, R. Coates, D. Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see Waddell, R. Diaz, M. S. Goldberg, F. W. page $6) Curtis. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—41. Microbial Population Dynamics on Granular Activated Carbon used for Treat­ ing Surface Impounded Groundwater. R. M. Donlan, K. E. Shull, T. L. Yohe. The Committee on Meetings & 3:50—42. Bacteriological Activity in Activated Expositions requests that there be no Carbon Filters and Its Influence on The smoking in meeting rooms Water Quality. J. G. den Blanken.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

53

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4:15—43. Pilot Scale Evaluation of Ozone/ GAC Combinations for THM Precursor Removal. W. H. Glaze, J. Wallace, K. Dickson, D. Wilcox, K. R. Johannsson, B. Scalf, R. Noack. 4:40—Panel Discussion. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour. 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 16 for details).

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Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) General

R. L. Jolley, Presiding 2:00—44. Optimization of Gas Chromatog­ raphy—Mass Spectrometry Data Acquisi­ tion, Manipulation and Processing from Complex Environmental Samples. A. S. Nakagawa, C. A. Kieda, H. G. Nowicki. 2:25—45. Oxidation of Molecular Tritium by Intact Soild. C. W. Sweet, C. E. Murphy, Jr. 2:50—46. High Volume Sampling of Chlori­ nated Hydrocarbons in Urban Air using Three Adsorbents. W. N. Billings, T. F. Bidleman. 3:15—47. Frontal Movement of PCB Vapors Through a Polyurethane Foam Column. N. F. Burdick, T. F. Bidleman. 3:40—Intermission. 3:50—48. Validation and Application of a Rapid Determination of BaP from Forest Fire Smoke by HPLC. J. D. White. 4:15—49. Hyperkeratotic Activity from the Photolysis Products of the Inactive 2,2',4,4',5,5'-Hexabromobiphenyl. R. H. Hill, D. G. Patterson, L. L. Needham, D. L. Orti, R. D. Kimbrough, J. A. Liddle. 4:40—50. Treatment of Form Forming Firefighting Wastewater with the Fluidized Granular Activated Carbon Anaerobic Bioreactor. M. T. Suidan, E. S. K. Chian, W. H. Cross, D. B. Chan. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour. 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A for details). WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granulated Activated Carbon. Pilot Studies J. DeMarco, Presiding 9:00—51. Experimental Error Estimates As­ sociated with Pilot-Scale Investigations of Trace Organic Removals. M. J. McGuire, T. S. Tanaka, M. K. Davis. 9:25—52. Performance Evaluation of GAC Pilot Columns in THM Removal at Louisville, KY. W. J. Doyle, G. C. Holdren. 9:50—53. Pilot Plant Study on the Use of Chloride Dioxide and Granular Activated Carbon. B. W. Lykins, J. DeMarco. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—54. A Comparison of Granular Acti­ vated Carbon and a Carbonaceous Resin for Removal of Volatile Halogenated Or­ ganics from a Groundwater. R. S. Chroback, P. C. Chrostowski, I. H. Suffet. 10:50—55. Experimental Studies of the Dis­ tribution Profiles of Substances Adsorbed on Fixed Beds of Granular Activated Car­ bon. K. Alben, K. Shpirt. 11:15—56. Monitoring of Granular Activated Carbon Filters: Comparison of American and French Experience. J. Mallevialle, F. Fiessinger, I. H. Suffet, P. R. Cairo. 11:40—Panel Discussion.

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Energy and Environmental Chemistry II. Acid Rain

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granular Activated Carbon. Pilot and Large Scale Studies

A. A. Stevens, Presiding 2:00—62. Removal of Chlorinated Brominated and lodinated Nonvolatile Compounds by GAC-Filtration. J. J. Rook. 2:25—63. Production of Volatile Halogenated Compounds upon Chlorination After Carbon Filtration. A. Graveland, J. C. Kruithof, P. A. N. M. Nuhm. 2:50—64. Interaction of Adsorption and Bioactivity in Full Scale Activated Carbon Filters: The Mont-Valerien Experiment. F. Fiessinger, J. Mallevialle, A. Benedek. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—65. Dynamic Behavior of Organics Removal in Full-Scale Granular Activated Carbon Columns. R. S. Summers, P. V. Roberts. 3:50—66. Utility of Pilot Scale Granular Ac­ tivated Carbon Configuration in Terms Relative to Full-Scale Implementation. N. V. Brodtmann, Jr., W. E. Koffskey, J. DeMarco. 4:15—67. Experiences in Operating a Full Scale Granular Activated Carbon System with On-Site Reactivation. J. DeMarco, R. Miller, C. Cole, D. C. Davis. 4:40—Panel Discussion.

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Energy and Environmental Chemistry II. Acid Rain

G. E. Glass, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—68. Acidity and Related Minerals in Precipitation Across Florida: Spatial and Temporal Variations. P. L. Brezonik, C. D. Hendry, E. S. Edgerton. 2:35—69. pH and Alkalinity Changes During Snowmelt in Streams and Lakes of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) and Voyageurs National Park (VNP) of Northern Minnesota. G. E. Glass, L. J. Heinis, L. Anderson, C. Sandberg, J. Use, J. Rogalla, F. Boettcher, T. Roush. 3:00—70. Acid Precipitation Impact As. sessment in Minnesota Derived from Cur­ rent and Historical Data. J. D. Thornton, M. E. Hora, S. A. Heiskary. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—71. Chronology of Atmospheric De­ position of Acid and Metals in New England, Based on the Record in Lake Sediments. S. A. Norton, S. E. Johnston, C. T. Hess, R. B. Davis. 4:10—72. Critique of Methods to Measure Dry Deposition: U.S. EPA Workshop Summary. J. L. Durham, Β. Β. Hicks, M. L. Wesley. 4:40—73. Acid Precipitation: The Interface Between Biologists and Chemists. R. A. Linthurst, Ε. Β. Cowling. THURSDAY MORNING

Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) General

J. I. Teasley, Presiding 9:00—79. Oxidation of Sulfur Dioxide in Aqueous Ammonium Sulfate Aerosols Containing Manganese as a Catalyst. D. J. Kaplan, D. M. Himmelblau, C. Kanaoka. 9:25—80. Estimation of Octanol/Water Par­ tition Coefficients for Organic Pollutants Using Reverse-Phase HPLC. B. McDuffie. 9:50—81. Fate of T.E.L. in Sea Water. J. W. Robinson, I. A. L. Rhodes, E. Kiesel. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—82. Development and Application of Chemical Actinometers for Solar Irradiance. T. Mill, D. Dublin, J. Davenport. 10:50—83. Negative Chemical Ionization Screening for Toxic Substances in Mother's Milk. J. E. Thean, R. C. Dougherty. 11:15—84. Photolysis of 2,4-6-Trinitrotoluene in Dilute Water Solution: Kinetics and Mechanisms. W. R. Mabey, T. Mill, A. Baraze.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) General L. H. Keith, Presiding 2:00—85. Inorganic Tracers of Petroleum Drilling Fluid Dispersion in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico. R. P. Trocine, J. H. Trefry, D. B. Meyer. 2:25—86. Organic Tracers of Petroleum Drilling Fluid Dispersal in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico. B. A. Weichert, R. H. Pierce, Jr., D. C. Anne, F. I. Saksa. 2:45—87. Potential Impact of Drilling Fluids on the Texas Flower Garden. J. H. Trefry, R. P. Trocine, R. H. Pierce, Jr., B. A. We­ ichert, D. B. Meyer, S. R. Piotrowicz. 3:10—88. Vessel-Related Inputs of Copper to the Coastal Zone. M. Sadoughi, J. H. Trefry. 3:35—89. Particle Size Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in Coke Oven Emissions in the Submicron Range. A. H. Miguel.

P. V. Roberts, Presiding 9:00—74. Performance and Cost of GAC Treatment for Trace Organic Removal. R. A. Hyde, T. Burke, T. F. Zabel. 9:25—75. Economic Comparison of Granular Activated Carbon and Anion Exchange Resin for Trihalomethane Precursor Re­ moval. S. J. Medlar, S. A. Turner, W. Keene. 9:50—76. GAC Treatment Designs and Costs for Controlling Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater. A. F. Hess, P. L. Busch, M. J. Barnes, J. E. Dyksen.

Section Β Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 43) Section C Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-l. FGD Scrubbers and Dry Re­ moval Systems organized by Division of In­ dustrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Environmental Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. {see page 56) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on Oxidative Degradation of Coal

R. E. Winans, Presiding 2:00—7. Oxidations of Illinois No. 6 Coal at and Below 60 C. F. R. Mayo, L. A. Pavelka. 2:30—8. Fourier Transform Infrared Studies of Coal Oxidation. P. C. Painter, C. A. Rhodes. 3:00—9. Thin Section Microscopic Studies of the Diffusion of Oxygen into Coal at Ele­ vated Temperatures. D. Brenner. 3:30—10. Chemical Studies of the Ames Oxydesulfurization Process. T. G. Squires, C G. Venier, L. W. Chang, T. E. Schmidt. 4:00—11. HPLC and Phase Transfer Catalysis in the Analysis of Oxidation Products of Lignite Liquids and Model Compounds. E. S. Olson, B. W. Farnum. Section Β Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 43)

Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-ll. Liquid Phase Reactions organized by Division of Industrial and Engi­ neering Chemistry joint with Divisions of En­ vironmental and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 56)

DIVISION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on the Role of Hydrogen in Coal Chemistry M. Siskin, Presiding

R. C. Neavel, Chairman M. Farcasiu, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

10:10—3. Oxidation .of Coal: A Mechanistic Puzzle. S. K. Chakrabartty. A Novel Method for Controlled Oxidation. Β. Μ. Benjamin, V. F. Raaen. 10:40—4. A Novel Method for Controlled Oxidation. B. M. Benjamin. V. F. Raaen. 11:10—5. The Fate of Sulfur Functions on Oxidation with Peroxytrifluoroacetic Acid. C. G. Venier, T. G. Squires, Y-Y. Chen, J. C. Shei, R. M. Metzler, B. F. Smith. 11:40—6. Evidence for Long Chain Aliphatic Structures in Sporinite Kerogen by Alkaline Potassium Permanganate Oxidation. J. Allen, S. R. Larter.

Section C

FUEL

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granular Activated Carbon. Design and Economic Factors

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—57. Interactive Effects of Ozone, Sul­ phur Dioxide, and Nitrogen Oxides on Vegetation: Potential Confounding by Acidic Precipitation. J. M. Skelly, B. I. Chevone. 9:50—58. Acidification of Rain in the Pres­ ence of S0 2> H 2 0 2 , 0 3 and HN0 3 . J. L. Durham, J. H. Overton. 10:20—59. Relationships of Chemical Wet Deposition to Precipitation Amount and Meteorological Conditions. G. S. Raynor, J. V. Hayes. 10:45—Intermission.

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Section Β

Section A

G. E. Glass, Presiding

54

10:15—Intermission. 10:25—77. Trace Organic Chemical Removal from Contaminated Groundwater with Granular Activated Carbon. R. P. O'Brien, D. M. Jordan, W. R. Musser. 10:50—78. Design Considerations for GAC Adsorbers. B. A. Carnes. 11:15—Panel Discussion.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Section Β

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10:55—60. A Mass-Balance Atmospheric Sulfur Model for Florida. E. S. Edgerton, P. L. Brezonik. 11:20—61. Some Evidence for Acid Rain Resulting from HCI Formation During an Expendable Vehicle Launch from Kennedy Space Center. B. C. Madsen.

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on Oxidative Degradation of Coal

R. E. Winans, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Oxidative Fragmentation of Coals. N. C. Deno, K. W. Curry, A. D. Jones, R. D. Minard, T. Potter, W. J. Rakitsky, K. Wagner. 9:40—2. Oxidative Degradation Studies and Modern Concepts of the Formation and Transformation of Organic Constituents of Coals and Sedimentary Rocks. R. Hayatsu, R. E. Winans, R. L. McBeth, R. G. Scott, L. P. Moore.

9:00—12. The Role of Hydrogen in UK Coal Liquefaction. G. O. Davies, D. F. Wil­ liams. 9:40—13. Production of Distillate-Oils from German Coals. I. Romey, F. Friedrich, B. Strobel. 10:15—14. Interactions Between Solvent Components, Molecular Hydrogen and Mineral Matter During Coal Liquefaction. F. J. Derbyshire, P. Varghese, D. D. Whitehurst. 10:50—15. Evaluation of the Donor Ability of Coal Liquefaction Solvents. B. C. Bockrath, R. P. Noceti.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

11:25—16. Radical Pathways of Coal Disso­ lution in Donor Media During Reactions of Coals and Specifically Deuterated Tetralin. J. A. Franz, D. M. Camaioni. Section Β Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 44)

Section C Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-lll. Thermodynamics and Solid Dissolution organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Environmental Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 56)

9:30—24. Application of On-Line Multidi­ mensional Chromatography to Solvent Refined Coal. J. A. Apffel, T. M. Chen, Η. Μ. McNair. 9:55—25. Coupled Column Chromatography Used for the Analysis of Coal Derived Liq­ uids. E. Katz, K. Ogan. 10:20—26. Characterization of High Boiling Components in Fischer-Tropsch Liquids. F. P. DiSanzo. 10:45—27. Calibration Curve for GPC Anal­ ysis of Asphalts. B. Brule. 11:10—28. Separation and Chemistry of Lignite Derived Preasphaltenes by GPC and NMR. R. J. Baltisberger, K. M. Patel, N. F. Woolsey. 11:40—29. The Use of Microreticular Resin for Separation of Coal Conversion Process Wastewater. J. I. S. Tang, F. K. Kawahara. 12:10—Divisional Luncheon (see Social Events, ticket 19 for details).

Section Β

Section D Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Geo­ chemistry (Probationary) (see page 74)

Symposium on Residuum Upgrading and Coking organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 74)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Section Ε Ε. V. Murphree Award Symposium Honoring G. Alex Mills: Advanced Catalytic Processes for Synthetic Fuels organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 57) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on the Role of Hydrogen in Coal Chemistry

M. Siskin, Presiding 1:30—17. An Isotopic Investigation of the Chemistry of Coal Hydroliquefaction. L. A. Heredy, R. P. Skowronski, J. J. Ratto, I. B. Goldberg. 2:05—18. Model Pathways for Hydrogen Transfer in Coal Liquefaction. P. S. Virk, D. H. Bass, M. J. Garry. 2:40—19. Participation of Hydrogen in the Hydrogenolysis and Hydrogénation of Coal-Related Codel Compounds Catalyzed by Zinc Halides. A. T. Bell, T. J. Fredrick. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—20. Hydrogenolysis of Dilute Solutions of Dibenzyl in Toluene at Coal Liquefaction Conditions. L. W. Vernon, R. Livingston, H. Zeldes. 3:50—21. ESR Study of Bibenzyl During Pyrolysis with and Without Hydrogen. R. Livingston, H. Zeldes, L. W. Vernon. 4:15—Joint Discussion. 4:45—22. Hydrogen-Carbon Monoxide Reactions in Low Rank Coal Liquefaction. C. L. Knudson, W. G. Willson, G. G. Baker. 5:30—Divisional Business Meeting.

Section Β Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Geo­ chemistry (Probationary) (see page 74) Section C Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 44) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on Chromatography of Coal Derived Products L. T. Taylor, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—23. Coal Classification by HPLC and Three-Dimensional Detection. E. S. Yeung, M. J. Sepaniak.

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on Chromatography of Coal Derived Products L. T. Taylor, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—30. Separation and Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Alkylphenols in Coal Derived Solvents. R. J. Hurtubise, T. W. Allen, A. Hussain, H. F. Silver. 2:05—31. A Comparative Study of HPLC Column Packings for the Separation of Aromatic and Polar Compounds in Fossil Fuel Liquids. A. Matsunaga, S. Kusayanagi. 2:35—32. Reverse Phase Liquid Chromato­ graphic Separation of Coal Liquefaction Solvents. F. P. Burke, R. A. Winschel, T. C. Pochapsky. 3:05—33. A Computer Data Reduction Sys­ tem for Tabulating Data from GC Runs and Correlating Changes in Product Composi­ tion with Process Conditions or Mutageni­ city. L. Raphaelian. 3:35—34. Liquid Chromatographic Class Separation and High Resolution Gas Chro­ matography of Shale Oil Polar Compounds. P. C. Uden, R. J. Crowley, W. F. Joyce, S. Siggia. 4:05—35. Chromatographic Separation of Functional Group Classes from Process Derived Recycle Solvents. G. A. Odoerfer, L. R. Rudnick, D. D. Whitehurst. 4:35—36. Specific Metal Detection in the Size Exclusion Separation of Solvent Re­ fined Coal. D. W. Hausler, L. T. Taylor. Section Β Symposium on Residuum Upgrading and Coking organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 74) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) General

J. W. Larsen, Presiding 9:00—37. Pyrolysis/(GC)2/MS as a Coal Characterization Technique. Β. Μ. Hughs, J. Troost, R. Liotta. 9:30—38. Effects of Calcium Minerals on the Rapid Pyrolysis of a Bituminous Coal. H. D. Franklin, W. A. Peters, J. B. Howard. 10:00—39. An Investigation of Yields and Characteristics of Tars Released During the Thermal Decomposition of Coal. J. D. Freihaut, D. J. Seery. 10:30—40. Coal Conversion in CO/H 2 0 Systems. D. S. Ross, Q..C. Nguyen. 11:00—41. Effect of Preoxidation on Reac­ tivity of Chars in Steam. K. Gomi, Y. Hishinuma.

Section Β Symposium on Production and Conversion of Bioresources to Energy organized by Di­ vision of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 42)

4:10—10. Observation of a Charge Transfer Band in Copper (II)—Fulvic and Humic Acid Solutions. R. L. Wershaw, D. M. McKnight, D. J. Pinckney. 4:40—Concluding Remarks. TUESDAY MORNING

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Geology and Geochemistry of Coal

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) General

F. O. Simon, I. A. Breger, Co-Chairmen F. O. Simon, Presiding

J. W. Larsen, Presiding 2:00—42. A Study of Deactivation and Re­ generation of Catalysts Used in the LCFining of Solvent Refined Coal. C. W. Curtis, J. A. Guin, R. Nalitham. A. Moshin, J. D. Potts, Κ. Ε. Hastings. 2:30—43. The Effects of Catalysts on SCT Liquefaction. M. G. Thomas, T. C. Bickel, B. Granoff. 3:00—44. ^Recent Developments in High Gradient Magnetic Separation for Coal Desulfurization. Y. A. Liu. 3:30—45. Investigation of the High-Temper­ ature Behavior of Coal Ash in Reducing and Oxidizing Atmospheres. G. P. Huffman, F. E. Huggins, G. R. Dunmyre. 4:00—46. Coal Structure Cleavage Mecha­ nisms: Scission of Diphenylmethane and Diphenyl Ether Linkages to Hydroxylated Rings. D. G. McMillen, W. C. Ogier, D. S. Ross.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—11. Geologic Factors in Coal Chemis­ try. J. A. Simon. 10:00—12. Coal Quality Information in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Coal Resources Data System (NCRDS). A. L. Medlin, K. K. Krohn, M. D. Carter. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—13. Natural Combustion of CoalRelease of C0 2 and Other Compounds to the Atmosphere. J. R. Herring. 11:10—14. Peat from the Everglades of Florida: A Study of the Origin of Coal and of Natural Gas. I. A. Breger, M. R. Krasnow, J. C. Chandler. 11:40—15. Mineral Associations of Chalcophile Elements in Illinois Basin Coal Wastes. E. M. Wewerka, J. M. Williams.

Section Β Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 74)

GEOC

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Geology and Geochemistry of Coal I. A. Breger, Presiding

DIVISION OF GEOCHEMISTRY (PROBATIONARY)

2:00—16. Organic/Inorganic Interaction: Its Geochemical Significance in Lignitic Coal Seams. R. N. Miller. 2:30—17. Organic Sulfur in Coal: Relationship to Macérais, Rank, and Depositional Environments. R. Raymond, Jr., T. D. Davies.. 3:00—18. Identification and Geochemical* Significance of Some Aromatic Components of Coal. C. M. White, N. C. Li, M. L. Lee. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—19. Aromatic Structures in Coal Macérai Kerogens and Solvent Extracts. S. Larter, J. Allan. 4:10—20. Solid-State 13C NMR Studies of Coalified Logs: A Revised Concept of the Early Coalification Process. P. G. Hatcher, I. A. Breger, G. E. Maciel. 4:40—Concluding Remarks.

D. S. Montgomery, Chairman T. F. Yen, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Humic Substances in Coals, Soils, and Aquatic Environments

I. A. Breger, M. Schnitzer, CoChairme η I. A. Breger, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Laser Pyrolysis of Humic Materials. W. J. Verzino, N. E. Vanderbough, R. E. Hermes. 9:40—2. Studies of the Origin of Humic Substances Using NMR. P. G. Hatcher, I. A. Breger, G. E. Maciel, L. E. Dennis. 10:10—3. Characterization of Functional Groups in Humic Acids and Fulvic Acids. C. Steelink, M. A. Mikita, R. L. Wershaw. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—4. Molecular Shapes and Weights of Humic and Fulvic Acids. M. Schnitzer. 11:20—5. Calculation of Molecular Weights of Humic Substances from Colligative Data: Application to Aquatic Humus and its Mo­ lecular Size Fractions. J.H. Reuter, Ε. Μ. Perdue.

Section Β Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 74)

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Advances in Geochemical Techniques for Oil Exploration

F. P. Miknis, T. F. Yen, Co-Chairmen F. P. Miknis, Presiding

Morris Schnitzer, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—21. Vertical Migration Mechanism in Petroleum Geochemical Exploration. M. J. Davidson. 9:40—22. Organic Geochemistry and Petro­ leum Exploration—Problems? L. C. Price. 10:10—23. Isotope Geochemistry of Shallow Groundwater as an Indication of Active Gas Migration. R. J. Drozd, J. Krushin, H. W. Rauch, D. Newton, D. A. Jeffrey. 10:40—Intermission.

2:00—6. Occurrence of Fulvic and Humic Acids in Uncontaminated Ground Waters. R. L. Malcolm, E. M. Thurman. 2:30—7. Nature and Source of Humic Sub­ stances Isolated from Surface Waters. E. M. Thurman, R. L. Malcolm 3:00—8. Origin and Nature of Humic Sub­ stances in the Waters of the Amazon River Basin. J. A. Leenheer. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—9. Metal Ion Complexation of Isolated Fulvic Acid and Natural Water Samples. J. H. Weber.

I Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

55

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10:50—24. Organic Matter of Marine Sedi­ ments Studied by a Thermal Analysis-Gas Chromatography Technique. J. K. Whelan, J. M. Hunt. 11:20—25. Oil-Oil Correlations by Fluores­ cence Spectrophotometry. G. G. Janezic, M. Rodgers, R. C. Burruss, D. A. Jeffrey. T, J . Weismann, Presiding 2:00—26. Pyrolysis as a Geochemical Screening Technique in Oil Exploration. J. M. Patterson, W. F. Kardosh, D. A. Jef­ frey. 2:30—27. Perylene in Marine Sediments: A Potentially Useful Geothermal Stress Indi­ cator of Problematic Source. E. W. Baker, J. W. Louda. 3:00—28. Correlation of Well Gas Analysis with Hydrocarbon Seep Data. J. C. Wil­ liams, R. J. Mousseau, T. J. Weismann. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—29. Helium and Hydrogen Soil Gas Anomalies Associated with Deep or Active Faults. V. T. Jones, R. J. Pirkle. 4:10—30. Use of Compositional Indicators in Prediction of Petroleum Production Poten­ tial. G. J. Pazdersky, R. J. Drozd, V. T. Jones, T. J. Weismann.

10:00—4. Eminent Women Chemists in the South. N. W. Moy. 10:20—5. Eminent Black Chemists in the South. W. L. Hawkins. 10:40—6. Eminent Chemists in Texas. M. W. Hanson. 11:00—7. Eminent Chemists in Louisiana. J. C. Arthur. 11:20—8. Eminent Chemists in Mississippi. W. E. Pittman. 11:40—9. Eminent Chemists in Alabama. E. S. Carmichael. C. H. Fisher, Presiding 2:00—10. Eminent Deceased Chemists in Kentucky. Ε. Ε. Byrn. 2:20—11. Eminent Chemists in Tennessee. D. S. Tarbell. 2:40—12. Eminent Chemists in Georgia. H. C. McBay. 3:00—13. Eminent Chemists in Florida. H. P. Schultz. 3:20—14. Eminent Chemists in South Caro­ lina. H. G. Spencer. 3:40—15. Eminent Chemists in North Caro­ lina. M. M. Bursey. 4:00—16. Virginia's Eminent Deceased Chemist. C. H. Fisher.

THURSDAY MORNING

TUESDAY MORNING

Hyatt Regency, Falcon Ballroom (Terrace Level) Symposium on Advances in Geochemical Techniques for Oil Exploration F. P. Miknis, T. F. Yen, Co-Chairmen E. W. Baker, Presiding 9:00—31. Potential Geochemical Applica­ tions of a New NMR Well Logging Tech­ nique. J. A. Jackson, J. A. Brown. 9:30—32. Application of Lanthanide NMR Shift Reagent for Functional Group—Mat­ uration Correlation of Shale Asphaltenes. T. F. Yen, F-F. Shue. 10:00—33. New Biological Markers in Atha­ basca Asphaltene Revealed by Mild Ther­ molysis. D. S. Montgomery, N. Samman, T. Ignasiak, O. P. Strausz. 10:30—34. An Interlaboratory Study of Or­ ganic Geochemical Methods. Applications to Source Rock Studies. R. L. Kaufman. 10:45—35. 13C NMR Measurements of the Genetic Potentials of Oil Shales. F. P. Miknis, M. A. Mast, G. E. Maciel. General D. S. Montgomery, Presiding

World Congress Center, Room 307 (Level II) General Ο. Β. Ramsay, Presiding 9:00—17. Robert D. Billinger: Chemist, His­ torian, Educator (1899-1980). N. D. Heindel, W. C. Broad. 9:15—18. Pioneering in Early Chemical In­ dustry. F. E. Wall. 9:40—19. Centennial-Chemists at the Uni­ versity of Wisconsin in Madison. A. J. Ihde. 10:00—20. Rachel Lloyd and Helen Michael, Nineteenth Century American Woman Chemists. A. T. Tarbell, D. S. Tarbell. 10:25—21. Was There a Conspiracy When Kekulé's First German Benzene Publication in Annalen 137 (1866) was Frequently Listed as Published in 1865? J. H. Wotiz, S. Rudofsky. 10:55—22. Nitroglycerine: A Chemist's Chance Observation Leads to a Valulable Family of Therapeutics. N. I. Foster. 11:15—23. Synthetic Medieval Blue Pigments II. Silver Blue and Copper Blues. M. V. Orna. 11:35—24. The Evaluation of History of Chemistry Museums and Exhibits. J. H. Wotiz.

11:10—36. A Technical Databook for Geo­ thermal Energy Utilization. S. L. Phillips, R. J. Otto, H. Ozbek, M. Tavana. 11:35—37. X-Ray Photoelectron Studies of Volcanic Ash from Mt. St. Helens. D. L. Perry, A. F. White, L. V. Benson.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Perspectives Lecture organized by Divisions of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 48)

Section Β Symposium on True Stories of Small Chemical Businesses organized by Division of Small Chemical Businesses (see page 48)

DIVISION OF THE HISTORY OF CHEMISTRY D. S. Tarbell, Chairman N. I. Foster, Secretary-Treasurer

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 211 (Level ID Symposium on Eminent Southern Chem­ ists R. B. Seymour, Presiding 9:00—1. Coming to an Age of Chemistry in . the South. R. B. Seymour. 9:20—2. Contributions of Charles Herty to the American Chemical Society, the Paper Industry, and Chemistry in the South. C. H. Herty III. 9:40—3. Charles Holmes Herty and the Naval Stores Industry. G. M. Reed.

56

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom D (2nd floor) Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry and Polymer Chemistry, Inc. N. Platzer, Presiding 9:00—Welcome, and Introductory Remarks. A. C. Zettlemoyer. 9:10—1. Commodity and Engineering Plas­ tics. N. Platzer. 9:35—2. Optimum Design and Operation of Batch Reactors for Polymerization. Y. Soni, L. F. Albright. 9:55—3. Trends in Suspension PVC Manu­ facture. P. A. Schwab, J. B. Cameron, A. J. Lundeen, J. H. McCulley, Jr. 10:25—4. Continuous Polymerization of Vinyl Acetate in Suspension. K. H. Reichert, H. U. Moritz. 11:00—5. Acrylate Copolymers by H2O2/U.V. Initiation. J. C. Brosse, J. M. Gauthier, J. C. Lenain, G. Legeay, R. Pautrat. 11:30—6. Recent Developments in the Syn­ thesis of Block Polymers. A. D. Jenkins. Section Β

Section A

HIST

MONDAY MORNING

INDE DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY C. M. Bartisch, Chairman K. C. Taylor, Secretary

SUNDAY EVENING 8:00—Chemical Industry Hospitality Event. Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor G.

Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Advances In Flue Gas Desulfurization—I. FGD Scrubbers and Dry Removal Systems organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Environmental Chemistry, Fuel Chemistry, and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. L. Hudson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—7. Laboratory Investigation of Adipic Acid Degradation in FGD Scrubbers. J. C. Terry, J. B. Jarvis, D. L. Utley, E. E. Ell­ sworth. 9:35—8. Buffer Additives for Lime/Limestone Slurry Scrubbing. G. T. Rochelle, W. T. Weems, R. J. Smith, M. W. Hsiang. 10:05—9. Energy Requirements for S0 2 Absorption with Limestone Scrubbers. R. H. Borgwardt. 10:35—10. Control of S0 2 Emissions by Dry Sorbent Injection. J. T. Yeh, R. J. Demski, J. I. Joubert. 11:05—11. Characterization of Volatile Or­ ganic Components of Nahcolite and Trona. B. W. Farnum, R. C. Timpe, S. A. Farnum. MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom D (2nd floor) Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry and Polymer Chemistry, Inc. N. Platzer, Presiding 2:00—12. Synthesis and Characterization of Functional Graft Copolymers by Macromonomer Technique. Y. Yamashita. 2:30—13. Thermoplastic Graft Copolymers of Cellulose and Vinyl Monomers. J. C. Arthur, Jr. 3:00—14. Toughened Plastics. H. Keskkula. 3:30—15. Structure and Morphology of EVA-SAN Graft Polymers. H. Bartl, H. Al­ berts, K. Riebel, L. Morbitzer, G. Weber. 4:00—16. Selective Alkylation of Toluene with Methanol to Produce Para-Xylene. W. W. Kaeding, C. C. Chu, L. B. Young, B. Weinstein, S. A. Butter. 4:30—17. Structure and Properties of Poly­ ethylene Terephthalate) and Copoly(Ethylene Terephthalate) Prepared in a Solid-State Condensation Process. M. Droescher. 8:30—Divisional Hospitality Suite, Crystal Parlor D. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization—II. Liquid Phase Reactions organized by Division of Industrial and Engi­ neering Chemistry joint with Divisions of En­

vironmental Chemistry, Fuel Chemistry, and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

G. T. Rochelle, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—18. Thermal Decomposition of Sulfur Oxyacids. B. Meyer, K. Koshlap, M. Rigdon. 2:35—19. Kinetics of Reactions in a Wet Flue Gas Simultaneous Desulfurization and Denitrification System. S. G. Chang. 3:05—20. Sulfite Oxidation in Organic Acid Solutions. J. L. Hudson, D. B. Nurmi, J. W. Overman, J. Erwin. 3:35—21. A Model of Oxidation in Calcium Sulfite Slurries. J. Erwin, C. C. Wang, J. L. Hudson. 4:05—22. Mechanism of the Oxidation of Bisulfite Ion by Oxygen. T. G. Braga, R. E. Connick. 4:35—23. Influence of Metal Ions on the Autooxidation of SO2 in Aqueous Solution. R. E. Huie, N. C. Peterson. 8:30—Divisional Hospitality Suite (see Section A for location). TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom D (2nd floor) Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry and Polymer Chemistry, Inc. N. Platzer, Presiding 9:00—24. Polyphenylene Sulfide—How, When, Where, and Why. D. G. Brady. 9:30—25. Metallic and Semiconducting Polymers—Possible New Engineering Plastics. R. H. Baughman, J. L. Brédas, R. R. Chance, H. Eckardt, R. L. Elsenbaumer, D. M. Ivory, G. G. Miller, A. F. Preziosi, L. W. Shacklette. 10:00—26. Ethylene Radical Copolymerization with Vinyl Silanes. S. M. Samoilov. 10:30—27. Computor Model for Commercial High-Pressure Polyethylene Reactor Based on Elementary Reaction Rates Obtained Experimentally. M. Sugimoto, S. Goto, K. Yamamoto, S. Furui. 11:00—28. Comparison of a Modern HighPressure Tubular Low-Density Polyethylene Process with Gas-Phase Linear Low-Density Polyethylene Technology. P. Newman, K. H. Imhausen, F. Schoeffel, J. Zink. 11:30—29. Phillips Loop Reactor Polyethylene Technology. J. P. Hogan, D. D. Norwood, C. A. Ayres. Noon. Divisional Social Hour and Luncheon, E. V. Murphree Award (see Social Events, ticket 10 for details). Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization—III. Thermodynamics and Solid Dissolution organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Environmental Chemistry, Fuel Chemistry, and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. L. Hudson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—30. Thermodynamic Data for Stack Gas Desulfurization Processes. L. Brewer. 9:35—31. Reliable Data for Flue Gas Desul­ furization Processes. B. R. Staples. 10:05—32. Use of Pitzer's Equations to Es­ timate Strong-Electrolyte Activity Coeffi­ cients in Aqueous Flue-Gas-Desulfurization Processes. G. M. Rosenblatt. 10:35—33. Limestone Dissolution: Effects of pH, CO2, and Buffers Modeled by Mass Transfer. G. T. Rochelle, P. K. Chan. 11:05—34. Laboratory Studies to Determine the Major Factors Which Affect Limestone Dissolution and the Availability of Magne­ sium in Limestone. F. B. Messerole, R. L. Glover, D. A. Stewart. Noon. Divisional Social Hour and Luncheon, E. V. Murphree Award (see Section A for details). Section C Atlanta Hilton, Dekalb-Gwinnett Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on the R&D/Manufacturing In­ terface—I. General Commercialization Techniques A. R. Hirsig, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—35. Dow Approach to Development and Commercialization of Pharmaceutical Processes. S. W. Tobey. 9:40—36. R&D/Manufacturing Interface for Specialty Chemicals. D. E. Sllva. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—37. Research Strategies in the R&D/Manufacturing Interface. J. D. Idol. 11:05—38. Organizing the R&D/Mnufacturing/Marketing Interface in a Large Diverse Product Line Company. J. W. Pearson. Noon. Divisional Social Hour and Luncheon, E. V. Murphree Award (see Section A for details).

Section C Atlanta Hilton, Dekalb-Gwinnett Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Industrial Separation and Processing of Natural Fats, Oils, and Resins (Naval Stores) organized by Division of In­ dustrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division and Di­ vision of Chemical Marketing and Eco­ nomics K. Zilch, Presiding

1:00—Introductory Remarks. 1:10—55. Sunflower Seed Oil Waxes: Their Origin, Quantitation, and Removal. W. H. Morrison, D. E. Akin. Section D 1:35—56. Detergent Fractionation of Edible Tallow. D. M. Bussey, T. C. Ryan, J. I. Gray, Atlanta Hilton, Fayette-Newton Rooms (2nd Μ. Ε. Zabik. floor) 2:00—57. Aqueous Extraction Process: An E. V. Murphree Award Symposium Honoring Alternative Soybean Milling Procedure. K. G. Alex Mills: Advanced Catalytic Processes M. Foley, K. C. Rhee. for Synthetic Fuels organized by Division of 2:25—Intermission. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with 2:40—58. Fractionation of Jojoba Products. Divisions of Fuel Chemistry and Petroleum Τ. Κ. Miwa. Chemistry, Inc. 3:05—59. Tall Oil Separation. Ε. Ε. J. E. McEvoy, Presiding McSweeney, E. Fritz.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—39. Pyrite in Coal Liquefaction. D. Garg, E. N. Givens. 9:40—40. Fuels Catalysis from Reforming to Coal Liquefaction. H. Heinemann. 10:10—41. Mobil Methanol-to-Gasoline Process. A. J. Silvestri. 10:40—Intermission. 10:55—42. Catalytic Coal Gasification Technology. N. C. Nahas. 11:25—43. Award Address. (E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry sponsored by Exxon Research & Engineering Co.) Catalytic Concepts for Coal Conversion. G. A. Mills. Noon. Divisional Social Hour and Luncheon, E. V. Murphree Award (see Section A for details). TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom D (2nd floor) Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry and Polymer Chemistry, Inc. N. Platzer, Presiding 2:00—44. 25 Years of Ziegler—High Density Polyethylene—History and Outlook. H. P. Schulz. 2:30—45. Insertion-Polymerization with Soluble Ziegler Catalysts: The Dependence on the Monomer Concentration. G. Fink, G. Dôellinger. 3:00—46. Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene—Properties and Processing Techniques. W. H. Birnkraut, G. Braun, J. Falbe. 3:30—47. In Commemoration of Giulio Natta. J. D. D'lanni. 3:45—48. Giulio Natta—Ad Memoriam. H. F. Mark. 4:25—49. Polypropylene Process and Product Improvements with New High Yield Catalysts. C. Cipriani, C. A. Trischman. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on the R&D/Manufacturing In­ terface—II. Case Studies and On-Going Technical Support A. R. Hirsig, Presiding 1:45—50. Strategy for Commercializing New Technology. A. Saffer. 2:20—51. Catalytic Dewaxing Technology: From Concept to Innovation. S. L. Meisel. 2:55—52. R&D/Manufacturing Interface— Management of Technology Scale-Up for Gas-Phase Polyolefins Processes. G. G. Madgwick. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—53. Solving Production Problems with a Research-Led Task Force. R. S. Miller. 4:20—54. Process Services in Support of Manufacturing. J. E. Master.

Section D Atlanta Hilton, Fayette-Newton Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Recent Advances in Sepa­ ration Technology organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. Ν. Ν. Li, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—60. Possibilities for the Use of Crown Ethers as Size-Selective Extractants in Process Applications. W. J. McDowell. 2:30—61. Valence Control of Plutonium in Actinide Separations. Y. K. Sze, J. Gosselin. 2:55—62. Advances in Extractive Distillation by Salt Effect. W. F. Furter. 3:20—63. Use of Difiltration to Separate Reaction Products and Catalysts in Organic Synthesis. E. Bayer. 3:45—64. Comparison Between a Conven­ tional Cascade and a Continuous Mem­ brane Column. S. T. Hwang, Κ. Η. Yuen. 4:10—65. Extraction of Ammonia from Mu­ nicipal Waste Water by the Liquid Mem­ brane Process. Η. Η. Downs, Ν. Ν. Li. 4:35—66. A Simple Heuristic Method for the Optimal Synthesis of Multicomponent Separation Sequences. V. M. Nadgir, Y. A. Liu. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom D (2nd floor) Symposium on Mass Transfer with Chemical Reactions in Two-Phase System L. F. Albright, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—67. Mass Transfer with Chemical Re­ action in Liquid-Liquid Systems. C Hanson. 9:40—68. Regiospecific Nitration. The Use of Two Phase Systems to Convert IPSO Nitration Products to para-Alkylnitrobenzenes. P. C. Myhre, T. P. Heil. 10:15—69. Is Nitronium Ion an Intermediate in Aromatic Nitration in Mixed Acids? D. S. Ross, W. G. Blucher, R. Malhotra, R. Schmitt. 10:50—70. Dependence of the Rate Constant and Activation Energy of Aromatic Nitration on Mixed Acid Composition. J. P. Field, A. N. Strachan. 11:25—71. Discussion on Oxidation Mecha­ nism of TNT in Nitric-Sulfuric Acid Mixture. Q-Z. Yu. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatability of Industrial Aqueous Effluents—Innovative Treatment Technology

9:35—73. Adsorption of Heavy Metals (Cop­ per & Cadmium) on Waste Activated Sludge. J. P. Vollmuth, B. A. Bell. 10:00—74. Treatment of Beef Slaughtering and Processing Wastewaters Using Rotat­ ing Biological Contractors. F. C. Blanc, J. C. O'Shaughnessy, S. H. Corr. 10:25—Intermission. 10:40—75. Sulfide Reduction Process for Treatment of Wastewaters Containing Ni­ trated Organics. R. P. Carnahan. 11:05—76. Biological Treatment of Oil Shale Retort Wastewater Using Rotating Biolog­ ical Contactors. J. C. O'Shaughnessy, F. C. Blanc, I. W. Wei, J. Patinskas. 11:30—77. Activated Sludge Treatment of Diluted Slagging Fixed-Bed Coal Gasifica­ tion Wastewaters. Y. T. Hung, G. O. Fossum, L. F. Paulson, W. G. Willson.

Section C Atlanta Hilton, Dekalb-Gwinnett Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on the Funding of Industrial Re­ search and Development cosponsored with Board-Council Committee on Chemistry and Public Affairs joint with Committee on Cor­ poration Associates W. N. Smith, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—78. Research and Development Plan­ ning for Specialty Chemicals and Polymers. M. E. Kelly. 9:40—79. Funding Industrial R&D: Petroleum and Related Energy Industries. B. Turnquist. 10:10—80. Funding Industrial R&D: The Aerospace Industry Perspective. G. C. Henderson. 10:40—81. Research and Development Planning in the Electronics Industry. D. L. Hammond. 11:10—82. Research and Development Planning for Commodity Chemicals. G. Hill.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom D (2nd floor) Symposium on Mass Transfer with Chemical Reactions in Two-Phase System C. Hanson, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—83. A Standard Affinity of Extraction and the Kinetics of Solvent Extraction. M. A. Hughes. 2:40—84. Single Drop Reactive Extraction. W. Halwachs, K. Schugerl. 3:15—85. Role of Interfacial Structuring Ef­ fects on the Liquid-Liquid Transfer Kinetics ofSome Metal Cations. P. R. Danesi, G. F. Vendergrift, E. P. Horwitz, T. Muscatello, R. Chiarizia. 3:50—86. Determination of Interfacial Areas in Gas/Liquid-Non-Newtonian Flow by a Chemical Method. A. Schumpe, W-D. Deckwer. 4:25—87. Some Aspects of Process Design of Liquid-Liquid Reactors. M. M. Sharma, T. V. Vasudevan. 5:00—88. Liquid Membranes. A Review of Mass Transfer Models. A. Bright. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatability of Industrial Aqueous Effluents J. E. Norris, Presiding 2:00—89. Effluent Monitoring: Methods and Costs for Conventional, Non-Conventional and Priority Pollutants. J. E. Norris.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

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Section C Atlanta Hilton, Dekalb-Gwinnett Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on the Funding of Industrial Re­ search and Development cosponsored with Board-Council Committee on Chemistry and Public Affairs joint with Committee on Cor­ poration Associates E. G. Meyer, Presiding 2:00—94. Chemical Science and Technology, the University-Industry Interface. J. R. Lovett, J. E. McEvoy. 2:30—95. The Federal Role in Encouraging Industrial R&D. M. K. Wilson. 3:00—96. Industrial Innovation: Issues and Opportunities Before the Congress. Α. Ε Scoville. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—97. Major R&D Funding by Industry at Universities: The MIT Example. D. White. 4:15—98. Why Industry Uses Outside Profit Making Organizations to Carry Out R&D. S. V. Margolin. Section D Symposium on Chemical Consideration for Important Radioactive Waste Species II or­ ganized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry {see page 67)

Section D Symposium on Chemical Consideration for Important Radioactive Waste Species I or­ ganized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 67)

B. A. Bell, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—72. Use and Interpretation of Powdered Carbon Adsorption Isotherms in Waste Water Treatment. A. P. Ferrara.

2:30—90. New Methodology for Monitoring Priority Pollutants in Energy-Related Waste Waters. L. H. Keith. 3:00—91. Monitoring Tasks, Validation Techniques and Regulatory Limits. L. B. Rogers. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—92. Effluent Monitoring: A Tiered Ap­ proach Employing Biological and Chemical Indicators. L. I. Bone, D. R. Branson, D. A. Armentrout, W. M. Parker, C. Van Hall. 4:15—93. Analyses of Petrochemical Wastewater for Volatile Organic Priority Pollutants. G. H. Stanko, R. Szentirmay.

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom D (2nd floor) Symposium on Mass Transfer with Chemical Reactions in Two-Phase System L. F. Albright, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—99. Kinetics of Surface Reactions Using the LJRR: Copper-Sulfuric AcidOxime Extractant System. R. W. Freeman, L. L. Tavlarides. 9:40—100. Selective Metal Ion Extraction for Multiple Ion Exchange Reactions in Liq­ uid-Liquid Systems. L. L. Tavlarides, E. Ho, C. K. Lee. 10:15—101. Kinetics of Extraction of Metals with Di-(2Ethylhexyl) Phosphoric Acid. I. Komasawa, T. Otake. 10:50—102. Triphasé Reaction of 1-Bromooctane with Aqueous Sodium Cyanide Catalyzed by Polystyrene-Bound Onium tons. W. T. Ford, M. Tomoi. 11:25—103. Continuous Two Phase Sulphonation of some Aromatic Hydrocarbons. M. Sohrabi, T. Kaghazchi. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatability of Industrial Aqueous Effluents R. Rocheleau, Presiding 9:00—104. Dynamic Mini-Column Adsorption Technique. L. Billela, D. Beaudet. 9:30—105. Carbon Treatment of Pesticide Manufacturing Wastes in Light of EPA's Proposed Effluent Guideline Limitations. K. N. Wood. 10:00—106. Effectiveness of Biological Treatment for Priority Pollutant Removal. L. Tischler. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—107. Assessment of Treatment Methods for Toxic Organic Substances in Waste Waters. S. L. Daniels, R. O. Kagel. 11:15—108. Prediction of the Fate of Organic Priority Pollutants in Biological Wastewater Treatment Systems. R. F. Wukasch, E. J. Kirsch, C. P. L. Grady.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

57

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Without feeding a good idea, it will bear no fruit. It begins as a flash of brightness in an unremarkable stream of thought. Incandescent, irresistible, it blazes into our consciousness. Invading our thoughts, capturing our imagination, it is creation turned conqueror. And we 58

C&EN Feb. 16, 1981

©Conoco Chemicals Company, A Division of Conoco Inc., Houston .Texas.

are its willing prisoner. That is how an idea is born. Here is how it can die. For if an idea is not utilized, it cannot survive. Somewhere, somehow, there must be metamorphosis. Concept must shed its chrysalis and assume the shape of reality. If it does not, if any idea remains too long in the form of conjecture, its fate is surely sealed. At Conoco Chemicals, we understand the power of a good idea. But, equally important, we know what it takes to keep a good idea alive. We are aware of the tremendous financial commitment we must be willing to make. We are aware, and we are prepared. We employ bright, resourceful people and encourage their ingenuity. We have acquired a level of technical expertise and feedstock self-sufficiency that facilitates excellence.We have even committed ourselves to an ambitious program of growth that will enable us to further subsidize our conceptual and technological strengths. In other words, we have what it takes to give our good ideas a long, full and productive life. The many chemical innovations for which we have been responsible will serve as ample proof of our sincerity and our abilities. For we are here to help good ideas survive beyond fmr\r%f"r%\ the first bright moment of their conception. And to share ^COnOCO^ with you their brilliance and their benefits. Conoco Chemicals Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

59

METHANOL BETWEEN 1980 AND 1990, THE U.S. WILL NEED ENOUGH TO FILL A STORAGE TANK 20 TIMES LARGER THAN NEW YORK'S WORLD TRADE CENTER. SOME OF IT WILL COME FROM ASHLAND. In the decade ahead, it is estimated that the U.S. will use 19,000,000,000 gallons of methanol.* The estimated combined volume of the World Trade Center's twin towers is 122,518,000 cubic feet. Multiplying that volume by 7.481 gallons per cubic foot, you get 916,557,158 gallons. Which means that a storage tank large enough to hold the nation's predicted methanol requirements, over the next ten years, would have to be 20.73 times larger than these two 110-story buildings. That's obviously a lot of methanol. But in view of the chemical's importance as a m Systems Ir

feedstock, its use as an intermediate, and its end-use promise for the future, that projected volume is not too surprising. Nor is Ashland Chemical's position as both a producerand a supplier. A position that serves to further broaden Ashland's already broad base as a manufacturer and distributor of essential industrial chemicals. Ashland Chemical Company, P.O. Box 2219, Columbus, Ohio43216.

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Symposium on Sulfur Recovery and Utilization—New Sources and New Uses organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 74)

THURSDAY

AFTERNOON

Section A Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom D (2nd floor) Symposium on Mass Transfer with Chemical Reactions in Two-Phase System

C. Hanson, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—109. Kinetics of Partial Hydrogénation Reactions in the Liquid Phase with Sorption and Mass Transfer Phenomena. G. Gut, O. M. Kut, T. Buhlmann, A. Lussy. 2:40—110. Effect of Mixing in the Oxidation of Liquid-Solid Slurries. J. Y. Oldshue. 3:15—111. Optimal Temperature Profile for Steady-State Operation of Countercurrent Moving Bed Chromatographic Reactor. D. Altshuller. 3:50—112. A Two-Phase Model for an Upflow Coal Liquefaction Reactor. L. G. Focht, H. S. Qivanji, T. H. Forsyth. 4:25—113. The Discussion on Nucleophilicity of the Constituents in Mannich Reactions of Polynitroalkanes and its N-Nitration. F-Q. Zhong, B-R. Chen, M-X. Zeng. 5:00—114. The Effect of Sulfuric Acid Strength and Temperature on the Selective Nitration of Toluene. D. F. Wang, Z. X. Yu.

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Clayton-Cobb Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatability of Industrial Aqueous Effluents P. D. Fahrenthold, Presiding 2:00—115. Biological Treatment of Organic Compounds Found in Industrial Aqueous Effluents. D. F. Kincannon, E. L. Stover. 2:35—116. Petroleum Refinery Two Plant Long Term Toxics Treatability Study. W. A. Tellaird. 3:10—Intermission. 3:25—117. Fate of Semivolatile Priority Pol­ lutants in a Demonstration Wastewater Treatment Plant. J. M. Meuser, F. R. Moore, M. G. Nishioka, W. M. Cooke, A. C. Petrasek, L. A. Winslow, R. H. Wise, R. T. Wil­ liams. 4:00—118. Occurrence and Predictability of Priority Pollutants in Waste Waters of the Organic Chemicals and Plastic/Synthetic Fibers Industrial Categories. Η. Ε. Wise, P. D. Fahrenthold. Section C Symposium on Sulfur Recovery and Utiliza­ tion—New Sources and New Uses organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75) Section D Symposium on Toxic Chemical Laboratory Hood Ventilation—Engineering Design, Performance Testing Guidelines, and Impli­ cations of Health and Safety Legislation or­ ganized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety (see page 49) FRIDAY MORNING Symposium on Sulfur Recovery and Utiliza­ tion—New Sources and New Uses organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75)

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

62

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

World Congress Center, Room 210, Level II) Symposium on Inorganic Reactions in Or­ ganized Media organized by Division of In­ organic Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry S. Holt, Presiding

INOR DIVISION OF INORGANIC CHEMISTRY H. D. Kaesz, Chairman R. N. Grimes, Secretary-Treasurer G. J. Long, Program Chairman

SUNDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Omni International, Liberty Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) Tutorial Session on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond Μ. Β. Hall, Presiding 10:00—Introduction to Theoretical Methods and Concepts. Μ. Β. Hall. 11:15—Introduction to Crystallographic Methods and Concepts. J. Glusker. 2:15—Theoretical Electron Distributions and Their Interpretation. V. H. Smith. 3:30—Derivation and Interpretation of Ex­ perimental Electron Distributions. P. Coppens. SUNDAY

EVENING

6:00—Social Hour, Organometallic Subdi­ vision. Omni International, Swanton Room.

MONDAY MORNING World Congress Center, Room 302 (Level HI) Awards Symposium H. D. Kaesz, Presiding 9:00—Introduction of the Distinguished Ser­ vice in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry Award Winner. H. D. Kaesz. 9:05—1. Award Address. (ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Mallinckrodt, Inc.) (jU-Dithio)Bis(Tricarbonyliron), An Inorganic Mimic of Organic Disul­ fides. D. Seyferth. 10:00—Introduction of the Inorganic Chem­ istry Award Winner. E. L. King. 10:05—2. Award Address. (ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Mon­ santo Company.) Electron Derealization in Mixed Valence Molecules. H. Taube. 11:00—Introduction of the Alpha Chi Sigma Pure Chemistry Award Winner. Η. Β. Gray. 11:05—3. Award Address. (ACS Award in Pure Chemistry sponsored by Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity.) Inorganic and Organo­ metallic Photochemistry. M. S. Wrighton. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 302 (Level IN) Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Physical Chemistry P. Becker, Presiding 2:00—4. Theoretical Aspects of Electron Distributions. R. G. Parr. 2:30—5. Relativity and the Chemical Bond. J. G. Snijders, E. J. Baerends, T. Ziegler, P. Ros. 3:00—6. Relative and Absolute Charge Density Differences, Correlation, Defor­ mation and Association. V. H. Smith, Jr. 3:30—Discussion. 4:00—7. Computation and Interpretation of Electron Distributions. Μ. Β. Hall. 4:30—8. Experimental Versus Theoretical Electron Distributions. A. Schweig. 5:00—9. Structural Consequences of Tran­ sition Metal Basicity: Polar Metal-Metal Bonds. F. E. Smion, J. W. Lauher. 5:15—Discussion.

2:00—10. Colloidal Association Structures of Amphophilic Molecules. S. E. Friberg. 2:45—Discussion. 2:50—11. Radical Pair Reactions in Micellar Solution in the Presence and Absence of Magnetic Fields. G. F. Lehr, J. Mattay, N. J. Turro. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—12. Aspects of Artificial Photosynthesis in Surfactant Vesicles. J. H. Fendler. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—13. Efficient Water Cleavage by Visible Light in Colloidal Solutions of Bifunctional Redox Catalysts. M. Gràtzel. 5:15—Discussion.

Section C World Congress Center, Room 300 (Level III) Poster Session N. Serpone, Presiding 2:00—3:00—14. Computer Simulation of Phosphate Hydrolysis Catalyzed By Staphylococcal Nuclease. J. A. Deiters, J. C. Gallucci, R. R. Holmes. 2:00—3:00—15. Pentacoordinated Compounds of Main Group IV Elements. R. R. Holmes, R. O. Day, A. J. Sau, J. M. Holmes. 2:00—3:00—16. Solution Dynamics of Cyclopropyl AI, Ga, and In as Studied By 13C NMR. R. D. Thomas, J. P. Oliver. 2:00—3:00—17. Seven-Coordinate Cadmium: Crystal Structures and Biochemical Probes Utilizing 113Cd NMR. Ε. Α. Η. Grif­ fith, E. L. Amma. 2:00—3:00—18. Pentagonal Bipyramidal Complexes of Cadmium(ll) and Mercury(ll). G. J. Palenik, J. H. Davis, R. C. Palenik. 2:00—3:00—19. Crystal and Molecular Structure of Dichloro-1-Diphenylphosphino-2-DiethylaminoethaneCadmium(ll). L. W. Houk, P. K. Sen Gupta, M. B. Hossain, D. van der Helm. 2:00—3:00—20. Kinetics of Dealkylation of N-Methylporphyrin Complexes. D. Kuila, D. K. Lavallee. 2:00—3:00—21. EPR and Metallation of Surface Active Porphyrins. D. Doll, S. L. Holt, G. M. Cole. 2:00—3:00—22. Long Chain Alkyl Substi­ tuted 1,10 Phenanthrolines as Surfactant Ligands for Transition Metal Ions. G. K. Lund, G. M. Cole, S. L. Holt. 2:00—3:00—23. Catalytic Formation of Ke­ tones in Microemulsions. J. Murphy, S. L. Holt. 2:00—3:00—24. Correlation of Structural Characteristics and Catalytic Activities For Some Oxide Supported Iron Catalysts. K. J. Mbadcam, G. A. Melson, J. M. Stencel, R. A. Diffenbach. 2:00—3:00—25. Characterization and Eval­ uation of Some ZSM-5 and NU-1 Supported Iron and Cobalt Catalysts for the FischerTropsch Reaction. J. E. Crawford, G. A. Melson, J. M. Stencel, D. J. Fauth, V. U. S. Rao. 3:00—4:00—26. Demetallation of «, ρ, σ, ô-Tetra(P-Sulfophenyl)porphinato-indium(lll) In Aqueous Cl~ and Br~ Media. W. L. Reynolds, P. Leonard. 3:00—4:00—27. Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of Dinuclear Ylide-Bridged Organogold Complexes. J. D. Basil, J. P. Fackler, Jr. 3:00—4:00—28. Formation, Stabilization, and Reactivity of Nickel(lll) Complexes With Macrocyclic Ligands in Aqueous Media. L. J. Kirschenbaum, R. I. Haines, E. Zeigerson, G. Ginzburg, J. Bernstein, I. Bar, D. Meyerstein. 3:00—4:00—29. Kinetics of the Formation of Transition Metal Complexes of 2-(2'Pyridyl)-lmidazole. A. D. Kowalak, P. L. Parise. 3:00—4:00—30. A Facile Synthesis of Tetrazolatopentaaminecobalt(lll) Complexes via Azide Attack at Coordinated Nitriles. W. R. Ellis, Jr., W. L Purcell. 3:00—4:00—31. Facile Conversion of a Coordinated Carboxamide to a Coordinated Nitrile. R. J. Balahura, N. Ireland.

3:00—4:00—32. Effect of the Nitro Group on the Coordination of Organic Ligands. M. E. Farago, S. Dichakjian. 3:00—4:00—33. Structure and Reactivity of Polypyrazolylborate Complexes of Mo(V). C. P. Marabella, J. H. Enemark. 3:00—4:00—34. Reactivity of CpW(CO)2(CS)- and Hb(pz)3W(CO)2(CS)-. Reactions of the CS Ligand Leading to Mercaptocarbyne and Isocyanide Complexes. R. J. Angelici, W. W. Greaves. 3:00—4:00—35. Complexes of Rhodium(lll) with Optically Active Tetramine Ligands. L. M. Torres, M. M. Muir, L. B. Zinner. 3:00—4:00—36. Synthesis of a New Chelating Ligand and the Study of Its Ruthenium(ll) Complexes. M. N. Ackerman, L. V. Interrante. 3:00—4:00—37. Preparation, Bonding, and Photochemistry of Mixed Metal Dimers Containing the Pentacyanoferrate(ll) Moeity. K. J. Pfenning, L. Lee, J. D. Petersen. 4:00—5:00—38. Solution Magnetic Studies of Binuclear Copper(ll) Complexes. G. S. Vigee, C. L. Watkins, D. Bolus. 4:00—5:00—39. Synthesis and Study of New Binuclear Copper(ll) Complexes. Κ. Μ. Moore, G. S. Vigee. 4:00—5:00—40. Quartet -*- Doublet Intersystem Crossing Efficiencies of Cr(bby)33+ and Cr(phen)33+: Relative Values and Sol­ vent Isotope Effect. M. Z. Hoffman, R. Sriram, N. Serpone, M. A. Jamieson. 4:00—5:00—41. Low Dimensionality Mag­ netic Interactions in the Linear Chain Transition Metal Complexes M(2,2'-Bipyridine)H 2 0) 2 S0 4 , M(Fe, Ni and Cu). C Nicolini, W. M. Reiff. 4:00—5:00—42. Magnetic Ordering of Transition Metal Polymers Based on Nu­ cleoside Ligands: Temperature Depen­ dence of the Magnetic Susceptibility and Mossbauer Spectrum of [Fe(uridine)CI2]. C. Nicolini, W. M. Reiff. 4:00—5:00—43. Spectral and Susceptibility Studies Revealing Highly Varied Magnetic Behavior in a Series of Mono SubstitutedDiimine Iron(ll) Chlorides. F. F. Charron, Jr., W. M. Reiff. 4:00—5:00—44. Magnetic Ordering in [Co(7-CH3C5H4NO)6] (CI04)2. R. L. Carlin. 4:00—5:00—45. Field-Induced Magnetic Ordering in Ni(thiourea)4CI2. R. L. Carlin, R. D. Chirico, A. Paduan-Filho. 4:00—5:00—46. Antiferromagnetic Ordering in [Cu en 3 ]S0 4 . R. L. Carlin, R. D. Chirico. 4:00—5:00—47. Magnetic Ordering in CoCI2-2P(C6H5)3 and CoBr2-2P(C6H5)3. R. L. Carlin, R. D. Chirico. 4:00—5:00—48. Magnetic Investigations of Rare Earth Hydrides. R. L. Carlin, L. J. Krause. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 302 (Level HI) Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Physical Chemistry V. H. Smith, Presiding 9:00—49. Theoretical Determination of Electronic Charge Densities in Covalently Bonded Semiconductors. C. S. Wang, B. M. Klein. 9:30—50. Electron Density in a Polyhedral Beryllide of Calcium. D. M. Collins, M. C. Mahar. 9:50—51. Ab Initio Calculations of Defor­ mation Density Distributions for Binuclear Complexes of Transition Metals and for Fe and Co Porphyrins. M. Bénard. 10:20—Discussion. 10:50—52. Experimental Observation of Tellurium Lone Pair, and MolybdenumMolybdenum Triple and Quadrupole Bond Densities. J. M. Troup, M. W. Extine, R. F. Ziolo. 11:15—53. Analysis of Electronic Structure from Electron Density Distributions of Transition Metal Complexes. E. D. Stevens. 11:45—54. Electron Density Distributions for the Tetramethylporphyrin and Tetramethylchlorin Complexes of Nickel(ll). J. C. Gallucci, J. A. Ibers. 12:00—Discussion.

Section D

Section F

World Congress Center, Room 303 (Level III)

Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—I organized by Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 75)

Section B World Congress Center, Room 210 (Level ID Symposium on Inorganic Reactions in Organized Media organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry

G. M. Cole, Presiding 9:00—55. Light Induced Electron Transfer Reactions of Metalloporphyrins and Other Transition Metal Complexes in Organized Assemblies. D. G. Whitten, T. K. Foreman, R. H. Schmehl, K. Chandrasekaran, W. M. Sobol. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—56. Photochemistry on Aqueous Colloidal Silica Surfaces. J. Wheeler, J. K. Thomas. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—57. Inorganic Reactions in Microemulsions. R. A. Mackay, N. S. Dixit, R. Agarwal. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—58. Control of Photosensitized Electron-Transfer Reactions Across Water-Oil Interfaces, a Means to Stimulate Photosynthesis. I. Willner, J. W. Otvos, M. Calvin. 12:15—Discussion. 12:20—59. A Kinetic Investigation of Cu(phen)+ by Two Cationic Oxidants, trans-Co(en)2(N3)Î and Co(phen)3+ in Micellar Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Solution. L. Hodges, K. Ponganis, M. de Araujo. 12:35—Discussion.

Section C World Congress Center, Room 203 (Level I") General—Organometallic Compounds

M. D. Rausch, Presiding 9:00—60. Synthesis and Characterization of 1,2-Bis[Bis(Pentafluorophenyl)-Phosphino]ethane and Its Group VIB Metal Carbonyl Complexes. J. G. Morse, R. L. Cook. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—61. Formation and Chemistry of New Functionally-Substituted Cyclopentadienyl-Lithium and -Thallium Reagents. B. G. Conway, W. P. Hart, D. W. Macomber, M. D. Rausch. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—62. Synthetic, Spectroscopic and Reactivity Studies of Group IV-B Metallocene Carbonyl and Phosphine Complexes. D. J. Sikora, M. D. Rausch. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—63. Structural Studies of Group IV-B Metallocene Carbonyl and Phosphine Complexes. R. D. Rogers, J. L. Atwood. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—64. Evidence for Insertion of a Coordinated Methylene Ligand into a Transition Metal Alkyl Linkage. J. C. Hayes, G. D. N. Pearson, N. J. Cooper. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—65. Deoxygenation of Substituted Oxiranes to Form Metal-Olefin Complexes. R. B. Osborne. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—66. Organometallic Chemistry of Carbon-Nitrogen Multiple Bonds. Products Derived from Reactions of Tris(Triphenylphosphine)-Platinum(O) with Iminium Salts. E. K. Barefield, A. M. Carrier, D. G. Van Derveer. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—67. Chemical and Structural Studies of Transition Metal Complexes Containing Novel Ring-Bridged Bis(775-Cyclopentadienyl) Ligands. V. W. Day, M. R. Thompson, G. O. Nelson, M. E. Wright. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—68. Chemical and Structural Studies of Novel Polyoxoanions Which Contain Organometallic Groups. V. W. Day, M. R. Thompson, W. G. Klemperer, C. Besecker, R. S. Liu, T. Che. 11:55—Discussion. 12:00—69. Resonance Enhanced Intrinsic Molecular Depolarized Rayleigh Scattering of Ligands and Complexes. W. H. Nelson, R. Pecora. 12:15—Discussion. 12:20—70. Light-Scattering Structure Analysis of Six-Coordinate Organotin(IV) Complexes Having Butyl, Octyl, and Cyclohexyl Groups. W. F. Howard, Jr., W. H. Nelson. 12:35—Discussion.

General—Bioinorganic Systems

K. W. Jennette, Presiding 9:00—71. Carcinogen Chromate Induces DNA Crosslinks. M. J. Tsapakos, K. W. Jennette. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—72. Interaction of Thioacetylsteroids with Platinum, Palladium and Mercury Salts. G. Pouskouleli, I. S. Butler, P. Kourounakis. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—73. Approaches to the Preparation of Nontoxic Organoplatinum Antitumor Agents: Polymer Complexes of Organoplatinum Compounds. B. A. Howell, E. W. Walles. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—74. A Rapid Synthesis for 109Pd Hematoporphyrin Applied to Lymphatic Ablation Studies. J. Doi, D. K. Lavallee. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—75. Reversible Oxygenation of Synthetic Copper(l) Complexes. C. L. Merrill, J. M. Trantham, L. J. Wilson. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—76. On the Origin of the Low Hyperfine Values of Type I Copper(ll) in Metalloenzymes. R. D. Bereman, J. Dorfman, J. Bordner, D. P. Rillema. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—77. Reactivity Patterns in Models for Type II Copper(ll) Centers in Metalloenzymes. R. D. Bereman, J. Dorfman, J. Bordner, G. Shields. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—78. Crystal Structure of a Thermally Stable Copper(lll) Peptide Complex. CuMI [H2NC(CH3)2CONC(CH3)2CONC(CH3)2COO]-1.5 NaCI04-1.5 H 2 0. L L Diaddario, D. W. Margerum, W. R. Robinson. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—79. Iron Transport in Paracoccus Denitrificans. J. P. Robinson, J. V. McArdle. 11:55—Discussion.

Characterization

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 302 (Level I") Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Physical Chemistry

D. Schwarzenbach, Presiding 2:30—90. Charge Density Study of Methylidyne Tricobalt Nonacarbonyl—A Model for Surface Absorbed Hydrocarbon Species. P. C. W. Leung, A. Holladay, P. Coppens. 2:45—91. Neutron Scattering by Paramagnets: Experimentally Determined Molecular Eigenfunctions and Their Comparison with Theory. R. Mason. 3:00—Discussion. 3:30—92. Deformation Density Determina­ tions (X-X, X-N) of Organometallic Com­ pounds. R. Goddard, C. Kruger. 4:00—93. Structures and Electron Density Distributions in the Bonds of Cumulenes and Small-Ring Compounds. H. Irngartinger, H-U. Jâger, M. Nixdorf, N. H. Riegler. 4:30—94. Theoretical and Experimental Charge Density Distributions in Silicates. J. W. Downs, R. J. Hill, M. D. Newton, J. A. Tossell, G. V. Gibbs. 5:00—Discussion. 6:30—8:30 Divisional Social Hour. Omni International, Glenmar Room.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 210 (Level ID Symposium on Inorganic Reactions in Or­ ganized Media organized by Division of In­ organic Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry

R. A. Mackay, Presiding

2:00—95. Reactions on Solid KMn0 4 Sur­ faces. F. M. Menger. 2:45—Discussion. 2:50—96. Use of Phase Transfer and Micelle World Congress Center, Room 305 (Level Catalysts in Electrooxidation and Heterog­ III) enous Catalysis Using Platinum. T. C. General—Transition Metal Complexes Franklin, M. Iwunze, S. Gipson. R. J. Butcher, Presiding 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—97. Hydrolysis of Chlorophyll a in 9:00—80. Synthesis and Structure of a Bi­ Nonionic Microemulsion Media. D. K. La­ metallic Complex of S3. Τ. Β. Rauchfuss, vallee, E. Huggins, S. Lee. C. M. Bolinger. 3:45—Discussion. 9:15—Discussion. 3:50—98. Reactions of Long-Chain Acidato 9:20—81. Vibronic Spectroscopy of facComplexes of Transition Metals in Micelles Tris(glycinato)chromium(lll). W. M. Wal­ and Microemulsions. G. M. Cole, Jr. lace, K. Dwarakanath, P. E. Hoggard. 4:15—Discussion. 9:35—Discussion. 4:20—99. Photochemical Studies of Uranyl9:40—82. An Angular Overlap Model Analysis Exchanged Zeolites. S. L. Suib, O. Borof Bis(cysteinato)chromate(lll). W. M. deianu. Wallace, P. E. Hoggard. 4:45—Discussion. 9:55—Discussion. 4:50—100. Light-Induced Electron Transfer 10:00—83. Crystal Structure and NMR Reactions of Anionic Transition Metal Spectrum of Κ Co(en)(C03)2-H20. R. J. Complexes in Homogeneous and Micellar Butcher, N. S. Rowan, C. B. Storm. Solutions. T. K. Foreman, W. M. Sobol, D. 10:15—Discussion. G. Whitten. 10:20—84. Nuclear and Electronic Contri­ 5:05—Discussion. butions to Electron Transfer in Low Spin 6:30—8:30 Divisional Social Hour (see Cobalt(lll)/High Spin Cobalt(ll) Couples. K. Section A for location). Kumar, B. Durham, J. F. Endicott. 10:35—Discussion. Section C 10:40—85. Base Adducts of Transition Metal Complexes of a Schiff-Base Derived from World Congress Center, Room 203 (Level Salicylaldehyde and an Aminoalcohol. J. G. ID Wardeska. General—Organometallic Compounds 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—86. Crystal and Molecular Structure J. S. McKennis, Presiding of a Cu(l) Complex of Vitamin B1f Cu(thiamine)CI2. R. E. Cramer, R. S. Evan- 2:20—101. Preparation of New Carbon Dioxide Complexes Utilizing Liquid Carbon gelista, R. B. Maynard. Dioxide. M. G. Mason, J. A. Ibers. 11:15—Discussion. 2:35—Discussion. 11:20—87. Structures of the Low Tempera­ 2:40—102. Solid State Structure and Reac­ ture Phases of Cu(C5H5NO)6X2 Complexes tivity in Solution in (772-RSCH2CH2SR)by EPR and Neutron Diffraction. J. S. Wood, Cr(CO)4 Complexes (R = Bu1, Et). G. R. R. K. McMullan, C. P. Keijzers. Dobson, G. M. Reisner, I. Bernai. 11:35—Discussion. 2:55—Discussion. 11:40—88. Studies of Copper Complexes of Substituted Tetrahydroborates. P. Egan, T. 3:00—103. Structural Features of a Cyclohexenyl Manganese Complex Containing Lofthouse, K. W. Morse. a Two-Electron Three-Center C—H—Μη 11:55—Discussion. Bond. Μ. Β. Humphrey, W. Lamanna, M. 12:00—89. Amine-Cyanoborane Metal Brookhart. Complexes: Synthesis and Structure of 3:15—Discussion. ZnCI2[(CH3)3N-BH2CN]2. K. W. Morse, A. T. McPhail, B. F. Spielvogel. 12:15—Discussion.

Section Ε

3:20—104. Structural and Spectroscopic of

(Î? 5 -C 5 H 5 )(CO) 2 -

Fe(772-B2H5) an Analogue of the MetalOlefin Complex (ηέ-05Η5(00)2-^β(η2C 2 H 4 ) + . S. G. Shore, J. S. Plotkin, J. C. Huffman, G. J. Long, T. P. Fehlner, R. Dekock. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—105. Insertion of Transition Metals into (Cyclobutadiene)lron Complexes. The Formation of Novel Metallocycle Com­ plexes. J. S. McKennis, M. King, P. Radnia. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—106. Iron Mediated [4+3] Cycloaddition Reactions. W. P. Giering, J. E. Belmonte. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—107. Electrophilic Reactivity of Coor­ dinated Cyclobutadiene. H. S. Choi, D. A. Sweigart. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—108. Structure and Bonding in Cyclobutadieneiron Tricarbonyl. A. B. Anderson, G. Fitzgerald. 4:55—Discussion. 5:00—109. Preparation and Structure of an Unusual Binuclear Cobalt Carbonyl Com­ plex of Methylaminobis(dimethoxyphosphine). R. B. King, J. W. Bibber, G. M. Brown, J. E. Finholt. 5:15—Discussion. 6:30—8:30 Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location).

Section D World Congress Center, Room 303 (Level III) General—Photochemical Studies A. B. Ellis, Presiding 2:20—110. Stereochemical Consequences of the Ligand Field Photolysis of d 6 M(chel)2XYn+ Complexes. S. F. Clark, J. D. Petersen. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—111. Cyclic Voltammetry and ESR of the Reduction Products of [Fe(terpy) 2 ] 2+ and [Ru(terpy) 2 ] 2+ . D. E. Morris, A. G. Motten, M. K. DeArmond, K. W. Hanck. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—112. Mechanistic Pathways in the Reversible Photoinduced Reactions Be­ tween *Ru(bpy)|+ and Co(phen)ij+ by Flash Photolysis Techniques. K. Krist, H. D. Gafney. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—113. Photocatalysis of Hydrosilylation Using Metal Carbonyls. C. U. Pittman, Jr., M. Absi-Halabi, B. Tielking. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—114. Photochemical Properties and X-Ray Structural Characterization of a Tetranuclear Bimetallic Complex. Rh2(2,5dimethyl-2-5-diisocyanohexane)4Mn2(CO)10(PF6)2.2(CH3)2CO. K. R. Mann, D. A. Bohling, T. P. Gill. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—115. Cyclopentadienylcobalt-1,4Diaryltetraazadienes: Photochemical, Mechanistic, and Structural Studies. M. E. Gross, W. C. Trogler, J. A. Ibers. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—116. Reassessment of the Role of Ground-State Complex Formation in the Cu Cl-Sensitized Rearrangement of Cis, Cis1,5-Cyclooctadiene. S. W. Orchard, E. Grobbelaar, C. Kutal. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—117. Ligand Control of the Mechanism of Photosensitization by Cuprous Com­ pounds. C. Kutal, N. Borsub. 4:55—Discussion. 5:00—118. Excited-State Properties of Ad­ ducts Formed with Lanthanide Shift Re­ agents. A. B. Ellis, R. Schreiner, R. A. Ulkus. 5:15—Discussion. 6:30—8:30 Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location).

Section Ε Breakthrough Lecture II organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 47) Section F Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—II organized by Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 76)

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

63

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TUESDAY

EVENING

6:30—Divisional Social Hour and repeat of some Monday afternoon Inorganic Divi­ sional Posters. Omni International, Glenmar Room. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 302 (Level III) Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Physical Chemistry

R. G. Parr, Presiding

Section D World Congress Center, Room 303 (Level III) General—Solid State

Η. Η. Patterson, Presiding

9:00—119. Study of Molecular Electron Dis­ tribution by X-Ray Photoelectron Spec­ troscopy. W. L. Jolly. 9:30—120. Auger Spectra of Methyl Cyanide and Related Compounds. R. R. Rye, J. E. Houston. 9:50—121. On the Interpretation and Pre­ diction of the Integrated Infrared Absorption Intensities. P. Polavarapu. 10:05—122. Distributions of Density of States of the Unoccupied Valence Levels: L Edge Absorption Studies of Metallic and Ionic Bonds with Synchrotron Radiation. T. K. Sham. 10:20—Discussion. 10:50—123. Derived and Contrived Electro­ static Properties from Diffraction Data. R. F. Stewart, M. A. Spackman. 11:20—124. Integrated Electron Populations in Organic Chemistry. A. Streitwieser, Jr., E. R. Vorpagel, D. Grier, W. G. Schriver, B. A. B. Kohler. 11:50—Discussion. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 210 (Level II) Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. D. H. Busch, Presiding 9:00—125. Role of Transition Metal Com­ plexes in the Oxidation of Organic Sub­ strates. C. A. Tolman. 9:50—Discussion. 10:00—126. Activation of Molecular Oxygen by Coordination to Metals. R. S. Drago, B. Corden, A. Zombeck. 10:50—Discussion. 11:00—127. Photocatalytic Oxidation Pro­ cesses: Metal Phthalocyanine Photooxidation Systems. R. M. Dahlgren. 11:50—Discussion. Section C World Congress Center, Room 203 (Level II) General—Catalysis

K. S. Suslick, Presiding 9:00—128. Optical Activity Induced in the EU(III) Complexes of β-Diketones Through Complexation with Phenylalkylamines. H. G. Brittain, X.-C. Yang. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—129. Some Bonding Aspects of Tran­ sition Metal Hydride Complexes. A SCFX«-SW Study. C. J. Eyermann, A. ChungPhillips. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—130. Silica as an Oxidation Catalyst. J. N. Armor, P. Zambri. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—131. Hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride: Catalytic Considerations. Generation of Hydrogen for Fuel Cell Applications. C. M. Kaufman, B. Sen. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—132. Role of Formato Complexes in Homogeneous Catalysis. W. A. R. Slegeir, R. S. Sapienza, B. A. Easterling. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—133. Metal Formates: The Catalytic Link Between CO/H 2 0 and Syngas Chem­ istry. R. S. Sapienza, W. A. Slegeir, R. I. Goldberg, B. Tims, G. Dandreaux. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—134. Structure Sensitive Catalytic Reactions of Supported Group VIII Organo-metallic Catalysts. G. D. Stucky, S. Hardwick, V. Payne, J. Shapley. 11:15—Discussion.

64

11:20—135. Synthesis of Transition Metal Vinylidene Complexes Using Phase Transfer Catalysis. D. F. Marten, D. J. Hanlon, D. van der Helm, Μ. Β. Hossain. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—136. Sonocatalysis. K. S. Suslick, J. W. Goodale, P. F. Schubert. 11:50—Discussion.

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

9:00—137. Heteroatomic Cluster Anions of the Post-Transition Elements. T^Tel" and T l S n f . R. C. Burns, J. D. Corbett. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—138. Chevrel Phases. Some Obser­ vations on Their Metal-Metal Bonding and Crystal Chemistry. J. D. Corbett. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—139. Optical and Structural Charac­ terization of Platinum Blau, A Platinum Acetamide Blue. H. H. Patterson, J. Toth, J. Biscoe, M. Dionne, M. Laurent. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—140. Solid State Interactions in One Dimension. Luminescence and Absorption Study of the Palladium(ll) Tetracyanide Ion. K. A. Viswanath, H. H. Patterson. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—141. Partially Oxidized Tetramethylporphyrinatonickel: A New Conductive Molecular Crystal. L. J. Pace, A. Ulman. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—142. Polymetallic Heteronuclear Mixed-Valence Ions Based on the μ-ΥΙίdenemalononitrile Bridging Unit. N. Dowling, P. M. Henry. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—143. Dynamic Reorientational Be­ havior of 7r-Aromatic Transition Metal Complexes in the Solid State. P. J. Fitzpatrick, D. F. R. Gilson, G. Gomez, I. S. Butler. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—144. Tetrahalocadmium(ll) Com­ plexes: Solid and Solution 113Cd NMR, Raman Spectra and Crystal Structures. R. S. Honkonen, E. L. Amma. 11:35—Discussion. Section Ε World Congress Center, Room 305 (Level III) General—Macrocyclic Compounds R. F. Pasternack, Presiding 9:00—145. Superoxide Dismutase Activities of Water-Soluble Metalloporphyrins. R. F. Pasternack. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—146. Multinuclear NMR of Spin-Ad­ mixed S = 3/2,5/2 Iron(lll) Porphyrin Complexes. A. D. Boersma, H. M. Goff. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—147. Electrochemical Evidence for Symmetrically Substituted Cr(lll) Porphy­ rins. L. A. Bottomley. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—148. Reactions of Rhodium Porphy­ rins with Nitrogen Donors. B. A. Woods, B. B. Wayland. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—149. Rhodium Porphyrin Complexes with Small Molecule Ligands. Β. Β. Wayland, A. R. Newman, T. K. Abraham. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—150. Molecular Strain Energy Mini­ mization Calculations. Cryptand Confor­ mational Analysis and Its Mechanistic Im­ plications. R. Pizer, R. Geue. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—151. Structural Studies on Cyclam Complexes. E. K. Barefield, D. G. Van Derveer, D. A. Krost, G. M. Freeman, D. Chueng. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—152. Acid-Catalyzed Dissociation of Macrocyclic and Macrobicyclic Complexes of Pb(ll) in 95% Aqueous Methanol. R. W. Taylor. 11:30—Discussion. Section F ACS Creative Invention Award Symposium Honoring R. L. Pruett—Catalysis for Chem­ icals and Fuels organized by Division of Pe­ troleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 74)

Section G Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—III organized by Division of Physical Chemistry {see page 76)

Section H Symposium on Chemical Consideration for Important Radioactive Waste Species I or­ ganized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 67)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A World Congress Center, Room 302 (Level ID Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Physical Chemistry R. F. Stewart, Presiding 2:30—153. Refinement of Charge Density Models Using Constraints for Electric Field Gradients at Nuclear Positions. D. Schwarzenbach, J. Lewis. 3:00—154. Pseudomolecular Electrostatic Properties from X-Ray Diffraction Data. G. Moss. 3:30—Discussion. 3:45—155. An Experimental Test of Trans­ ferability of Electron Densities from X-Ray Data. R. H. Blessing, G. Moss, G. T. DeTitta. 4:00—156. Characterization of Various Types of Solids Using Charge Density Concepts. P. Becker. 4:30—General Discussion of present and future developments led by P. Coppens and M. B. Hall.

2:45—Discussion. 2:50—165. Free and Polymer-Anchored Molybdenum Coordination Complexes. J. Topich. 3:05—Discussion. 3:10—166. Exchange Reactions of Binuclea Molybdenum(ll) Complexes. T. R. Webb, T. Y. Dong, A. H. Reid, Jr. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—167. Seven-Coordinate Molybdenum(IV) Chelates. C. J. Weber, R. D. Archer. 3:45—Discussion. 3:50—168* A Systematic Approach to Alkyne-Cyclobutadiene Conversions in Group VI Metal Complexes. R. S. Herrick, J. L. Templeton. 4:05—Discussion 4:10—169. Synthesis and Properties of 7r-Allyl Derivatives of Group VIB Metal Carbonyl Halides. P. B. Winston, J. L. Templeton. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—170. Generation and Spectroscopic Characterization of a Cationic Molybdenum Methylene Complex. S. E. Kegley, M. S. Brookhart. 4:45—Discussion.

Section Ε Perspectives Lecture organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of The History of Chemistry (see page 48)

Section F ACS Creative Invention Award Symposium Honoring R. L. Pruett—Catalysis for Chem­ icals and Fuels organized by Division of Pe­ troleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 74)

Section G Section Β World Congress Center, Room 210 (Level II) Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

J. T. Groves, Presiding 2:30—157. Role of Peroxometal, Organometal and Organoperoxometal Intermedi­ ates in Catalytic Oxidations. R. A. Sheldon. 3:20—Discussion. 3:30—158. Roles of Transition Metals in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates. K. Barry. 4:20—Discussion. 4:30—159. Promotion of Oxidation Reactions by Totally Synthetic Heme Protein Models. D. H. Busch. 5:20—Discussion.

Section C World Congress Center, Room 203 (Level ID Symposium on the Surface Properties of In­ organic Compounds at Elevated Tempera­ tures and Their Relation to Catalysis orga­ nized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

G. D. Stucky, Presiding 2:30—160. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Studies of Surfaces of Ionic Oxides. P. S. Turner, R. L. Segall, R. S. C. Smart. 3:15—161. Segregation and Diffusion in Ox­ ides at Elevated Temperatures. J. Nowotny. 4:00—162. In Situ Study of the High Tem­ perature Behavior of Iron Sulfides and Supported Iron Chlorides Catalysts. P. A. Montano, P. Vaishnava. 4:45—163. Exafs as a Probe of Short Range Order in Metal-Exchanged Zeolites. T. Morrison, L. E. Iton, G. K. Shenoy, S. L. Suib. Section D World Congress Center, Room 303 (Level III) General—Molybdenum Chemistry

T. R. Webb, Presiding 2:30—164. Theoretical Calculations on the Strengths of Metal-Metal Multiple Bonded Systems. R. A. Kok, Μ. Β. Hall.

Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—IV—Poster organized by Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 76)

Section H Symposium on Chemical Consideration for Important Radioactive Waste Species II or­ ganized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 67) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 302 (Level III) Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

R. M. Dehlgren, Presiding 9:00—171. Catalytic Oxidation of Isonitriles to Isocyanates by Transition Metal Nitro Complexes. M. A. Andrews, K. P. Kelly. 9:20—Discussion. 9:25—172. Catalytic Oxidation of Olefins to Ketones by Transition Metal Nitro Com­ plexes. K. P. Kelly, M. A. Andrews. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—173. Photocatalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide in the Presence of Dirhenium Decacarbonyl. D. M. Roundhill, K. Alexander. 10:10—Discussion. 10:15—174. Mechanistic Studies of Metal Catalyzed 1-Phenylethyl Hydroperoxide Decomposition. P. J. Domaille, J. D. Druliner, P. J. Krusic, A. J. Mical, A. E. Nader, C. A. Tolman. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—175. New Cycloaddition and Insertation Reactions of Transition Metal Com­ plexes. A. Wojcicki, T. W. Leung, G. G. Christoph. 11:00—Discussion. 11:05—176. Complexes of the Monothiocarbamate Derived from Pyrrole. D. Baird, R. D. Bereman, W. Hatfield. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—177. Ruthenium and Rhodium Com­ plexes of Organometallic Ligands. J. C. Kotz, D. A. Wink, W. Vining. 11:50—Discussion.

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11:55—178. Electrochemistry of Organometallic Compounds of the Type Cp2Mx2. J. C. Kotz, W. Vining, R. Rosen, W. Coco. 12:00—Discussion.

9:00—179. Role and Limitations of Spec­ troscopy in the Study of Catalysis. W. K. Hall. 9:45—180. Applications of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to the Study of Catalytic Reactions. A. T. Bell. 10:30—181. Transfer of Exciton Energy and Photocatalytic Reactions in Zeolites. K. Klier, D. H. Strome, L. Trombetta. 11:15—182. Use of Angle-Resolved Electron and Photon Stimulated Desorption for Surface Structural Studies. T. E. Madey. 12:00—Discussion.

10:00—196. Syntheses of Boron (+1) Cations Containing Alkylamines and Phenyl-Substituted Phosphines. M. A. Mathur, K. C. Nainan, G. E. Ryschkewitsch. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—197. Cation Size and Polarizability in the Thermal Stability of Sulfito Species in Ionic Solids. L. Peter, B. Meyer. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—198. Ammonium Trimethylsilysulfite—An Ionic Solid with Unique Physical Properties. D. W. Bennett, L. D. Spicer. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—199. An Inherently Fibrous Siloxane Polymer. M. E. Kenney, J. Hefter. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—200. Substituent Effects on the Thermolysis of Silacyclobutanes. P. R. Jones, W. D. Snyder. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—201. (CF3)2Cd-glyme, A New, More Powerful Fluoroalkylating Agent. J. A. Morrison, L. J. Krause. 11:55—Discussion. 12:00—202. Hard-Soft Acid-Base Theory and Steroactive Electron Pairs: The Crystal and Molecular Structure of 7r/s-{Tetraphenylimidodithiodiphosphinato)bismuth(lll). D. J. Williams, K. M. Barkigia, C. O. Quicksall. 12:15—Discussion.

Section C

Section Ε

World Congress Center, Room 203 (Level ID General—Transition Metal Compounds R. A. Krause, Presiding

Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—V—Poster organized by Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 77)

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 210 (Level ID Symposium on the Surface Properties of In­ organic Compounds at Elevated Tempera­ tures and Their Relation to Catalysis orga­ nized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. Butt, Presiding

9:00—183. Axial Ligand Substitution Reac­ tions of Ruthenium(ll) Phthalocyanine. M. M. Doeff, D. A. Sweigart. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—184. Chemistry of Bipyridyl-Like Ligands. II. Substituted Complexes of Ruthenium(ll) with 2-Phenylazopyridine. R. A. Krause, K. Krause. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—185. Emission Studies of the Tris 2,2'-Dipyridylamine Complex of Ruthenium(ll). D. P. Segers, M. K. DeArmond. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—186. Characterization of Binuclear Mixed Valence Ruthenium Complexes Bridged by a Tetradentate Ligand. D. Sedney, A. Ludi. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—187. S—Ο Bond Activation in 7/2-S02 Complexes: Novel Structure and Reactivity for Ru(CO)2(?72-S02-S02)(PR3)2· D. C. Moody, R. R. Ryan. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—188. Synthesis and Reactivity of Metal Carbonyl Sulfide Complexes. T. R. Gaffney. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—189. 1H NMR Studies of Cyclometallated Complexes of Pd(ll), Rh(lll), and Ir(lll). J. Selbin, M. A. Gutierrez. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—190. Steric Contributions to Ligand Substitution Processes in lr4(CO)i2-n — [Ρ^3]η. η = 3,4 Derivatives. Β. J. Baldwin, D. J. Darensbourg. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—191. Spectroscopic and Theoretical Studies on Ru3(CO)i2, OS3(CO)12, and Re­ lated Compounds. M. C. Manning, W. C. Trogler, D. E. Ellis. 11:55—Discussion. 12:00—192. Reaction of Osmium Tetroxide with Amino Acids: New Osmyl-Amino Acid Complexes. W. J. Roth, C. C. Hinckley. 12:15—Discussion. Section D World Congress Center, Room 303 (Level III) General—Main Group Chemistry J. A. Morrison, Presiding 9:00—193. 2N Framework Electron Clusters: The Boron Subhalides and Their Deriva­ tives. J. A. Morrison, N. A. Kutz, and S. Emery. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—194. Inorganic Aromatic Rings: The Electronic Structure of B8S-(6. Β. Μ. Gimarc. 9:40—195. Studies on the Conversion of B5H9 to B9H14-, B9H13 (ligand), and B 18 H 22 . P. C. Keller, F. L. Himpsl, M. A. Toft, S. Boocock, S. G. Shore. 9:55—Discussion.

THURSDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

2:40—212. Influence of Ligand Electronic Effects on the Aquation Rates of Monohydroxamatoiron(lll) Complexes. C. P. Brink, A. L. Crumbliss. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—213. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Iodide by the Nickel(lll) Complex of Tri-a-aminosobutyric Acid. J. M. T. Raycheba, D. W. Margerum. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—214. Mechanism of Decomposition of «-Haloalkylcobaloximes. F. S. Pinault, A. L. Crumbliss. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—215. Transition Metal Nitrite Complexes as Nitrosating Agents. J. C. Fanning, A. F. Croisy, A. Dorries, S-J. Uhm, B. W. Slavin, L. K. Keefer. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—216. Metal Ion Conformation Changes in Aqueous DMF. H. B. Silber, F. Gaizer, M. R. Riddle. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—217. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Carborane Cage Exchange Reactions. T. B. Marder, J. A. Long, M. F. Hawthorne. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—218. Stereochemistry and Kinetics of Reactions of Water-Soluble Olefins and DMSO with Platinum Complexes of Amino Acids. L. E. Erickson, T. A. Ferrett, J. M. Estai. 4:55—Discussion. Section D World Congress Center, Room 303 (Level III) General—Lanthanides and Actinides W. J. Evans,

World Congress Center, Room 302 (Level III) Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. C. A. Tolman, Presiding 2:00—203. Hydrocarbon Oxidations Cata­ lyzed by Metalloporphyrin Complexes. J. T. Groves. 2:50—Discussion. 3:00—204. Oxygen Transfer from Inorganic and Organic Peroxidic Reagents to Organic Substrates. Is There a Common Mecha­ nism? H. Mimoun. 3:50—Discussion. 4:00—205. Mechanisms for Oxidation of Hydrocarbons by Transition Metal Com­ plexes. W. A. Goddard III, A. K. Rappé. 4:50—Discussion. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 210 (Level II) Symposium on the Surface Properties of In­ organic Compounds at Elevated Tempera­ tures and Their Relation to Catalysis orga­ nized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. B. Wagner, Jr., Presiding 2:00—206. Spectroscopy of Metal Atoms and Small Metal Clusters in Noble Gas Matrices. D. M. Gruen. 2:45—207. Reactive Compounds on Single Crystal Metal Surfaces. R. J. Madix. 3:30—208. Direct Observation of Wetting and Spreading of Iridium Particles on Graphite. R. T. K. Baker, E. G. Derouane, J. A. Dumesic, R. D. Sherwood. 4:15—209. Modification of the Structure Sensitive Behavior of Supported Pt and Pd. J. B. Butt, R. L. Burwell, Jr., J. B. Cohen. 5:00—Discussion.

Presiding

2:00—219. Synthesis of Stable Lanthanide Hydride Complexes. W. J. Evans, A. L. Wayda, I. Bloom, K. M. Coleson. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—220. Catalysis by 5f-element Organometallics. The Chemistry of Carbene-like Dihaptoacyls. E. A. Maatta, T. J. Marks. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—221. Lanthanide Complexes of Potentially Heptadentate Schiff Base Ligands. E. C. Alyea, A. Malek, A. Vougioukas. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—222. 13C NMR Spectra of the Uranyl Tricarbonate-Bicarbonate System. Ε. Τ. Strom, D. E. Woessner, W. B. Smith. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—223. Heterobinuclear Complexes Containing Unusual Combinations of Heavy Metal Ions. R. L. Lintvedt, N. Ahmed. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—224. Synthesis and Physicochemical Properties of r?5-Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Uranium and Thorium Tris(Hydrocarbyls). E. A. Mintz, T. J. Marks. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—225. Evidence for Splitting of the Lu­ minescent Excited-State of the Uranyl Ion. H. G. Brittain, D. L. Perry. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—226. The 195PT-NMR of c/'s-PT(ll) Diammine Complexes. M. Chikuma, R. J. Pollock, B. Rosenberg, O. A. Gansow. Section Ε Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—VI organized by Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 77)

FRIDAY MORNING Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—VII organized by Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 77)

Section C World Congress Center, Room 203 (Level II) General—Kinetics and Mechanisms J. C. Fanning, Presiding 2:00—210. Hydrogénation and Reduction of Nitrogen Containing Heteroaromatics. G. D. Stucky, D. Corbin, W. S. Willis. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—211. Kinetics and Mechanisms of the Chromium(ll) Reductions of Bis(glycinato/VfO)ethylenediaminecobalt(lll) and Bis(glycinato-A/,0)diamminecobalt(lll) Ions. R. D. Williams, D. E. Pennington. 2:35—Discussion.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

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SUNDAY EVENING 8:00—Divisional Business Meeting. Omni International, Rutherford Hall (1st floor, Convention Center). 9:00—Divisional Social Hour. Omni Inter­ national, Rutherford Hall (1st floor, Con­ vention Center).

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MONDAY MORNING World Congress Center, Room 200 (Level II) Symposium on Amino Acid Neurotransmit­ ters

P. Krogsgaard-Larsen, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Chemical Approaches to the Mod­ ulation of GABAergic Mechanisms. P. S. Anderson, S. F. Britcher, M. E. Christy, B. E. Evans, B. V. Clineschmidt, G. E. Martin, D. Haubrich, G. G. Yarbrough, M. Wil­ liams. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—2. Design, Synthesis and StructureActivity Studies on Conformationally Re­ stricted Analogues of GABA. R. D. Allan. 10:30—Discussion. 10:35—3. Design, Development and Mech­ anism of Action of Irreversible Inhibitors of Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Enzymes. P. Bey. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—4. Conversion of the Centrally Active Constituents of the Mushroom AMANITA MUSCARIA into Specific GABA and GLU Agonists. P. Krogsgaard-Larsen, B. Schultz, H. Mikkelsen, J. J. Hansen. 11:55—Discussion.

MONDAY AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 200 (Level ID Symposium on Non-Tricyclic Antidepressant Drugs

R. W. Fuller, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—5. Nontricyclic Antidepressant Drugs and Some eNewer Ideas About Their Mechanism (s) of Action. R. W. Fuller. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—6. Bupropion and Nomifensine: NonTricyclic Antidepressant Drugs That Affect Dopaminergic Neurons in the Brain. W. C. Stern. 3:20—Discussion. 3:25—7. Zometapine, A. Pyrazolodiazepine with Antidepressant Properties. H. A. DeWald, S. J. Lobbestael, B. P. H. Poschel. 3:45—Discussion. 3:50—8. Synthesis and Evaluation of (±)4,5-Dihydro-4-Phenyl-3H-1,3-Benzodiazepines as Potential Antidepressant Agents. L. L. Setescak, L. L. Martin, M. Worm, C. A. Crichlow, H. M. Geyer, III, J. C. Wilker, D. B. Ellis. 4:05—Discussion. 4:10—9. Pharmacology of Trazodone, a Structurally Novel Antidepressant Drug. L. A. Riblet, D. P. Taylor. 4:40—Discussion.

TUESDAY MORNING World Congress Center, Room 200 (Level II) Symposium on Computer Graphics in Me­ dicinal Chemistry D. Pensak, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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9:05—10. Molecular Graphics: A Tool in In­ dustrial Research. R. Venkataraghavan, R. E. Carhart, J. S. Dixon, D. A. Dunn. 9:30—Discussion. 9:35—11. Computer Graphics and Chemical Synthesis. A. K. Long, E. J. Corey. 10:00—Discussion. 10:05—12. Real-Time Three Dimensional Interactive Color Graphics in Drug Design. R. Langridge. 10:30—Discussion. 10:35—13. The Script Molecular Modeling System. N. C. Cohen, P. Colin, G. Lemoine. 10:55—Discussion'. 11:00—14. Macromolecular Graphics. R. Feldman. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—15. Applications of Prophet and MMS-X Graphics to the Study of Digitalis and Toad Poison Analogs—and Chlormadinone Acetate. D. S. Fullerton, D. C. Rohrer. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 200 (Level II) Symposium in Honor of Professor Joseph H. Burckhalter W. Brinigar, V. Marquez, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—16. Malaria Chemotherapy—An Overview. L. M. Werbel. 2:40—17. A Powerful New Class of Silylating Reagents: Appjications in Prostaglandin Synthesis. L. A. Mitscher, T. Veysoglu. 3:00—18. Program Strategy for the Discovery of New Anticancer Drugs. V. L. Naray­ anan. 3:20—19. The Transition-State Approach to Novel Cytidine Deaminase Inhibitors. V. E. Marquez. 3:40—20. Macrolide Chemistry: Synthetic Modifications of Erythromycin and Olean­ domycin. F. C. Sciavolino, M. A. Guadliana, A. A. Nagel, A. R. English, J. A. Retsema. 4:00—21. Substances Derived from 4-NDesmethylfortimicin B. P. Kurath, J. Tadanier, P. Johnson, D. Grampovnik, R. S. Egan, R. S. Stanaszek, M. Cirovic, W. H. Washburn, J. E. Leonard. 4:20—22. Lithium Carbonate Studies in Man. H. C. Caldwell, W. J. Westlake. 4:40—23. Thiocynate as an Antisickling Agent. W. S. Brinigar, E. H. Koh. 6:00—Social Hour honoring Prof. J. H. Burkhalter, French Suite. 7:00—Dinner honoring Prof. J. H. Burck­ halter (see Social Events, ticket 13 for details).

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 202 (Level II) Demonstrations of Computer Graphics in Medicinal Chemistry

D. Pensak, Presiding 2:00-4.00 WEDNESDAY MORNING World Congress Center, Room 200 (Level II) Garvan Medal Award Address; Selected Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

L. Townsend, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—24. The Consequences of Adenosine Deaminase Inhibition and the Effects of Adenine Nucleoside Analogs Resistant to Deamination. J. A. Montgomery. 10:05—25. Interferom Inducers. W. Wierenga. 11:00—26. Award Address. (Garvan Medal sponsored by W. R. Grace & Co.) A Legacy from William Henry Perkin. Ε. Κ. Weisberger.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON World Congress Center, Room 200 (Level II) Symposium on Recent Developments in Al­ lergy

G. Cordes, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—27. Cell Interactions and Genetic Control of the Immune Response to Anti­ gens. A. S. Rosenthal.

66

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

3:00—Discussion. 3:05—28. Leukotriene Constituents of Slow Reacting Substance of Anaphylaxis (SRS-A). K. F. Austen. 4:00—Discussion. 4:05—29. Chemistry and Biology of a New Naturally Occurring Lipid Chemical Medi­ ator: AGEPC. D. J. Hanahan, R. N. Pinckard. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 200 (Level ID General

J. B. Hynes, Presiding 9:00—30. Preparation and Preliminary Anti­ tumor Evaluation of Some A/-Trifluoroacetyladriamycin-14-O-hemiester Deriva­ tives: AD 32 Analogs with Improved Water Solubility. M. Israel, P. G. Gopalakrishnan Potti. 9:15—31. P 1 -[Adenosine-5']-P 5 -[8-(ethylthio)adenosine-5']penta-Phosphate, a Po­ tent Adenylate Kinase Inhibitor with Iso­ zyme Selectivity. A. Hampton, F. Kappler, D. Picker. 9:30—32. Cyclic Urea Nucleosides: Cytidine Deaminase Activity as a Function of Ring Size. P. S. Liu, V. E. Marquez, J. S. Driscoll, J. J. McCormack. 9:45—33. Pyrimidine Acyclic Nucleosides: 1-(2-Hydroxyethoxymethyl) pyrimidines as Candidate Antivirals. J. L. Kelley, J. E. Kelsey, W. R. Hall, M. P. Krochmal, H. J. Schaeffer. 10:00—34. Synthesis of Halogenated Py­ rimidine Acyclonucleosides as Potential Antitumor Agents. A. Rosowsky, S-H. Kim. 10:15—35. Synthesis of Abnormal Mesoionic Nucleosides. E. Schubert, R. A. Glennon, R. G. Bass. 10:30—36. Synthesis and Biological Activity of 9-j6-D-Arabinofuranosyl-adenine Con­ jugates of Corticosteroids. C. I. Hong, A. J. Kirisits, A. Nechaev, C. R. West. 10:45—37. Improved Methods for the Prep­ aration of Quinazoline Analogues of Folic Acid. Y. C. S. Yang, G. H. McCue, J. B. Hynes. 11:00—38. Potential Radiosensitizing Agents. 5. 2-Substituted Benzimidazole Derivatives. R. P. Gupta, K. C. Agrawal. 11:15—39. Potential Radiosensitizing Agents. 6. 2-Nitroimidazole Nucleosides: Arabinofuranosyl and Hexopyranosyl Analogs. M. Sakaguchi, C. A. Larroquette, K. C. Agrawal. 11:30—40. Stereoselective Anti- and Prometastatic Effects of Bis-Diketopiperazines. B. K. Trivedi, T. J. George, B. S. Zwilling, L. Β Campolito, N. A. Reiches, D. T. Witiak. 11:45—41. A Structural Hypothesis of Can­ cer. P. G. Barber.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 211 (Level ID General R. J. Doll, Presiding 9:00—42. A New Class of Potent and LongActing H2-Receptor Antagonists: BL6341A. A. A. Algieri, G. M. Luke, R. T. Standridge, M. Brown, R. A. Partyka, R. R. Crenshaw. 9:15—43. Insect Repellent Structure-Activity Studies Using Kovats Indices. T. A. Lajiness, E. S. Oonnithan, A. G. Hageman. 9:30—44. Studies on the Geometric Re­ quirements for Membrane Perturbation Using Anesthetic Steroid Analogs. S. W. Fesik, A. Makriyannis. 9:45—45. Molecular Mechanics Calculations as an Aid in Interpreting the Conformational Preferences of Corticosteroids. S. Prof eta, Jr., F. J. Marsh, D. L. Lee, P. K. Weiner, P. A. Kollman, M. E. Wolff. 10:00—46. Use of Interactive Computer Graphics as an Adjunct to Molecular Me­ chanics Calculations. A. Dearing, P. A. Kollman, E. C. Jorgensen, J. Blaney. 10:15—47. Affinity Labels Which Irreversibly Bind a Subpopulation of Opioid Receptors. L. M. Sayer, P. S. Portoghese, A. E. Takemori. 10:30—48. N-Cycloalkylmethyl-7,7-dimethyl-dihydro-norcodeinones and -Normorphinones as Analgesic Narcotic Antago­ nists. M. P. Kotick, D. L. Leland.

10:45—49. Expeditious Approach to the Total Synthesis of Racemic and, Chiral Opium Alkaloids and Derivatives. Â. K. C. Rice. 11:00—50. Expeditious Approach to the Total Synthesis of Racemic and Chiral Opium Alkaloids and Derivatives. B. K. C. Rice. 11:15—51. Expeditious Approach to the Total Synthesis of Racemic and Chiral Opium Alkaloids and Derivatives. C. K. C. Rice. 11:30—52. Structure Anticonvulsant Activity Studies of Cannabidiol Analogs. V. Singh, P. F. Consroe, V. V. Kane, A. R. Martin. 11:45—53. D-Homo-17-oxaandrostane3,17a-dione Derivatives as Aromatase Inhibitors and Ovulation Inhibitors. D. Y-W. Lee, C. E. Cook, J. R. Reel, L. M. Dasher, B. H. Thomas, K. J. Allen, V. M. Petrow, M. C. Wani. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 200 (Level ID General

K. Agrawal, Presiding 2:00—54. 4-Arylcyclohexylaminoalcohol Anti-Hypertensive Agents. R. J. Doll, B. Neustadt, E. H. Gold, J. Kuo, T. Baum. 2:15—55. Antihypertensive β-Adrenergic Blocking Agents: N-Aralkyl Analogs of 2(3-Tertbutylamino-2-hydroxypropoxy)-3cyanopyridine. D. E. McClure, K. Mensler, T. F. Lyon, W. C. Randall, D. M. Gross, C. S. Sweet, J. J. Baldwin. 2:30—56. Hallucinogenic Phenethylamines: Arylmethoxyl Group Conformations as a Basis for Receptor Modeling. A. Makri­ yannis, J. Knittel, S. El Khateeb. 2:45—57. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of Sulfonium Analogs of Dopa­ mine: Non-Classical Dopamine Agonists. K. Anderson, A. Kuruvilla, N. Uretsky, D. D. Miller. 3:00—58. 3-Phenylpiperidines: Central Dopamine-Receptor Stimulating Activity. U. Hacksell, L-E. Arvidsson, U. Svensson, J. L. G. Nilsson, S. Hjorth, A. Carlsson, H. Wikstrom, P. Lindberg, D. Sanchez. 3:15—59. Bridgehead Alkylamantadines: Potential Anti-Parkinson Drugs with En­ hanced Direct Dopaminergic Agonist Ac­ tivity. J. G. Henkel, G. Gianutsos. 3:30—60. Synthesis of Clozapine Analogs and Their Affinity for Clozapine and Spiro­ peridol Binding Sites in Rat Brain. H. E. Smith, C. R. Betts, T. de Paulis, P. L. Mobley, D. H. Manier, F. Sulser. 3:45—61. In Quest of Receptor-Mediated Cytotoxicity: The Synthesis and Biochem­ ical Evaluation of Chemically Reactive Tamoxifen Analogs. D. W. Robertson, J. A. Katzenellenbogen. 4:00—62. 2-(6-Carboxyhexyl)-cyclopentanone Hexylhydrazone: A Potent and Time Dependent Inhibitor of Platelet Aggregation. N. I. Ghali, D. L. Venton, G. C. Le Breton, S. C. Hung. 4:15—63. Synthesis of Some Glutamine and Glutamimide Derivatives for Pharmaco­ logical Study. S. El-Zanfally, S. El-Migirab, V. Singh. 4:30—64. Toxic Substance Formation in Autoinjectors Containing Citrate Buffer. H. K. Sleeman, M. J. Gemski, N. D. Brown, M. P. Strickler, B. P. Doctor.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 211 (Level ID General

C. F. Schwender, Presiding 2:00—65. Alkaline Phosphatase Inhibition: A Possible Relationship with Cromolyn-Like Antiallergy Action. C. F. Schwender, V. L. Decker. 2:15—66. Oral Gold: Triethylphosphine Gold Thiosugars Related to Auranofin, A Novel Antiarthritic Agent, Their Synthesis and Antiinflammatory Activity. D. T. Hill, S. Libsch, K. Stanley, C. Razgaitis, I. Lantos, B. Sutton, D. Walz, D. Griswold. 2:30—67. Osmarins: Osmium-Carbohydrate Polymers of Potential Use as Antiinflam­ matory Agents. C. C. Hinckley, W. J. Roth, P. S. Ostenburg, L. E. Strack, L. D. Rus­ sell. 2:45—68. Antiinflammatory-Immunosup­ pressive Thalidomide Analogs. Κ. Μ. Has­ san, C. Agrawal, R. C. Hastings. 3:00—69. Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid: A Prospective Gallstone Dissolving Agent. A. K. Batta, G. Salen, S. Shefer.

3:15—70. Synthesis of Naphthyridinone De­ rivatives as Potential Antimalarials. F. I. Carroll, B. D. Berrang, C. Linn. 3:30—71. The Concept and Chemistry of Organophosphinates as Prophylactic Agents in Organophosphorus Intoxication. C. N. Lieske, J. H. Clark, H. G. Meyer, J. R. Lowe, M. A. Lawson, W. J. Lennox, W. E. Sultan, A. Kaminskis, W. A. Groff, M. B. Shutz, A. Singer. 3:45—72. Synthesis and Mutagenicity of Epoxyalcohols and Epoxy-aldehydes Re­ lated to Lignins: Their Possible Relevance to Carcinogenesis Induced by Tobacco Smoke. S. A. LaCour, B. M. Lynch. 4:00—73. A Series of lodinated Bisbenzoic Acids for Intravenous Cholangio-Cholecystography. J. H. Ackerman, V. Akullian, J. O. Hoppe, F. J. Rosenberg. 4:15—74. Voltammetric Immunoassay in a Reticulated Vitreous Carbon-Flow Cell. G. Svoboda, C. W. Anderson, B. G. Bennett, K. R. Lung. 4:30—75. Voltammetric Immunoassay for Estradiol in Real Samples. C. W. Anderson, B. G. Bennett.

NUCL DIVISION OF NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY J. Hudis, Chairman R. Hoff, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Essex Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Deep Inelastic Reaction Studies I J. B. Natowitz, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Comparison of Damped Heavy-Ion Reaction Data with Predictions of a Dy­ namical Reaction Model. J. R. Huizenga. 9:40—Discussion. 9:50—2. Deformation and Dissipation in Heavy-Ion Collisions. A. J. Sierk. 10:25—Discussion. 10:35—Intermission. 10:55—3. Direct and Non-direct Particle Emission in Heavy-Ion Dissipative Pro­ cesses. D. Guerreau. 11:20—Discussion. 11:30—4. Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Light-Particle Emission in Deeply Inelastic Reactions at 8-3 MeV/amu. G. R Young, R. L. Ferguson, A. Gavron, D. C. Hensley, F. E. Obenshain, F. Plasil, A. H Snell, G. A. Petitt, C. F. Maguire, K. G. Young, D. G. Sarantites. 11:55—Discussion. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Essex Room Β (Meeting Level) Symposium on Fission Product Transport and Release in Light Water Reactors N. P. Jacob, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—5. Fission Product Release and Transport Following the TMI-2 Accident. D. A. Nitti, J. Η Hicks, K. L. Harner. 9:30—Discussion. 9:35—6. Fission Product Transport During Decontamination. J. Torok, C. E. Ferris, R. D. Delaney. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—7. Detection of Failed Fuel Rods of an Irradiated Fuel Assembly. V. B. Subrahmanyam, G. M. Bain. 10:20—Discussion.

10:25—Intermission. 10:40—8. On-Line Coolant Monitoring and Fission Product Spiking. W. N. Bishop, L. L. Collins. 11:00—Discussion. 11:05—9. Radionuclides in Dardanelle Res­ ervoir in the Area of the Arkansas Nuclear One Reactor Facility. D. M. Chittenden II. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—10. Airborne Fission Product Activity in Primary Containments of Nuclear Power Plants. N. P. Jacob, R. B. Coad, Β. Ε. Tawney, R. C. Young, R. A. Shaw. 11:50—Discussion. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Essex Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Deep Inelastic Reaction Studies II F. Plasil, Presiding 2:00—11. Collisions at the Borderline Be­ tween Scattering and Fusion for Transplu­ tonium Composite Nuclei. H. Sann, S. Bjomholm, R. Bock, Y -T. Chu, A. Gobbi, U. Lynen, W. Muller, A. Olmi. 2:35—Discussion. 2:45—12. Charge and Mass Distributions in 56 Fe-lnduced Reactions. A. C. Mignerey, H. Breuer, V. Viola, Jr., K. L. Wolf, B. G. Glagola, W. W. Wilcke, W. U. Schroder, J. R. Huizenga, J. R. Birkelund. 3:20—Discussion. 3:30—Intermission. 3:50—13. Role of Fluctuations in Deep-In­ elastic Processes. L. G. Moretto. 4:35—Discussion. 4:50—14. Investigation of Sequential Fission in Very Asymmetric Systems. D. J. Morrissey, G. J. Wozniak, C. C. Hsu, R. J. McDonald, A. J. Pacheco, L. G. Sobotka, L. G. Moretto. 5:05—Discussion.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Essex Room Β (Meeting Level) General

N. Morcos, Presiding 2:00—15. Preparation of Simulated Fuel Fragments of U0 2 . M. C. Tinkle, J. A. Kircher. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—16. Effect of pH on the Destruction of Complexants with Ozone in Hanford Nu­ clear Waste. W. I. Winters. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—17. Toxic and Priority Pollutant Organics in Municipal Sludge Land Treatment Systems. M. R. Overcash, J. S. Su, W. P. Tucker. 3:05—Discussion. 3:10—Intermission. 3:25—18. Rapid Incorporation of Bromine Into Functionally Substituted Molecules via Organoborane Technology. G W. Kabalka, K. A. Sastry, H. C. Hsu. 3:40—Discussion. 3:45—19. An Improved Method for the Sep­ aration of the Trivalent Actinides from the Lanthanides by Extraction Chromatography. D. B. Martin, D. G. Pope. 4:00—Discussion. 4:05—20. Observation of Clustering and Precipitation in In-Doped Silicon with Time Dependent Perturbed Angular Correlation Measurements. W. H. Ellis, L. E. Zapata. 4:25—Discussion. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Essex Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Heavy Ion Reaction Mecha­ nisms (Award Symposium) I

J. R. Huizenga, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—21. Award Address. (ACS Award for Nuclear Chemistry sponsored by an anon­ ymous donor.) An Integrated View of Nuc­ léon Exchange, Energy Damping, and Angular Momentum Transfer in Heavy Ion Reactions. R. Vandenbosch. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—22. Q-Value and Ζ Dependence of Angular Momentum Transfer in Deeply In­ elastic Scattering of 56Fe + 209 Bi. M. S. Zisman, R. J. Puigh, R. Vandenbosch, T. D. Thomas, L. Nunnelley.

10:25—Discussion. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—23. The "Spin-Spectrometer" at HHIRF: Capabilities, Performance, and First Results. D. G. Sarantities, F. A. Dilmanian, M. Jàâskelàinen, R. Woodward, J. H. Barker, M. L. Halbert, D. C. Hensley. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—24. Preequilibrium Light Particle Emission in 1 6 0 Induced Reactions between 140 and 315 MeV. C. K. Gelbke. 11:55—Discussion.

4:05—Discussion. 4:10—36. Regulatory Implications of Radia­ tion Dose-Effect Relationships. Η. Τ. Pe­ terson, Jr. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—37. Cancer Mortality Among Women Employed in the Radium-Dial Industry Be­ fore 1930. A. F. Stehney. 4:50—Discussion. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location).

Section Β WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Essex Room Β (Meeting Level) Symposium on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation I organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Division of Chemical Health and Safety A. F. Stehney, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—25. Late Somatic Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Man. G. W. Beebe. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—26. Experimental Radiation Carci­ nogenesis. R. J. M. Fry. 10:40—Discussion. 10:45—Intermission. 10:55—27. A Study of the Mortality Experi­ ence of Hanford Workers. S. Marks, E. S. Gilbert. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—28. Follow-up on Persons Exposed to Plutonium. G. L. Voelz, G. S. Wilkinson. 12:00—Discussion.

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Essex Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Deep Inelastic Reaction Studies III

M. Kaplan, Presiding 9:00—38. Mean Field Studies of Strongly Damped Reactions. M. R. Strayer. 9:35—Discussion. 9:45—39. A search for Non-Fusion in the 1 6 0 + 1 6 0 Reaction at Ec.m. = 34 MeV. A. Lazzarini, H. Doubre, V. Metag, R. Van­ denbosch, K. Lesko, A. Seamster. 10:10—Discussion. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—40. Angular Momentum Fractionation Along the Mass Asymmetry Coordinate. R. P. Schmitt. 11:05—Discussion. 11:15—41. Limitation to Complete Fusion in the Reaction 32 S + 2 7 AI. G. Rosner, G. Doukellis, G. Hlawatsch, B. Kolb, J. B. Na­ towitz. 11:50—Discussion.

Section A

Section Β

Hyatt Regency, Essex Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Heavy Ion Reaction Mecha­ nisms (Award Symposium) II

Hyatt Regency, Essex Room Β (Meeting Level) Symposium on Chemical Consideration for Important Radioactive Waste Species I or­ ganized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Divisions of Inorganic Chemistry and Industrial & Engineering Chemistry

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

T. D. Thomas, Presiding 2:00—29. Heavy Target Fragmentation in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions. G. T. Seaborg. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—30. Evidence for High Temperatures and High Densities in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions. K. L. Wolf. 3:15—Discussion 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—31. Study of Reactions Induced by 1 GeV 12C Beam. H. Nifenecker, J. P. Buenerd, J. Cole, De Saintignon, C. Guet, D. Lebrun, P. Martin, M. Maurel, E. Monnand, J. Mougey, R. Ost, P. Perrin, J. Pinston, C. Ristori, F. Schussler, L. Carlén, B. Jackobsson, A. Oskarsson, I. Otterlund, B. Schroder, H. A. Gustafsson, H. Ryde, J. P. Bondorf, O. B. Nielsen, G. Tibell. 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—32. Heavy Ion Reactions at 19 to 42 MeV/nucleon. J. B. Natowitz, L. Adler, M. Berlanger, R. Choudhury, P. Gonthier, K. Hagel, H. Ho, S. Kniffen, M. N. Namboodiri, S. Simon, R. P. Schmitt, R. L. Watson. 4:50—Discussion. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Essex Room Β (Meeting Level) Symposium on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation II organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Division of Chemical Health and Safety B. Kahn, Presiding 2:00—33. Mechanisms of Ionizing Radiation Action on DNA and Cellular Response. J. I. Williams. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—34. Genetic Risk Associated with Ion­ izing Radiation. J. G. Brewen. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—35. Comparative Risk from Radioactive Bone-Seekers as a Toxicological Model for Animal to Human Extrapolation. N. J. Parks, S. A. Book, O. G. Raabe.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

3:45—50. How Element Concentration and Solution-to-Solid Ratio Affect the Sorptive Behavior of Geologic Media. S. J. DeVilliers, A. J. Mitchell. 4:05—Discussion. 4:10—51. Effect of Radiation on the Leachability of Borosilicate Glass Containing High-Level Nuclear Waste. N. E. Bibler, J. R. Wiley, D. D. Walker, M. J. Plodinec. 4:25—Discussion.

A. M. Friedman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—42. Interactions Among Nuclides, Rock, Engineered Barriers in a Flooded Repository: Laboratory Simulation. R. J. Seme, R. G. Strickert. 9:25—Discussion. 9:30—43. Nuclide Migration Field Experi­ ments. B. R. Erdal, K. Wolfsberg, J. K. Johnstone, D. R. Fortney, K. L. Erickson, A. M. Friedman, S. Fried, J. J. Hines. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—44. Chemistry Research in the U.S. Subseabed Disposal Program. L. H. Brush, K. L. Erickson, J. L. Krumhansl. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—45. Factors Effecting the Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in the Envi­ ronment. K. L. Nash, S. Fried, A. M. Fried­ man, J. C. Sullivan. 11:10—Discussion. 11:15—46. Characterization of Plutonium in Waters at Selected Radioactive Waste Disposal Sites. J. M. Cleveland, T. F. Rees. 11:55—Discussion. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Hyatt Regency, Essex Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Chemical Consideration for Important Radioactive Waste Species II or­ ganized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Divisions of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry and Inorganic Chem­ istry B. R. Erdal, Presiding 2:00—47. Uranium(VI) Complexation in Aqueous Carbonate Media. L. Maya. 2:25—Discussion. 2:30—48. Complexes of Np(V) in Carbonate and Sulfate Media. J. Halperin, J. H. Ol­ iver. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—49. Geochemical Processes Important to Radionuclide Retention in Shallow Land Burial Sites. K. Czyscinski, R. Pietrzak. 3:40—Discussion.

Hyatt Regency, Essex Room Β (Meeting Level) General

J. Hud is, Presiding 2:00—52. Charged Particle Emission from 194 Hg Compound Nuclei: Energy and Spin Dependence of Fission-Evaporation Com­ petition. M. Kaplan, M. Rajagopalan, D. Logan, J. W. Ball, H. Delagrange, M. F. Rivet, J. M. Alexander, L. C. Vaz, M. S. Zisman. 2:20—Discussion. 2:25—53. Tests of Energy Equilibration in 40 Ar Reactions: Correlations between Evaporative 1 H, 4He, and Fission. M. F. Rivet, D. Logan, J. M. Alexander, E. Duek, M. S. Zisman, M. Kaplan. 2:45—Discussion. 2:50—54. Fusion Barriers, Empirical and Theoretical: Evidence for Dynamic Defor­ mation in Subbarrier Fusion. L. C. Vaz, J. M. Alexander, G. R. Satchler. 3:10—Discussion. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—55. Isomer Ratio Calculation in the Reaction 18 0( 29 Si,p2n) 44 Sc. H. Groening, K. Aleklett, P. McGaughey, K. Moody, W. Loveland, G. T. Seaborg. 3:50—Discussion. 3:55—56. A Comparison of Fission of Ura­ nium 238 Induced by 500-MeV Protons and 350-MeV Positive Pions. W. Faubel, B. P. Bayhurst, B. J. Dropesky, C. J. Orth, R. J. Prestwood, R. S. Rundberg. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—57. An Automated System for Selec­ tive Fission Product Separations: Decays of 113 - 115 Pd. D. H. Meikrantz, R. J. Gehrke, L. D. Mclsaac, J. D. Baker, R. C. Green­ wood. 4:40—Discussion.

ORGN DIVISION OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY P. G. Gassman, Chairman P. Beak, Secretary-Treasurer

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 301 (Level III) The James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry Symposium

Ε. Μ. Burgess, Presiding 9:00—1. Advances in Detection of Free Radicals by Spin Trapping. E. G. Janzen. 9:40—2. Chemistry of Carbenes Probed by Direct Observation. G. B. Schuster, J. J. Zupancic. 10:20—3. Evidence for Electron Transfer as the Major Pathway in Reactions of Main Group Metal Alkyls and Hydrides with Or­ ganic Substrates. E. C. Ashby. 11:00—4. Award Address. (The James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry sponsored by the ACS Northeastern Sec­ tion.) The Unity of Electrophilic Mechanisms in Organic and Organometallic Chemistry. S. Fukuzumi, J. K. Kochi.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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Section B

Section D

World Congress Center, Room 208 (Level ID Synthesis—Alkaloids and Heterocyclic Ni­ trogen Compounds K. A. Parker, Presiding

World Congress Center, Room 304 (Level III) Heteroaromatics

9:00—5. a-Methoxyhippuric Acid-Α Versatile Intermediate for p-Lactam Synthesis. M. S. Manhas, M. S. Khajavi, M. Sugiura, M. S. Bose. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—6. Selectivity in the Addition of Carbanion Nucleophiles to Indole Chromium Tricarbonyl Complexes. M. F. Semmelhack, J. L. Garcia, W. D. Wulff 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—7. Biomimetic Approach to Elaeocarpus Alkaloids. A Short Convergent Syn­ thesis of Elaeocarpidine. R. M. Soil, G. W. Gribble. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—8. Synthesis of Perhydrohistrionicotoxin. J. D. Meinhart, S. Van Wallendael, S. A. Godleski. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—9. A General High Yield Synthesis of 2-Azaadamantanes and Their 4,8-Disubstituted Derivatives. W. C. Faith, J. T. Hane, J. G. Henkel. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—10. Synthesis of 7,9-Di-O-Methyl11-Oxosibiromycinone. F. A. Carey, R. M. Giuliano. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—11. Progress on the Total Synthesis of Sibiromycin: Synthesis of Sibirosamine. K. A. Parker, R. E. Babine. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—12. Oxime Rearrangement Cyclization. R. E. Gawley, E. J. Termine. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—13. N-Acyliminium Ions: Detection of a Hidden 2-Aza-Cope Rearrangement. D. J. Hart, Y-M Tsai. 11:55—Discussion. Section C World Congress Center, Room 209 (Level ID Synthetic Methodology J. Wolfe, Presiding 9:00—14. Directed Metalation in Aryloxazolines: Studies Directed Toward the Syn­ thesis of Internally Functionalized Dihydropyrenes. T. D. Harris, S. A. Babirad, D. Shea, M. Spacher. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—15. Metalation of Diazepam and Use of the Resulting Carbanion Intermediate in a New Synthesis of 3-Substituted Diazepam Derivatives. B. E. Reitter, Y. P. Sachdeva, J. F. Wolfe. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—16. Synthesis of Polycyclic Hydrocar­ bons via A Novel Annelation Method. R. G. Harvey, C. Cortez. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—17. Methoxymethyl-Directed Aryl Metalation, a Total Synthesis of Averufin. C. A. Townsend, S. G. Davis, S. B. Christensen, J. C. Link. 10:15—Discussion 10:20—18. 1,4-Dipole Strategies for Anthracyclinone Synthesis. B. L. Chenard, M. G. Dolson, T. Gaag, J. S. Swenton. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—19. Sultines in the Synthesis of Anthracyclinones and Anthraquinones. J. R. Wiseman, N. J. Iroff, C. A. Otto, P. E. Finke. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—20. Phthaloylmetal Complexes in Synthesis. Menaquinones. L. S. Liebeskind, M. S. South, S. L. Baysdon, C. P. Jewell, Jr. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—21. A Highly Stereoselective Syn­ thesis of Cyclopentene Derivatives from 1,3-Dienes. R. L. Danheiser, C. MartinezDavila, R. J. Auchus, J. T. Kadonaga. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—22. Studies Directed Toward the Synthesis of Quassin. L. Mandell, L. Courtney, D. Lee. 11:55—Discussion.

4:40—40. Benzaldehyde Plus Potassium Hydride-Benzoyl Anion? M. Govindan, H. W. Pinnick. 4:55—Discussion.

Section Β

S. W. Schneller, Presiding 9:00—23. Molecular Rearrangement and Rate Study in the Reaction of Indoxyl Acetate and Indoxyl Sulfate with Aryl Diazonium Salts. J. E. Sheets, M. T. Burchill, A. C. Skjold. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—24. 3,4-Dihydro-B-Carboline Reissert Compound. F. D. Popp, S. Veeraraghavan. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—25. Rates and Orientation in the Re­ actions of Alkenes with a Reissert Hydrofluoroborate. J. J. Lubinkowski, F. McCarty, E. Marmugi, W. E. McEwen. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—26. Synthesis of 5-Methyl-2H-lsoindole-4, 7-Diones as Potential Radiosensitizing Agents. J. A. Myers, W. L. Whitter, M. F. Ahmad, G. A. Infante, A. Santos, J. Correa. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—27. A Modified Bischler Synthesis of Some Tetracyclic Indole Derivatives. A. Hallberg, D. R. Deardorff, A. R. Martin. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—28. Efficient Regiocontrolled Con­ versions of Quinolines to N-carboalkoxy1,2-Dihydroquinolines. P. L. Stotter, D. E. Minier. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—29. A Novel Product from the Reac­ tion of p-Methylbenzyl Chloride with Guanosine in Neutral Aqueous Solution. R. C. Moschel, W. R. Hudgins, A. Dipple. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—30. Synthesis of Linear-Benzocaffeine. W. J. Christ, S. W. Schneller. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—31. Syntheses of 8-Deaza Analogues of Aminopterin and Folic Acid. A. Srinivasan, A. D. Broom. 11:55—Discussion. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 301 (Level HI) Mechanisms of Addition and Rearrange­ ment

World Congress Center, Room 208 (Level ID Reactions and Synthetic Methods

S. Denmark, Presiding 2:00—41. Reaction of Sydnones with Oxygen. M. Nakajima, J-P. Anselme. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—42. Reaction of Ketenes with Sulfilimines. M. Abou-Gharbia, D. Ketcha, D. Swern. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—43. Deuteration of Acidic Organic Molecules on Metal Oxide Surfaces. II. Exploratory Chemistry. R. M. Pagni, G. W. Kabalka, P. Bridwelt, E. Walsh, H. M. Hassaneen. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—44. Deuteration of Acidic Organic Molecules on Metal Oxide Surfaces. I. Preparation and Characterization of the Deuterated Metal Oxide. G. W. Kabalka, R. M. Pagni, P. Bridwell. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—45. Synthesis of 1,2-Diphosphorylbenzenes. E. P. Kyba, S. P. Rines, P. W. Owens, S. S. P. Chou. 3:35—Discussion. 40—46. Reaction of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Oxalyl Halides. D. W. Miller, J. P. Freeman, F. E. Evans, P. P. Fu, W. M. Trie, D. T. Yang. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—47. Improved Methods for Stereose­ lective Hydrogénation of Highly Substituted Alkenes, Arènes, and 3,6-Dihydroarenes. P. L. Stotter, R. L. Blackstock, K. A. Hill. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—48. Ethylidenation of Olefins Using a Convenient Iron-Containing Cyclopropanation Reagent. K. A. M. Kremer, P. Helquist, R. C. Kerber. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—49. Substitution of Vinyl Chloride Under Friedel Crafts Conditions: Arylation of Activated Chloroethylenes. P. R. West, R. H. Mitchell, S. K. Chaudhary. 4:55—Discussion.

Section C

T. W. Cole, Jr., Presiding 2:00—32. A Remarkable Difference Between Pyrrolidine and Piperidine in their Kinetics of Reaction with 2,4-Dinitro-1-Naphthyl Ethyl Ether. J. F. Bunnett, S. Sekiguchi, L. A. Smith. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—33. A Kinetic Study of the Acid Hy­ drolysis of Representative 2-Fluoro-Nitrogen Heterocycles. H. R. Clark, L. D. Beth, R. M. Burton, D. L. Garrett, A. L. Miller, O. J. Muscio, Jr. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—34. Heavy Atom Kinetic Isotope Effects in Solving the Mechanism of the Benzidine Rearrangement. C. Collins, A. G. Horgan, H. Kwart, K. H. Park, H. J. Shine, H. Zmuda. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—35. Alkoxy-Cope Rearrangement. A Kinetic Study of the Thermolysis of 3-Methoxy-1, 5-Hexadiene. J. S. Locke, A. Viola. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—36. Rearrangement of o'-Aminophenyl Arenesulfonates to N'-(o-HydroxyphenylfArenesulfonamides. K. K. Andersen, G. Gowda, P. McGraw, B. T. Phillips, L. Jewell. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—37. Base Induced Molecular Rear­ rangement of Substituted α,α-Dichloroacetophenones. Β. Μ. Williams, S. W. Tobey, B. A. Howell. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—38. Some Extensions of the Hydrazone and Beckmann Rearrangements. Κ. Ν. Carter, J. E. Hulse, III. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—39. Base Catalyzed Methanolysis of N-Chloro-N-Phenylbenzeneacetamide. J. Almy. 4:35—Discussion.

World Congress Center, Room 209 (Level II) Synthesis

M. Koreeda, Presiding 2:00—50. Toward the Synthesis of Aplidiasphingosine. P. G. M. Wuts, P. A. Thompson. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—51. Studies Directed Toward the Total Synthesis of Magnamycin B. P. G. M. Wuts. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—52. Prelude to a Convergent Synthesis of Maytansinoids. Addition of Carbon Nucleophiles to Hex-1-Enopyran-3-Uloses. T. E. Goodwin, C. M. Crowder, R. B. White, D. G. Ratcliff, F. E. Evans. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—53. Synthesis of Racemic PrelogDjerassi Lactone. P. M. Wovkulich, M. R. Uskokovic. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—54. Synthesis of P-Menthenolides. B. S. Bal, H. W. Pinnick. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—55. Synthetic Approaches to Polyhydroxyagarofurans. J. W. Huffman, G. F. Hillenbrand. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—56. Stereocontrolled Elaboration of Sterol Side Chains. M. Tanabe, K. Hayashi, S. Harada, E. G. Taylor. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—57. Studies Directed Toward the Synthesis of Tritium Labelled Antheridiol. M. D. Meyer, G. L. Carlson. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—58. Electroorganic Synthetic Methods. R. W. Johnson, E. R. Grover, L. J. MacPherson, K. Goldman. 4:55—Discussion.

Section D World Congress Center, Room 304 (Level III) Photooxidation and Organoborane Chemistry D. G. Whitten, Presiding 2:00—59. Gas Phase Generation of Singlet Oxygen at Atmospheric Pressure. W. C. Eisenberg, A. Snelson, R. Butler, J. Veltman, R. W. Murray. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—60. Mechanisms for the Photooxidation of Protoporphyrin IX by Molecular Oxygen. G. S. Cox, D. G. Whitten. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—61. Photooxidation of Chromenol Esters of Vitamin Κ Analogs. R. M. Wilson, T. F. Walsh, W. Whittle. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—62. Rearrangement of Cyclobutylmethylboranes. E. A. Hill, P. A. Nylen. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—63. Relative Migratory Aptitudes of Alkyl Groups in the lodination of Lithium Ethynyltrialkylborates. S. W. Slayden. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—64. Synthesis of Organic Iodides via Reaction of Organoboranes with Sodium Iodide. G. W. Kabalka, Ε. Ε. Gooch. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—65. New Practical Synthesis of Dialkylboranes for Organic Synthesis via the Reduction of Dialkylchloroboranes. S. U. Kulkarni, H. C. Brown. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—66. Hydroboration of 1-Halo-1-Alkynes with 9-Borabicyclo [3.3.1] Nonane Dimer in Carbon Tetrachloride. D. J. Nelson, H. C. Brown, C. D. Blue. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—67. Hydroboration of O-Silylated 1Methylene-2-Cycloalkanols. J. A. Prieto, G. L. Larson, A. Hernandez. 4:55—Discussion. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 301 (Level III) ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry Symposium

A. Padwa, Presiding 9:00—68. Total Synthesis of (±)-Thienamycin. T. N. Salzmann, R. W. Ratdiffe, B. G. Christensen, F. A. Bouffard. 9:40—69. Asymmetric Oxidation of Olefins. K. B. Sharpless, T. Katsuki, B. Rossiter, V. Martin, S. Woodard, Y. Yamada, M. Ikeda, J. Zilenovski. 10:20—70. Methods for the Synthesis of Polyfunctionalized Degraded Triterpenes. P. Magnus. 11:00—71. Award Address. (ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry sponsored by Aldrich Chemical Co.) Selectivity in Organic Synthesis. Β. Μ. Trost.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 208 (Level II) Strained and Bridged Systems

T. Balthazor, Presiding 9:00—72. "Tied-Back" Intermediates in the Synthesis of Extremely Sterically Strained Olefins. E. R. Cullen, M. I. Hollander, C. J. Murphy, F. S. Guziec, Jr. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—73. Synthesis and Thermal Rear­ rangements of Bicyclic Dienes. K. J. Shea, P. S. Beauchamp, L. D. Burke, S. L. Nguyen. 9:35—Discussion. g : 40—74. Propargyltrimethylsilanes. P. E. Peterson, S. K. Chiu, T. Flood. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—75. Crystal and Molecular Structures of Selected [2.2] Heterophanes. A. Halverson, B. Foxman, P. Keehn. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—76. Synthesis, Structure, and Reac­ tions of Small [n] Paracyclophanes. P. G. Gassman, R. C. Hoye. 10:35—Discussion.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

68

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

10:40—77. A New Approach to Stabilizing Monomeric Cyclopentadienones with Respect to [2 + 4] Dimerization. H. Hart, D. Klipa. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—78. Synthesis of Bridgehead-Substituted Norbornadienes. G. L. Grunewald, V. M. Paradkar, D. P. Davis, A. Mizoguchi. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—79. Diels-Alder Reactions of Methylcyclopentadiene. P. T. Klemarczyk. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—80. A Novel Synthesis of Five-Six and Seven-Membered. Spiro-7-Lactones in Rigid Bicyclic Systems. P. Canonne, D. Bélanger, G. Lemay. 11:55—Discussion.

Section C World Congress Center, Room 209 (Level ID Synthetic Methodology

D. J. Sandman, Presiding 9:00—81. Bifunctional Cyclopropyl Reagents: Chemodifferentiated 1,4-DicarbonyI Synthon. B. M. Trost, P. Ornstein. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—82. 1,3-Dithiane-2-Carbodithioate: Synthesis and Reactivity Patterns. R. D. Bereman, D. M. Baird. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—83. Synthesis of Sterically Hindered α-Acylacrylate and Methylenemalonate Esters. M. R. Baar, B. W. Roberts, J. Wong. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—84. Reactions of α-Keto Dianions: The "Super-Aldol" Condensation. C. J. Kowalski, K. W. Fields. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—85. Synthetic Applications of 2Phenylselenenylenones. D. Liotta, G. Zima, C. Barnum, M. Saindane. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—86. a-Trimethylsilylbenzocyclobutenones. Versatile Intermediates in the Synthesis of Functionalized Benzocyclobutenone Systems. D. K. Anderson, B. L. Chenard, C. Slapak, J. S. Swenton. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—87. Synthesis and Reactivity of α-C-Silylated Esters. L. M. Fuentes, G. L. Larson. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—88. Wittig Reaction of Some a-Silyloxy Cycloalkanones. A. Hernandez, G. L. Larson, J. A Prieto, R. Seda. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—89. Direct Conversion of Ketones to Vinyl Phosphines and Phosphine Oxides. D. G. Mislankar, B. Mugrage, S. D. Darling. 11:55—Discussion. Section D World Congress Center, Room 304 (Level III) Physical Organic—Anions, Radicals and Carbenes E. Grovenstein, Presiding 9:00—90. Thermochemical Comparison of Deprotonation by the Superbases ΚΑΡΑ and Potassium D. E. M. Arnett, K. G. Venkatasubramaniam. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—91. Acidities of the C-H Protons in Imines. M. J. O'Donnell, W. A. Bruder, K. Knuth, B. LeClef, R. L. Polt, F. G. Bordwell, S. Romberg. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—92. Probing Electron Transfer Path­ ways in Reductions by Lithium Dialkylamides. M. Newcomb, R. A. Reeder. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—93. Reactions of Triarylsulfonium Salt with Alkoxide Nucleophiles: Involvement of Radical Intermediates. S. K. Chung, K. Sasamoto. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—94. A Novel, Unusual Pathway for Coupling of Aromatic Nuclei via Aromatic Radical Cation Initiation. P. Kovacic, W. B. England, M. B. Jones, C-F. Hsing, R. H. Baughman, D. M. Ivory. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—95. Mechanistic and Synthetic As­ pects of the Anodic Oxidation of Naphtha­ lenes. The EECrCp Mechanism. M. G. Dolson, J. S. Swenton. 10:55—Discussion.

11:00—96. Polar Effects Revisited: H-Abstraction from Toluenes by tert-Butyl Rad­ icals. W. A. Pryor, R. H. Tang, F. Y. Tang, D. F. Church. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—97. Ethenylidines from Diazoethenes: Studies of Their Encumbrance. J. C. Gil­ bert, D. Giamalva. 11:35—Discussion. J 1:40—98. Direct Examination of the Reac­ tion of Singlet Fluorenylidene with Alcohols, Amines and Thiols at Room Temperature. J. J. Zupancic, P. B. Grasse, G. B. Schuster. 11:55—Discussion.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 301 (Level III) Silicon in Organic Synthesis Symposium

T. J. Barton, Presiding 2:00—99. Recent Advances in the Use of Organosilicon Chemistry for the Synthesis of Natural Products. P. D. Magnus. 2:45—100. Synthetic Applications of Vinylsifanes, Allenylsilanes, and Silylcyclopropanes. L. A. Paquette. 3:30—101. Enol Silyl Ethers in Organic Syn­ thesis. T. H. Chan. 4:15—102. Functional Transformations Using Organosilicon Compounds. R. Corriu, J. Boyer, C. Guerin, J. Moreau, R. Perz, C. *Reye.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 208 (Level II) Chiral Systems in Mechanistic and Synthetic Studies

P. Wender, Presiding 2:00—103. Chiral Discrimination in the En­ ergetics of Ion Aggregation. Ε. Μ. Arnett, S. P. Zingg.

2:15—Discussion. 2:20—104. On the Stereochemistry of the SN' Reaction. S. E. Denmark. A. Eschenmoser. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—105. Stereochemistry of Allyl Migration in the Stevens Rearrangement. R. K. Hill, R. Soman, M. Hojjat. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—106. Cooperativity in Asymmetric In­ duction. A Demanding Test for Concertedness. L. M. Tolbert, Μ. Β. Ali. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—107. Asymmetric Synthesis with Chiral Host-Guest Complexes. G. D. Y. Sogah, I. B. Dicker, M. Lauer, D. J. Cram. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—108. Dilongifolylborane: A New Chiral Hydroborating Agent for the Conversion of Prochiral Olefins into Chiral Alcohols of High Enantiomeric Excess. P. K. Jadhav, H. C. Brown. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—109. Asymmetric Reduction of Ke­ tones with Metal Hydride Reagents Modified with Aminodiols and Aminotriols. J. D. Morrison, E. R. Grandbois, S. I. Howard, G. R. Weisman. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—110. A Chiral Synthesis of L-Daunosamine and L-Acosamine. P. M. Wovkulich, M. Jones, M. R. Uskokovic. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—111. Chiral cv-Aminoketones from the Friedel-Crafts Reaction of Protected Amino Acids. D. E. McClure, B. H. Arison, J. H. Jones, J. J. Baldwin. 4:55—Discussion.

Section C World Congress Center, Room 209 (Level ID Synthesis—Carbocyclic Systems and Terpenes

J. S. Swenton, Presiding 2:00—112. Synthetic Approaches to Quasimarin. G. A. Kraus, M. J. Taschner. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—113. Anionic Oxy-Cope Reaction of a Divinyl Cyclobutanol, Pleuromutilin Model Study. M. Kahn. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—114. TMS-Cyclopentene Annulation: A Regiocontrolled Route to Highly Substi­ tuted Five-Membered Rings. R. L. Danheiser, D. J. Carini.

2:55—Discussion. 3:00—115. A Spiroannulation-Ring Trans­ mutation Route to the Antineo-plastic Sesquiterpene Ouadrone. S. D. Burke, C. W. Murtiashaw, M. W. Dike, J. O. Saun­ ders. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—116. A Photochemical Ene Reaction and Formal Acorenone Synthesis. T. R. Hoye, S. J. Martin, D. R. Peck. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—117. Sequential Cope-Claisen Rear­ rangements for the Construction of 1,6Cyclodecadienes: A Strategy for the Syn­ thesis of Germacrane Sesquiterpenes. S. Raucher, J. E. Burks, Jr., K-J. Hwang, D. P. Svedberg. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—118. Cope Rearrangement of Trimethylsilylcyanohydrins: A New Approach to Estrogens and Corticoids. F. E. Zeigler, R. V. Nelson, T-F. Wang. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—119. Synthesis of the Ophiobolane Ring system. P. D. Senter, W. R. Baker, R. M. Coates. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—120. Use of Dithianylidene Anions in the Synthesis of Pseudoguaianolides. F. E. Ziegler, J-M. Fang. 4:55—Discussion. Section D World Congress Center, Room 304 (Level HI) Reaction Mechanisms—Eliminations, Dis­ placements, Cycloaddition G. R. N e w k o m e , Presiding 2:00—121. Kinetic and Carbon-14 Isotope Effect Studies of the Mechanisms of the Base-Promoted Elimination Reactions of Alpha and Beta Labeled p-Substituted 2Phenylethyl Chlorides and Trimethylammonium Bromides. A. Fry, J. R. I. Eubanks, F. A. Pettigrew, L. B. Sims. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—122. Mechanism of Reaction of Benzyl Bromide with Aqueous Sodium Cyanide Catalyzed by Polystyrene-Bound Onium Ions. M. Tomoi, W. T. Ford. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—123. Ion Pairing and Reactivity in the Alkylation of Some Simple Alkali Enolates. E. M. Arnett, S. G. Maroldo, F. Hyduke, G. W. Schriver, E. B. Troughton. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—124. Mechanism of the Triphenylphosphine-Tetrachloromethane-Alcohol Reaction: Pericyclic or Clustered Ion-Pairs? J. D. Slagle, T. T-S. Huang, B. Franzus. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—125. A Geometrical Model for the Ex­ tended Hammond's Postulate and Related Theories. J. M. Harris, L. C. Paul. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—126. Synthesis and Solvolytic Reac­ tivity of Fluorinated Bicyclo[2.1.0]Pentanes. T. H. Kinstle, R. W. Roth, D. W. Beight. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—127. Vicinal Substituent Effect in an Intramolecular Azide to Olefin 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Reaction. T. R. Hoye, D. W. Deerfield. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—128. On the Stereochemical Aspects of the Intramolecular 1,1-Cycloaddition Reaction of Diazoalkanes. A. Rodriguez, M. Tohidi, A. Padwa. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—129. Regioselective Dimerizations of Thiophene Dioxides. K. N. Houk, R. T Pat­ terson. 4:55—Discussion. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 301 (Level HI) Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Essential Oils and Related Products Sym­ posium

M. P. Cava, Presiding 9:00—130. Arene-Olefin Cycloadditions: An Emerging Methodology for Organic Syn­ thesis. P. A. Wender. 9:40—131. Pursuits in Natural Product Syn­ thesis. B. Ganem. 10:20—132. Progress in the Total Synthesis of the Rubradirin Antibiotics. A. P. Kozikowski, K. Sugiyama, E. Huie, K. L. Sorgi.

11:00—133. Award Address. (The Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Es­ sential Oils and Related Products sponsored by Fritzsche Dodge & Olcott Inc.) Synthetic Studies in the Area of Natural Products. S. Danishefsky.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 208 (Level ID New Methods and Applications of NMR Spectroscopy Symposium G. C. Levy, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—134. Ultra High-Field NMR. F. W. Wehrli. 9:50—135. Applications of 600 MHz 1H NMR to Organic Structures. A. A. Bothner-By, J. Dadok. 10:30—136. High Resolution NMR Studies of Cells and Tissues. R. G. Shulman. 11:15—137. Quadrupolar Nuclei—New Techniques. P. Laszlo.

Section C World Congress Center, Room 209 (Level ID Hypervalent Species, Phosphorus, and Sulfur Compounds

R. K. Hill, Presiding 9:00—138. A Dialkoxyarylbrominane. Syn­ thesis, Stability and Reactions. T. T. Nguyen, J. C. Martin. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—139. Formation of Bicyclic Phosphorus Methylides by a Novel Oxidative Cyclization at an 8-P-3 Center. S. D. Harper, A. J. Arduengo, III. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—140. Some Conformational Properties of Nine-Membered Rings Containing Phosphorus. L. D. Quin, E. D. Middlemas, N. S. Rao. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—141. Preparation and Characterization of Dibenz[c,e][1,2]Oxathiin-6-Oxide, a Novel Heterocyclic System. T. G. Squires, B. A. Hodgson, L. W. Chang, C. G. Venier. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—142. Derivatization of Organic NChloramines. F. E. Scully, Jr., K. F. Bowdring, T. Palmer. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—143. Some Reactions of Benzoisothiazole 1,1-Dioxides. R. A. Abramovitch, B. Mavunkel. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—144. Stereochemistry of Oxidation of Sulfur in 2-encfc>-(Hydroxy-methyl)-6encfo-(Methylthio)Bicyclo[2.2.1 ] Heptane. W. N. Setzer, U. D. G. Prabhu, R. S. Glass, G. S. Wilson. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—145. Synthesis, Electronic Structure, and Complex Formation of Simple 1,1,4,4-Tetrathiabutadienes. D. J. Sand­ man, W. A. Burke, G. D. Zoski, L. Samuelson, G. P. Ceasar, A. D. Baker. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—146. Synthesis and Properties of 2endo, 6 -enctonb/s(Methy lthio)3-exo, 5 -exoDichlorobicyclo [2.2.1] Heptane. U. G. Prabhu, W. N. Setzer, B. R. Coleman, R. S. Glass, G. S. Wilson. 11:55—Discussion.

Section D World Congress Center, Room 304 (Level HI) Organometallics

M. P. Doyle, Presiding 9:00—147. Stoichiometric Decarbonylation of Benzoyl Chloride by ChlorotrisfTriphenylphosphine)Rhodium (I). J. A. Kampmeier, R. M. Rodehorst, J. B. Philip, Jr. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—148. Highly Effective Catalytic Methods for Ylide Generation from Diazo Com­ pounds and Allylic Substrates. M. P. Doyle, W. H. Tamblyn, W. J. Hoekstra. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—149. 2,2',5,5'-Tetramethyldistibolyl, a Thermochromic Distibine. A. J. Ashe, III, W. Butler, T. R. Diephouse. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—150. Synthesis and Properties of 2Benzylidene-4Phenyl-1,3-Ditellurole. M. V.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

69

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Lakshmikantham, M. P. Cava, M. Albeck, ι 3:40—167. Singlet-Triplet Reactivity of L Engman, F. Wudl, J. Bergman. /3,7-Unsaturated Ketones. R. S. Givens, W. 10:15—Discussion. K. Chae, D. J. Choo, W. D. Gillaspey. 10:20—151. Vinyl Tellurathiacarbamate. F. 3:55—Discussion. Wudl, D. Nalewajek. 4:00—168. Trans Stilbene Chromophore as 10:35—Discussion. a Photochemical Surfactant Probe into the 10:40—152. A Rational Synthesis of a Stable Structure of Organized Media. J. C. Russell, a-Hydroxyalkyl Complex. G. D. Vaughn, J. A. M. Braun, D. G. Whitten. A. Gladysz. 4:15—Discussion. 10:55—Discussion. 4:20—169. Electron-Transfer Sensitization 11:00—153. Acetyl and Polyacetyl Deriva­ by Organic Anionic Dyes in Photoelectrotives of Silicon, Germanium, Tin and Lead. chemical Cells. J. R. Hohman, M. A. J. A. Soderquist. Fox. 11:15—Discussion. 4:35—Discussion. 11:20—154. Palladium(ll) Complexes with 4:40—170. Photoinduced Electron Transfer S/s-Carbon-Metal Bonds: Ligand Synthe­ Reactions. The Radical Cations of Norses, Complexation, X-Ray Analysis, and bornadiene and Quadricyclene. M. L. M. Biochemical Activity with Supercoiled Schilling, H. D. Roth, G. Jones, II. DNA. G. R. Newkome, T. Kawato, D. K. 4:55—Discussion. Kohli, W. E. Puckett, B. D. Olivier, G. Chiari, F. R. Fronczek, W. A. Deutsch. Section D 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—155. Kinetics and Mechanism of the World Congress Center, Room 304 (Level Reactions of Lithium Reagents with Ke­ III) tones and Esters. S. J. Smith, B. D. Al­ Oxygen Heterocycles and Thermal Extru­ lison. sion Reactions 11:55—Discussion. H. C. McBay, Presiding Section Ε Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64) WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A World Congress Center, Room 301 (Level III) Silicon in Organic Synthesis Symposium T. J . Barton, Presiding 2:00—156. Silylation/Desilylation Process. A New and Useful Strategy for Organic Synthesis. J. Dunogues. 2:45—157. Transition Metal Mediated Con­ version of Trimethylsilyl Alkynes to Com­ plex Organic Molecules. K. P. C. Vollhardt. 3:30—158. Organosilicon Compounds in Organic Synthesis. P. F. Hudrlik. 4:15—159. Silyl Ketone Chemistry. H. J. Reich.

Section Β Wdrld Congress Center, Room 208 (Level ID New Methods and Applications of NMR Spectroscopy Symposium

E. D. Becker, Presiding 2:00—160. Metal Nuclide NMR Applications in Organometallic, Inorganic and Bio­ chemistry. O. A. Gansow. 2:40—161. Natural Abundance Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopic Studies of Native and Denatured DNA. G. C. Levy, R. L. Rill, P. R. Hilliard, Jr., L. F. Levy. Section C World Congress Center, Room 209 (Level II) Photochemistry

L. M. Tolbert, Presiding 2:00—162. Photochemical Additions of Alkenes to Aryl Substituted Phthalimides. P. Wilson, F. Khachik, P. Mazzocchi, K. Houk, N. Rondan. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—163. Synthetic Studies of Benzo(b) Thiophenes and Benzothiazoles: The Iso­ lation of Unrearranged Intermediates. D. C. Neckers, P. D. Davis, S. R. Ditto, F. Wagenaar. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—164. Regiochemical Control in the Photoarylation of 1,3-Diphenylindenyl Anion. L. M. Tolbert, S. Siddiqui. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—165. Neophotosantonin: A New Irra- I diation Product of α-Santonin. A. W. Burgstahler. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—166. Photochemical Ring Opening of Cyclopropyl Anions: An Attempted Gen­ eration of the Isoprenyl Anion. M. A. Fox, C. C. Chen. 3:35—Discussion.

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2:00—171. An Unexpected Product from the Peracid Oxidation of Furan Derivatives: A New (-Lactone Synthesis. P. W. Jennings, S. B. Gingerich, W. H. Campbell. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—172. Tetronic Acid as a Synthon for Heterocycles. D. G. Schmidt, H. Zimmer. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—173. A Novel Two Step Pyrone to 4Chromanone Transformation. S. D. Burke, J. O. Saunders, C. W. Murtiashaw. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—174. Synthesis of Difunctional Me­ tabolites of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). R. P. Duffley, G. J. Lambert, H. C. Dalzell, R. K. Razdan. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—175. Preparation and Characterization of a Destructible Surfactant. D. A. Jaeger, M. R. Frey. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—176. DAST Induced Epimerization of Inositols. S. S. Yang, T. R. Beattie. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—177. Thermolysis and Photolysis of Amino-Substituted Benzenesulfonyl Azides and Benzenesulfonyl Azide-Amine Charge Transfer Complexes. R. S. Lenox, C. E. Hoyle, P. A. Christie, R. A. Shoemaker. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—178. A Mechanistic Study of the De­ composition of a c/'s-Diacyl Diimide. 4Phenyl-1,2,4-Triazoline-3,5-Dione. R. A. Izydore, H. E. Johnson, R. T. Horton. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—179. Fragmentation Reactions of Acyldiazenes. Z. G. Bardossy, M. I. Hol­ lander, F. S. Guziec, Jr. 4:55—Discussion. Section Ε Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 301A (Level Ml) The Photochemistry of Polychromophoric Molecules Symposium cosponsored by the Inter-American Photochemical Society H. Morrison, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—180. Mechanism of Photochemical and Thermal Di-II-Methane Rearrangements of Benzyl Arobarrelene-like Systems. K. Schaffner. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—181. Theoretical Treatments of Regioselectivity in Excited State Interactions between Unsaturated Centers. Κ. Ν. Houk. 10:30—Discussion. 10:35—182. Triplet Energy Transfer in Poly­ chromophoric Systems in Solution. J. C. Scaiano. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—183. Recent Studies on Visual Pig­ ments and Bacteriorhodopsin. K. Nakanishi. 12:00—Discussion.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 208 (Level ID New Methods and Applications of NMR Spectroscopy Symposium W. Harris, Presiding 9:00—184. High Resolution NMR in Organic Solids. J. S. Waugh, W. P. Rothwell. 9:45—185. Chemical Bond Labeling and Double-Cross Polarization NMR. R. A. McKay, J. Schaefer, E. O. Stejskal. 10:30—186. Multiple Quantum Spectroscopy. A. Pines. 11:15—187. Carbon-13 Magnetic Resonance of Solids at Cryogenic Temperatures. D. M. Grant, K. Zilm, A. Beeler. Section C World Congress Center, Room 209 (Level ID Bioorganic and Natural Products H. Pinnick, Presiding 9:00—188. Biosynthetic and Biomimetic Studies of Nocardicins. C. A. Townsend, A. M. Brown, L. T. Nguyen. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—189. Biosynthesis of Streptothricin F. Observing the Interaction of Primary and Seconary Metabolism with 1,2-13C2-Ace­ tate. S. J. Gould, K. J. Martinkus, C-H. Tann. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—190. Biosynthesis of Streptonigrin from UL-13C6-D-Glucose. The Converging Pathway Revealed. S. J. Gould, D. E. Cane. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—191. Ζ,Ε-α-Farnesene: The Major Component of the Trail Pheromone of the Red Imported Fire Ant. R. K. Vander Meer, F. D. Williams, C. S. Lofgren. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—192. Favorsky Reactions of Halogenated β-Diketones-Synthesis of Halogenated Metabolites from Red Algae by Biomimetic Favorsky Reactions. O. J. McConnell, D. Karr. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—193. Terpenoids from the Green Marine Algae Penicillus Dumetosus and Cymopolia Barbata. O. J. McConnell, Ν. Μ. Targett, P. A. Hughes, D. Lehsau. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—194. Natural Products from Three Gorgonian Corals. N. M. Targett, O. J. McConnell. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—195. A N-Acetyl Group More Labile to Methanol ic Hydrogen Chloride than an Analogous N-Tert-Butoxycarbonyl Group. J. C. Howard 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—196. Synthesis of Some Deuterated Hexadecanoic Acids. A. P. Tulloch, L. Bergter. 11:55—Discussion. Section D Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

3:25—Discussion. 3:30—199. Photochemistry of Molecules with Low and High Energy Chromophores. Η. Ε. Zimmerman. 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—200. Photochemical Probes of Elec­ tronic and Conformational Mobility in Bifunctional Ketones. P. J. Wagner. 4:55—Discussion.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 208 (Level ID New Methods and Applications of NMR Spectroscopy Symposium

G. C. Levy, Presiding 2:00—201. Some Biological Applications of 15 N NMR Spectroscopy. K. Kanamori, W. W. Bachovchin, T. L. Legerton, K. Eberl, B. L. Vallée, R. L. Weiss, J. D. Roberts. 2:45—202. Structural Studies of Solid Fossil Fuels by 13C NMR. G. E. Maciel. 3:30—203. NMR Spectroscopy at High Pressure. J. Jonas. 4:15—204. Spin-1/2 Nuclei in Catalytic Environments. W. H. Dawson, R. R. Inners, P. D. Ellis.

Section C World Congress Center, Room 209 (Level ID Gas Phase and Thermal Reactions

D. Liotta, Presiding 2:00—205. Gas Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Reactions in Carbanions: Exchange of Vinyl and Aryl Protons by D 2 0. R. R. Squires, C. H. DePuy, V. M. Bierbaum. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—206. Proton Affinities and Site of Protonation of Enamines in the Gas Phase. D. A. Dixon, W. E. Farneth, M. Ellenberger. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—207. Proton Affinity and Ion-Molecule Reactions of a Simple Silyl Enol Ether. M. L. Hendewerk, M. R. Ellenberger, W. E. Farneth, D. A. Dixon. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—208. Gas Phase Ion-Molecule Reactions of Organosilanes. R. Damrauer, S. A. Sullivan, C. H. DePuy. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—209. Gas Phase Nitration of Aromatic Radical Cations. R. J. SchmHt, D. S. Ross, S. E. Buttrill, Jr. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—210. Neutral Products of Ion-Molecule, Reactions. M. A. Smith, R. M. Barkley, G. B. Ellison. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—211. Coincidence Spectrometry Reveals the Energetic Basis of the Mass Spectrum of Secondary Butyl Acetate. M. M. Green, T. Mukhopadhyay, M. Vairamani, J. Vogt, R. McCluskey, L. Baumm. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—212. Flash Vacuum Thermolysis of 1,3-Dioxolan-4-Ones. T. B. Cameron, H. W. Pinnick. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—213. A Study of 1-Olefin to n-Paraffin Ratios in the Fischer-Tropsch Reaction. T. H. Johnson, R. A. Diffenbach, R. R. Schehl. 4:55—Discussion.

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 301 (Level III) The Photochemistry of Polychromophoric Molecules Symposium cosponsored by the Inter-American Photochemical Society

G. Griffin, Presiding 2:00—197. Photochemistry of Some Bichromophoric Benzobicyclic Molecules. H. Morrison. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—198. Stereochemistry of Excitation Transfer between Chromophores in Poly­ chromophoric Molecules Involved in Carbenium-lon Reactions. S. J. Cristol.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Section D Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 65) FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 301 (Level III) Spectroscopy

M. G. Newton, Presiding 9:00—214. Studies in Hydrogen Bonding. R. C. Haddon, L. E. Brus. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—215. Long-Range Deuterium Isotope Effects on NMR Chemical Shifts in Benzylic Ions. D. A. Forsyth.

9:35—Discussion. 9:40—216. Structure Elucidation with Lanthanide Shift Reagents—Evaluation of Blocking Groups for Polyfunctional Com­ pounds. D. J. Raber, G. J. Propeck. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—217.13C NMR, Crystal and Molecular Structure, and Biological Activity of 4-Fluoro-17j3-Estradiol. M. Neeman, G. Kartha, K. Go, J. P. Santodonato, 0. D. Simmons. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—218. 1H and 19F NMR of 2cv-Fluoro10/3-Hydroxy-4-Estrene-3,17-Dione. M. Neeman, O. D. Simmons. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—219. Annelated Tropylium Salts. R. P. Thummel, P. Chayangkoon. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—220. A 13C NMR Study of Individual Quinoxaline Isomers. F. L. Hedberg, R. A. Harvey, M. T. Ryan. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—221. Conformational Analysis and Hydrolysis of Tricyclic Orthoamides. G. R. Weisman, V. B. Johnson, M. B. Coolidge. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—222. Circular Dichroism of Chiral Vanadium(V) Peroxospecies in Organic Media. Evidence for a Cyclic Structure. O. Bortolini, F. Di Furia, G. Modena, E. Scattolin. 11:55—Discussion. Section Β World Congress Cerjter, Room 208 (Level ID Nitro Compounds and Hetrocycles

J. C. Howard, Presiding 9:00—223. First Steps of the Thermochemical Decomposition of Molten 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene. L. P. Davis, A. G. Turner, W. R. Carper, J. S. Wilkes, R. C. Dorey, H. L. Pugh, Κ. Ε. Siegenthaler. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—224. Synthesis of Carbon-14 Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans. S. W. Page, A. Abramovitch. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—225. Synthesis of 1,4,5,8-Tetranitro1,4,5,8-Tetraazadecalin: Configuration of 1,4,5,8-Tetraazadecalins. R. L. Wilier, W. P. Norris, D. W. Moore. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—226. β-Acylamination of Nitrones. R. A. Abramovitch, D. A. Abramovitch, H. P. Benecke. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—227. Studies of the 2,3-Diphenyl Thiirene Oxide System. U. Zoller, Ε. Μ. Burgess. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—228. Total Synthesis of Apigeninidin and Luteolinidin Chlorides. J. G. Sweeny, G. A. lacobucci. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—229. Synthesis of 3-Phenacylidenephthalides, Phthalimidines and Thiophthalides. J. A. Houbion. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—230. Acylation of 5,6-lsopropylidene Ascorbic Acid. Synthesis of 2-O-Acyl- and 2-O-Methyl Ascorbic Acid. G. A. King, J. G. Sweeny, G. A. lacobucci. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—231. A New Approach to Azaphenothiazine Synthesis. C. O. Okafor. 11:55—Discussion.

Section C World Congress Center, Room 209 (Level ID General S. May, Presiding 9:00—232. An MM2 Force Field Treatment of Aliphatic Amines: Structures and Confor­ mational Energies of Polycyclic Systems. S. Profeta, Jr, N. L. Allinger.

9:15—Discussion. 9:20—233. Conformational Analysis of 8Alkyl-trans-Decahydroquinolines: Experi­ mental and MM2 Results; The Λ/-Η Con­ formational Equilibrium. S. Profeta, Jr., N. L. Allinger. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—234. Structure and Stereochemistry of a New C26 Sterol Excreted by Patients with Neutral Sterolemia and Xanthomatosis: A Circular Dichroism Study. B. Dayal, G. S. Tint, V. Toome, G. Salen. 9:55—Discussion.

10:00—235. Trimethylsilylpolystyrene Resins in the Formation of Polymeric Reagents. R. A. Cassell, R. T. Taylor. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—236. 4-Biphenylmethanol. A New Reagent for the Estimation of Alkyllithium Concentrations. E. Juaristi, J. S. Cruz, A. Martinez-Richa. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—237, Transnitrosation by Nitrosoureas and Related Compounds. S. S. Singer, B. B. Cole. 10:55—Discussion.

Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Automated Dynamic Mechanical Method for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

Section Ε Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 56)

ORPL

MONDAY AFTERNOON

DIVISION OF ORGANIC COATINGS AND PLASTICS CHEMISTRY S. S. Labana, Chairman M. J. S. Bowden, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Knollwood Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Biological Activities of Polymers. I. Herbicidal, Fungicidal and Re­ lated Activities

J. M. Anderson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. C. G. Gebelein. 9:05—1. Recent Advances in the Biological Activities of Qrganometallic Polymers. C. E. Carraher, Jr., D. J. Giron, D. R. Cerutis, S. Tsuji, T. J. Gehrke, R. S. Venkatachalam, H. S. Blaxall. 9:35—2. Biocidal Activity of Organotin Poly­ mers in Wood. R. V. Subramanian, D. M. Andersen, J. A. Mendoza, Β. Κ. Garg. 10:05—3. Polymer-Bound Fungicides for Paints. Synthesis and Testing. C. U. Pittman, Jr., K. D. Lawyer. 10:35—4. Poly(thiosemicarbazide) Copper (II) Complexes as Potential Algicides and Molluscicides. L. G. Donaruma, S. Kitoh, J. K. Edzwald, J. V. Depinto, M. J. Maslyn. 11:05—5. Modifications of Polymers. V. The Synthesis of Some Potential Carbamate Herbicides from Polyvinyl alcohol). C. G. Gebelein. 11:30—6. Polysaccharide Models for Con­ trolled Release of Pendent Herbicides. C. L. McCormick, K. W. Anderson, Β. Η. Hutchinson, Jr.

Section Β Omni International, Knollwood Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) General—New Concepts in Applied Polymer Science C. Schoff, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—7. Characterization of the Curing Be­ havior of Photopolymers by Thermal Analysis, FT-IR, and Solvent Absorption/ Extraction Techniques. R. D. Small, J. F. Geibel, T. A. Giverson, J. A. Ors. 9:35—8. Solution Behavior of a Ternary Systém-ABPBI/PBT in a Mixed Acidic Solvent. W. F. Hwang, D. R. Wiff. 10:05—9. Morphology of Solid Uncured Rubber-Modified Epoxy Resins. J. E. Sohn. 10:35—10. Survey of Polymer Education in U.S. Colleges and Universities. R. D. Deanin, R. R. Martin. 11:05—11. Survey of Applied Polymer Education in the United States. R. D. Deanin, R. R. Martin.

Section C Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (seepage 77)

Section A

Omni International, Knollwood Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Biological Activities of Polymers. II. Drug Related Activity J. M. Whiteley, Presiding 2:00—12. Controlled Release from Erodible Polymers. S. Yolles, R. Roat. 2:25—13. Animal Models for Drug-Polymer Sustained Release Systems. J. M. An­ derson. 2:50—14. Polymers for the Sustained Re­ lease of Macromolecules: Controlled and Magnetically Modulated Systems. R. S. Langer, D. S. T. Hsieh. 3:20—15. Chemical Aspects of the Com­ mercial Development of Polymeric Dyes and Polymeric Drugs, R. E. Wingard, Jr. 4:05—16. Macromolecular Beta-Adrenergic Antagonists. J. Pitha. 4:45—17. Design of Polymeric Iron Chelates for Treating Iron Overload in Cooley's Anemia. A. Winston, J. W. Rosthauser, D. L. Fair, J. Bapasola. Section Β Omni International, Knollwood Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) General—New Concepts in Applied Polymer Science M. B. Polk, Κ. Β. Bota, Presiding 2:00—18. A New Approach to High Solids Coatings. M. S. Chattha, H. van Oene. 2:30—19. Multifeed Emulsion Polymers—the Effects of Monomer Feed Sequence and the Use of Seed Emulsion Polymers. L. W. Morgan. 3:00—20. A Comparison of the Amine Cure of Two Different Epoxy Resin Model Sys­ tems. C. A. Byrne, N. S. Schneider, H. 3:30—21. Polyblends of Polyvinyl Chloride with Chlorinated Polyethylenes. R. D. Deanin, M. R. Shah.

Section C Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (seepage 78)

Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Method for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

Section Ε Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 56)

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Knollwood Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Biological Activities of Polymers. III. Antitumor Polymers

C. G. Gebelein, Presiding

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9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—22. Structure of the Divinyl EtherMaleic Anhydride Cyclic Alternating Co­ polymer, a Biologically Active Agent. W. J. Freeman, D. S. Breslow. 9:35—23. Recent Studies on the Antitumor and Antiviral Effects of Polyanions. R. M. Ottenbrite, A. E. Munson, P. C. Klykken, A. M. Kaplan. 10:05—24. Platinum Polymers as Antitumoral Agents. C. E. Carraher, Jr., D. J. Giron, I. Lopez, D. R. Cerutis, W. J. Scott. 10:30—25. Interaction of Methotrexate (Polylysine) with Rat Liver Tumor Cells. J. M. Whiteley, Z. Nimec, J. H. Galivan. 11:00—26. Polymeric Drugs with Tissue Binding Properties for Localized Chemo­ therapy. R. N. Terry, E. P. Goldberg, M. Levy. 11:30—27. Equilibrium Binding of Drugs and Carcinogens to DNA. The Role of Cooperativity, Site Selectivity and Allosteric Ef­ fects. T. R. Krugh, M. S. Balakrishnan, D. E. Graves, K. R. Lee, L. S. Rosenberg, S. A. Winkle.

Section Β Omni International, Knollwood Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) International Symposium on Reaction In­ jection Molding and Fast Polymerization Reactions

J. E. Kresta, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—28. Crown Ether-Assisted Butyl Lithium Polymerization of Styrene and Dienes. F. L. Cook, J. D. Muzzy, Τ. Ν. Montgomery, R. M. Burton. 9:40—29. Adapting the Crown Ether-Assisted Anionic Polymerization of Styrene to Re­ action Injection Molding. J. D. Muzzy, F. L. Cook, T. N. Montgomery, K. Domeshek. 10:15—30. Polyamide RIM Systems I: Chemistry. D. F. Regelman, L. M. Alberino. 10:45—31. Polyamide RIM Systems II: For­ mulations and Properties. D. F. Regelman, L. M. Alberino. 11:15—32. Studies of the Formation and Properties of Polyurethanes Suitable for Reaction Injection Molding. J. L. Stanford, R. F. T. Strepto, R. H. Still.

Section C Omni International, Glenmar Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) Borden Award Symposium Honoring Eric Baer—Structure-Property Relationships of Polymeric Solids J. Blackwell, Presiding 8:30—33. Catalytic Control of the Nascent Morphology of Polyethylene. A. MunozEscalona, P. Frias, A. Sierralta. 9:00—34. Substitution Reactions of Halogenated Polyethylene. I. R. Harrison, J. S. Butler, J. P. Runt. 9:30—35. Study of Molecular Motions in Polysaccharides by Thermally Stimulated Techniques. C. Lacabanne, K. Nishinari, D. Châtain. 10:00—36. Time-Temperature-Transformation (TTT) State Diagram and Its Role in Determining Structure/Property Relationships in Thermosetting Systems. J. K. Gillham. 10:30—37. Electron Microscopy of PS/PMMA and Rubber Modified Polymer Blends: Use of Ruthenium Tetroxide as a New Staining Agent. J. S. Trent, J. I. Scheinbeim, P. R. Couchman. 11:00—38. Network Development in Films Cast from Emulsions of Polydimethylsiloxane. D. Gravier, J. C. Saam, M. Baile. 11:30—39. Thermoreversible Gelation of Crystal I izable Polymers and its Relevance for Applications. A. Keller.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

71

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Section D Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers wtth Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 78)

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Section Ε Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Elec­ tron Microscopy organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Ana­ lytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. {seepage 81)

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Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 56) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Omni International, Κ no 11 wood Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Biological Activities of Polymers. IV. Miscellaneous Biological Ac­ tivity R. V. Subramanian, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—40. Structure and Function of Anterior Pituitary Hormones. J. Ramachandran. 2:30—41. Covalent Binding of Trypsin to Hydrogels. W. H. Daly, F. Shih. 3:00—42. Carrier Drug Conjugates—A Novel Approach to Drug Design. M. S. Verlander, M. Goodman. 3:30—43. Interactions of Synthetic Polymers with Cell Membranes and Model Membrane Systems. II. Calorimetric, Monolayer and Radiotracer Results. D. A. Tirrell, L. K. Marwaha, P. M. Boyd. 4:00—44. Structure of Chitin-Protein Com­ plexes. J. Blackwell, M. A. Weih, L. T. Germinario. 4:30—45. Thermodynamic Characterization of Proflavine Binding to DNA. Y. Baba, C. L. Beatty, A. Kagemoto. Section Β Omni International, Κ no 11 wood Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) International Symposium on Reaction In­ jection Molding and Fast Polymerization Reactions R. J. Zdrahala, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—46. RIM Development in Japan. K. Ashida. 2:40—47. Quantitative Determination of Re­ action During PUR Foam Formation. G. Hahn, G. Menges, H. Schwesig. 3:10—48. Catalysis of the Cyclotrimerization of Phenylisocyanate by Quarternary Am­ monium Carboxylates. I. S. Lin, J. E. Kresta, K. C. Frisch. 3:40—49. Effect of Annealing on the Thermal Properties of RIM Urethane Elastomers. R. J. G. Dominguez. 4:10—50. Effect of Isocyanurate Rings on Properties of Urethane-lsocyanurate RIM Elastomers. J. E. Kresta, C. L. Wang. 4:40—51. Effect of Hard Segment Composi­ tion and Content on the Dynamic Mechan­ ical Properties of Some RIM Systems. R. B. Turner, H. L. Spell.

Section C Omni International, Glenmar Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) Borden Award Symposium Honoring Eric Baer—Structure-Property Relationships of Polymeric Solids

C. E. Rogers, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. R. F. Boyer. 2:10—52. Award address. (ACS Award in the Chemistry of Plastics and Coatings spon­ sored by Borden Foundation.) Irreversible Deformation Processes in Amorphous Polymers. E. Baer. 3:00—53. Synthesis and Characterization of Poly(1,11-Dodecadiyne) and Related Poly­ mers. J. B. Lando, D. R. Day.

72

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

3:30—54. Nucleation Kinetics in Flowing Polymers Melts. S. H. Carr. 4:00—55. Phase Transformation and Fer­ roelectric Polarization Reversal in Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride). K. Matsushige, T. Takemura. 4:30—56. Interaction of Liquid Environments with Hard Elastic High Impact Polystyrene. A. Moet, K. Walton, E. Baer.

Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Nu­ clear Magnetic Resonance organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

Section C Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 79)

Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Ana­ lytical Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Fourier Transform Infrared* organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cel­ lulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Section Ε Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 78) Section F Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 57) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Knollwood Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) International Symposium on Reaction In­ jection Molding and Fast Polymerization Reactions R. Turner, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—57. Experimental Studies in Phase Separation of Reaction Injection Molded (RIM) Polyurethanes. M. Tirrell, R. E. Camargo, C. W. Macosko. 9:35—58. Formulation Parameters Affecting the Preparation of Semi-flexible Foam In­ strument Panels by the RIM Process. J. M. O'Connor, V. B. Jenkin, R. L. Visger, T. C. Kraus. 10:10—59. RIM Urethanes: Structure/Prop­ erty Relationships for Linear Polymers. R. J. Zdrahala, F. E. Critchfield. 10:40—60. Comparison of 1,4-Butanediol and Ethylene Glycol Crosslinkers in RIM and RRIM Urethane Elastomers. I. S. Lin, J. Biranowski, R. C. Gasman. 11:10—61. Graft Polyol RIM Systems: Ther­ mal Stability and Moisture Absorption. R. A. Markovs. Section Β Omni International, Knollwood Room Β (1st floor. Convention Center) Borden Award Symposium Honoring Eric Baer—Structure-Property Relationships of Polymeric Solids M. H. Litt, Presiding 8:30—62. Hydrostatic Extrusion of Celcon POM. J. R. Kastelic, P. Hope, I. M. Ward. 9:00—63. Feasibility of Using the Coil-stretch Transition in Flow Fields for Molecular Weight Distribution Determination. M. J. Miles, K. Tanaka, A. Keller. 9:30—64. Effect of Oil Level on Extrusion Behavior and Physical Properties of an Epom Compound. A. Banerjie. 10:00—65. Flow Induced Crystallization and Orientation from the Melt. J. R. Collier. 10:30—66. A Biaxial Fiber Composite Pro­ duced by Nature. A. Hiltner, J. Orberg, L. Klein. 11:00—67. Advances in Strength Prediction for Short-Fiber Reinforced Plastics. J. L. Kardos. 11:30—68. Effect of Microcrazing on Fatigue Crack Propagation in Polymers. A. Chudnovsky, A. Moet, I. Palley, E. Baer.

Omni International, Knollwood Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) International Symposium on Reaction In­ jection Molding and Fast Polymerization Reactions K. Ashida, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—69. Metering and Mixing of RIM Reac­ tions. F. W. Schneider. 2:35—70. Fiber Glass Reinforced Reaction Injection Molding. J. A. Harvey, M. M. Girgis, B. Das. 3:10—71. Recent Chemical and Reinforce­ ment Development in the Reinforced Re­ action Injection Molding Process for the Automobile Application. P. Z. Han, W. L. Lennon, R. B. Ratajczak. 3:40—72. Simulation of Cavity Filling and Curing in Reaction Injection Molding. L. T. Manzione. 4:10—73. Computer Analysis of RIM Moldability from Density Distribution in Molded Products. K. Okuda. 4:40—Closing Remarks. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (joint with Di­ vision of Polymer Chemistry, Inc.).

Section Β Omni International, Knollwood Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) General—New Concepts in Applied Polymer Science G. W. Gruber, Presiding 2:00—74. Accelerated Aging of Nylon 6,6 and Kevlar 29 in Elevated Temperature, Ele­ vated Humidity, Smog and Ozone. J. W. Mead, K. E. Mead, I. Auerbach, R. H. Ericksen. 2:30—75. Effects of Filler Surface Modifica­ tions on the Properties of Poly(dimethyl Siloxane) Elastomers. J. Kozakiewicz, S. J. Huang. 3:00—76. Methods for Study of Thermal Aging and Stabilization of Grafted ABS. D. M. Chang. 3:30—77. Plastic, Rubber, and PVC Pro­ cessing Emissions. A. M. Usmani. 4:00—78. Toxic Releases from Applied Antifouling Paints. M. Kronsteln. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (joint with Di­ vision of Polymer Chemistry, Inc.), (see Section A for location).

Section C Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (seepage 79) Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Poly­ mer Characterization by Chromatographic Techniques organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) THURSDAY MORNING

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no srnoking in meeting rooms

Section A

Omni International, Knollwood Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Plastics for the 1980's R. D. Deanin, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks.

9:05—79. Plastics in the 1880'sand 1980's. R. B. Seymour. 9:25—80. Electrochemistry of Polyacetylene, (ΟΗ)χ: Lightweight Rechargeable Batteries Using (CH)x as the Cathode-Active material. A. G. MacDiarmid, P. J. Nigrey, D. F. Maclnnes, Jr., D. P. Nairns, A. J. Heeger. 9:55—81. A New Weatherable Engineering Thermoplastic. J. M. Wefer. 10:30—82. Styrenic Thermoplastic Elasto­ mers. B. D. Simpson. 11:05—83. Segmented Polyether Ester Co­ polymers—Thermoplastic Elastomers. J. D. Ryan. 11:30—84. Nylon 11—The Engineering Coating. C. Fazekas.

Section Β Omni International, Knollwood Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) General—New Concepts in Applied Polymer Science

L. W. Morgan, Presiding 9:00—85. D.S.C. Detection of Til in Copoly­ mers: Styrene-Ethyl Acrylate Copolymers. P. L. Kumler, G. A. Machajewski, J. J. Fitzgerald, R. F. Boyer, L. R. Denny. 9:30—86. Dielectric Properties of Concen­ trated Solutions of Poly(2,4 Chloro Styrene) in the Glass Transition Region and Liquid Region Above Tg. K. Varadarajan, R. F. Boyer. 10:00—87. Encapsulation Technique for Dynamic Mechanical Study of the Poly­ meric Liquid State. K. Varadarajan, R. F. Boyer. 10:30—88. Synthesis and Characterization of Liquid Crystalline Block Copolyesters. M. B. Polk, K. B. Bota, E. C. Akibuiro. 11:00—89. Synthesis and Characterization of Liquid Crystalline Block Copolyamides. M. B. Polk, K. B. Bota, E. C. Akibuiro.

Section C Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Vi­ brational Spectroscopy organized by Mac­ romolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Omni International, Knollwood Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Plastics for the 1980's R. D. Deanin, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—90. A Novel Process for the Production of Particulate Phenolic Resins. A. M. Regina-Mazzuca, G. L. Allen. 2:35—91. Phenolic Thermo Spheres— Chemical Design and Principles. S. W. Chow, G. L. Brode, P. W. Kopf. 3:05—92. IPN's for the 1980's. L. H. Sperling. 3:35—93. Recent Product Advances in Thermoplastic Composites. J. E. Theberge. 4:10—94. Prospects for Polymer and Plastic Technologies in 1980-1990. A. M. Usmani, I. O. Salyer, J. M. Butler, R. P. Chartoff, J. L. Burkett. 4:45—Concluding Remarks.

Section Β Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Recent Advances in Specialized Techniques orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) FRIDAY MORNING Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

PEST DIVISION OF PESTICIDE CHEMISTRY M. L. Leng, Chairman G. J. Marco, Program Chairman P. A. Hedin, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING Atlanta Hilton, Fulton Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Effects of Chronic Exposures to Pesticides on Animal Systems J. E. Chambers, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—1. Effects of Pesticides on Biotrans­ formation Systems. C. F. Wilkinson. 9:45—2. Alterations in Hepatic Structure and Function Resulting from Chronic Pesticide Exposure. J. D. Yarbrough, J. E. Cham­ bers. 10:15—3. Effects of Pesticides on the Kidney. J. B. Hook. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—4. Carcinogenicity Tests on Pesti­ cides. E. K. Weisburger. 11:20—5. Effect of Chronic Exposure to Pesticides on Delayed Neurotoxicity. J. G. Hollingshaus, T. R. Fukuto. 11:50—6. Possible Role of Nerve Microtubule Phosphorylation in the Delayed Neurotox­ icity of Organophosphorus, Toxicants. J. Seifert, J. E. Casida. 12:05—Discussion. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Fulton Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Effects of Chronic Exposures to Pesticides on Animal Systems J. D. Yarbrough, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—7. Estrogenic Actions of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons. D. Kupfer, W. H. Bulger. 2:35—8. Reproductive Toxicity Potential of Pesticides in Animals and its Relevance to Humans. K. S. Rao, B. A. Schwetz. 3:05—9. An Overview of the Structural Fea­ tures of Some Mutagenic and Teratogenic Pesticides. L. Fishbein. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—10. Effects of Chronic Administration of Pesticides on Schedule-Controlled Re­ sponding by Rats and Pigeons. D. E. McMillan. 4:10—11. Pesticide Interactions and Devel­ opment of Tolerance. S. D. Murphy. 4:40—Discussion. 4:50—Concluding Remarks. J. E. Cham­ bers.

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Dekalb-Gwinnett Rooms (2nd floor) General

W. Y. Garner, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—12. Field and Laboratory Evaluation of Various Clothing Materials for Protection and Worker Acceptability During Applica­ tion of Pesticides. D. C. Staiff, J. E. Davis, E. R. Stevens, Jr. 2:30—13. Use of Pooled Bovine Sera in As­ sessing Methodology to Determine PCB's in Blood Serum. V. W. Burse, L. L. Needham, J. A. Liddle, D. D. Bayse. 2:55—14. Toxicokinetics and Metabolism of Daily Dermal Administrations of O-ethylO-4-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonothioate (EPN) in the Hen. M. B. Abou-Donia, H. M. Abdel-Kader.

3:20—15. Kinetics of Chemical Degradation of Organophosphorus Pesticides. Hydrol­ ysis of Chlopyrifos—Methyl and Chlorpyrifos in Aqueous Solution in Presence of Copper (II). P. F. Blanchet, A. St. George. 3:45—16. Identification of Two Isomeric Biphenyl Compounds Formed in the Photol­ ysis of Aqueous Monuron. F. S. Tanaka, R. G. Wien, B. L. Hoffer. 4:10—17. Development of Soil as Quality Assurance Standard Reference Material. E. J. Kantor, R. R. Watts.

4:15—33. Room Air Concentrations of In­ secticides Following Application of Com­ mercial Pest Control Strips. M. D. Jackson, R. G. Lewis. 4:35—34. Persistent Vitellogenin—Like Protein and Binding of DDT in the Serum or Insecticide—Resistant Mosquitofish (Gambusia Affinis). M. S. Denison, J. E. Chambers, J. D. Yarbrough. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location).

TUESDAY MORNING

Symposium on N-Nitroso Compounds. II. Chemistry of Formation and Blocking orga­ nized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 42)

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Fulton Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Biochemical Responses In­ duced by Herbicides D. E. Moreland, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—18. Identification of the Receptor Site for Triazine Herbicides in Chloroplast Thylakoid Membranes. K. E. Steinback, K. Pfister, G. Gardner, C. J. Arntzen. 9:40—Discussion. 9:50—19. Binding Sites Associated with In­ hibition of Photosystem II. L. L. Shipman. 10:25—20. PS II Inhibiting Chemicals: Mo­ lecular Interaction Between Inhibitors and a Common Target. C. J. Van Assche, P. M. Carles. 11:00—Discussion. 11:15—21. Interaction of Herbicides with Cellular and Liposome Membranes. D. E. Moreland, S. C. Huber, W. P. Novitzky. 11:45—Discussion. Section Β Symposium on N-Nitrosocompounds. I. Chemistry and Metabolism organized by Di­ vision of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 42) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Fulton Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Biochemical Responses In­ duced by Herbicides F. D. Hess, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—22. Effects of Herbicides on Plant Membrane Lipid Composition. J. B. St. John. 2:35—Discussion. 2:45—23. New Aspects on the Biochemical Mode of Action of Bleaching Herbicides. P. Boger. 3:20—24. Bioregulation of Pigment Biosyn­ thesis by Onium Compounds. H. Yokoyama, W. J. Hsu, S. M. Poling, E. Hayman. 3:45—Discussion. 4:00—25. Site of Action of New Diphenyl Ether Herbicides. G. L. Orr, F. D. Hess. 4:25—26. Role of Light and Oxygen in the Action of Photosynthetic Inhibitor Herbi­ cides. A. D. Dodge. 4:50—Discussion. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour. Jonathan's Atop the Mart, 240 Peachtree St., N.W.

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Strasboug-Vienna Rooms (3rd floor) General G. L. Baughman, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—27. Degradation and Persistence of Decamethrin in Soil. D. D. Kaufman, A. J. Kayser, B. A. Russel, E. H. Doyle, T. I. Munitz. 2:25—28. Microbial Degradation of Carbofuran in Soil. D. D. Kaufman, A. J. Kayser, E. H. Doyle, T. I. Munitz. 2:45—29. Gas-Chromatographic Analysis of Residues of Pirimiphos Methyl in Water, Fish, and Snails. L. H. Zakitis. 3:05—30. Toxicity, Bioconcentration, and Persistence of Pyrethroid Insecticides in the Marine Environment. R. L. Garnas, S. C. Schimmel. 3:30—31. A Sand Filtration/Activated^arbon Treatment System for Removal of Pesticide Residues from Flowing Aquatic Toxicity Tests. J. C. Moore, L. R. Goodman. 3:55—32. A Program for Surveying Pesticide Residues in the Air of Private Residences. K. E. MacLeod, R. G. Lewis.

Section C

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Fulton Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Biochemical Responses In­ duced by Herbicides

J. B. St. John, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—35. Herbicides as Mitotic Poisons: Determining and Categorizing Types of Effects. F. D. Hess. 9:45—Discussion. 9:55—36. Biochemically Induced Interactions of Glyphosate. R. E. Hoagland. 10:30—Discussion. 10:40—37. Mode of Action Information for Herbicides from Using Chlamydomonas Reinhardii and a Coulter Counter. C. Fedtke. 11:10—38. Use of Chlorella to Identify Bio­ chemical Modes of Action of Herbicides. S. Sumida, R. Yoshida. 11:40—Discussion.

Section Β Symposium on N-Nitroso Compounds. III. Chemistry of Formation and Blocking orga­ nized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 42)

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Fulton Room (2nd floor) Discussion Group on Developments in Ana­ lytical Chemistry J. R. Plimmer, Presiding 9:00—46. Introductory Remarks and Dis­ cussion Objectives. 9:15—Open discussion by participants on Developments in Analytical Chemistry. 11:30—Concluding Remarks. J. R. Plimmer. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Milan Room (3rd floor) General J. E. Oliver, Presiding

Section A Atlanta Hilton, Fulton Room (2nd floor) General Η. Μ. LeBaron,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—39. Structure-Activity Relationship of a New Selective Postemergence UreaType Herbicide (S-3552) and Its Derivatives for Broadleaf Weed Control in Soybeans. K. Kamoshita, I. Takemoto, R. Yoshida, A. Okumura, S. Sumida. 2:30—40. Chemistry and Biological Activity of Some Alkylsulfur-Substituted Trifluoromethyl Alkanesulfonanilides. J. R. Throckmorton, L. S. Ruffing, W. E. Burg, E. A. Mikhail. 2:50—41. Insecticide Resistance in Different Strains of Spodoptera Littoralis (BOISD). A. S. El-Nawawy, M. A. Abbassy, M. Ashry, N. Anbr, M. B. Abou-Donia. 3:15—42. Synergism in the Toxicity of Mos­ quitoes to Photodynamically Active Xanthene Dyes. J. R. Heitz, T. L. Carpenter, J. H. Ross, T. G. Mundie. 3:40—43. Enhancement of Boll Weevil Pheromone Biosynthesis with JH-3. P. A. Hedin, O. H. Lendig, G. Wiygul. 4:00—44. Isolation and Characterization of the Feeding and Oviposition Stimulants for Manduca Sexta from Solanum Carolinense. W. J. Coco, J. D. Thacker, J. Bordner, R. T. Yamamoto. 4:25—45. Natural Ant Repellants from Tropical Plants. D. F. Wiemer, D. C. Ales, A. Adejare, S. P. Hubbell. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting. Section Β Symposium on N-Nitroso Compounds. IV. Analysis and Occurrence organized by Divi­ sion of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 42)

Atlanta Hilton, Fulton Room (2nd floor) Discussion Group on the Significance of Impurities in Pesticides

P. C. Kearney, Presiding 2:00—55. Introductory Remarks and Dis­ cussion Objectives. 2:15—Open discussion by participants on the Significance of Impurities in Pesticides. 4:30—Concluding Remarks. P. C. Kearney.

PETR DIVISION OF PETROLEUM CHEMISTRY, INC. Ε. Κ. Fields, Chairman W. V. Bush, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Forsythe and Rockdale Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Chemistry of Engine Com­ bustion Deposits L. B. Ebert, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Effect of Combustion Chamber Deposit Location and Composition. R. E. Baker, Κ. Μ. Adams. 9:35—2. Fuel-Related Factors Affecting En­ gine Octane Requirements. L. B. Graiff. 10:05—3. Some Aspects of the Development of Combustion Chamber Deposits in Gas­ oline-Fueled Internal Combustion Engines. P. J. Jessup.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—47. Agricultural Exposure to 2,4-D. R. G. Nash, P. C. Kearney, S. N. Fertig v J. C. Maitlen, C. R. Sell. 9:30—48. Solution Photolysis as a Pretreatment in Soil Disposal of Chlorinated Or­ ganic Wastes. P. C. Kearney, J. R. Plim­ mer, Ζ. Μ. Li. 9:55—49. Some "Phenolic Impurities of 2,4-D Herbicides. J. E. Oliver, W. R. Lusby. 10:20—50. Preliminary Survey of Major Neutral Impurities of 2,4-D. W. R. Lusby, J. E. Oliver, P. C. Kearney. 10:45—51. Column Chromatography Sepa­ ration of Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and Me­ tabolites. L. L. Needham, A. L. Smrek, S. L. Head, V. M. Burse, J. A. Liddle. 11:10—52. Evaluation of Silica and Polar Bonded Columns for the HPLC Analysis of Temephos Formulations. J. W. Miles, D. L. Mount. 11:35—53. Analysis of Dialkyl Phosphate Metabolites of Organophosphorus Pesti­ cides by Extractive Alkylation. D. E. Bradway. 11:55—54. Insect Ecdysis Inhibitors from Ajuga Remota. I. Kubo, J. A. Klocke, S. Asano. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

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10:35—4. Effect of Combustion Chamber Deposits on Octane Requirement Increase and Fuel Economy. Y. Nakamura, Y. Yonekawa, N. Okamoto. 11:05—5. Chemistry of Deposits of Internal Combustion Engineers. I. Microanalysis, TGA, and Infrared Spectroscopy. L. B. Ebert, W. H. Davis, Jr., D. R. Mills, J. D. Dennerlein. 11:35—6. Chemistry of Deposits of Internal Combustion Engines. II. Direct Insertion Probe Mass Spectroscopy, Nuclear Mag­ netic Resonance, and Soxhlet Extraction. W. H. Davis, Jr., L. B. Ebert, J. D. Denner­ lein, D. R. Mills.

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Section Β Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-l. FGD Scrubbers and Dry Re­ moval Systems organized by Division of In­ dustrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Environmental Chemistry and Fuel Chemistry {see page 56) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Forsythe and Rockdale Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Chemistry of Engine Com­ bustion Deposits L. B. Ebert, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—7. Deposit Formation by Diffusion of Flame Intermediates to a Cold Surface. J. D. Bittner, S. M. Faist, J. B. Howard, J. P. Longwell. 2:35—8. A Theoretical Study of Engine De­ posit and Its Effect on Octane Requirement Using an Engine Simulation. A. J. DeGregoria. 3:05—9. Jet Aircraft Fuel System Deposits. R. N. Hazlett, J. M. Hall. 3:35—10. Soot Reduction in Diesel Engines by Catalytic Effects. R. Sapienza, T. Butcher, C. Krishna, J. Gaffney. 4:05—11. Evaluation of Engine Deposits in a Modified Single-Cylinder Engine Test. I. J. Spilners, J. F. Hedenburg, C. R. Spohn. 4:35—12. Effect of Fuel and Lubricant Com­ position on Engine Deposit Formation. I. J. Spilners, J. F. Hedenburg. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Fayette and Newton Rooms (2nd floor) Lubrizol Award Symposium Honoring H. Pines: Fundamentals of Catalytic and Ther­ mal Reactions W. O. Haag, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—13. Isomerization and Hydrocracking of Long Chain Alkanes: New Insight into Carbenium Ion Chemistry. J. Weitkamp, P. A. Jacobs. 2:35—14. Thermal Reactions of Aliènes and Acetylenes. W. D. Huntsman, K. A. Dykstra, V. P. Giannamore, K. C. Weaver, T. K. Yin. 3:05—15. Dehydration of Alcohols on Alumina. H. Knôzinger. 3:40—16. Activities of Activated Mo(CO)6/ Al 2 0 3 Catalysts for the Hydrogénation of Propylene and the Hydrogenolysis of Alkanes and Cyclopropane. R. G. Bowman, R. I. Nakamura, R. L. Burwell, Jr. 4:15—17. Award Address. (ACS Award in Petroleum Chemistry sponsored by Lubrizol Corp.) Saga of the Discovery of Alkylation of Paraffins and Related Reflections. H. Pines. Section C Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-ll. Liquid Phase Reactions organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Environmental Chemistry and Fuel Chemistry (see page 56)

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

74

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Forsythe and Rockdale Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry and Geochemistry {Probationary) R. L. Berg, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—18. Oxyalkylation Kinetics and Alkenyl Oxide Distribution. T. L. Ashcraft, Jr. 9:30—19. An Explanation of the Origin of the Middle Phase in Oil-Water-Surfactants-Salt Systems. E. Ruckenstein. 10:00—20. Aggregation of Sodium Alkylbenzenesulfonates in Aqueous Solution. L. J. Magid, R. J. Shaver, E. Gulari. 10:30—21. Oil-Water-Rock Wettability Measurement. E. C. Donaldson. 11:00—22. Temperature, Pressure, and Composition Effects on the Phase Behavior of Some Concentrated Surfactant Systems. J. P. O'Connell, J. D. Kim, P. T. Coram, R. J. Brugman. 11:30—23. Liquid-Liquid Phase Behavior in C02-Hydrocarbon Systems. F. M. Orr, Jr., C. L. Lien, M. T. Pelletier. Section Β Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-lll. Thermodynamics and Solid Dissolution organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Environmental Chemistry and Fuel Chemistry (see page 56)

Section C E. V. Murphree Award Symposium Honoring G. Alex Mills: Advanced Catalytic Processes for Synthetic Fuels organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 57)

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Forsythe and Rockdale Rooms (2nd floor) 1:45—Divisional Business Meeting. Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry and Geochemistry (Probationary)

R. T. Johansen, Presiding

J. S. Bradley,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—30. Chemicals and Fuels from Syn­ thesis Gas—a Look to the Future. I. Wender. 9:50—31. Rhodium Catalyzed Low Pressure Hydroformylation of Vinyl Esters. Solvent and Phosphine Effects on Catalyst Activity, Selectivity, and Stability. D. R. Bryant, A. G. Abatjoglou. 10:35—32. Syngas Homologation of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids. J. C. Knifton. 11:20—33. Award Address. (ACS Award for Creative Invention sponsored by the Cor­ poration Associates.) Rhodium Chemistry and the Hydroformylation Reaction. R. L. Pruett. Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Fayette and Newton Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Residuum Upgrading and Coking organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry D. C. Green, Presiding 8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—34. Asphaltene Cracking in Catalytic Hydrotreating of Heavy Oil. S. Asaoka, S. Nakata, Y. Shiroto, C. Takeuchi. 9:30—35. Residuum and Heavy Oil Upgrading with the CANMET Hydrocracking Process. D. J. Patmore, C. P. Khulbe, K. Belinko. 10:00—36. Composite Catalyst Beds for Hydroprocessing of Heavy Residua. A. Nielsen, B. Cooper, A. C. Jacobsen. 10:30—37. Upgrading of High Metals Vene­ zuela Residua. J. M. Pazo, L. Aquino, J. Pachano. 11:00—38. Successful Performance of a Refinery with Eureka Unit. T. Takeuchi, Y. Hirotani, Y. Miyabuchi, M. Shigeta T. Aiba. 11:30—39. Industrial Process (VREC) for the Thermocatalytic Desulfurization of High Sulfur Content Petroleum Green Cokes to Electrode Grade Coke. T. Reis. Section C Atlanta Hilton, Milan Room (3rd floor) Symposium on Chemical Physics of Catal­ ysis organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry H. F. Harnsberger, Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—24. An Evaluation of the Flow Proper­ ties of Xanthan Gum Solutions. J. L. Duda, E. E. Klaus, W. C. Leung. 2:30—25. Synthesis, Characterization and Rheological Behavior of Model Acrylamide Random and Graft Copolymers for Utiliza­ tion in Enhanced Oil Recovery. C. L. McCormick, H. H. Neidlinger, R. D. Hester, G. C. Wildman. 3:00—26. Linear Oil Displacement by the Emulsion Entrapment Process. D. P. Schmidt, H. Soo, C. J. Radke. 3:30—27. Salting-Out and Multivalent Cation Precipitation of Anionic Surfactants. R. D. Walker, Jr., R. A. Keppel, M. B. Cosper, J. J. Funk, M. J. Meister. 4:00—28. The Effect of Alkaline Chemicals on the Adsorption of Anionic Surfactants by Clays. P. H. Krumrine, I. B. Ailin-Pyzik, J. S. Falcone, T. C. Campbell. 4:30—29. Adsorption from Microemulsions. C. Nunn, R. S. Schechte, W. H. Wade.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—40. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Spectroscopy Applied to Raney Nickel Catalyst. R. D. Kelley, R. R. Cavanagh, J. J. Rush, T. E. Madey. 9:35—41. Raman Spectroscopy and Ion Scattering Spectroscopy for Catalyst Characterization. H. Knôzinger, E. Taglauer. 10:05—42. Nature of Metallic Catalysts and Skeletal Reactions of Hydrocarbons. J. R. Anderson. 10:35—43. Model Studies with Bimetallic Surfaces. G. Ertl. 11:05—44. Role of Catalysis in Photoelectrochemistry. M. S. Wrighton, D. C. Bookbinder, J. A. Bruce, R. A. Dominey, N. S. Lewis. 11:35—45. Electronic Structure of Hydrosulfurization Catalysts. S. H. Rabitz, R. R. Chianelli.

Section Β

Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Organic Chemistry (see page 64)

Symposium on Recent Advances in Sepa­ ration Technology organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 57)

Section D

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Forsythe and Rockdale Rooms (2nd floor) ACS Creative Invention Award Symposium Honoring R. L. Pruett—Catalysis for Chem­ icals and Fuels organized by Division of Pe­ troleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

Section A Atlanta Hilton, Forsythe and Rockdale Rooms (2nd floor) ACS Creative Invention Award Symposium Honoring R. L. Pruett—Catalysis for Chemicals and Fuels organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry J. S. Merola, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks.

2:05—46. Mechanistic Aspects of the Fischer-Tropsch Reaction. R. Pettit, R. Brady. 2:50—47. Migratory Insertion Reactions of Carbene Complexes of Metal Hydrides and Alkyls. J. E. Bercaw. 3:35—48. Palladium Catalyzed Reactions of Vinylic Halides with Allylic Alcohols and Amines. R. F. Heck, L-C. Kao. 4:20—49. Carbon Atoms in Molecular Metal Clusters—a New Role for Clusters in CO Hydrogénation. J. S. Bradley, G. B. Ansel I, M. E. Leonowicz, E. W. Hill, M. Modrick. 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 21 for details). Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Fayette and Newton Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Residuum Upgrading and Coking organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry

D. C. Green, Presiding 2:00—50. Catalytic Cracking of Raw and Hydrotreated Petroleum Residuum. Ε. Η. Gray, D. R. Scharf, G. H. Dale, J. B. Rush. 2:30—51. Metal Resistance of Zeolitic Cracking Catalysts. A. W. Chester. 3:00—52. Upgrading of Residual Oils by De­ layed Coking and Solvent Deasphalting. J. P. VanHook. 3:30—53. Diffusion of Petroleum Asphaltenes through Well Characterized Porous Mem­ branes. R. J. Thrash, R. H. Pildes. 4:00—54. Characterization of Needle Coke Feedstocks by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. K. S. Seshodri, E. W. Albaugh, J. D. Bacha. 4:30—55. Pyrolysis of Boscan Asphaltenes: Process Description and Nature of the Products. E. Cotte, J. L. Calderon. 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A for details).

Section C Atlanta Hilton, Milan Room (3rd floor) Symposium on Chemical Physics of Catal­ ysis organized by Division of Petroleum, Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry G. L. Hal 1er, Presiding 2:00—56. Theoretical Studies of Chemisorption. W. A. Goddard III, J. N. Allison, J. J. Low, M. H. McAdon, T. H. Upton. 2:30—57. Physico-Chemical Characterization of Supported Catalysts by Analytical Elec­ tron Microscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Ion Scattering Spec­ trometry. C. Defossé, F. Delannay. 3:00—58. Surface Structure of Catalysts. G. A. Somorjai. 3:30—59. EXAFS Determination of the Structure of Bimetallic Catalysts. F. W. Lytle, R. B. Greegor, G. A. Via, J. H. Sinfelt. 4:00—60. Advanced Characterization of Pt/Re Catalysts. M. J. Kelley, J. R. Katzer. 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A for details).

Section D Symposium on the Surface Properties of Inorganic Compounds at Elevated Temperatures and Their Relation to Catalysis organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 64) Section Ε Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Organic Chemistry (see page 64) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Forsythe and Rockdale Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Sulfur Recovery and Utiliza­ tion—New Sources and New Uses organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry

M. E. D. Ray mont, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—61. Recent Developments in Sulfur Production from Hydrogen Sulfide Con­ taining Gases. J. B. Hyne. 9:50—62. Sulfur—Sulfur/Demand and Its Relationship to New Surgery Sources. M. Manderson, C. D. Cooper. 10:35—63. Sulfur Recovery from New Energy Sources. D. K. Fleming. 11:20—64. New Markets for Tomorrow's Sulfur. D. R. Muir.

Section Β Symposium on the Surface Properties of In­ organic Compounds at Elevated Tempera­ tures and Their Relation to Catalysis orga­ nized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry {see page 65)

Section C

PHYS DIVISION OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

Section Β

W. H. Flygare, Chairman A. L. Kwiram, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

World Congress Center, Room 201 (Level ID Peter Debye Award Symposium—II W. H. Cramer, Presiding Section A

Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Organic Chemistry (see page 64)

World Congress Center, Room 207 (Level II) Symposium on Critical Points and Tricritical Points of Multicomponent Fluids—I

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Classical Theory of Multicritical Points in Fluid Mixtures. R. B. Griffiths. 9:55—2. Theory of Tricritical Coexistence in Two- and Three-Dimensional Systems. M. E. Fischer. 10:45—Intermission. 10:55—3. Tricritical Phenomena in "Quasibinary" Mixtures of Hydrocarbons. R. L. Scott. 11:45—4. Light Scattering and Sum Rules in Three Phases of a Liquid Mixture Near its Tricritical Point. W. I. Goldburg, P. Esfandiari, M. W. Kim, J. Μ. Η. Levelt Sengers, E-S. Wu.

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Forsythe and Rockdale Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Sulfur Recovery and Utiliza­ tion—New Sources and New Uses organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chem­ istry Μ. Ε. D. Raymont,

Presiding

2:00—65. Sulfur Recovery from Oil Sands. A. W. Hyndman, J. Liu, D. W. Denney. 2:30—66. Claus Processing of Novel Acid Gas Streams. D. K. Beavon, B. Konzel, J. W. Ward. 3:00—67. Sulfur from the Hydrometallurgical Processing of Sulphide Minerals. A. Wilson. 3:30—68. Sulfur Recovery from Coal Fed Synfuel Plants. S. I. Freedman, D. D. Gray 4:00—69. New Sulfur Sources in the U.S. M. Rieber. Section Β Symposium on the Surface Properties of In­ organic Compounds at Elevated Tempera­ tures and Their Relation to Catalysis orga­ nized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 65) Section C Symposium on the Roles of Transition Metal Complexes in the Oxidation of Organic Substrates organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Organic Chemistry (see page 65) FRIDAY MORNING Atlanta Hilton, Forsythe and Rockdale Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Sulfur Recovery and Utiliza­ tion—New Sources and New Uses organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Μ. Ε. D. Raymont,

Presiding

9:00—70. Road Construction Using Sulfur. G. D. Love, Ε. Τ. Harrigan. 9:30—71. Industrial Applications for Sulfur Concrete in Corrosive Environments. R. H. Funke, Jr. W. C. McBee. 10:00—72. Potential and Properties of Sulfur Concretes. N. G. Shrive, J. E. Gillott, I. J. Jordaan, R. E. Loov. 10:30—73. Potential for Sulfur Products in the Middle East. R. L. Terrel, A. T. Al-Otaishan. 11:00—74. A Review of the State of the Art of Sulfur Asphalt Paving Technology. D. Saylak, W. E. Conger.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

B. Widom, Presiding

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 201 (Level ID Peter Debye Award Symposium—I W. H. Cramer, Presiding 9:00—5. Molecular Beam Studies of H 2 + Reactions with First-Row Atoms. W. R. Gentry. 9:40—6. Crossed Molecular Beams Studies of Endothermic Reactions. Y. T. Lee, D. J. Krajnovich, Z. Zhang, F. Huisken. 10:20—Intermission. 10:35—7. Award Address. (The Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry sponsored by E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.) Molecular Beam Scattering: Interplay Between Theory and Experiment. R. B. Bernstein. 11:15—8. Reaction Dynamics Involving Ex­ change of van der Waals Bonds. D. R. Herschbach, D. R. Worsnop, E. L. Quitevis.

Section C Symposium on New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (seepage 47) MONDAY AFTERNOON

4:00—15. Non-Local Critical Transport Properties for Binary Liquids. J. Bhattacharjee, R. A. Ferrell. 4:20—16. Mass Diffusion in a Critical Binary Mixture: The Hydrodynamical Regime. P. Calmettes. 4:40—17. Flow Birefringence in a Binary Mixture Near the Critical Point. Y. C. Chou, W. I. Goldburg. 5:00—17A. Antiferroelectric Order and Frustration: A Mechanism for Reentrant Phase Diagrams in Liquid Crystals. J. S. Walker, A. N. Berker.

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 207 (Level N) Symposium on Critical Points and Tricritical Points of Multicomponent Fluids—II B. Widom, Presiding 2:00—9. Equilibrium of Three Liquid Phases and Approach to the Tricritical Point in a Four-Component System. P. Bocko. 2:20—10. Experimental Critical Points in Multicomponent Hydrocarbon Systems. K. D. Luks, J. P. Kohn. 2:40—11. Critical-Tricritical Crossover of Interfacial Tensions. B. Widom. 3:00—12. Equilibrium Polymerization as a Critical Phenomenon. J. C. Wheeler, P. Pfeuty. 3:20—13. First Sound Attenuation in He3-He4 Mixtures Near Two Critical Lines. H. Meyer. 3:40—14. Wall Effects in Critical Binary Fluid Mixtures. M. E. Fisher.

2:00—18. Laser's Edge. R. N. Zare. 2:40—19. Laser Photons as Analytic and Synthetic Reagents in Studies of Reaction Dynamics. J. L. Kinsey. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—20. Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Reaction Complexes. P. R. Brooks. 4:15—21. Reactions of Metastable Elec­ tronically Excited and Fast Ground State Alkaline Earth Atoms with Simple Oxidants. P. J. Dagdigian.

Section C World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A (Level I) Poster-General—I T. George, Presiding 1:30—22. Semiclassical and Quantal Cal­ culation of Resonances. V. Babamov, D. W. Noid, M. L. Koszykowski. 1:30—23. Molecular Structure and Computed Vibrational Spectrum of B 2 0 3 . J. E. Boggs, H. Sellers, J. Alml0f, A. V. Nemukhin. 1:30—24. Theory of Phase Transitions in Monolayers. L. L. Combs, L. C. Dunne. 1:30—25. Sensitivity Analysis of Oscillating Reactions. I. The Period of the Oregonator. D. Edelson, V. M. Thomas. 1:30—26. Theoretical Analysis of the Quan­ tum Resonance Structure in the Reaction F + H2(v = 0) — HF(v = 0,1,2,3) + H. E. F. Hayes, R. B. Walker. 1:30—27. Semiclassical Calculation of Overtone Spectra. M. L. Koszykowski, D. W. Noid. 1:30—28. Perturbative Improvements in Molecular Hartree-Fock Energies. K. McDowell, L. Lewis. 1:30—29. Experimental Appraisal of the Maximal-Entropy Theory of Multiphoton Ionization—Fragmentation: The Alternative Doorway-State Test. R. B. Bernstein, D. A. Lichtin, K. R. Newton. 1:30—30. Application of Quantum Monte Carlo to Molecular Systems. K. McDowell. 1:30—31. Multiphoton Ionization Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Molecules. J. C. Miller, R. N. Compton. 1:30—32. Multiphoton Ionization—Frag­ mentation Patterns of Tertiary Amines. D. H. Parker, D. A. Lichtin, R. B. Bernstein. 1:30—33. Analysis of Relaxation Amplitudes of Coupled Equilibria, Using Laplace Transform. Z. A. Schelly, K. Tamura. 1:30—34. Effect of Vibration on Rotational Energy Transfer. A Quasiclassical Trajec­ tory Study of He + H2. D. L. Thompson. (By Title Only.) 1:30—35. Ab Initio SCF Calculations on Small Amino Acids and Dipeptides. L. R. Wright, R. F. Borkman. 3:00—Intermission. 3:30—36. Application of a Microcomputer Based Fourier Transform Mass Spectrom­ eter. T. J. Buckley, R. J. Doyle, J. R. Eyler. 3:30—37. Carbon-Metal Bonds Studied by Matrix Isolation. G. Cook, O. D. Krogh. 3:30—38. A Photogalvanic Cell Based on a Highly Soluble Dye: 3,7-Bis-(N, N-Di/3-Hydroxyethlamino)-Phenothiazinium Bromide. N. C. Fawcett, D. Creed, R. L. Thompson, W. C. Burton. 3:30—39. Thermodynamics of the Second Stage Dissociation of N-(2-Acetamido) Iminodiacetic Acid (ADA) in Water from 5 to 55°C. J. J. Gibbons, R. N. Roy, J. L. Padron, R. G. Casebolt.

3:30—40. Gamma Radiolysis of Hydro­ gen—Carbon Monoxide Mixtures. R. J. Hanrahan, F. K. St. Charles. 3:30—41. Modification of Surfaces with Poly(vinylpyridine). Measurement of Coverage and Chemical Reactions of the Modified Surfaces. R. G. Hayes, N. C. Saha. 3:30—42. Solvent Cage and Diffusion in Simple Liquids. J. N. Kushick. 3:30—43. Synthesis and Electrochemical Studies of Alkyl Bridged Bis-Cyclooctatetraenes. R. Maldonado, L. Echegoyen, D. Parra, A. Alvarado. 3:30—44. High Resolution Microwave Spectroscopy of Borine Carbonyl. A. M. Murray, S. G. Kukolich. 3:30—45. Polarographic Behavior of Aro­ matic Thionocarbonates. C. Parkânyi, A. G. Newton. 3:30—46. Free Radical Oxidation in Dilute Water Solution: Oxidation of p-Cresol and p-lsopropyl Phenol. A. Pohlman, T. Mill. 3:30—47. Application of Pitzer's Equations to the System HCI + BaCI2 + H 2 0 at Different Temperatures. R. N. Roy, J. J. Gibbons, G. Bliss, L. Ovens, J. Hartley. 3:30—48. Possible Explanations for High Energy Hydrogen Bond Interactions of Phenols and Specific Aliphatic Amines. R. M. Scott, A. Alawar. 3:30—49. Rate Limiting Proline Isomerization in the Protein Folding of Carbonic Anhydrase. R. A. Sheffey, R. W. Henkens. 3:30—50. Effect of Acidity and Sulfate Ions on the Chloride Inhibition of Ethanol Electrooxidation at a Platinum Electrode. Κ. ΓΑ Snell, A. G. Keenan. Section D Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 62) Section Ε Symposium on New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 47)

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 207 (Level II) Symposium on Critical Points and Tricritical Points of Multicomponent Fluids—III B. Widom, Presiding 9:00—51. Phase Equilibria and Critical Phe­ nomena in Fluid Mixtures at High Pressures. G. M. Schneider. 9:50—52. Critical Fluctuations in Partially Miscible Binary Liquids. J. V. Sengers, H. C. Burstyn. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—53. Critical Behavior of Reactive and Polymeric Fluids. B. Chu. 11:40—54. Critical Points and Tricritical Points in Molecularly Complex Liquid Mix­ tures. J. C. Wheeler. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 201 (Level ID Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—I organized by Division of Physical Chemistry joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry J. L. Gole, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—55. Electronic Structure and Spectra of Light Alkali Diatomic Molecules and Their Molecular Cations. D. D. Konowalow, M. E. Rosenkrantz. 9:45—56. Selective Photolysis and Photoionization of Alkali Metal Dimers. C. B. Collins, F. W. Lee, P. A. Vicharelli, D. Popescu, I. Popescu. 10:30—57. Molecular Electronic Structure of Small Metal Clusters. D. A. Dixon. 11:15—58. ESR Spectra of Stationary and Pseudorotating Alkali Metal Trimers. D. M. Lindsay.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

75

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Section C

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World Congress Center, Room 211 (Level II) Nobel Laureate Signature Award Sympo­ sium—I

W. M. Gelbart, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—59. Award Address. (Nobel Laureate Signature Award for a Graduate Student in Chemistry sponsored by J. T. Baker Chemical Co.) Rotationally Resolved Flu­ orescence Lifetimes and Formaldehyde Photochemistry. J. C. Weisshaar. 10:00—Discussion. 10:15—60. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of Highly Vibrational^ Excited States. M. J. Berry. 11:00—Discussion. 11:15—61. Stimulated Emission Pumping. R. W. Field. 12:00—Discussion.

a.

7:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location). Section C World Congress Center, Room 211 (Level II) Nobel Laureate Signature Award Sympo­ sium—II W. M. Gelbart, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:15—77. Pulsed Molecular Beams. W. R. Gentry. 3:00—Discussion. 3:15—78. Molecular Beam Probes of Relax­ ation and Predissociation. R. E. Smalley. 4:00—Discussion. 4:15—79. CW Vibrational Predissociation of Weakly Bound Molecules. K. C. Janda. 5:00—Discussion. 7:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location).

Section D

Section D

Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 62)

World Congress Center, Room 305 (Level ID Symposium on Equilibrium and Dynamic Properties of Solutions—I

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 207 (Level

")

Symposium on Critical Points and Tricritical Points of Multicomponent Fluids—IV

B. Widom, Presiding 2:00—62. Some Interesting New Phase Di­ agrams for Hydrogen Bonded Mixtures. J. C. Wheeler, G. R. Andersen. 2:20—63. Lattice Model for Closed-Loop Mutual Solubility Phase Diagrams in Binary Fluid Mixtures. C. Vause, J. Walker. 2:40—64. Interfacial Behavior Near a UCST (C 16 H 34 + Acetone) and an LCST (2-Butoxyethanol + Water). I. A. McLure, I. Pegg. 3:00—65. Near-Critical Phase and Wetting Behavior in Multicomponent Systems. G. F. Teletzke, L. E. Scriven, H. T. Davis. 3:20—66. Temperature Dependence of Par­ tial Molar Heat Capacities of Binary Critical Mixtures. D. Woermann, M. Pelger, H. Klein. 3:40—67. Dielectric Constant Anomaly Near the Critical Solution Point in Polystyrene + Cyclohexane. D. T. Jacobs, S. C. Greer. 4:00—68. Critical Behaviour of Nonionic Micellar Solutions. M. Corti, V. Degiorgio. 4:20—69. Phase Equilibria in C10E4-H2O and Closed-Loop Coexistence. J. C. Lang, R. D. Morgan. 4:40—70. Phase Boundary Curves in Toluene, 1-Butanol, and Aqueous Sodium Alkylbenzenesulfonate Systems. P. C. Ho. 5:00—71. Critical Phenomena in Binary Fluid Mixtures Containing Fluorocarbons at Low Temperatures and High Pressures. P. Jeschke, G. M. Schneider. 5:20—72. Measurement of Critical Lines and Surfaces in Ternary Mixtures. G. Mor­ rison. 7:30—Divisional Social Hour. Omni Inter­ national, Knollwood Room

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 201 (Level ID Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—II organized by Division of Physical Chemistry joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

D. R. Herschbach, Presiding 2:00—73. Interaction of Alkali Metal Clusters with Photons, Electrons, and Particles. E. Schumacher. 2:45—74. Energetics of Small Metal Clusters. K. A. Gingerich. 3:30—75. Characterization of Small Metal Clusters. J. L. Gole. 4:15—76. Laser Raman Spectroscopy of Metal Molecules and Molecules on Metals. M. Moskovits.

H. L. Friedman, Presiding 2:00—80. Exploiting the Isomorphism Be­ tween Quantum Many-Body Theory and the Classical Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics of Polyatomic Fluids. D. Chandler. 3:00—81. MTGLE: A New Concept for Con­ densed Phase Chemistry. S. A. Adelman. 4:00—82. Atom Pair Distribution Functions for Liquid Water from Neutron Diffraction. A. H. Narten, W. E. Thiessen. 4:20—83. An Infrared Spectroscopic Deter­ mination of the Velocity Autocorrelation Function for the Na + Motion in Pyridine Solution. Its Modelling by Theory. W. Edg­ ed, M. Balk. 4:40—84. Solvation of Ions in Propylene Carbonate. J. E. Desnoyers, G. Perron, R. Zana, R. L. Kay, K. Lee. 7:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location).

Section Ε Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 63) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 207 (Level ID Symposium on Equilibrium and Dynamic Properties of Solutions—II

A. H. Narten, Presiding 9:00—85. Along the Reaction Coordinate in Liquids. J. T. Hynes. 10:00—86. Laser Probing of Molecular and Chemical Dynamics in the Picosecond Time Domain. G. A. Kenney-Wallace. 11:00—87. Quantum Monte Carlo and Mo­ lecular Dynamic Studies of Polyatomic Molecules in Liquids. B. J. Berne. 12:00—88. Dielectric Friction and Dielectric Dispersion in Electrolyte Solutions with Spin. R. F. Kayser, J. B. Hubbard. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 201 (Level ID Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—III organized by Division of Physical Chemistry joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry K. Bergmann, Presiding 9:00—89. lonic-Covalent Interactions in the Alkali Hydrides. S. C. Yang.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

76

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

9:45—90. Alkali Vapor Transport in Energy Systems. J. W. Hastie, E. R. Plante, D. W. Bonnell. 10:30—91. Photoionization and Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Alkali Halide Monomers, Dimers and Trimers. J. Berkowitz, C. H. Batson, G. L. Goodman. 11:15—92. Theory of Metal Atom-Water In­ teractions and Alkali Halide Dimers. K. D. Jordan.

Section C World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A (Level I) Poster-General—II

P. R. Brooks, Presiding 9:00—93. Negative Ion Molecule Reactions of SF4. L. M. Babcock, G. E. Streit. 9:00—94. Studies of Ions Relevant to Com­ bustion. F. W. Brill, J. R. Eyler. 9:00—95. Matrix Isolation Spectroscopic Studies of Chlorine-Oxygen and ChlorineOzone Reaction Products. R. O. Carter III, L. Andrews. 9:00—96. Thermal Decomposition of Nitrous Oxide and the Inversion of Limiting High Pressure Unimolecular Rate Constant. W. Forst. 9:00—97. Recombination and Cross Combi­ nation of CH3 and C2H5 Radicals at High Temperatures. W. C. Gardiner, Jr. 9:00—98. A Fast Fourier Transform Program for a 6502 Microprocessor Based Micro­ computer. D. G. Grande, J. R. Eyler. 9:00—99. A Mechanism for the Oscillatory Oxidation of Ascorbic Acid with Oxygen in Aqueous Solutions. T. T-S. Huang, J. Young, B. Franzus. 9:00—100. Rates of Vibrational-Rotation Relaxation in HF and DF. Y. D. Jones, W. F. Coleman. 9:00—101. Kinetics of the Reaction OH + H0 2 — H 2 0 + 0 2 . L. F. Keyser. 9:00—102. Crossed Beam Reactions of Ori­ ented Alkyl Iodides with Metal Atoms. D. H. Parker, K. Chakravorty, R. B. Bernstein. 9:00—103. Cyclobutane Revisited. D. F. Swinehart. 9:00—104. Kinetics of the Thermal Decom­ position of Cis- and Trans- 1,3-Dimethylcyclobutane over a Wide Pressure Range. D. F. Swinehart, F. J. Surawski. 9:00—105. Kinetics of the Thermal Reactions of Vinylcyclobutane over a Wide Pressure Range. D. F. Swinehart, T. Micka. 9:00—106. Nonresonant Collision-Induced Absorption in Xe/CI 2 Mixtures. B. E. Wilcomb, R. Burnham. 10:30—Intermission. 11:00—107. Photochromism of Spiroindolinenaphthoxazine. N. Y. C. Chu. 11:00—108. A Spectroscopically Resolved Pulsed C0 2 Laser. M. R. Colberg, O. D. Krogh. 11:00—109. Singlet and Triplet State Photoreduction of 3,9-Diaminophenoxazin5-ium Chloride ('Oxonine') by Iron (II). D. Creed, N. C. Fawcett, R. L. Thompson. 11:00—110. Photolysis of Cyanogenazid, CN 4 , Studied by Matrix Isolation. J. Hollenbeck, O. D. Krogh. 11:00—111. Photolysis of Some Tryptophan Peptides. N. J. Kirk, R. F. Borkman. 11:00—112. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Photochemistry of 1,2-Dibromopropane. T. D. Kunz, K. V. Reddy, M. J. Berry. 11:00—113. Excited States of Salicylidene Anils. J. W. Ledbetter, T. J. Cornish, G. A. Guirgis, B. H. Jo. 11:00—114. Computer Assisted Pho­ toacoustic Spectroscopy of Forbidden Vi­ brational Transitions. R. F. Menefee, R. H. Hall, M. J. Berry. 11:00—115. Laser Separation of Gram Quantities of Sulfur Isotopes. A. Nilsson, J. Lyman, G. P. Quigley, B. B. Mclnteer, G.*W. Read, F. Archuleta, J. Montoya. 11:00—116. Argon Resonance Photolysis of the Sulfuryl and Thionyl Halides in Solid Argon at 12 K. F. T. Prochaska, C. P. Hallowell. 11:00—117. Determination of the Radiative Lifetime of Excited Iodine Atoms (52P1/2). S. D. Roberts, W. F. Coleman. 11:00—118. Luminescence of EDA Com­ plexes with Ketones as Electron Donors. A. C. Testa, R. Snyder. 11:00—119. Highly Vibrational^ Excited Benzene: The Nature and Dynamics of Overtone and Combination Band States. G. L. Valderrama, K. V. Reddy, D. F. Heller, M. J. Berry.

11:00—120. Quenching of Γ( 2 Ρν 2 ) by 0 2 . A. T. Young, P. L. Houston.

Section D Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 64) WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A World Congress Center, Room 207 (Level ID Symposium on Equilibrium and Dynamic Properties of Solutions—III

S. Adelman, Presiding 2:00—121. Thermodynamics of Solution of Non-Polar Gases in a Fused Salt. "Hydro­ phobic Bonding" Behavior in a Non-Aque­ ous System. G. W. Schriver, D. F. Evans, S-H. Chen, Ε. Μ. Arnett. 2:20—122. Thermodynamics of N-Alkane Mixtures. A. Trejo, D. Patterson. 2:40—123. Ultrasonic Absorption in Alco­ hol-Water Mixtures. G. Atkinson, B. L. At­ kinson, H. Endo. 3:00—124. Thermodynamic Theory and Ap­ plications of the Solvent-Jump Relaxation Method. Z. A. Schelly. 3:20—125. Water as a Model Substance for Estimation of Ionic Equilibria in High Tem­ perature, High Pressure Water. W. T. Lindsay, Jr. 3:40—126. Thermodynamic Analysis of So­ dium Perchlorate Contact Ion Pair Forma­ tion in Aqueous'Solutions. A. G. Miller, J. W. Macklin. 4:00—127. Spectroscopic and Conductance Values of Ion Association Constants. Alkali Metal Salts in 2-Butanone. W. R. Gilkerson, J. M. Hahn. 4:20—128. Unusual Ion Pairs in Aqueous Solutions. O. D. Bonner. 4:40—129. Effect of NaCI on the Interaction of N-Acetyl-1-Tyrosine Ethyl Ester with Cycloheptaamylose in Aqueous Solution. L. Leifer, D. B. Powell. 5:00—130. Electrostatic Interactions and Hydration in 1:1 Electrolyte Solutions. D. B. Powell, L. Leifer.

Section Β World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A (Level I) Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—IV—Poster organized by Division of Physical Chemistry joint with Division of In­ organic Chemistry

L. B. Knight, Presiding 2:00—131. Electric Dipole Polarizabilities of Alkali Halide Dimers. B. Bederson, R. Kremens, B. Jaduszliwer, J. Stockdale. 2:00—132. Time-of-Flight Analysis of Small Clusters in Molecular Beams. K. Bergmann, R. Engelhardt, N. Reinsbach, K. D. Wildberger. 2:00—133. Visible and Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Group MIA Metal Atom Reactions with Water. M. A. Douglas, R. H. Hauge, J. L. Margrave. 2:00—134. Interaction Between Cs* (7S, 5D 5/2 ) and Rare Gas Atoms. M. Ferray, J. P. Visiticot, J. Lozingot, B. Sayer. 2:00—135. A Statistical Mechanical Method for the Prediction of Entropies and Free Energy Functions for Small Clusters of Atoms. D. J. Frurip, C. Chatillon, M. Blander. 2:00—136. Atomization Energies of the Gaseous Molecules SbLi, Sb2Li, SbLi2, Sb 2 Li 2 and Sb3Li Determined by Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry. K. A. Ging­ erich, H. R. Ihle, A. Neubert, K. F. Zmbov. 2:00—137. Matrix Isolation Infrared Studies of Group IVA Metal Atom Reactions with Water. J. W. Kauffman, R. H. Hauge, J. L. Margrave. 2:00—138. Recent Work on Na2 and Li 2 Op­ tically Pumped Lasers. C. N. Man-Pichot, A. A. Brillet. 2:00—139. Vibrational and Electronic Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Metal-Halide Vapor Complexes. G. N. Papatheodorou.

2:00—140. Laser Fluorescence Spectros­ copy of Mo2 Isolated in Rare Gas Matrices. M. J. Pellin, T. Foosnaes, D. M. Gruen. 2:00—141. Laser Alignment and Two-Step Photo Ionization in Na2 Beams. E. W. Rothe, F. Ranjbar, G. P. Reck. 2:00—142. Investigation of the Cesium Hy­ dride Formation in the Reaction Between Cs* (7P) and H2. B. Sayer, H. Ferray, J. Lozingot. 2:00—143. Magnetic Circular Dichroism of Matrix-Isolated Lead Atoms and Dimers. M. Vala, K. Zeringue, J. ShakhsEmampour. 2:00—144. Strong Na2 3 2 u + — 3 π 9 Emission and Absorption Observed Near 551.5 nm in a High-Pressure Sodium Arc. J. P. Woerdman, J. J. de Groot. 2:00—145. Laser Diagnostics of Reactive Wall Collisions in a Sodium Vapor Cell. J. P. Woerdman, S. S. Eskildsen. 2:00—146. Studies of Potassium Phosphate Molecules in Combustion Gases. J. Wormhoudt, A. Freedman, C. E. Kolb. 2:00—147. Thermochemistry of the Dimer Lithium Hydride Molecule Li2H2(g). C. H. Wu, H. R. Ihle. 2:00—148. Photoabsorption Measurements of Atomic and Molecular Potassium Ions. C. Y. R. Wu. 2:00—149. Formation of Large Alkali Halide Cluster Ions by Ion Bombardment. J. R. Wyatt, T. M. Barlak, J. E. Campana, J. J. DeCorpo, R. J. Colton. Section C Symposium on Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond cosponsored with Division of Inorganic Chemistry {see page 64) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 207 (Level ID Symposium on Equilibrium and Dynamic Properties of Solutions—IV W. Edgell, Presiding 9:00—150. Thermodynamics of Aqueous Salt Solutions near the Critical Point. R. H. Wood, D. Smith-Magowan, J. Quint. 10:00—151. Microscopic Theory of Recom­ bination Dynamics in Liquids. R. Kapral. 11:00—152. Quantum Statistical Mechanics in Solution Chemistry. P. G. Wolynes. 12:00—153. QSM Approach to Diffusive Motion in Molecular Systems. W. A. Wassam, Jr., J. H. Freed, M. Nilges.

Section Β World Congress Center, Room 201 (Level N) Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—V organized by Division of Physical Chemistry joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry J. L. Margrave,

Presiding

9:00—154. Matrix Isolation Investigation of the Reactions of Alkali Halide Salts with Lewis Acids and Bases. B. S. Ault. 9:45—155. Photochemistry of Metal Atoms and Small Metal Clusters. A. Reactions of Water, Methane and Cyclopropane. B. Reactions of H2OMCO and CH4MCO Adducts Where M is Mn, Fe, or Ni. R. H. Hauge, J. Kauffman, L. Fredin, W. E. Billups, J. L. Margrave. 10:30—156. An Overview of Alkali Metal Vapor Applications. W. C. Stwalley, M. E. Koch. 11:15—157. Physics and Chemistry of High Pressure Sodium Lamps. R. J. Zollweg. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

World Congress Center, Room 207 (Level ID Symposium on Equilibrium and Dynamic Properties of Solutions—V M. D. Newton, Presiding 2:00—158. A Molecular Theory of Electro­ striction. J. C. Rasaiah, D. J. Isbister, G. Stell. 2:20—159. Hard Ions and Dipoles. L. Blum, F. Vericat. 2:40—160. Statistical State Solvation Sites. F. T. Marchese, P. K. Mehrotra, D. L. Beveridge.

3:00—161. Chemistry and Physics of Water Oligomers. T. A. Weber, F. H. Stillinger. 3:20—162. Convergence Characteristics of Monte-Carlo Computer Simulations on Aqueous Solutions. P. K. Mehrotra, D. L. Beveridge. 3:40—163. D 2 0/H 2 0 Henry's Law Constant Isotope Effects. S. Goldman, P. Backx. 4:00—164. Thermodynamics of Urea-H4/H20 and Urea-D4/D20 Solutions Compared. W. A. Van Hook, Gy. Jakli. 4:20—165. Linear Response Theory of the Heat of Transport of Electrolyte Solutions. J-L. Lin, P. Y. Kahana, H. K. Yow. 4:40—166. Thermal Diffusion in BenzeneChloroform Mixtures. A. L. Beyerlein, R. Ma, M. Dempsey. 5:00—167. Structure in NaMn(CO)s Solutions and its Role in the Reaction of This Salt with Benzyl Chloride. W. Edgell, T. Balch. Section Β World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A (Level D Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—VI—Poster organized by Division of Physical Chemistry joint with Division of In­ organic Chemistry D. J. Frurip, Presiding 2:00—168. Observation of Radical Production and Oscillatory Emission in Hydrogen Sulfide-Fluorine Combustion. Κ. Η. Casleton, C. P. Connor, G. W. Stewart. 2:00—169. Chemiluminescence Studies of Boron Atom Reactions with 0 2 , N 2 0, N0 2 , S0 2 and H 2 0 2 . J. DeHaven, P. Davidovits, M. T. O'Connor. 2:00—170. A Spectroscopic Investigation of Energy Transfer and Chemiluminescent Reactions Involving High Temperature Molecules in Active Argon Flames. T. C. DeVore, T. N. Gallaher. 2:00—171. Vaporization Chemistry of Va­ nadium Monosulfide by Simultaneous Tor­ sion- and Knudsen-Effusion Measurements. J. G. Edwards, J. S. Starzynski, M. Pelino. 2:00—172. High Temperature Generation and Matrix ESR Investigation of BO17: Com­ parison with ab Initio Theoretical Results. T. A. Fisher, M. B. Wise, L. B. Knight, Jr., L E. McMurchie, E. R. Davidson. 2:00—173. Sublimation Kinetics and Ther­ modynamics of Cuprous Chloride. D. E. Peterson, P. W. Gilles. 2:00—174. Bond Angle Distortion of MatrixIsolated Ozone. D. W. Green, K. M. Ervin. 2:00—175. Use of Ammonium Acid SulfateZinc Oxide for High Temperature Thermal Energy Storage. W. E. Wentworth, J. G. Ibanez, C. F. Batten, E. D. M. Chen. 2:00—176. IR Laser Induced Decomposition of Tetrahydrofuran. J. Kramer. 2:00—177. Chemical Branching in Uranium Atom Reactions: U + N0 2 and S0 2 . N. C. Lang, R. C. Stern. 2:00—178. Re-interpretation of the Vapor Pressure Measurements Over UF5. J. M. Leitnaker. 2:00—179. Phenomenological Model for the Gas Phase Production of Solid State Sta­ tistical Polymers. K. M. Maloney, O. Cernichiari, F. Jansen. 2:00—180. Bond Lengths and Vibrational Amplitudes in Hot SF6 and C0 2 . R. J. Mawhorter, M. Fink. 2:00—181. Thermodynamic Properties of Manganese Phosphides from High Tem­ perature Solid-State Galvanic Cells. C. E. Myers, D. J. Simpson. 2:00—182. Steam Explosion Experiments with Single Drops of Laser-Melted Iron Oxide. L. S. Nelson. 2:00—183. Spectroscopic, Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Selected Visible Chemiluminescent Metal Atom Oxidation Reactions. J. J. Reuther. 2:00—184. High Temperature Radical-Mol­ ecule Reaction Kinetics. F. P. Tully, A. R. Ravishankara.

FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

10:00—186. Theoretical Results for the Equilibrium Properties of Simple Model Electrolytes. G. N. Patey, D. Levesque, J. J. Weis. 11:00—187. Solution Structure and the Fe 2 + -Fe 3 + Electron Exchange Rate. M. D. Newton, H. L. Friedman, B. Tembe. Section Β World Congress Center, Room 201 (Level ID Symposium on High Temperature Chemis­ try—VII organized by Division of Physical Chemistry joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

W. C. Stwalley, Presiding 9:00—188. Physics and Chemistry of Cesium Thermionic Convertors. E. J. Britt. 9:45—189. Plasma Formation in Alkali Metal Vapors by Quasi-Resonant Laser Excita­ tion. A. C. Tarn. 10:30—190. Use of Lithium in Fusion Reac­ tors. J. A. Blink, O. H. Krikorian, N. J. Hoffman. 11:15—191. Optically Pumped Lasers with Alkali Molecules. B. Wellegehausen.

Section C World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A (Level I) Poster—General—III

W. C. Harris, Presiding 9:00—192. 2H Relaxation in Perdeuterated Hydrocarbon Chains. A. L. Beyerlein, S. E. Emery, R. Ma, G. B. Savitsky. 9:00—193. EPR Detection of a New Radical Species. A Cyclooctatetraene Anion Rad­ ical-Divalent Cation Ion Pair? L. Echegoyen, I. Nieves. 9:00—194. π-Electron Spin Distribution in Triplet Carbenes. R. S. Hutton, H. D. Roth, M. L. M. Schilling, S. Chari. 9:00—195. Solid State 13C NMR Studies of Molecular Motion in Segmented Copoly­ mers. L. W. Jelinski, F. C. Schilling, F. A. Bovey. 9:00—196. ESR Studies of the DBTTF-TCNQ and Related Complexes. M. T. Jones, D. J Sandman, R. Kellerman, A. Troup. 9:00—197. ESR Study of <5-CH2 Acyl-Proton Couplings in α-Acyloxy Radicals. Κ. Κ. Karukstis, P. Smith. 9:00—198. Application of Selective Deuteration to 13C-NMR Studies of Polymers in Solution. G. C. Lickfield, G. B. Savitsky, A. L. Beyerlein, H. G. Spencer. 9:00—199. EPR Studies of Alkyl Bis-Cyclooctatetranes. A. Oritz, L. Echegoyen, A. Alegria, P. Franco. 9:00—200. EPR Detection of Radiation Damage in Nitroguanidine Crystals at Room Temperature and -160°C. M. D. Pace, W. B. Moniz. 9:00—201. Solid State NMR of Linear and Cyclic Peptides. L. G. Pease, M. H. Frey, J. G. Hexem, S. J. Opella. 9:00—202. ENDOR Detected NMR (EDNMR) Studies of 2 D in Single Crystals. A. Reuveni, A. L. Kwiram. 9:00—203. Rearrangement of the Benzyl Group on Ν,Ν,Ο-tribenzyl Cyanurate. A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Kinetic Study. G. F. Reynolds, C. Nagel. 9:00—204. 113Cd NMR as a Probe of the Metal Site of Metalloporphyrin and Bis(Dipyridyl) Complexes with Nitrogen, Oxygen and Phosphorous Bases. P. F. Rodesiler, E. L. Amma. 9:00—205. Electron Magnetic Resonance Studies of Thermally Produced Radicals in Phenylacetylene. H. J. Sipe, Jr., L. D. Kispert, J. S. Hwang. 9:00—206. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of the Interaction of Xenon with Simple Liquids, Lipid Bilayers, Proteins and Biological Membranes. T. R. Stengle, N. V. Reo, K. L. Williamson, D. P. Stengle. 9:00—207. 35CI NMR and EPR Evidence of Strong Ionic Association for Ca 2 + in HMPA Solutions. J. Thompson, L. Echegoyen, I. Nieves, A. Lopez, R. Concepcion.

World Congress Center, Room 207 (Level II) Symposium on Equilibrium and Dynamic Properties of Solutions—VI

D. Chandler, Presiding 9:00—185. Structure and Dynamics of Ions in Solutions: Recent Experimental Prog­ ress. J. E. Enderby.

9:00—208. An Infrared Study of Complex Formation Between Phenols and Quinones. B. B. Adeleke, J. A. Faniran. 9:00—209. Infrared Spectroscopic Deter­ minations of Association Constants of Acetanilide and its p-Methyl Derivative in Chloroform. I. Iweibo, I. N. Ufaruna, J. A. Faniran. 9:00—210. Electric Dichroism of DNA's of Varying Molecular Weights. W. Mickols, S. Wat, F. Allen.

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W. C. Wooten, Chairman J. J. Ο'Mai ley, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Thornton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry J. E. Kresta, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. A New Family of Cation-Binding Compounds: Tftreo-o:,cu-Poly(cyclooxa-alkane)diyl. W. J. Schultz, S. Smith, A. V. Pocius, M. C. Etter. 9:50—2. Mossbauer Studies of Polymers from 1,1'-Divinylferrocene. G. C. Corfield, J. S. Brooks, S. Plimley. 10:15—3. Polyphenylquinoxalines Containing Ethynyl Groups. P. M. Hergenrother. 10:40—4. Acetylene Terminated Fluorocarbon Ether Bibenzoxazole Oligomers. R. C. Evers, G. J. Moore, J. L. Burkett. 11:05—5. Cyclization Reaction of N-Substituted Dimethacrylamides In the Crystalline and Glass States at 77 K. T. Kodaira, M. Taniguchi, M. Sakai. 11:30—6. Homopolymerization of Isomeric N-Phenyl-5-Norbornene-2,3-Dicarboximides, Model Compounds for Norbornene End-Capped Addition-Curing Polyimides. N. G. Gaylord, M. Marfan.

Section Β Omni International, Glenmar Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Dynamical Properties of Polymer Fluids: Solution, Gel and Melt

A. M. Jamieson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—7. Concentration Dependence of the Hydrodynamics of Polymer Solutions and Suspensions. K. F. Freed. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—8. Polymer Dynamics: When do Scal­ ing Laws Apply. D. W. Schaefer, C. H. Han. 10:10—Discussion. 10:15—9. Dynamic Light Scattering of Poly­ mer Solutions in the Intermediate Momen­ tum Transfer Region. C. C. Han, A. Z. Akcasu. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—10. Mapping of Static and Dynamical Properties of Polystyrene (NBS-705 Stan­ dard) in Methyl Acetate. B. Chu, K. Kubota, Κ. Μ. Abbey. 11:20—Discussion. 11:25—11. New Results on Global and Local Dynamics of Chain Molecules. R. Cerf. 11:55—Discussion.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

77

Section C

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Omni International, Glenmar Room A (1st floor, Convention Center) Witco Award Symposium Honoring Ε. J. Vandenberg: Coordination Polymerization

C. C. Price, Presiding 9:15—Introductory Remarks. 9:20—12. The Polymerization of 1,2-Epoxides Catalyzed by the Condensation Products of Metal-Containing Compounds with Alkylphosphates. T. Nakata. 9:55—13. Stereochemical Aspects of the Cationic Polymerization of Chiral Alkyl Vinyl Ethers. E. Chiellini, R. Solaro, F. Masi. 10:30—14. Stereochemical Aspects of the Polymerization on Cis and Trans Thiiranes Using Chiral Initiators. N. Spassky, A. Momtaz, P. Sigwalt. 11:05—15. Award Address. (ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry sponsored by Witco Chemical Corp. Foundation.) Coordination Polymerization. E. J. Vandenberg.

2:30—24. Forward Depolarized Scattering of Semi-Dilute Solutions of Poly(a-Methyl Styrene). H. Yu, M. Delsanti, C. C. Han. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—25. Dynamical Studies of Polystyrene in Tetrahydrofuran by Photon Correlation Spectroscopy. H. Reihanian, T. L. Yu, A. M. Jamieson. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—26. Studies of the Evolution of Local­ ized Motion in Polystyrene-Cyclohexane Solution by Quasielastic Light Scattering. C. H. Wang, W. Lempert. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—27. Effective Viscosity of Dilute Poly­ mer Solutions Near Interfaces. M. Tirrell, J. H. Aubert. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—28. Dynamics of Polymers in Solution as Studied by Flash Photolysis in Conjunc­ tion with Light Scattering Measurements. W. Schnabel, S. Tagawa. 4:55—Discussion.

Section D

Section C

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Methods for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

Omni International, Glenmar Room A (Meeting Level) Witco Award Symposium Honoring E. J. Vandenberg: Coordination Polymerization H. G. Tennent, Presiding

CL

Section Ε Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry {see page 56) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Omni International, Thornton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry G. B. Butler, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—16. NMR Studies on Styrene—(Methyl Methacrylate) Copolymers Derived From Styrene—Methacrylic Anhydride Copoly­ mers. H. J. Harwood, D. L. Neumann. 2:30—17. Investigation of the Structure of Poly(1,4-Dimethy!ene-cyclohexane) by PMR and CMR Spectroscopy. H. J Har­ wood, A. Sebenik. 2:55—18. Fracture Behavior of an Acety­ lene-Terminated Polyimide. W. B. Jones, Jr., T. E. Helminiak, C. C. Kang, M. A. Lucarelli, L. G. Picklesimer. 3:20—19. Initiation of an Acetylene-Termi­ nated Phenyl Quinoxaline. W. B. Jones, Jr., M. A. Lucarelli, L. G. Picklesimer, T. E. Helminiak. 3:45—20. Synthesis and Characteristics of Bisimides Part II. I. K. Varma, G. M. Fohlen, J. A. Parker. 4:10—21. The Temperature Dependence of Cyclization Ratios in Cyclopolymerization. M. Guaita. 4:50—22. Structures and Properties of Cyclotrimerized Polymers Based on Acety­ lene-Terminated Aryl Ether-Sulfone (Ketone)s. K. J. Liu, T. L. Chen. Section Β Omni International, Glenmar Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Dynamical Properties of Polymer Fluids: Solution, Gel and Melt M. E. McDonnell, Presiding 1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—23. Light Scattering from Concentrated Polymer Solutions and Gels. G. D. Pat­ terson. 2:25—Discussion.

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—29. Stereoselective and Stereoelective Polymerization of Racemic α-Olefins with Supported Titanium Catalysts. P. Pino, G. Fochi, R. Mulhaupt, O. Piccolo, U. Giannini, A. Oschwald. 2:40—30. 1.4 Polybutadiene (1.4.) Block Copolymers from "Living" Coordination Catalysts. P. Teyssie, P. Hadjiandreou, M. Julemont. 3:15—31. Supported Catalysts for Polypro­ pylene: Aluminum Alkyl-Ester Chemistry. A. W. Langer, T. J. Burkhardt, J. J. Steger. 3:50—32. Tetra (Neophyl) Zirconium and Its Use in the Polymerization of Olefins. R. A. Setterquist, F. N. Tebbe. 4:25—33. Polymerization of Ethylene Using Organoscandium Compounds. G. A. Moser. Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Methods for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 81) Section Ε Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page 56) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Thornton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry R. C. Evers, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—34. Biologically Active Synthetic An­ ionic Polymers: A Review. D. S. Breslow. 9:50—35. Toxicity and Immunologic and Endocytotic Behaviour of DIVEMA Deriva­ tives. L. Gros, H. Ringsdorf, R. Schnee, J. B. Lloyd, H. U. Schorlemmer, H. Stôtter. 10:15—36. Synthesis and Intramolecular Cyclization of Ethynyl-Substituted Polyurethanes. R. K. Gupta, F. W. Harris. 10:40—37. The Thermal Degradation of Phenolphthalein Based Polymers. Ε. Μ. Pearce, M. S. Lin, B. J. Bulkin.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

78

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

11:05—38. 1,3-Dioxepin-Maleic Anhydride Copolymerizations. B. M. Culbertson, A. E. Aulabaugh. 11:30—39. Triazine Ring Cross-linked Polyimides and Refractory Materials Derived from Them. L. Hsu, W. H. Philipp.

4:15—51. Radiation-Induced Loss of Unsaturation in 1,2-Polybutadiene. M. A. Golub, R. D. Cormia. 4:40—52. Thermal Polymerization of 2,5Diphenyl-1,5-Hexadiene. L. Costa, M. Guaita.

Section Β

Section Β

Omni International, Glenmar Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Dynamical Properties of Polymer Fluids: Solution, Gel and Melt D. W. Schaefer, Presiding

Omni International, North Foyer (1st floor, Convention Center) SPECIAL TOPICS POSTER SESSION

R. Ikeda, Presiding

2:00—53. Phosphorus Based Additives for Flame Retardant Polyester. I. Low Molec­ ular Weight Additives. R. W. Stackman. 2:00—54. Phosphorus Based Additives for Flame Retardant Polyester. II. Polymeric Phosphorus Esters. R. W. Stackman. 2:00—55. Impact Strengths of Modified Epoxies via an Instrumented Falling-Weight Impact Tester. V. S. Pircivanoglu, T. C. Ward, I. Yilgor, A. K. Banthia, J. E. McGrath. 2:00—56. Application of the Finite Element Method to the Computation of Craze De­ formation Parameters. L. Bevan. 2:00—57. Chemo-Rheological Studies of Isoprene-Butadiene Copolymers. S. Abouzahr, G. L. Wilkes, J. E. McGrath. 2:00—58. Entanglement Networks of 1,2Polybutadiene Cross-Linked in States of Strain. Simple Extension Special Case. Derivation of the CKF Theory Part II. CKF Strain Energy Function and Final Expres­ sions. R. L. Carpenter. 2:00—59. The Theory of Polymer Melts. S. F. Edwards, Κ. Ε. Evans. 2:00—60. Rigid Backbone Polymers XIX. Minimal Viscosity-Molecular Weight De­ pendence of Anisotropic Poly-(n-hexylisocyanate) Solutions. S. M. Aharoni. 2:00—61. Inverse Gas Chromatography Section C Studies of Polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) Polycarbonate (PC) Copolymers and Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Blends. T. C. Ward, D. P. Sheehy, J. E. Educators III: Polymer Chemistry organized McGrath, J. S. Riffle. by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see 2:00—62. The Influence of Diffusion in page 47) Moisture Controlled Cross-Linking Reac­ tions of Elastomeric Sealants, II. W. Section D Schoenherr, J. Falender. 2:00—63. Raman Spectroscopy as a Struc­ Symposium on Instrumental and Physical tural Probe of Polyacrylamide Gels. M. J. Characterization of Macromolecules: Elec­ Gupta, R. Bansil. tron Microscopy organized by Macromolec­ 2:00—64. Polyhydroxyether: Molecular ular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Ana­ Characterization with Special Emphasis to lytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Branching Determination. D. J. Lunsford, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic A. K. Banthia, J. E. McGrath. Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. 2:00—65. Analogs of Polyacetylene—Prep­ (see page 81) aration and Properties. W. Deits, P. Cukor, M. Rubner, H. Jopson. Section Ε 2:00—66. Thermal Conductivity of Polymers I. Commercially Available Polymers and Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Comparison with Literature Data. S. PattPlastics organized by Division of Industrial and naik, E. V. Thompson. Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of 2:00—67. A Modified Urey-Bradley Force Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see Field for a Syndiotatic Diester Model of page 56) PMMA. I. Lipschitz, J. M. Gray. 2:00—68. Absolute Rate Constants for the TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Free Radical Polymerization of Ethylene in the Supercritical Phase. T. Takahashi, P. Omni International, Thornton Room (1st floor, Ehrlich. Convention Center) 3:30—69. Spectroscopic Examination of Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers Polyethylenimine Backbone Polynucleotide with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Models. A. G. Ludwick C. G. Overberger. Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics 3:30—70. Laser Initiated Polymerization of Chemistry Charge Transfer Monomer Systems. M. A. Williamson, J. D. B. Smith, P. M. Castle. R. M. Ottenbrite, Presiding 3:30—71. Bis-Methacryloxy Bisphenol-A 2:00—Introductory Remarks. Epoxi Networks: Synthesis, Characteriza­ 2:05—46. Polymers and Fibers of Para-/ tion, Thermal and Mechanical Properties. Meta-Phenylene Oxadiazole/A/-Methyl I. Yilgor, A. K. Banthia, J. E. McGrath, G. L. Hydrazide Copolymers—High Strength/ Wilkes. High Modulus Materials of Increased Mo­ 3:30—72. Effect of Thermal History on the lecular Flexibility. H. C. Bach, H. E. HinEnd-linking of Dienyllithium Anions with derer. Divinylbenzene. M. K. Martin, J. E. 2:30—47. Polyspiroketals Containing Five-, McGrath. Six-, Seven-, and Eight-Membered Rings. 3:30—73. Polyimides Containing PolyoxyW. J. Bailey, C. F. Beam, Jr., E. D. Cappuethylene Units. W. A. Feld, F. W. Harris, B. cilli, I. Haddad, A. A. Volpe. Ramalingam. 2:55—48. The Cyclopolymer Poly(1,6-Hep3:30—74. Low Molecular Weight Copolymers tadiyne): Doping and Oxidation. H. W. of Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate and Methyl Gibson, F. C. Bailey, J. M. Pochan, J. Har­ Methacrylate. K. Patel, W. H. Snyder. bour. 3:30—75. Organic Fillers Formed by Anionic 3:20—49. Intramolecular Addition Modes in Dispersion Polymerization. J. G. Murray, F. Radical Cyclopolymerization of Some Un­ C. Schwab. conjugated Dienes. A. Matsumoto, K. Iwanami, T. Kitamura, M. Oiwa, G. B. Butler. 3:45_50. New Phase Transfer Catalysts Containing Oxyethylene Oligomers. L. J. Mathias, J. B. Canterberry.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—40. Dynamics of Single Polymer Chains Investigated in Solution and the Melt by New High Resolution Neutron Scattering Techniques. J. S. Higgins, L. K. Nicholson, J. B. Hayter. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—41. Effects of Slow Dynamics of En­ tangled Polymer Chains ON NMR Proper­ ties. J. P. Cohen-Addad. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—42. Light Scattering Measurements of Polymer Permeability. M. E. McDon­ nell. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—43. Intramolecular Rotational Diffu­ sion as Studied by Excimer Fluorescence. C. W. Frank, P. D. Fitzgibbon. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—44. A Molecular Experimental Ap­ proach to Viscoelasticity Using Fluoroescence Polarization. L. Monnerie. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—45. Rotational and Translational Dif­ fusion in Semi-Dilute Solutions of Rigid Rod Macromolecules. R. Pecora, K. M. Zero. 12:05—Discussion.

3:30—76. Catalytic Effects of Poly(3-alkyl1-vinyl-imidazolium) Salts on the Hydrolysis of Neutral Phenyl Esters. S. C. Israel, K. I, Papathomas, J. C. Salamone. 3:30—77. Hydrolytic Degradation of Polyester Polyurethane Foams. D. W. Brown, R. E. Lowry, L. E. Smith. 3:30—78. The Flexibility of Various Molecular Swivels used to Control the Rigidity and Tractability of Aromatic Heterocyclic Polymers. W. J. Welsh, D. Bhaumik, J. E. Mark. 3:30—79. Phenylene Group Rotations and Nonplanar Conformations in Some Cis and Trans Polybenzoxazoles and Polybenzothiazoles. W. J. Welsh, D. Bhaumik, J. E. Mark. 3:30—80. Interchain Interactions in Some Benzoxazole and Benzothiazole Rigid-Rod Polymers. D. Bhaumik, W. J. Welsh, H. H. Jaffe, J. E. Mark. 3:30—81. Polarizabilities of Some Benzox­ azole and Benzothiazole Rigid-Rod Poly­ mers. D. Bhaumik, H. H. Jaffe, J. E. Mark. 3:30—82. Model Polyurethane Elastomers Prepared from Non-Crystal!izable Poly­ propylene Oxide) Chains. P-H. Sung, J. E. Mark. 3:30—83. Model Networks of End-Linked Polydimethylsiloxane Chains. XII. Depen­ dence of Ultimate Properties on DanglingChain Irregularities. M. A. Sharaf, A. L. Andrady, M. A. Llorente, R. R. Rahalkar, J. E. Mark, J. L. Sullivan, C. U. Yu, J. R. Falender. 3:30—84. Photoelastic Studies of Some Polybutadiene Networks. J. E. Mark, M. A. Llorente. Section C Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Educators III: Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 47)

8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—91. Molecular Interpretation for the Linear Viscoelasticity of Concentrated Polymer Solutions and Melts-Explanation for the 3.4 Power Law. M. Doi. 9:25—Discussion. 9:30—92. Concentration Dependence of the Viscosity of Polyisoprene Solutions. D. S. Pearson, A. Mera, W. E. Rochefort. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—93. Newtonian Viscosity of SemiDilute Solutions. M. Adam, M. Delsanti. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—94. The Diffusion of Linear, Branched, and Cyclic Molecules in Concentrated So­ lutions and Melts of a Linear Polymer. J. Klein. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—95. Chain Motion in Molten Polysty­ rene as Seen from Proton and Deuteron NMR. H. Sillescu, E. Rossler, P. Lindner. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—96. Reptation in Polymer Melts: A Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Study. R. Kimmich. 11:55—Discussion.

Section C Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Educators III: Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 48)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Nu­ clear Magnetic Resonance organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. {see page 81)

Omni International, Thornton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry

Symposium on Commodity and Engineering Plastics organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page 57) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Thornton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Cyclopolymers and Polymers with Chain-Ring Structures cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry J. Nishimura, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—85. Preparation and Polymerization of N,N-Dimethyl-3,4-Dimethylenepyrrolidine Bromide. R. M. Ottenbrite. 9:30—86. Polycyclotrimers and Polycocyclotrimers Based on Isocyanates. J. E. Kresta, Κ. Η. Hsieh. 9:55—87. Cationic Cyclopolymerization of 1,3-Bis(p-Vinylphenyl) Propane and Its Derivatives. J. Nishimura, S. Yamashita 10:20—88. Polymerization of Bis-Phthalonitriles. Metal Free Phthalocyanine Forma­ tion. N. P. Marullo, A. W. Snow. 10:45—89. Properties of Cured DietherLinked Phthalocyanine Resins. R. Y. Ting, T. M. Keller, N. P. Marullo, P. Peyser, C. F. Poranski, T. R. Price. 11:10—90. Poly(carbon Suboxide)-A Laddar—Poly(a-Pyrone). N. L. Yang, A. Snow, H. Haubenstock.

Section Β Omni International, Glenmar Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Dynamical Properties of Polymer Fluids: Solution, Gel and Melt

G. C. Corfield, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—97. Synthesis of Macrocyclic RingContaining Polymers via Cyclopolymeri­ zation. G. B. Butler, Q. S. Lien. 2:30—98. Polymers Containing HydrogenBonding Rings. S. J. Huang, B. C. Benicewicz, J. A. Pavlisko, E. Quinga. 2:55—99. Cyclopolymerization of Divinyl Ethers. T. Kunitake, M. Tsukino. 3:20—100. Thermally Stable Polyimides from Pyrrole Dicarboxylic Acid Anhydride Monomers. R. W. Stackman. 3:45—101. Synthesis of Poly-p-Benzamide (PBA) and W-Methyl PBA Copolymers. J. Preston, J. Asrar, W. R. Krigbaum. 4:15—102. Synthesis of Liquid Crystalline Solutions of Poly(p-phenylene benzobisthiazole) in Polyphosphoric Acid. J. F. Wolfe, B. H. Loo, E. R. Sevilla. 4:40—103. Heat and Water Resistant Polyphenyl-as-triazines from Terephthalamidrazone. L. Fengcai, X. Lanmin, W. Yulan. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (joint with Di­ vision of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry), Knollwood Room. Section Β Omni International, Glenmar Room Β (1st floor, Conventional Center) Symposium on Dynamical Properties of Polymer Fluids: Solution, Gel and Melt M. Tirrell, Presiding 1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—104. Free Volume Analysis of Molec­ ular Diffusion in Polymer Melts. J. L. Duda, J. S. Vrentas.

10:05—118. Comparison of the Selectivities of Resin-bound Catalysts to Their Homogeneous Counterparts. Alkoxycarbonylation and Hydroformylation with Anchored Pd, Ru, and Pt. C. U. Pittman, Jr., G. M. Wilemon, Q. Y. Ng, L. I. Flowers. 10:30—119. Transition Metal Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Synthesis Via Polymer-attached Optically Active Phosphine Ligands V. Preparation of Amino Acids in High Optical Yield via Catalytic Hydrogénation. J. K. Stille, G. L. Baker, S. J. Fritschel. 10:55—120. A New Polymer-bound Catalyst: the Boron Trifluoride Etherate of Poly(pmethoxystyrene). J. F. Kinstle, G. L. Quintan. 11:20—121. Photochemical Reactions in Polymers. D. C. Neckers, S. N. Gupta, I. Gupta, L. Thijs, J. Damen.

Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Educators III: Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 48)

Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Vibrational Spectroscopy organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

Section D

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Omni International, Thornton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Aqueous Polymer Systems T. L. St. Pierre, Presiding 8:50—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—110. New Water-Soluble Polymers with Electrophilic Functional Groups. E. J. Goethals, E. H. Schacht, Y. Bogaert, I. Ali. 9:30—111. Carbon-13 NMR Analysis of Polyethyleneimine. T. St. Pierre, M. Geckle. 10:00—112. C-13 NMR Identification of Urea-Formaldehyde Resins. B. Meyer, R. Nunlist. 10:30—113. High Performance Aqueous Exclusion Chromatography of Polycations on a Hydrophilic Gel Column. P. L. Dubin, I. J. Levy. 11:00—114. Hemin Copolymerization with Vinyl Monomers of Potential Use in Artifi­ cial Hemoglobins. L. C. Dickinson, J. C. W. Chien. 11:30—115. Serum Albumin Electrophoresis in Gels Containing Hydrophobic Substituents. H. Morawetz, J. L. Chen. Section Β Omni International, Glenmar Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Polymeric Reagents J. F. Kinstle, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—116. Copper Containing Poly[thiosemicarbazides]. L. G. Donaruma, S. Kitoh, G. Walsworth, J. K. Ezwald, J. V. Depinto, M. J. Maslyn, R. A. Niles. 9:40—117. Polymeric Reagents VII. Polystyryl Diphenyl Phosphine Tetrahydroborate Copper(l): A New Recyclable Reducing Agent. W. Amaratunga, J. M. J. Fréchet.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Omni International, Thornton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Aqueous Polymer Systems L. J. Guilbault, Presiding 2:00—122. Model Acrylamide Random and Graft Copolymers (I)—Synthesis and Characterization. C. L. McCormick, G. S. Chen, L. S. Park, H. H. Neidlinger. 2:30—123. Model Acrylamide Random and Graft Copolymers (II)—Viscosity Studies in Aqueous Solutions. H. H. Neidlinger, G. S. Chen, L. S. Park, C. L. McCormick. 3:00—124. Determination of Weak Acid Residues in Water-Soluble AcrylamideAcrylic Acid Type Copolymers. Ν. Η. Kil­ mer, L. G. Donaruma, M. J. Hatch, G. D. Khune, F. D. Martin, J. S. Shepitka. 3:30—125. Dynamical studies of Xanthan Polysaccharide in Water by Photon Corre­ lation Spectroscopy. A. M. Jamieson, J. G. Southwick, J. Blackwell. 4:00—126. Friction Reduction Process. Y. Ozari. 4:30—127. Hydration Rate of Polymers in Friction Reduction Process. Y. Ozari. Section Β Omni International, Glenmar Room Β (1st floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Polymeric Reagents

J. F. Kinstle, Presiding 2:00—128. Polyfunctional Gels. F. S. Bates, R. E. Cohen. 2:25—129. Triphasé Catalysis and Cation Extraction with Crown Ether Polymers. F. L. Cook, J. R. Robertson, W. R. Ernst. 2:50—130. Catalytic Properties of Polymers Containing Crown Ethers. J. Smid, K. Kimura, M. Shirai, R. Sinta. 3:15—131. Polymeric Catechols. W. H. Daly, S. Chotiwana. 3:40—132. Acylations and Alkylations of an Ester Enolate in High Yield at Room Temperature on Polystyrene Supports. W. T. Ford, Y.H. Chang. 4:05—133. Reagent Resins Containing Rigid Polyimide Arms. C. Lo, J. Fan, H. J. Harwood.

Section C

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

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Section C

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Poly­ mer Characterization by Chromatographic Techniques organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

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Section C

Symposium on State of the Art for Chemical Educators III; Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 48)

Section D Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Ana­ lytical Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Fourier Transform Infrared organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cel­ lulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (seepage 81)

Section D

Section Ε

2:25—Discussion. 2:30—105. Rheology of Semi-Crystalline Polymer Blends. L. A. Utracki, M. R. Kamal, A. Catani. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—106. Dynamic Flow Birefringence of a Linear Macromolecule with Optically Anisotropic Side Groups. A. Peterlin. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—107. Rigid Backbone Polymers, XX: Effect of Solvents on the Onset of Anisotropy in Solutions of Semi-Rigid Polymers. S. M. Aharoni. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—108. Molecular Relaxation Times of Polymer Molecules in Dilute Solution Ob­ served by Elongational Flow. A. Keller, M. J. Miles, K. Tanaka. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—109. Extension and Relaxation of High Macromolecules in Oscillatory Elongational Flow using Flow Birefringence. R. Cressely, R. Hocquart. 4:55—Discussion. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (joint with Di­ vision of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry), (see Section A for location).

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Recent Advances in Specialized Techniques organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 81)

C. W. Frank, Presiding

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

79

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FRIDAY MORNING

9:00—134. Chlroalkyl-Substituted Polysulfides: New Reactive Polymeric Alkylating Agents. M. P. Zussman, B. A. Meindl, J. F. Brandt, D. A. Tirrell. 9:20—135. Synthesis and NMR Character­ ization of Polymers and Alternating Co­ polymers of Methyl α-Fluoroacrylate. R. N. Majumdar, H. J. Harwood. 9:40—136. AB-lnitio Quantum Chemical Calculations Permit Prediction of Pro­ pensities of Substituted Cyclic Ethers to Polymerize. F. L. Tobin, P. C. Hariharan, J. J. Kaufman. 10:00—137. Orientation Effects in Thermotropic Liquid-Crystalline Mesophases of Polyesters Subjected to High Magnetic Fields. G. Maret, A. Blumstein, S. Vilasagar. 10:20—138. Synthesis and Properties of Siloxane-b-styrene-b-siloxane Polymers. P. Bajaj, S. K. Varshney. 10:40—139. Stretching of Nylon 66 Yarn Saturated with Dry HCI. W. Wu, W. B. Black.

tr

Ε 2

Section A

Omni International, Thornton Room (1st floor, Convention Center) SPECIAL TOPICS R. Ikeda, Presiding

Section Β Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 81).

PRFR DIVISION OF PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS S. W. Drigot, Chairman M. W. Wadley, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Tudor Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on Compensation for Employed Inventors organized by Division of Profes­ sional Relations joint with Joint Board-Council Committee on Patent Matters and Related Legislation, Council Committee on Profes­ sional Relations and Division of Small Chemical Businesses W. Marcy, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:20—1. DuPont Special Compensation Plan. B. A. Montague. 9:55—2. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Inventor Award Plan. E. E. Innis. 10:30—3. IBM Awards Program. W. J. Turner. —4. Withdrawn 10:50—5. Survey of Inventor Award Plans. W. Marcy. 2:00—6. More Than Fifty Years of Compro­ mise, A Review of the Development of the German Compensation Rules. B. W. R. Redies.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

80

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

2:30—7. 1979 ACS Salary and Employment Status Survey—Supplemental Report: Employed Inventors. J. R. Jones, H. J. Foxwell. 3:00—Panel Discussion—W. Marcy, Mod­ erator. D. Chamot, AFL-CIC, Washington, D.C. J. P. Sutton, Limbach, Limbach and Sutton, San Francisco, Calif. W. D. Niederhauser, Rohm & Haas Co., Spring House, Pa. Additional panelist to be announced. TUESDAY MORNING Hyatt Regency, Tudor Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on Education for a Professional Life organized by Division of Professional Relations joint with the Council Committee on Professional Relations, Women Chemists Committee and Younger Chemists Com­ mittee Ε. Ν. Garcia, Presiding 9:00 a.m.—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—8. A Career Development Course for the Chemist. D. J. Runser. 9:40—9. Performance Appraisals—From the Employee's Side of the Desk. Β. Μ. Abler. 10:10—Intermission. 10:15—10. Some Aspects of Professional Employment Agreements. Η. Μ. Peters. 10:45—11. Safety—What Do We Really Mean? Η. Η. Fawcett. 11:15—12. Learning To Live With Our Chemicals. J. Y. Tong. 11:45—Concluding Remarks.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Symposium on Legal and Para-legal Career Options in Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Information, Chemistry and the Law Subdivision joint with Women Chemists Committee and Younger Chemists Committee {see page 50) 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting. 5:30—Divisional Wine and Cheese Recep­ tion (see Social Events, ticket 11 for de­ tails).

RUBB

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Nuclear Magnetic Reso­ nance organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Ana­ lytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemis­ try, Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 81)

DIVISION OF SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESSES

WEDNESDAY MORNING

K. W. Greenlee, Chairman G. R. Hutchens, Secretary

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Analytical Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Fourier Transform Infrared orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly­ mer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 81)

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Automated Dynamic Me­ chanical Methods for Polymer Char­ acterization organized by Macromo­ lecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plas­ tics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 81) TUESDAY MORNING Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Electron Microscopy orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly­ mer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 81)

MONDAY MORNING Symposium on Compensation for Em­ ployed Inventors organized by Division of Professional Relations joint with Joint Board-Council Committee on Patent Matters and Related Legislation (see page 80) MONDAY AFTERNOON

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Symposium on Compensation for Em­ ployed Inventors organized by Division of Professional Relations joint with joint Board-Council Committee on Patent Matters and Related Legislation (see page 80)

Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Polymer Characterization by Chromatographic Techniques or­ ganized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Section Β Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly­ Symposium on Hazardous Chemicals mer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 81) Control: Toxic Substances Control Act and Resource Conservation and Re­ covery Act organized by Division of THURSDAY MORNING Chemical Information Chemistry and the Law Subdivision joint with Division of Symposium on Instrumental and Chemical Health and Safety (see page Physical Characterization of Macro50) molecules: Vibrational Spectroscopy organized by Macromolecular Secre­ tariat joint with Divisions of Analytical TUESDAY MORNING Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room (Meeting Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly­ Level) Symposium on Professional Liability Prob­ mer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 81)

RUBBER DIVISION, INC. D. W. Gorman, Chairman T. Jones, Secretary

SCHB

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Recent Advances in Spe­ cialized Techniques organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cel­ lulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 81) FRIDAY MORNING Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules organized by Macromolec­ ular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plas­ tics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 81)

lems Faced by Independent Testing, Ana­ lytical and R&D Laboratories organized by Division of Small Chemical Businesses joint with Division of Chemical Information Chemistry and the Law Subdivision; with contributions by the Independent Laboratories Assurance Co. Ltd. C. A. Garber, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Alternatives for Professional Lia­ bility Protection. R. L. Harris, L. E. Harris, J. E. McClurg. 9:30—2. The Laboratory Qualification Manual as an Aid in the Elevation of Professional Standards. E. H. Hess, J. P. Dux. 9:50—3. Precautions A Small Independent Consultant and Laboratory Takes to Mini­ mize Professional Liability Problems. D. N. Kendall. 10:10—4. Accreditation Criteria Applied to an Electron Optical Service Laboratory—A Model Program. J. T. Stasny, C. A. Garber. 10:30—5. Liability Problems of Independent Analytical Laboratories with High Tech­ nology Clients. M. A. Kelly, L. H. Scharpen, H Diemer. 10:50—Round Table Discussion. 11:50—Concluding Remarks.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on Organizing, Financing, and Starting-Up A Small Business G. R. Hutchens, Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—6. Starting and Organizing A Small Chemical Business. H. R. Friedberg. 2:30—7. The Birthof Lindau Chemicals. R. E. Robinson. 2:50—8. The Factors in Raising Capital for A Small Business. M. S. Long. 3:15—9. The Hows and How-Nots of Buying a Small Company. D. W. Gleeson. 3:40—10. The Role of SBA's Office of Ad­ vocacy. R. C. Davis. 4:05—11. Where the Money Goes, and How to Stop It. E. A. Fike. 4:35—12. Initial Public Offering as an Equity Source for a Small Chemical Company. S. B. Mainthia.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on True Stories of Small Chemical Businesses organized by Division of Small Chemical Businesses joint with Di­ vision of The History of Chemistry M. G. Gergel, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—13. Columbia Organic: From Man­ hattan District Days Until Now. S. S. Reichlyn. 2:40—14. A Story of Mann Research Labo­ ratories. D. M. Kirschenbaum. 3:10—15. The Story of Kings Laboratory. J. A. Montgomery. 3:30—Intermission. 3:35—16. The Story of Wateree Chemical Company. W. W. Wannamaker, III. 4:00—17. The Story of Aceto Chemical Company, Inc. A. J. Frankel. 4:30—18. The Story of the Late Hynes Chemical Company. M. G. Gergel. 4:55—Concluding Remarks. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social 'Events for location). 6:30—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 20 for details).

GC-Mass Spectrometry of Macromole­ cules. E. Reiner, T. F. Moran. 9:05—23. Liquefaction Reactivity Correla­ tions Using Pyrolysis/Mass Spectrometry/Pattern Recognition Procedures. K. J. Voorhees, S. L. Durfee, R. M. Baldwin. 9:30—24. Analysis of Polymeric Materials Using Fourier Transform Infrared Evolved Gas Analysis. J. O. Lephardt, R. A. Fenner. TUESDAY MORNING 9:55—25. Microstructural Characterization of Various Copolymers by Pyrolysis Glass Omni International, Rutherford Hall (2nd floor, Capillary Gas Chromatography. S. Tsuge, Convention Center) Y. Sugimura, T. Kobayashi, T. Nagaya. Symposium on Instrumental and Physical 10:30—26. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatographic Characterization of Macromolecules: Elec­ Characterization Differentiation and Iden­ tron Microscopy organized by Macromolec­ tification of Biopolymers-An Overview. F. ular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Ana­ L. Bayer. lytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, 10:55—27. Recent Results in Pyrolysis Mass Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Spectrometry of Synthetic Polymers. I. Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Luderwaid. Chemistry, inc., Rubber, Inc. 11:30—28. Structure Correlation and Pattern L. H. Princen, Presiding Recognition in Analytical Pyrolysis. S. L. Morgan. 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—10. Organic Coatings Analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Dispersion X-ray Analysis. R. M. Hol­ Omni International, Rutherford Hall (2nd floor sworth. 9:35—11. Basic Principles of Scanning Convention Center) Transmission Electron Microscopy as an Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Analytical Tool. M. Isaacson. Characterization of Macromolecules: Poly­ 10:00—12. Structural Studies of Macromol­ mer Characterization by Chromatographic ecules and their Complexes Through Techniques organized by Macromolecular Electron Microscopy of Labeled Systems. Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical M. Beer, J. W. Wiggins, C. Stoeckert, N. Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Kettaneh, P. Anthony, D. Tunkel, M. Cole. Colloid and Surface Chemistry; Organic 10:25—Intermission. Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer 10:40—13. MOLE, a MicroRaman Instrument Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. for Polymer Analysis in Conjunction with T. Provder, Presiding Electron Microscopy. M. E. Andersen. 3:10—Intermission. 3:25—8. Dynamic Response of Polymer Melts Subjected to Shear from the Quiescent State. B. Maxwell. 4:00—9. A Low Shear High-Temperature Rotational Viscometer: The Viscosity of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene. H. L. Wagner, J. G. Dillon.

11:05—14. Micromechanical Measurements of Polymers by Transmission Electron Mi­ croscopy. E. J. Kramer. 11:30—15. Electron Crystal Structure Anal­ ysis of Linear Polymers—An Appraisal. D. L. Dorset, Β. Κ. Moss. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Omni International, Rutherford Hall (2nd floor Convention Center) Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Nu­ clear Magnetic Resonance organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, L. F. Thompson, Secretary Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface C. D. Craver, Symposium General Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chairman Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc.

MACROMOLECULAR SECRETARIAT

E. G. Brame, Presiding MONDAY NOON

MORNING

AND AFTER­

Omni International, Rutherford Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Auto­ mated Dynamic Mechanical Methods for Polymer Characterization organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divi­ sions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc.

J. K. Gillham, R. F. Boyer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Introductory Remarks on Dynamic Mechanical Methods. R. F. Boyer. 9:45—2. Torsional Pendulum and Torsional Braid Analysis of Polymers: A Review. J. K. Gillham. 10:20—3. Application of Torsion Impregnated Cloth Analysis (TICA) to Study Resin Cure. C. Y-C. Lee, I. J. Goldfarb. 10:55—4. Application of the Dynamic Me­ chanical Analyzer to Organic Coatings. T. H. Grentzer, R. M. Holsworth, T. Provder. 11:30—5. PL-Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analyzer and its Application to the Study of Polymer Transitions. R. E. Wetton, T. C. Croucher, J. W. M. Fursdon.

J. K. Gillham, Presiding 2:00—6. Dynamic Mechanical Spectroscopy Using the Autovibron DDV-111-C. S. H. Webler, J. A. Manson, R. Lang. 2:35—7. Dynamic and Transient Viscoelastic Characterization of Solids. S. S. Sternstein.

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—16. Structural and Dynamic Charac­ terization of Polymers by 1SC and 19F NMR. F. A. Bovey, R. E. Cais, L. W. Jelinski, F. C. Schilling, W. H. Starnes, Jr., A. E. Tonelli. 2:50—17. 13 C and 19F NMR Chemical Shifts and the Microstructures of Fluoropolymers. A. E. Tonelli, F. C. Shilling, R. E. Cais. 3:15—18. Use of Liquid and Solid State NMR to Study Compatibility with Epoxy Resins. P. B. Roush, C. S. Larkey, P. A. Craw­ ford. 3:40—19. Characterization of Molecular Motion in Solid Polymer by Variable Tem­ perature Magic Angle Spinning 13C NMR. J. R. Lyerla, W. W. Fleming, C. S. Yannoni. 4:05—20. 13C NMR Studies of Non-ordered Regions of Semi-crystalline Polymers, L. Mandelkern. 4:30—21. 13 C NMR Relaxation in Crosslinked Polystyrene Gels. W. T. Ford, T. Balakrishnan.

WEDNESDAY MORNING Omni International, Rutherford Hall (2nd floor Convention Center) Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Ana­ lytical Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Fourier Transform Infrared organized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cel­ lulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc.

S. A. Liebman, Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—29. Plenary Lecture. Field-Flow Fractionation: Versatile Method for the Separation and Characterization of Mac­ romolecules. J. C. Giddings, M. N. Myers, K. D. Caldwell. 2:20—30. Programming Separation Variables in Sedimentation Field-Flow Fractionation (SFFF) for Particle Size Distribution Anal­ ysis. W. W. Yau, S. W. Rementer, J. J. Kirkland. 2:50—31. Measurement of Particle Size Distribution of Polymer Latexes Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic Chromatograph. J. P. Olivier, C. E. Brown. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—32. Foam Fractionation of Polymers in Non-Aqueous Solvents. R. P. Chartoff, L. T. Chen, R. J. Roe. 3:50—33. Orthogonal Chromatography: Polymer Cross Fractionation by Coupled GPC. S. T. Balke, R. D. Patel. 4:15—34. Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) Characterization of Copolymers ILL. H. Garcia Rublo, J. F. MacGregor, A. E. Hamielec. 4:40—35. Calibration in Aqueous Size Ex­ clusion Chromatography. J. E. Rollings, A. Bose, J. M. Caruthers, M. R. Okos, G. T. Tsao. THURSDAY

MORNING

Omni International, Rutherford Hall (2nd floor Convention Center) Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules; Vi­ brational Spectroscopy organized by Mac­ romolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Or­ ganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly­ mer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc.

J. L. Koenig, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—36. Probing the Real Structure of Polymeric Materials by Vibrational Spec­ troscopy. Recent Results. G. Zerbi. 9:50—37. Infrared Spectra of Polymers and Coupling Agents Adsorbed onto Oxidized Aluminum. F. J. Boerio. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—38. Fourier Transform Infrared Stud­ ies of the Degradation of Polyacrylonitrile Copolymers. M. M. Coleman, G. T. Sivy. 11:00—39. Characterization of Deformation Phenomena in Polymers by Fourier Trans­ form Infrared Spectroscopy. S. L. Hsu, D. J. Burchell. 11:30—40. Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of Environmental Effect on Polymers. B. J. Bulkin, C. S. Chen, E. M. Pearce.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Omni International, Rutherford Hall (2nd floor Convention Center) Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules: Recent Advances in Specialized Techniques orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc.

L. E. Brydia, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—41. Recent Advances in Scattering Techniques. R. S. Stein 2:05—42. Developments in ESCA Analysis of Polymers. D. W. Dwight, H. R. Thomas. 2:35—43. Structural Analysis of Polymeric Materials by Laser Microprobe Mass Analysis (LAMMA). D. M. Hercules, S. W. Graham, J. A. Gardella, Jr. 3:05—44. Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Flexible, Linear Macromolecules. B. Wunderlich, U. Gaur. 3:35—Intermission. 3:45—45. Thermogravimetric Analysis Ki­ netics. J. H. Flynn. 4:15—46. Photoacoustic Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and its Application to Polymer Analysis. D. W. Vidrine. 4:45—47. Excimer Fluorescence as a Probe of Molecular Structure in Polymers. C. W. Frank, S. N. Semerak.

FRIDAY MORNING Omni International, Rutherford Hall (2nd floor Convention Center) Symposium on Instrumental and Physical Characterization of Macromolecules orga­ nized by Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Cellulose, Paper and Textile, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. C. D. Craver, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—48. Factor-Jump Thermogravimetry Applied to Polymer Degradations. B. Dickens. 8:55—49. Quantitative Reaction Kinetics by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. T. H. Grentzer, R. M. Holsworth, T. Provder. 9:15—50. Dynamic Mechanical and Molec­ ular Weight Measurements on Polymer Bonded Explosives from Thermally Accel­ erated Aging Tests I. Fluoropolymer Bind­ ers. D. M. Hoffman, L. E. Caley. 9:35—51. Dynamic Mechanical and Molec­ ular Weight Measurements on Polymer Bonded Explosives from Thermally Accel­ erated Aging Tests. II. A Poly(ester-urethane) Binder. D. M. Hoffman, L. E. Caley. 9:55—52. Dynamic Mechanical and Molec­ ular Weight Measurements on Polymer Bonded Explosives from Thermally Accel­ erated Aging Tests III. Kraton Block Co­ polymer Binder and Plasticizers. D. M. Hoffman, L. E. Caley. 10:15—53. Temperature Effect on Tear Propagation of Elastomers. W. R. Griffin. 10:35—54. ESCA Surface Analysis of Plasma Exposed Silicon Nitride and Photoresist Polymer Films. H. J. Leary, Jr., J. S. Slattery, R. J. Sargent. 10:55—55. Small Angle Neutron Scattering from PolyPentenamer Sulfonate lonomers. T. R. Earnest, Jr., J. S. Higgins, D. L. Handlin, W. J. McKnight. 11:15—56. Use of NMR Spectroscopy in the Study of the Molecular Structure of Biopolymers. G. G. S. Dutton. 11:35—57. Pressure Effects on Macromolecule-Water Interactions with Synthetic Membranes. C. R. Bennett, R. S. King, R. J. Petersen. 11:55—58. Morphology and Properties of Styrene and Dimethylsiloxane Triblock and Multiblock Copolymers. S. K. Varshney, C. L. Beatty, P. Bajaj.

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—22. Recent Studies on the Pyrolysis-

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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181st ACS National Meeting The Atlanta ACS meeting offers chemists much more than just a fine technical program. A variety of plant tours, social events, and award addresses are scheduled from Monday through Thursday. The ACS awards reception and dinner will be held Monday evening, March 30, and will be followed by a general meeting. At this meeting, Herbert C. Brown will present his Priestley Medal Address on "Adventures in Research." More than 25 other award recipients will present addresses throughout the week. Other events include the ACS mixer scheduled for Tuesday, March 31; a special presentation organized by the Geochemistry Division on the Voyager 1 encounter with Saturn that will feature four speakers discussing aspects of ongoing research on the ringed planet; and an evening at the 3200-acre Stone Mountain Park that features entertainment by a bluegrass band and an old-fashioned barbecue, also on Wednesday. Plant tours are scheduled to Micrometritics Instrument Corp. on Tuesday, March 31; Coca-Cola's technical center, also on Tuesday; and the U.S. Geological Survey, National Water Quality Laboratory on Wednesday, April 1. 82

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

ATLANTA ^ • j Registration Persons planning to attend the Atlanta meeting are encouraged to register in advance, using the form on page 97. Please note that two registration forms have been included. A separate form must be provided for each registrant, including guests (additional forms are available upon request—no photocopies please). As an incentive to advance registration, appreciable discounted fees are in effect. The current scale of fees for registration is shown at right. Either payment in full or authorization to charge to a credit card (Master Charge or VISA only) must accompany your order. Purchase orders cannot be honored. The deadline for advance registration is March 9. Registrations received after that date will be returned. Mail completed materials with payment to: Department of

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Meetings & Divisional Activities, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Please allow at least three weeks to process your request. The meeting badge will be mailed to the address shown on the registration form. If a registrant's affiliation and address are not available, please give a home address. Advance registrants' cards will be posted in the visible file in the ACS registration area, Georgia World Congress Center, level II. No check-in prior to attendance at technical sessions will be required. However, copies of the booklet program will be available in the registration areas. Please note on your registration form where you will be staying, so that in the event of an emergency, the proper information can be relayed. If the information is not known prior to departure for the meeting, please come to the Georgia World Congress Center, locate your card in the alphabetical file, and mark the appropriate space. On-Site Registration. Registration facilities at the meeting will be located

in the Georgia World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A, level I, and the Atlanta Hilton, second floor lobby. Hours for registration are: Sunday, March 29, 3 PM to 8 PM; and from 8 AM to 4 PM, Monday, March 30, through Thursday, April 2. Classification of registrants

Fees On-site Advance

MEMBERS ACS member or national affiliate Emeritus member Student member or affiliate, full-time undergraduate

$65

$75

25 10

30 10

65

75

10

10

95

110

10

10

ONE-DAY-SESSION TICKETS Regular 25 Student 5

30 5

VISITORS Non-U.S. resident; nonchemical scientist; chemical technician Family of registrant NONMEMBERS U.S. resident chemist or chemical engineer Student, full-time undergraduate

One-Dây-Session Tickets. $25 in advance; $30 on-site. Fill in the appropriate information on the advance registration form on page 97, following the same procedure for regular registration. One-day-session tickets will be sold in the registration areas during registration. These tickets can be converted at a later time to full registration, if so desired. Abstracts. Abstracts will be mailed upon completion, about March 13, to U.S. residents who pay the extra postage for mailing. Yellow receipt cards will be mailed to all other registrants ordering abstracts, to be exchanged for books in one of the registration areas. Orders for abstracts only should be sent to Special Issues Sales, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036, or call tollfree 1-800-424-6747. Refunds. Requests for refunds of registration will be honored if received, together with the return of the badge and a copy of the receipt, by March 23. No refunds will be honored after that date. Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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ATLANTA Housing Room Reservations. All housing re­ quests for the official hotels at the meeting must be submitted to the Department of Meetings & Divisional Activities, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Use the official housing form shown on page 87. Deadline for receipt of housing requests is March 9. Reservations received after the deadline cannot be processed and will be returned. Reservations will be confirmed directly to the individuals, by ACS, indicating the hotel assigned 84

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Georgia State Capitol Atlanta City Hall^

and a guaranteed rate. Please allow at least three weeks for processing your request. If registrants are sharing a twin or double-bedded room, use only one form listing both names. Incomplete information on the housing form will result in a delay in processing your request. If the type of accommodation requested has been sold out, the next closest type will be assigned according to your preference listed on the housing form. One night's deposit is required on all rooms. Send your check di­ rectly to your assigned hotel after receiving your confirmation from ACS. Do not send your check to ACS. Changes in arrival/departure times or dates should be sent directly to the

hotel; cancellation before March 9 to ACS. All unassigned rooms will be released to the hotels on March 9. After that date, all correspondence concerning housing matters, includ­ ing reservations, cancellations, and changes, should be made directly to the hotels. A map showing hotel lo­ cations in Atlanta appears above. Do not be disappointed; submit your housing requests as early as pos­ sible. Hotel List. For the convenience of reg­ istrants, area hotels not participating as official hotels for the meeting are shown on page 88. The ACS Housing Bureau recommends that you contact them directly. Rates shown for these hotels are estimated, not guaranteed by ACS. Shuttle service cannot be provided to these hotels.

Hotel rates in Atlanta Hotels

Single

Double

1. Atlanta American3 Spring at International Blvd., 30301 (404) 688-8600

$42

2. Atlanta Hilton & Towers b c Harris & Courtland St., N.E., 30303 (404) 659-2000

57/62 -75/80 SOLD OUT

3. Atlantan Hotelb Luckie & Cone St., 30303 (404)524-6461 80

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$52

67/72

85/90

£2

26

$52

double

$64/76

Smites 1 Bedroom 2 Bedrooms

$90 & up

165 & up

32

$250 & up

36-

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4. Downtowner ' 231 Ivy St., N.E., 30308 (404)577-1510

40-

5. Habersham ad 330 Peachtree St., N.E., 30308 (404)577-1980

40/60-

6. Hyatt Regency Atlanta bc 265 Peachtree St., N.E., 30301 (404)577-1234

65

77

77

7. Ladha Dowrrtownac 70 Houston St., N.E., 30303 (404) 659-2660

40/46-

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a Free parking, b Parking available at cost, c Swimming, d Restaurant not available; kitchenettes in each room. Note: All rooms are subject to 7 % sales tax. One night's deposit is required for all hotels. Send the deposit directly to hotel after confirmation is received. Do not send your check to ACS.

ATLANTA Local Arrangements Hospitality. Welcome to Atlanta, the booming centerpiece of the "Now South." We hope to share with you the flavor of this booming Sunbelt city, tinged with niceties of an earlier age. A variety of special events will present an opportunity to experience broadly the Atlanta area. Highlight­ ing the week will be a premeeting minitour on Sunday (for which tick­ ets will be sold only in advance) and a relaxing evening and dinner at the world famous Stone Mountain. All of the planned tours will depart from

the Atlanta Hilton, Harris Street entrance. The weather in Atlanta in late March and early April is variable, with temperatures ranging from 60° during the day to 45° in the evening. Rain gear and a light coat are strongly recommended. Hosts and hostesses from the Georgia Section of ACS will be avail­ able in the Hospitality Center, At­ lanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor A, to provide information regarding sightseeing, shopping, and dining. Invite your spouse to drop by for re­ freshments and conversation. The center will be open on Sunday, March 29, from 3 P M to 8 PM; Monday through Wednesday, from 9 AM to 4 PM; and on Thursday, from 9 AM to noon.

The following are responsible for your enjoyment of our fair city: Scott Pyron, chairman; Monica Ali, Kathy Ayer, Charlene Bayer, Mary Cohen, Wendall Cross, Manuel Fineman, Myra Fineman, Donald Hicks, Joanne Hicks, Jane Hopkins, Vernita Lockhart, Jay Patel, Jo Ann Pyron, Dallas Rogers, John Ross, Pedrick Stall, Dorothy Steinmeyer, and Preston Williams. Information Center. The center will operate in the Georgia World Con­ gress Center, level II, 3 P M to 8 P M on Sunday, March 29, and 8 AM to 5 PM, Monday, March 30 through Thursday, April 2. The hours on Fri­ day, April 3, will be from 8 AM until noon. Personal messages in writing may be exchanged and a lost-andfound service will be provided. Mail and telegrams should be addressed to the hotel in which you are staying. Communications addressed in care of ACS cannot be delivered, but will be held at the Information Center. No one will be paged in divisional meet­ ings. The society accepts no respon­ sibility for the delivery of mail, tele­ grams, or telephone messages, but is glad to be of as much service as pos­ sible. ACS Offices. Following is a list of ACS offices at the meeting. • Accounting. Atlanta Hilton, Press Room, second floor; World Congress Center, Room 215, level II. • Books & Journals. Hyatt Re­ gency, Van Dyck Room, terrace level. • Chemical Abstracts Service. Hyatt Regency, Spanish Suite, ter­ race level. • Chemical & Engineering News. Hyatt Regency, Van Dyck Room, terrace level. • Emergency after hours. A. T. Winstead, Atlanta Hilton. • Employment Clearing House. World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A, level I. • Executive Director's Office. Hyatt Regency, Spanish Suite, ter­ race level. • Hospitality Center. Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor A, first floor. • Information Center. World Congress Center, level II. • N e w s Service and Press Room. Hyatt Regency, Lancaster D & E, meeting level. • Operations Office. Atlanta Hilton, Press Room, second floor; World Congress Center, Room 214, level II. • Public Affairs. Hyatt Regency, Rubens Room, terrace level. Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

85

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Airfares are going up and regulations are getting more restrictive. Super-Savers require a minimum stay of 7 days. Therefore, group fares represent the least expensive way to travel to this meeting. Listed below are some sample cities and fares. Group flights are scheduled to depart on Saturday, March 28th, and Sunday, March 29th. You may return indi­ vidually, as long as you use the same airline. Airfares are valid as of January 15, 1981. We suggest early reserva­ tions. If your reservation is accompanied by a check or credit card number, you will receive your ticket immediately and avoid any subse­ quent fare increase. Please contact our office if you wish to leave on an alternative date. Tickets for this special group fare must be written no later than March 6,1981. Tickets are fully refundable. Partial List of Cities City

Flight #

Depart

Arrive

Group Fare

Economy Fare

Boston

DL1127

12:35p

3:12p

$251.

$358.

Chicago

PL 231

$186.

$266.

DL 339

12:30p 1:55p

3:18p

Cincinnati

3:09p

$137.

$196.

Cleveland

DL 665

3:1 Op

4:54p

$176.

$252.

Detroit

DL 635

3:15p

4:58p

11:35p

2:21p

Los Angeles New York-LGAa

EA 116 EA 82

$150. $203.

$260.

Houston

9:05a

$433.

$618.

DL 540 DL 602

1:43p

$184. $216.

$308.

Newark

11:20a 11:35a

4:04p 1:41p

Philadelphia Rochester

DL 903

2:40p

4:42p

$199.

$284.

EA 847

12:05p

2:17p

$251.

$358.

San Francisco Washington

DL1012

8:00a

3:15p

$469.

DL 305

1:30p

3:16p

$176.

$670. $252.

$290.

$308.

(a some restrictions on the return) (please contact our office for complete listing of cities.)

Please make the following reservations for me: Name(s) Mailing Address. City

Zip.

State-

(home)

Phone (business).

i wish to Depart from (city)_

on (date)_

I wish to Return on (date)— D morning D afternoon D evening D do not know at this time

enclosed please find my check or charge my credit card: Type of credit card Expiration date

Number Name on card

return to:

ACS Atlanta Flight Program, Zoe Newman Travel, Inc. 111 High Ridge Road, Stamford, Ct. 06905 phone (203) 327-1781 or (212) 893-4455

• Ticket Sales. World Congress Center, Room 214, level II. Conferences with ACS Staff. Discussions with society staff members may be arranged through the executive of­ fices in the Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Spanish Suite, Monday through Thursday, 8 AM to 5 PM. Telephone for an appointment if you would like to discuss ACS activities in any of the following areas: awards, chemistry and public affairs, constitution and bylaws, divisional activities, educa­ tional activities, local section activi­ ties, meetings and expositions ac­ tivities, membership in ACS, nomi­ nations and elections, Petroleum Research Fund, professional rela­ tions, professional training, public relations, regional meetings and conferences, and special projects. Audiovisual Offices. Audiovisual su­ pervisors will be available to assist you in the Atlanta Hilton, Press Room (Operations Office), second floor; Hyatt Regency, AV office ad­ jacent to the English Suite, meeting level; Omni International, convention office, first floor, convention center; World Congress Center, Room 214, level II. Facilities for the Handicapped. In 1981, the International Year of Disabled Persons, ACS wants to re-emphasize its intentions to make national meetings accessible to registrants with physical handicaps. Upon re­ ceipt of advance information, ACS staff will try to arrange for oral or sign language interpreters for registrants who are deaf or hearing impaired and escort services for registrants who are blind or visually impaired. A brochure on the World Congress Center is available from the ACS Meetings & Divisional Activities Department upon request. For assistance in ma­ neuvering the public areas of the meeting hotels, contact the assistant manager on duty in each property. Specially equipped sleeping rooms can be provided if so indicated on the housing request form. At least one month's notice is required for ad­ vance arrangements for special as­ sistance. Please address requests to the Department of Meetings & Divi­ sional Activities, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Local Transportation. Limousine transportation from the airport to official participating hotels is avail­ able to meeting attendees at $4.50 per person (a round trip ticket may be purchased for $8.50). Taxi service is available at $10 per person. There is

also a share-a-cab system that charges $3.00 each for two or more persons. This information applies to the downtown Atlanta area. Regular cab fees are as follows: meter start $1.00 plus 80 cents each additional mile, with an add-on of 25 cents for each additional rider. All transportation information is current as of Jan. 15,1981. Shuttle Bus Service. Available to all registrants, the shuttle will operate between the Hyatt Regency, Harris Street entrance, and the World Con­ gress Center, west lobby, level III. The hours are: Sunday, 3 PM to 8 PM Monday, 8 AM to 6 PM Tuesday, 8 AM to 7 PM Wednesday, 8 AM to 6 PM Thursday, 8 AM to 6 PM Friday, 8 AM to noon

The cooperation of the ACS Georgia Section in handling local arrangements is acknowledged gratefully. Through the efforts of its committees, many inter­ esting activities have been planned for registrants. H. P. Hopkins, general chairman R. S. Pyron, general interest program chairman F. L. Bayer, plant tours chairman A. L. Baumstark, student personnel chairman P. H. Williams, publicity chairman R. D. Kimbrough, local publications chairman

Divisional Membership. Divisional membership is evidence of your in­ terest in that particular field of chemistry or chemical engineering and in the work of the division. Divi­

sion members are granted at least one special privilege, a reduced rate on the purchase of abstracts. Most divisions offer additional services. Members of the society may become members of one or more divisions during the meeting by filling out a divisional membership form and paying the re­ quired dues. This can be done in the registration areas, or upon request to the divisional secretary. Poster Sessions. Posters will be dis­ played for the entire morning or af­ ternoon of their assigned days. Au­ thors will be with their posters during the times indicated in the program. Short Courses. The following program of intensive continuing education courses will provide chemical scien­ tists and engineers with the oppor­ tunity to learn from nationally

Use this form only for ACS participating housing/session hotels. Please read information on room reservations before completing this form. DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT AT ACS: MARCH 9. REQUESTS RECEIVED AFTER THIS DATE CANNOT BE PROCESSED. HOTELS:

INDICATE BELOW ORDER OF PREFERENCE (Choices 1st, 2nd, 3rd) INDICATE RATE PREFERENCE 1st 2nd 3rd S0LD

SOLD OUT

Atlanta American

SOLD OUT

Atlanta Hilton & Towers Atlantan Hotel

CHECK ONE:

0UT

Downtowner

Ladha Downtown

Habersham

Omni International

Hyatt Regency Atlanta

Peachtree Plaza Hotel , Rate

If my preferred rate is not available, I am more concerned with Location.

ROOM(S) WILL BE OCCUPIED BY: Name(s)_ Address. .ZIP.

City & State. Telephone: Home-

. Office. Departure date-

Arrival date Single (1 person)

Double/double (3 or 4 persons, 2 dbl. beds)

Double (2 persons, 1 bed)

Suite, 1 bedroom (1 or 2 persons)

Twin (2 persons, 2 beds)

Suite, 2 bedrooms (3 or more persons) ONE NIGHT'S DEPOSIT IS REQUIRED FOR ALL HOTELS

IMPORTANT: Changes in arrival/departure time or dates should be made directly to the hotel. Cancellations only to ACS. After March 9 all housing matters should be directed to the hotel. Mail confirmation to: Name Address. City & State_

ZIP.

-Telephone-

The name of each hotel guest must be listed for doubles/twin. Reservations cannot be made unless two names are given. Room assignments will be made in the order received. Incomplete information will result in a delay in processing your request.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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acclaimed experts. To obtain a de­ tailed brochure describing the courses and fees, call or write: Department of Educational Activities, American Chemical Society, 1155—16th St., N . W , Washington, D.C. 20036, (202) 872-4508. Because enrollments are limited, early registration is encouraged.

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Practice of modern liquid chro­ matography March 27-29 Pharmacology for chemists March 27-29 Capillary gas chromatography: techniques and problem-solving March 28-29

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Microemulsions and emulsions March 28-29

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Synthetic organic chemistry— modern methods and strategy March 28-29

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ο Chemical engineering for chem­ ists March 28-29 N e w product development: from research to commercialization March 31-Apr il 1 Writing for results March 31-April 1 Effective management for the newly appointed manager March 31-April 1 Technology forecasting March 31-April 1 Organizing, planning, and evalu­ ating R&D March 31-April 1 Introduction to environmental law March 31-April 1 X-ray fluorescence spectrometry March 31-April 1 Polymer chemistry March 31-April 2 Computer applications in chem­ istry March 31-April 2 88

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

publications on available

ATLANTA Chemical Exposition

The national ACS and the Georgia Section of the American Chemical Society are pleased to present a Chemical Exposition in conjunction with the 181st national meeting. It is the largest exposition ever held dur­ ing a spring meeting, and will include the complete range of products, ser­ vices, publications, and equipment that is currently available to the chemical community. More than a hundred new instruments, equip­ ment, publications, and other items will be introduced during the expo­ sition, along with many other prod­ ucts and services that represent the latest advances in the field of chem­ istry. More than 120 organizations will be on hand displaying these products and services, including a number of international firms. The exposition will be held in Hall A of the Georgia World Congress Center, in conjunction with the main registration area, a variety of techni­ cal poster sessions, the Employment Clearing House, the ACS products and services displays and exhibits, and the meeting restaurant. Another addition will be the Rathskeller for meeting attendees. Exposition hours are from 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday, March 30, through Wednesday, April 1. Another attraction for meeting at­ tendees will be free coffee and doughnuts served from 8:30 to 9:30 each morning during the three days of the exposition. These will be available to all meeting registrants and are being provided through the courtesy of the exhibitors participating in the exposition. Admission to the exposition will be by meeting badge, one-day-session ticket, or by complimentary badge for the exposition only. These compli­ mentary exposition badges will be available from the expositions oper­ ations desk in the registration area adjacent to the exposition in Hall A. Exhibitors Bold numbers at end of lines are booth numbers Academic Press, 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003. Displaying recent reference works, mono­ graphs, journals, and textbooks. Included are Karr, "Analytical Methods for Coal and Coal Products, " 3 vols.; Liner, "Toxic Constituents of Plant Foodstuffs, " 2nd éd.; Becker, "High Resolution NMR, " 2nd éd.; and West, "Oxocarbons." 330 Academic Press, College Department, 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003. Displaying recent chemistry

and distributing titles.

catalogs and

brochures 332, 334

Ace Glass, 1430 N.W. Blvd., Vineland, N.J. 08360. New, digital proportional temperature controller with Instatherm heated oil baths; Michel-Miller HPLP chromatography columns up to 2-inch diameter; pilot size laboratory reaction equipment and the Firestone valve for air-free reactions. 102, 104 Addison-Wesley Publishing, 1 Jacob Way, Reading, Mass. 01867. Introductory through graduate-level text materials in chemistry and related areas. 305 Aldrich Chemical, 940 West St. Wis. 53233. Organic chemicals, and biochemicals for research reagents, deuterated solvents, bulk intermediates.

Paul Ave., Milwaukee, inorganic chemicals, and industry. Borane stains and dyes, and 402

Alfa Products-Thiokol/Ventron div., 152 Andover St., Danvers, Mass. 01923. Organic, inorganic, and organometallic research chemicals. Puratronics, ultrapure chemicals, pure metals, alloys, and analytical standards. 613 Alltech Associates, 202 Campus Drive, Arlington Heights, III. 60004. 520 Allyn & Bacon, 470 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 02210. New and recently published texts and references. 311 Ann Arbor Science Publishers, P.O. Box 1425, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106. Scientific books for the graduate and professional levels in the areas of air and water pollution, water and waste technology, chemistry and engineering. 425,427 Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, III. 60439. Demonstration of Department of Energy projects in the technology area of energy conservation in wastewater management. 626, 628 J. T. Baker Chemical, 222 Red School Lane, Phillipsburg, N.J. 08865. Introducing state-of-the-art separation sciences products—Baker-10 sample preparation system replaces liquid/ liquid extraction; flash chromatography system, 17 bonded phases for HPLC and LC, automated TLC spotter and hard-layer TLC plates; also, reduced volume LSC fluids, H.P. solvents for GC, HPLC; new ReAquant II; Instra-Analyzed, atomic spectral standards and acids.

619,621

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Nonparticipating hotels, Atlanta

Hotel

Holiday Inn Downtown 175 Piedmont Ave., N.E., 30303 (404) 659-2727 Inntown Motor Hotel 89 Luckie St., N.W., 30303 (404)524-7991 Marriott Hotel Courtland & International Blvd., N.E., 30303 (404) 659-6500 Peachtree Manor Hotel 826 Peachtree St., N.E., 30308 (404)874-2791 Sheraton Atlanta Hotel 590 W. Peachtree St., N.W.. 30308 (404)881-6000 Sheraton-Biltmore Hotel 817 W. Peachtree St., N.W., 30308 (404)881-9500

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44/58

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Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43201. Battelle is an internationally recognized scientific research institute. Exhibited material will present capabilities in polymer chemistry, analytical chemistry, corrosion research, atmospheric sciences, synthetic organic chemistry, and environmental and life sciences. 101,103,105 Benjamin/Cummings Publishing, 2727 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, Calif. 94025. Publishers of Dickerson/ Gray/Haight, Roberts/Caserio, Watson, and many other outstanding science books. Featuring a new text for allied health and nursing chemistry: "Atoms, Mol­ ecules, and Life," by Michael Matta and Anthony Wilbraham, and the all new "Electronics and Instru­ mentation for Scientists," by Malmstadt, Enke, and Crouch. 303 Berghof/America, Raymond Professional Bldg., Main St., Raymond, N.H. 03077. Most complete line of Teflon products available for laboratory use. Vessels and utensils, autoclaves and digesters, membranes, fluid flow systems, pickling and etching vats, distillation equipment, valves, custom fabrication. 429

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Bioanalytical Systems, 1205 Kent Ave., Purdue Re­ search Park, West Lafayette, Ind. 47906. Electro­ chemical detectors for LC and flow-injection analysis, dedicated LC systems, column temperature control, instruments for cyclic voltammetry, synthetic potentiostats, preparative LC systems, centrifugal microfilters, centrifuges, specialty electrodes. 433

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Board of Trustees, Group Insurance Plans, 1155—16th St., N.W., Rm. 202, Washington, D.C. 20036. Information about the ACS Group Insurance Plans sponsored by the Board of Trustees, Group In­ surance Plans for ACS Members. These plans include term life, hospital indemnity, high-limit AD&D, disability income, and professional liability (malpractice) in­ surance. 108, 110 C. W. Brabender Instruments, 50 East Wesley St., South Hackensack, N.J. 07606. Laboratory instru­ mentation for measuring flow properties and polymer characterization. Instruments and literature will be on display including the new CWB line of testing appa­ ratus for physical and technical determinations of plastics and elastomers. Highlighted will be the Fractoscope Impact Tester available with standard Izod, Charpy, tensile-impact pendulums, or falling weight apparatus. Also featured: the Rheotron absolute rotational viscometer and Convimeter in-line vis­ cometer. 810 Brinkmann Instruments, Cantiague Rd., Westbury, N.Y. 11590. Electrochemical instrumentation, elec­ tronic analytical and top-loading balances, rotary evaporators, bottle-top dispensers and digital micro­ pipets. 107, 109, 111 Bureau of National Affairs, 1231—25th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037. Informational-type services dealing in the legal, tax, labor, economic, safety, and environment areas. 403 Burgess Publishing, 7108 Ohms Lane, Minneapolis, Minn. 55435. Publisher of educational and resource books and materials in chemistry and related fields.

314 Cathodeon Ltd., Nuffield Rd., Cambridge, England, CB4 1TF. Spectral sources—hollow cathode lamps, deuterium lamps, Mercury lamps, xenon lamps, etc. Detector for infrared. Video picture processor. 203 CEM, P.O. Box 9, Indian Trail, N.C. 28079. The auto­ matic volatility computer measures the solids/moisture in chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Combining the latest developments in microwave drying and com­ puter technology, the instrument is completely auto­ matic using microprocessor control with no operator adjustments required. Digital readout of solids or moisture to 0.01% is obtained in 3 to 5 minutes. 223 R. H. Chandler Ltd., P.O. Box 55, Braintree, Essex, England. Sample copies will be displayed of "Organometallic Compounds" and "Catalysts in Chem­ istry, " two specialized abstract journals published to give rapid coverage of literature and patents, sub-

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Hall A, Georgia World Congress Center scribers receiving abstracts within weeks rather than months of their publication. Other abstract journals provide a similar service in paint and plastics field. 405 Chemical Abstracts Service, P.O. Box 3012, Co­ lumbus, Ohio 43210. Demonstrating its CAS on-line system for substructure searching. Exposition Hall Chemical Data Systems, RD 2, Box 74, Oxford, Pa. 19363. Series 120 Pyroprobe GC and MS solid and liquid sampling system, Model 320 GC sample con­ centrator. 411 Chemical Dynamics, 3001 Hadley Rd., South Plainfield, N.J. 07080. Complete line of research and de­ velopment chemicals, including organics, biochemicals, deuterated compounds, and pharmaceutical intermediates. Of special interest is a unique, com­ plete line of optically active compounds and resolving agents, and chiral phosphine ligands. Also featured: chromatographic adsorbents and ion exchange resins. 437 Coulter Electronics, 601 West 20th St., Hialeah, Fla. 33010. Water chemistry analyzer and particle size analyzer covering a range from 0.03 to 800 microns.

219,221 Crystalytics, P.O. Box 82286, Lincoln, Neb. 68501. High-quality and confidential x-ray crystallographic structural services at affordable rates. Services range from crystal mounting, diffraction data collection, and molecular model building to complete crystal structure determination and refinement. Results can be provided in as little as three weeks. 202 Digilab, 237 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02139. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and GC/IR. 629 Eastman Kodak, 343 State St., Rochester, N.Y. 14650. Introducing new inorganic chemicals line. Available to discuss solvents, acids, and indicators. 113,114

EG&G Ortec and EG&G Princeton Applied Research, 100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830. Electro­ chemical, polarographic, and x-ray fluorescence in­ struments will be displayed. These instrumental methods for elemental analysis are widely accepted for research and quality control applications. Appli­ cations chemists will be available to discuss new ap­ plications reports and to demonstrate instrument op­ eration. 118 Elsevier North-Holland, 52 Vanderbilt Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. Monographs, proceedings, and journals. 413, 415 Encyclopaedia Britannica, 425 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60611. On display will be the 30-volume Encyclopaedia Britannica 3 and other related educa­ tional publications. 230 Engelhard Industries Division, 2655 Rte. 22 West, Union, N.J. 07083. Engelhard noble metal catalysts are used to synthesize fine chemicals and pharmaceuti­ cals and purify chemical process effluent streams. The catalysts have high specific activity and high selectivity towards desired products. Expert consultation on how stock and custom catalysts are produced, supplied, and reclaimed will be available. 232 Extranuclear Laboratories, P.O. Box 11512, Pitts­ burgh, Pa. 15238. Literature and applications notes on the new simultaneous CI-EI Simulscan GC-MS. Liter­ ature describing Extranuclear's electronics to update Finnigan 1015 and 3200 Series mass spectrometers, as well as the latest information on MS-MS will also be available. 422 Fairfield Chemical, P.O. Box 20, Blythewood, S.C. 29016. More than 15years'experience in the manu­ facture of fine organic chemicals—from grams to hundreds of kilos—for chemical, pharmaceutical, and agricultural research and development. More than 3000 items, many of which are unavailable elsewhere. Custom synthesis service also. 515

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN 89

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W. H. Freeman & Co., 660 Market St., San Francisco, Calif. 94104. College textbooks, professional and reference books in chemistry. 308

ogy, science policy, science and society, etc., imported in English from the U.S.S.R. and other socialist countries. 312

FTS Systems, P.O. Box 158, Rte. 209, Stone Ridge, N.Y. 12484. Low-temperature systems from — 130° C{-204° F) to 100° C(212° F), chambers, and baths ( 1-, 2-, 4-, and 8-liter capacity); vacuum vapor traps, circulating systems, cold plates; remote Flexi-cool on-the-spot probes; freeze-dryers. 208

Inficon Leybold-Heraeus, 6500 Fly Rd., East Syracuse, N.Y. 13057. LAMMA 500 laser microprobe mass analyzer for mass spectroscopy of solids; LHS-10 and SIMS-100 surface analysis sytems. 435

Information Sciences, 2135 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20007. The NIH/EPA Chemical Information System (CIS) is a collection of scientific Gilson Medical Electronics, P.O. Box 27, 3000 West databases available through an interactive computer Beltline Hwy., Middleton, Wis. 53562. Complete line of UV/VIS detectors, fraction collectors, and peristaltic program. CIS provides diverse numeric, as opposed pumps. Also exhibited will be a modular HPLC system, to bibliographic, data on chemical substances. a high-pressure metering/dispensing pump, and a filter Chemical structure, CAS index name, tradenames, common names, and synonyms or CAS Registry fluorometer. 116 number are search criteria. 503 Glenco Scientific, 2802 White Oak Dr., Houston, Tex. 77007. Liquid chromatographs and accessories; amino Institute for Scientific Information, 3501 Market St., University City Science Center, Philadelphia, Pa. acid analyzers; syringes; LC columns, fittings, and 19104. Science Citation Index, Current Abstracts of valves. 224,226 Chemistry and Index Chemicus, Current Chemical Reactions, Current Contents/ Physical, Chemical and Willard Grant Press, 20 Providence St., Boston, Mass. Earth Sciences, Index to Scientific and Technical 02116. Texts in general, organic, analytical, and bioProceedings, Index to Scientific Reviews, ASCA logical chemistry and the Modular Lab Program in profiles (personalized current awareness services), chemistry. 518 and ASCATOPICS in the Sciences (current awareness services based on standard interest profiles). 206 Haake, 244 Saddle River Rd., Saddle Brook, N.J. 07662, All-new competitively priced 1981 models of thermal liquid baths and circulators, introducing digital Instruments for Research & Industry, 108 Franklin display of the actual bath temperature. These units also Ave., Cheltenham, Pa. 19012. Therm-O-Watch verfeature digital electronic temperature control, built-in satile controller; Lead Donuts—weights for lab aprefrigeration in many units, and built-in safety devices. paratus; glove bag—inflatable, disposable dry Also on display will be other models of circulators and chamber; waterflow units for monitoring the flow of the Haake Rotovisco rotational viscometer. 212 cooling water; Lab-guard curved lead-based safety shield. 521 Hach, 57th & Lindbergh Pkwy., Loveland, Colo. 80537. Instruments SA, 173 Essex Ave., Metuchen, N.J. Laboratory analytical instrumentation. 627 08840. Instruments and technical literature in the following product lines: simultaneous and sequential Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, College Division, 757 ICP spectrometers; monochromators; holographic Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. Featuring the gratings; Ramanor and molecular microprobe. 523 newest textbooks: Goates, Ott, and Butler, "General Chemistry: Theory and Description"; Yoder, Suydam, JCPDS-lnternational Centre for Diffraction Data, and Snavely, "Chemistry" 2nd éd.; and the accom1601 Park Lane, Swarthmore, Pa. 19081. Featuring panying Alexander and Steffel, "Chemistry in the Set 30 of the Powder Diffraction File in data card, Laboratory." 313 microfiche, and computer database form. Also exhibited will be Sets 21-22 of the Data Book Series, Harper & Row Publishers, 10 East 53rd. St., New Crystal Data Volumes I through IV, and a new special York, N.Y. 10022. College textbooks. 318 publication entitled "The Mineral Powder Diffraction File." 222 D. C. Heath & Co., 125 Spring St., Lexington, Mass. 02173. Educational publisher—college level, chemistry textbooks. 302 Hitachi Scientific Instruments, Nissei Sangyo America, 460 East Middlefield Rd., Mountain View, Calif. 94043. UV/VIS spectrophotometer. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrophotometer. 808

Lockheed Information Systems, 3460 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, Calif. 94304. DIALOG information retrieval service, the leader in on-line chemical information, offers low-cost, rapid access to millions of references to journal articles, patents, reports, and papers in all areas of chemistry, engineering, and technology, as well as to identifying data on millions of chemical substances. Free demonstrations of on-line searching. 530 Macmillan Publishing, 866 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022. On display will be new and recent publications. 1981 books of special interest will be Streitwieser and Heathcock, "Introduction to Organic Chemistry, " 2nd éd.; Abrash and Hardcastle, "Chemistry"; and Sackheim and Lehman, "Chemistry for the Life Sciences, " 4th ed. 335 Mallinckrodt, P.O. Box 5840, St. Louis, Mo. 63134. Acids, solvents, and drys for analytical research chemistry with specialty grades for specified uses in spectrophotometry, chromatography, nanograde, and scintillation work (pesticide residue analysis). 424-426 Matheson, P.O. Box E, Lyndhurst, N.J. 07071. Manufacturers of specialty gases, gas mixtures, and gas handling equipment for the petrochemical, air pollution, biological, semiconductor, environmental, and chemical process industries. 404 MCB Reagents, 2909 Highland Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 45212. Reagent chemicals, products for chromatography-TLC, HPLC, high-purity solvents and reagents, pH specialties. 516 McGraw-Hill, 1221 Ave. of Americas, New York, N.Y. 10020. Featuring an exhibit of outstanding chemistry texts, including new texts, current revisions, and previously published texts in every field of chemistry. 319,321

Molecular Design, 1122 Β St., Hayward, Calif. 94541. Presenting MACCS (formerly MOLEX), the most so­ phisticated substructure search and retrieval system available; features full graphical input/output, explicit stereochemistry, isotopes, charges; fast proprietary searching algorithm; complete data flexibility. Within seconds, the researcher is in touch with all relevant structures, data, physical constants, and associated definitive references. 522, 524

IBM Instruments, Orchard Park, P.O. Box 332, Danbury, Conn. 06810. NR/80 Series of FT-NMR spectrometers, Minispec PC20 NMR process analyzer, IR/90 Series of FTIR spectrometers, ER 200 Series of electron paramagnetic resonance, EC 200 Series of electrochemical analyzers, related supplies. 510, 512, 607, 609

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Laboratory Data Control, P.O. Box 10235, Riviera Beach, Fla. 33404. Displaying full line of HPLC pumps, detectors, integrators, and system. The new CCM microprocessor-based L.C. controller/dual channel integrator will be featured. 502

Micron, P.O. Box 3536, Wilmington, Del. 19807. Pictorial presentation of EPA, SEM, TEM, OES, ESCA, XRD, XRF, QIA, DSC depicting problems encountered in materials and subsequent identification and documentation. 518

Houghton Mifflin, 1 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 02107. Featuring Sherman et al., "Basic Concepts of Chemistry" 2nd éd.; Whitaker et al., "Concepts of General, Organic, & Biological Chemistry"; Kotin, "Laboratory Exercises in General, Organic & Biological Chemistry"; Becker/Wentworth, "General Chemistry" 2nd éd.; Loebel, "Chemical Problem-Solving By Dimensional Analysis" 2nd éd.; Willis, "Problem-Solving in General Chemistry"; Harrington, "Discovering Science. " 344

90

Kontes, P.O. Box 729, Vineland, N.J. 08360. New countercurrent chromatograph, multimedia scanner with data reduction, sample preparation and laboratory glass ware, microglass ware and sys terns. 517

Micromeritics, 5680 Goshen Springs Rd., Norcross, Ga. 30093. Featuring complete line of automatic instruments for particle technology measurements: particle size, pore size, pore volume and structure, surface area, and absolute density. The new 7500 HPLC components and systems that feature ternary solvent blending and complete upgradability also will be exhibited. 214, 216

Holden-Day, 500 Sansome St., San Francisco, Calif. 94111. Texts and supplementary materials in chemistry for undergraduates, graduates, and researchers. Exhibit features books in organic chemistry and instrumental analysis, including IR and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Latest and most extensive molecular structure models now available for classroom and research use. 201

Imported Publications, 320 West Ohio St., Chicago, III. 60610. Books dealing with all aspects of natural sciences, including chemistry and chemical technol-

Johns-Manville, Ken Caryl Ranch, Denver, Colo. 80217. Chromatographic supports, packings, and adsorbents for both gas and liquid chromatography. 204

Atlanta's Georgia Tech, with famed "rambling wreck" in foreground

Molecular Structure, 3304 Longmire Dr., College Station, Tex. 77840. Offers complete single-crystal x-ray diffraction service, including crystal mounting, data collection structure solution and refinement, construction of 3-D scale model, and production of materials for publication. Also available are experi­ mental electron density studies and structure deter­ mination from powder. Results are available in as little as three weeks. 106

National Bureau of Standards, Office of Standard Reference Data (221 A-320), Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C. 20234. On-line demonstrations of physical/chemical properties databases; a variety of published materials in which such data are available; information on other services of the Office of Standard Reference Data. 501

The Royal Society of Chemistry, U.K. Chemical Information Service, The University, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England. The society's publications and services, including journals, books, specialist publication reports, special publications, monographs for teachers, RIC publications, chemistry cassettes, mass specto-, metry data center publications, computer-readable files, and microform files. Exposition Hall

Nicolet Instrument, 5225 Verona Rd., Madison, Wis. 53711. 7199 Fourier Transform Infrared System with GC-IR, LC-IR, and photoacoustic capabilities; economical, easy-to-use MX1 FTIR spectrometer; new 3600 FTIR spectrometer. 445, 447

Tekmar, P.O. Box 37202, Cincinnati, Ohio 45222. Laboratory and process homogenizers, laboratory grinding mills, sieve shakers, LSC-2 liquid sample concentrator, automatic lab sampler, muffle furnace, plasma asher, strip-chart recorders, vacuum/drying ovens, process and lab viscosimeters. 203, 205 Teknivent, 10774 Trenton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63132. 802, 804

Sadtler Research Labs, 3316 Spring Garden St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. The CIRA 101 chromato- Tracor Instruments, 6500 Tracor Lane, Austin, Tex. graphic infrared analyzer, an inexpensive GC/IR de- 78721. Exhibiting three new products: the Model 955 vice; Sadtler Standard & Commercial Spectra {IR, UV, low-cost pumping system for liquid chromatography, NMR, fluorescence, DTA, 13-C NMR, Raman, IR vapora low-cost column oven for LC, and a photoionization detector for gas chromatography. 526, 528 phase); analytical services; spectral search and reOrion Research, 380 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. trieval using an automated microfiche system. 431 02139. Model 611 pH meter with log R compensation, Universal Scientific, 2070 Peachtree Industrial Ct., Model 811 microprocessor pH meter, Model 901 miSuite 101, Atlanta, Ga. 30341. Chromatography adSargent-Welch Scientific, 7300 North Linder Ave., croprocessor ionalyzer, pH and specific ion meters, Skokie, III. 60077. IT spectrophotometer with data sorbents—Woelm, HPLC columns, valves and fittings. pH and specific ion electrodes, dissolved oxygen GLC columns, valves and fittings, fused silica flexible handling, UV-visible spectrophotometer, polarograph electrode, reagents, and accessories. 209, 211 voltammetric analyzer, pH meters, recorders, titrators. capillary columns, GC-MS and capillary GC accessories. Liquid dispensers. Flash chromatography 213,215 Parr Instrument, 211 53rd St., Moline, III. 61265. adsorbents and columns. TLC precoated plates. Pressure reaction equipment and general-purpose HPTLC plates, bulk sorbents for LC and TLC, dispospressure vessels for laboratory use. Oxygen comSartorius Filters, 26575 Corporate Ave., Hay ward, bustion and sodium peroxide fusion and acid digestion Calif. 94545. Products for filtration, purification, and able pipets, tips, RIA tubes, microcentrifuge tubes, pipets. 536 sample preparation bombs. Oxygen bomb calorimeter particulate removal. Solvent and aqueous solution and new master control system. 120 treatment and handling. The widest range of membrane filters and companion equipment. 401 D. Van Nostrand Co., 135 West 50th St., New York, N.Y. 10020. "Chemistry A Conceptual Approach," 4th PCR Research Chemicals, P.O. Box 1778, Gaineséd., Charles Mortimer; "Fundamentals of Biochemville, Fla. 32601. Organosilicon compounds, orgaSaunders College/HRW, 383 Madison Ave., New istry"; "The Chemistry of Living Systems"; "Fundanofluorine compounds, derivatizing agents, mass spec York, N.Y. 10017. Announcing the perfect text for mentals of Organic and Biochemistry"; Willard's "Instandards, crown ethers, synthetic reagents, and tergeneral chemistry: Whitten and Gailey's "General penes. 534 Chemistry" and "General Chemistry With Qualitative strumental Methods of Analysis"; "Chemistry for the Analysis. " A comprehensive package for these texts Health Professions"; "Fundamentals of Chemistry"; 342 Pergamon Press, Maxwell House, Fairview Park, including Davis' "Student Study Guide" for both texts, "Chemistry, The Working Science." Elmsford, N.Y. 10523. Publisher of scientific and "Text Bank," "Lecture Outline Series," "Problems technical books and journals including publications in Book," "Lab Manual," and "100 Overhead ProjectVarian Instrument Group, 6650 Powers Ferry Rd., No. the chemical sciences. In addition, offers publications uals, " plus text and lab instructor's manuals. The 100, Atlanta, Ga. 30339. Microprocessor-controlled on microform and publications of other publishers. classic, "Chemical Principles, " 5th éd., by Masterson chromatography systems with unique data handling Featuring the announcement of "Comprehensive et al., and 5th ed. of SI version, plus variety of accapabilities, microcomputer-controlled atomic abOrganometallic Chemistry" to be published in 1982. companying materials. Harris and Kratochvil's new sorption spectrophotometer, and high-performance "Introduction to Chemical Analysis, "plus our exten301 Cary 210/219 spectrophotometers. 623, 625 sive and complete backlist of chemistry titles. Perkin-Elmer, 702 Main Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 06856. 421, 423 Verlag Chemie International, Plaza Ctr., Suite E, 1020 Displaying "The Automated Laboratory:" a complete N.W. Sixth St., Deerfield Beach, Fla. 33441. "Phase array of linked microprocessor-controlled analytical Schott America, 11 East 26th St., New York, N.Y. Transfer Catalysis, " "Radioimmunoassay of Steroid instruments in the disciplines of infrared, ultraviolet/ 10010. Complete line of viscosity measuring instruHormones, " "Fundamental Aspects of Organic Mass visible, and fluorescence spectrophotometry; of mentation—A VS—ranging from semi- to fully autoSpectrometry, " "New Synthetic Methods, " "Solvent atomic spectroscopy; of gas and liquid chromatogramated. ATS (Automated Titration System), the latest Effects in Organic Chemistry, " "Oil Sand and Oil Shale phy; thermal and elemental analysis and nuclear addition to Schott's instrumentation line, can be proChemistry," "Industrial Organic Chemistry." Just magnetic resonance spectroscopy. grammed or operated manually. The building block published: "Atlas of Polymer and Plastics Analysis, " 434, 436, 438, 533, 535, 537 concept allows for future additions to meet new reVol. 3: "Additives and Processing Aids. " Stencils for quirements. 417 chemists. 320,322 Phillips Petroleum, 16 AI Phillips Bidg., Bartlesville, Okla. 74004. "The Search for Solutions" free loan film SDC Search Service, 2500 Colorado Ave., Santa Wadsworth Publishing, 10 Davis Dr., Belmont, Calif. series for science classes. Monica, Calif. 90406. The largest and best-designed 94002. College chemistry textbooks featuring G. Tyler 408,410,412,507,509,511 databases of chemical information available on line. Miller's revised preparation for general chemistry, Chemical Abstract files cover 1967 to date. Chemical "Chemistry: A Basic Intro, " and Siebring and Schaff's Photovolt, 1115 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10010. dictionary files offer substructure searching for more "General Chemistry" with complete teaching and Aquatest IV Karl Fischer titrator with microprocessor than 3.1 million compounds. SDC booth will be shared learning packages: study guides, detailed solutions control, new Apollo Mark XII microwave system with by Derwent Publications, offering World Patent Index manuals, instructor's manuals with test questions, lab microprocessor control for moisture determination through SDC Search Service. 615,617 manuals, answer keys to lab manuals, and transparwith automatic tare of electronic balance. Reflection encies. 419 meters for color and gloss measurements. 439, 441 Spectra-Physics, 1250 W. Middlefield Rd., Mountain View, Calif. 94042. Laser Instrument division will Waters Associates/Continental Water, 34 Maple St., Plenum Publishing, 222 West 17th St., New York, N.Y. display a subnanosecond ion laser and tunable infrared Milford, Mass. 01757. The latest in water purification 10011. Mengerl Mandell, "Electronic Interpretation of diode lasers. Autolab division will display a third gendevices and high-performance liquid chromatography Organic Chemistry"; Steinfeld, "Laser-Induced eration ternary gradient liquid chromatograph and a instruments, components, and supplies. Chemical Processes ''; Bezkorovainy, ''Biochemistry new gas chromatograph. 409, 411 540, 542, 544, 546, 548 of Nonheme Iron"; Berliner/Reuben, "Biological Magnetic Resonance"; Freiser, "lon-Slective ElecSpex Industries, P.O. Box 798, Metuchen, N.J. 08840. trodes in Analytical Chemistry"; Morrison, "ElectroJohn Wiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, HighPure inorganics, A A and custom plasma aqueous N.Y. 10158. Current and backlist textbooks and prochemistry at Semiconductor and Oxidized Metal solutions standards, stock and custom-blended powder fessional reference books from Wiley College Division, Electrodes"; Sperling, "Interpenetrating Polymer Networks and Related Materials"; Middleditch, "Mass standards, fusion fluxes. Literature on sample prepaWiley-lnterscience, and Halsted Press as well as ration equipment, spectrometer—spectrographs, Spectrometry of Priority Pollutants. " 304 journals of interest to those in the field of chemistry. spectrometer controls and data acquistion units. 324, 326, 328 525 Prentice-Hall, College Exhibit Dept., Englewood Cliffs, N.J. 07632. The most current college textbooks Wilmad Glass & Co., Rte. 40 and Oak Rd., Buena, N.J. Springer-Verlag New York, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, in chemistry. 315,317 08310. Materials and supplies for NMR spectroscopy N.Y. 10010. Springer advanced texts in chemistry: H. Dugas andC. Penney, "Bioorganic Chemistry"; G. E. and for IR and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Samples Rainin Instrument, Mack Rd., Wobburn, Mass. 01801. of precision bore glass tubing. 420 Schulz and R. H. Schirmer, "Principles of Protein Gilson Pipetman continuously adjustable digital microliter pipets, fixed-volume pipets, disposable tips, Gilson Repetman continuously adjustable microliter dispensers, glassmaster glass pipet controllers, PIPDIL automatic diluter with adjustable micrometer, bottle dispensers, liquid chromatography components, accessories, and supplies. 218 Random House—Alfred A. Knopf, 201 East 50th St., New York, N.Y. 10022. College textbooks. 316

Structure"; "Beilstein Handbook of Organic Chemistry"; "Gmelin Handbook of Inorganic Chemistry"; "Landolt-Bornstein"; W. Bartknecht, "Explosions" (monograph). 310 Sun Petroleum Products, 1608 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19103. Process oils for chemical industry—rubber process oils, technical and USP white oils. 416,418

Worth Publishers, 444 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10016. Callewaert and Genyea: "Fundamentals of College Chemistry"; "Fundamentals of Organic and Biological Chemistry"; "Basic Chemistry: General, Organic, Biological." Kemp and Vellaccio: "Organic Chemistry" and workbook and solutions manual; Allinger et al.: "Organic Chemistry, " 2nd Ed. and supplements. 323

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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The following schedule of social events has been arranged for the At­ lanta meeting. Where purchase of tickets is necessary, the event has been numbered to assist in ticket or­ dering. Tickets should be purchased as early as possible, either in advance using the registration form on page 97, or on-site in the registration area. The final deadline for the sale of tickets will be 48 hours before the event, after which time only a few tickets will be available at the door of the event. Ticket prices are shown, or events coded as follows: NT—sponsored, no ticket required; L or D—included in price of meal; Ρ—partially subsi­ dized; COD—cash bar; or M—divi­ sional membership. SATURDAY, MARCH 28 Reception, 6:30 P M

Divisional Officers Group, Hyatt Regency, Tudor Room D Dinner, 7:30 PM 1 Divisional Officers Group, Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room $17 SUNDAY, MARCH 29 Social H o u r , 6 P M

Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry Subdi­ vision, Omni International, Swanton Room COD Social Hour, 7 PM American Institute of Chemists, At­ lanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor C NT Division of Chemical Education Inc., Atlanta American, Convention Hall Β COD Dinner, 8 PM 2 American Institute of Chemists, Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Par­ lor C (Members and Fellows lecture to follow) $18.50 Social Hour, 8 PM Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Chemical Industry Hospitality, Atlanta Hilton, Crys­ tal Parlor G M Social Hours, 8:30 PM Colleagues and friends of Peter Debye Award winner: Richard B. 92

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Bernstein, Hyatt Regency, Phoenix Ballroom COD Electron Distributions and the Chemical Bond Symposium, Atlantan, Parlor Rooms B&C COD Social Hour, 9 PM Division of Medicinal Chemistry, Omni International, Rutherford Hall Ρ MONDAY, MARCH 30 Luncheon, 11:30 A M

Division of Chemical Health & Safe­ ty, buffet until 1:30 PM, Holiday Inn Downtown, 175 Piedmont Av­ enue, N.E. (Purchase own meal for $6.25.) Reception, Noon James T. Grady Award, Hyatt Re­ gency, Club Atlantis L Social Hour, Noon Iota Sigma Pi, Peachtree Plaza Hotel, Tower Suite COD Luncheons, Noon 3 Division of Chemical Education, High School/College Interface, World Congress Center, Room 203

$5.00

Phi Lambda Upsilon, contact J. L. Green (205) 826-4043 for details. Luncheons, 12:30 PM 4 Iota Sigma Pi, Peachtree Plaza Hotel, Tower Suite $13 5 James T. Grady Award, Hyatt Regency, Club Atlantis $14

Meeting Event, 6:30 PM Reception honoring 1981 ACS Award recipients, Atlanta Hilton, Salon West COD Meeting Event, 7:30 PM 6 Dinner honoring 1981 ACS Award recipients, Atlanta Hilton, Ballroom West $25 Hospitality Suite, 8:30 PM Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor D M TUESDAY, MARCH 31 Social H o u r , 11:30 A M

Women Chemists, Hyatt Regency, Club Atlantis COD Reception, Noon Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, E. V. Murphree Award, Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor C NT Luncheon, Noon 7 Division of Chemical Informa­ tion, Hyatt Regency, Lancas­ ter Room C $11 Luncheon, 12:10 PM 8 Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Omni Interna­ tional, French Restaurant $14 Luncheon, 12:15 PM 9 Women Chemists, Hyatt Re­ gency, Club Atlantis $11

Social Hour, 4 PM Association of Harvard Chemists, Atlanta Hilton, Cherokee Room COD

Luncheon, 12:30 PM 10 Division of Industrial & Engi­ neering Chemistry, E. V. Murphree Award, Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor D $14

Meeting Event, 4:30 PM ACS Rathskeller, World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A. Open until 6 PM. COD

Meeting Event, 4:30 PM ACS Rathskeller, World Congress Center, Hall A. Open until 6 P M COD

Social Hours, 5:30 PM Florida State University, Tallahassee, Omni International, Glenmar Room A COD Iowa State University, Hyatt Regen­ cy, Essex Room Β COD Society of Columbia Chemists, Omni International, Glenmar Room Β COD Stanford University, Hyatt Regency, Tudor Room COD University of Massachusetts, chem­ istry and polymer science depart­ ment, Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room A COD

Social Hour, 5 PM Division of Chemical Information, Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room C COD Social Hours, 5:15 PM University of Illinois, UrbanaChampaign, Atlanta Hilton, Crys­ tal Parlor G NT Social Hours, 5:30 PM Association of Indiana University Chemists, Atlanta Hilton, Dekalb Room COD 11 Division of Professional Rela­ tions, Wine and Cheese, At­ lanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor D $3.00

Duke University, Atlanta Hilton, John Adams Room COD Illinois Institute of Technology, Omni International, Westover Room COD Northwestern University, Atlanta Hilton, George Washington Room COD Pacific Northwest Universities; Uni­ versity of Idaho, Oregon State University, University of Oregon, University of Washington, Wash­ ington State University, Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room COD Ohio State University, Hyatt Re­ gency, Lancaster Room A COD Princeton alumni, Atlanta Hilton, Thomas Jefferson Room COD University of California, Los Ange­ les/Berkeley, Atlanta Hilton, Strasbourg Room COD University of Minnesota, Atlanta Hilton, Vienna Room COD University of Notre Dame, Atlanta Hilton, Gwinnett Room COD University of Wisconsin, Madison, Atlanta Hilton, Milan Room COD Social Hours, 6 PM Division of Pesticide Chemistry, Jonathan's Atop the Mart, 240 Peachtree S t , N.W. COD Michigan State University, Atlanta Hilton, Cherokee Room COD Symposium honoring Joseph Burckhalter, Division of Medicinal Chemistry, Hyatt Regency, French Suite COD University of Maryland, Hyatt Re­ gency, W. J. Bailey suite NT University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Atlanta Hilton, Walton Room COD Social Hours, 6:30 PM Cellulose, Paper & Textile Division, Omni International, Knollwood Room Β COD Division of Analytical Chemistry, Country Place Restaurant, Colony Square, 1197 Peachtree St., N.E. COD Division of Chemical Education Inc., Award Banquet, Midnight Sun Restaurant, 225 Peachtree St., N.E. COD Division of Environmental Chemis­ try, Brennan's Restaurant, Pied­ mont Room, 103 West Paces Ferry Rd. COD Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Omni International, Glenmar Room Ρ Social Hour, 7:30 PM Division of Physical Chemistry, Omni International, Knollwood Room A M or COD

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Dinner, 6:15 PM 12 Division of Chemical Health & Safety, Jonathan's Atop the Mart, 240 Peachtree S t , N.W. $12

Meeting Event, 4:30 PM ACS Rathskeller, World Congress Center, Exhibit Hall A. Open until 6 PM. COD

Dinner, 7 PM 13 Symposium honoring Joseph Burckhalter, Division of Me­ dicinal Chemistry, Hyatt Re­ gency, French Suite $18

Reception, 5 PM Division of Chemical Health & Safe­ ty, Wine and Cheese, Georgia Plaza Park (enter through Central Ave. parking garage) M or COD

Dinners, 7:30 PM 14 Division of Analytical Chemis­ try, Country Place Restaurant, Colony Square, 1197 Peachtree St., N.E. $18 15 Division of Chemical Education Inc., Award Banquet, Mid­ night Sun Restaurant, 225 Peachtree St., N.E. $15 16 Division of Environmental Chemistry, Brennan's Res­ taurant, Piedmont Room, 103 West Paces Ferry Rd. $25

Social Hours, 5 PM Cornell University, Hyatt Regency, French Suite COD Johns Hopkins University, Atlanta Hilton, Vienna Room COD Lone Star State colleges and univer­ sities, Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor G COD Purdue University, Hyatt Regency, Tudor Room COD

Meeting Event, 9 PM 17 ACS Mixer, Hyatt Regency, Falcon Ballroom Badge or $3.00 ticket WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1

Luncheon, Noon 18 Corporation Associates, hon­ oring recipient of ACS Award for Creative Invention, At­ lanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor G $7.00 Luncheon, 12:10 PM 19 Division of Fuel Chemistry, At­ lanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor C $12 Reception, 4 PM Local Section Officers Group and Tour Speakers, Hyatt Regency, English Suite NT

Social Hours, 5:30 PM Alpha Chi Sigma, details available at hospitality desks in registration areas Ρ Division of Colloid & Surface Chem­ istry, Omni International, Glenmar Room Ρ Division of Organic Coatings & Plas­ tics Chemistry, joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Omni International, Knollwood Room COD Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc., joint with Division of Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry, Omni International, Knollwood Room COD Louisiana State University, Atlanta Hilton, Strasbourg Room COD University of Florida, Hyatt Regency, Italian Suite COD Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

93

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University of Georgia, Hyatt Regen­ cy, Lancaster Room A COD University of Kansas, Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor D COD Social Hour, 6 PM Chinese-American Chemical Associ­ ation, Peng's Restaurant, 233 Peachtree St., N.E. COD Division of History of Chemistry, joint with Division of Small Chemical Businesses, Hyatt Re­ gency, York Room COD Division of Small Chemical Busi­ nesses, joint with Division of His­ tory of Chemistry, Hyatt Regency, York Room COD Reception, 6 PM Northeastern University, Atlanta Hilton, George Washington Room NT Reception, 6:30 PM Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc., Aunt Fanny's Cabin, Smyrna, Ga. (Buses will depart Atlanta Hilton, Harris St. entrance, at 5:30 PM)D Dinner, 7 PM 20 Division of History of Chemistry, joint with Division of Small Chemical Businesses, Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room $17 20 Division of Small Chemical Businesses, joint with Division of History of Chemistry, Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room $17 21 Chinese-American Chemical Association, Peng's Restau­ rant, 233 Peachtree St., N.E. $20

Dinner, 7:30 PM 22 Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc., Aunt Fanny's Cabin, Smyrna, Ga. (Buses will de­ part Atlanta Hilton, Harris St. entrance, at 5:30 PM.) $13

ATLANTA Awards

The awards reception, dinner, and general meeting will be held the eve­ ning of Monday, March 30, in the Atlanta Hilton: reception, 6:30 PM, dinner, 7:30 PM, general meeting, 8:30 PM. There will be additional seating for those wishing to attend only the general meeting. At the general meeting, Herbert C. Brown, 1981 Priestley Medalist, will speak on 94

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Downtown

Atlanta,

with Georgia

World Congress Center in

"Adventures in Research" (see Social Events listing, ticket 6). ACS Award Addresses Roger Adams Award in Organic Chemistry sponsored by Organic Reactions and Organic Synthesis will be presented to Nelson J. Leon­ ard during the 27th National Organic Chemistry Symposium in Nashville, Tenn., June 21-25,1981. ACS Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology sponsored by Air Products & Chemicals received by Philip W. West. Address to be pre­ sented before Environmental Chem­ istry, Tuesday, March 31, at 9:05 AM (see page 53). ACS Award for Creative Invention sponsored by the Corporation As­ sociates received by Roy L. Pruett. Address to be presented before Pe­ troleum Chemistry, Wednesday, April 1, at 11:20 AM (see page 74). ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry sponsored by Aldrich Chemical Co., received by Barry M. Trost. Ad­ dress to be presented before Organic Chemistry, Tuesday, March 31, at 11 AM (see page 68). ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Mallinckrodt received by Dietmar Seyferth. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, March 30, at 9:05 AM (see page 62).

foreground

ACS Award for Nuclear Chemis­ try sponsored by an anonymous donor received by Robert Vandenbosch. Address to be presented before Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, Tuesday, March 31, at 9:10 AM (see page 67). ACS Award in Analytical Chem­ istry sponsored by Fisher Scien­ tific Co. received by Fred W. McLafferty. Address to be presented before Analytical Chemistry, Tues­ day, March 31, at 9 AM (see page 43). ACS Award in Chemical Educa­ tion sponsored by Union Carbide Corp. received by Derek A. Daven­ port. Address to be presented at the dinner meeting of Chemical Educa­ tion, Tuesday, March 31, at 7:30 PM (see Social Events, ticket 15). ACS Award in Chromatography sponsored by SUPELCO received by Marcel J. E. Golay. Address to be presented before Analtyical Chem­ istry, Monday, March 30, at 1:55 PM (see page 43). ACS Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry sponsored by Kendall Co. received by Gabor A. Somorjai. Address to be presented before Col­ loid & Surface Chemistry, Tuesday, March 31, at 11 AM (see page 51). ACS Award in Inorganic Chemis­ try sponsored by Monsanto Co. received by Henry Taube. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, March 30, at 10:05 AM (see page 62).

ACS Award in Petroleum Chem­ istry sponsored by Lubrizol Corp. received by Herman Pines. Address to be presented before Petroleum Chemistry, Monday, March 30, at 4:15 PM (see page 74). ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry sponsored by Witco Chemical Corp. Foundation received by E. J. Vandenberg. Address to be presented before Polymer Chemistry, Monday, March 30, at 11:05 AM (see page 78). ACS Award in Pure Chemistry sponsored by Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity received by Mark S. Wrighton. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, March 30, at 11:05 AM (see page 62). ACS Award in the Chemistry of Plastics and Coatings sponsored by Borden Foundation received by Eric Baer. Address to be presented before Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry, Tuesday, March 31, at 2:10 P M (see page 72). James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching sponsored by Ethyl Corp. received by Floyd F. Sturtevant. Address to be presented before Chemical Educa­ tion, Monday, March 30, at 10 AM (see page 47). The Peter Debye Award in Physi­ cal Chemistry sponsored by E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. received by Richard B. Bernstein. Address to be presented before Physical Chem­ istry, Monday, March 30, at 10:35 AM (seepage 75). Garvan Medal sponsored by W. R. Grace & Co. received by Elizabeth K. Weisburger. Address to be pre­ sented before Medicinal Chemistry, Wednesday, April 1, at 11 AM (see page 66). James T. Grady Award for Inter­ preting Chemistry for the Public received by Robert W. Cooke. Ad­ dress to be presented at the Grady Luncheon, Monday, March 30, at noon (see Social Events, ticket 5). The Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Essential Oils and Related Products sponsored by Fritzsche Dodge & Olcott Inc. received by Samuel Danishefsky. Address to be presented before Or­ ganic Chemistry, Wednesday, April 1, at 11 AM (see page 69).

E. V. Murphree Award in Indus­ trial and Engineering Chemistry sponsored by Exxon Research & Engineering Co. received by G. Alex Mills. Address to be presented before Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Tuesday, March 31, at 11:25 AM (see page 57).

2. Cost implication of petitions for council action and consideration. 3. Report on budgets and pro­ grams. 4. Report on financial policy. 5. Discussion of dues escalator for 1982.

Nobel Laureate Signature Award for a Graduate Student in Chem­ istry sponsored by J. T. Baker Chemical Co. received by James C. Weisshaar. Address to be presented before Physical Chemistry, Tuesday, March 31, at 9:15 AM (see page 76).

Paul V. Smith Jr., chairman; Exxon Research & Engineering Co., P.O. Box 101, Florham Park, N.J. 07932

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Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 3-4:30 P M Hyatt Regency, Rembrandt Room

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The James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry sponsored by the ACS Northeast­ ern Section received by Jay K. Kochi. Address to be presented be­ fore Organic Chemistry, Monday, March 30, at 11 AM (see page 67).

1. CAS Online and CAS chemical substance-based services. 2. Other topics from executive ses­ sion or from floor.

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Priestley Medal received by Her­ bert C. Brown. Address to be pre­ sented at the general meeting, Mon­ day, March 30, 8:30 P M (see page 103).

CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE

Executive Session 1. Financial reports. 2. Contracts and grants. 3. International cooperation agree­ ments. 4. Production and editorial reports. CHEMICAL EDUCATION

Stanley Kirschner, chairman; Chemistry Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich. 48202

ATLANTA The open committee sessions listed below give ACS members opportunity to express their views on matters of importance to the society before these matters are acted on by the board or council. Members are urged to look over the agenda and make known any opinions or ideas that may arise. If you cannot attend the sessions in­ volved, you can write to the officers listed or ask someone attending to speak for you. Most executive sessions are open to councilors. For more information, contact the officers listed. BUDGET & FINANCE

Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 2-3 PM Hyatt Regency, English Suite No fixed agenda; questions and dis­ cussion relating to chemical educa­ tion are cordially invited. Executive Session 1. Structure, organization, and op­ eration of the committee. 2. Precollege chemical education. 3. College/university chemical edu­ cation. 4. Continuing chemical education. 5. Other topics. CHEMICAL SAFETY

George J. O'Neill, chairman; Research Labs, Tennessee Eastman Co., Kingsport, Tenn. 37660

Clayton F. Callis, chairman; Mon­ santo Co., 800 North Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 63166

Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 2-4 PM Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room C

Open Meeting Saturday, March 28, 8:30 AM-5 PM Hyatt Regency, York Room

Same as below plus topics from floor.

1. Financial status report: a. Year-end 1980. b. Review of 1981 performance against budget.

Executive Session 1. Chairman's report: a. Emphasis on safety in college curricula. Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN 95

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b. Interaction with Division of Small Chemical Businesses. 2. Impact of OSHA regulations on academic laboratories. 3. "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals in Laborato­ ries." 4. Chemical Health and Safety Re­ ferral Service: a. Report on current service de­ mands. b. Feasibility of use of an 800 number. c. Development of data on embryofetotoxins. 5. Report of Task Force on Hazard­ ous Laboratory Experiments. 6. Interactions with high school chemistry teachers. 7. Report—status of ACS safety manual. 8. Report—containerization of flammables and combustible liq­ uids. 9. Other business. CHEMISTRY & PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Herman L. Finkbeiner, chairman; Materials Science Engineering, General Electric, Box 8,1 River Rd., Schenectady, N.Y. 12306 Open Meeting Monday, March 30,10 AM-noon Hyatt Regency, Veneer Room 1. Board actions on committee rec­ ommendations. 2. Subcommittee and task force re­ ports: Energy and ACS; Federal R&D Funding; Legislative Update; OSHA/Laboratory Policy; Regula­ tory Calendar. 3. Reports from Congressional fel­ lows. 4. Other ACS public affairs and leg­ islative activities. 5. ACS members are invited to give short presentations on issues of con­ cern to the society. Such presenta­ tions should not be more than five minutes. Please send a copy of a pro­ posed presentation to the Depart­ ment of Public Affairs before March 23 to ensure placement on the open meeting schedule. COMMITTEES

Orville F. Hill, chairman; 2315 Camas Ave., Richland, Wash. 99352 Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 2-3 PM Hyatt Regency, French Suite 1. Petition on eligibility and length of service. 2. Review of other council peti­ tions. 96

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

3. Subcommittee reports: Committee Associates; Younger Chemists Com­ mittee; Chemical Safety Activities; Transition to New Joint BoardCouncil Committee on Science; So­ ciety Committee on Chemical Edu­ cation; Operations of the Society Committee on Chemical Abstracts Service. Executive Session 1. Guidance from the president-elect (open to councilors). 2. Subcommittee reports (closed). 3. Recommendations for new chair appointments (closed). CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS

Gary A. Zimmerman, chairman; Vice President for Academic Affairs, Seattle University; Seattle, Wash. 98122 Open Meeting A Sunday, March 29, 9 AM-12:30 P M and 1:30-5 P M Hyatt Regency, York Room See executive session agenda. ACS members, particularly petitioners, are invited to consult with the committee on matters likely to come up in the council meeting. Open Meeting Β Wednesday, April 1, starting two hours after council meeting ends. Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room C See comments under A above. Executive Session 1. Review of petitions to amend the ACS constitution and/or bylaws that will be acted upon by council at the Atlanta meeting: a. Eligibility for and length of service on the board of directors, elected and standing committees of the council, and society com­ mittees. b. Calculation of local section apportionments (withdrawn at petitioners' request). c. New member commissions. d. Extending ACS insurance programs to national affiliates. e. Quarterly admission of mem­ bers. f. Membership application pro­ cedure. g. Privileges of affiliates. 2. Review of petitions to amend the ACS constitution and/or bylaws that are on the agenda for consideration only at the Atlanta meeting:

Cable car ride to top of Stone Mountain offers visitors scenic view

a. ACS association or affiliation with other organizations. b. Modification in operation of society committees. 3. Reports of C&B subcommittees: a. Change in Number of Council Votes Required to Approve Con­ stitutional Amendments. b. Lifetime of Committees. c. Privileges of National Affili­ ates. d. Language Covering Resigned Candidates. 4. Proposed amendments to local section and division bylaws. COPYRIGHTS

Frederick H. Owens, past-chairman; 480 Steamboat Dr., Southampton, Pa. 18966 Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 9-11 AM Hyatt Regency, York Room Open forum on Documents and Data Bases: Use or Misuse? (joint with Division of Chemical Information). Designed to examine issues and problems in copying from printed documents and machine-readable data bases in light of provisions in the Copyright Act of 1976. Executive Session 1. Review of open forum. 2. Status of ACS permissions policy. 3. Register of copyrights hearings and contract study of photocopying practices. 4. Status of legislation relevant to the committee's interests.

5. Planning for the New York meet­ ing symposium. 6. Other old and new business. COUNCIL POLICY

Newman M. Bortnick, chairman; 509 Oreland Mill Rd., Oreland, Pa. 19075 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 31, 9:30 AM-4:30 PM Hyatt Regency, Phoenix Ballroom 1. Report of interim actions. 2. Reports of officers. 3. Report of CPC vice-chairman. 4. Reports of subcommittees. 5. Schedule of business sessions, fall 1981. 6. Reports of committees. 7. Review of council agenda. 8. Old and new business. DIVISIONAL ACTIVITIES

Barbara A. Montague, chairman; R.D. 2, Box 26A, Hockessin, Del. 19707 Open Meeting Sunday, March 29, 3-4 PM Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room C Reports from executive session plus topics from floor. Executive Session Subcommittee reports: 1. Division Financial Support: dis­ tribution formula for annual allot­ ment of funds. 2. Long-Range Planning: request for name change by Division of Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry. 3. Constitution & Bylaws: petitions for consideration and action assigned to DAC for review and recommenda­ tions. 4. Division Annual Reports Review: financial reporting. 5. Division Officers Conference: or­ ientation of incoming officers, joint with M&E Program Coordination Conference as an experiment. 6. New Division Formation: status of probationary Division of Geochem­ istry. 7. Local Section Cooperation: joint subcommittee with LSAC. ECONOMIC STATUS

Gerhard G. Meisels, chairman; Chemistry Department, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 68588 Open Meeting Monday, March 30,10-11:30 AM Hyatt Regency, French Suite Report on executive session plus topics from floor.

Executive Session 1. Position statement on employ­ ment and manpower. 2. Study of basic research expendi­ tures. 3. Employment projections for chemists and chemical engineers. 4. Improving the economic status of chemists—fringe benefits. 5. Cooperation on surveys with other professional societies. 6. Status reports: a. Subcommittee on Pensions. b. Subcommittee on Project Re­ view. c. Subcommittee on Personnel Planning & Policy. d. 1981 salary and employment status survey. 7. Other business.

INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES

Cyril A. Ponnamperuma, chairman; Lab of Chemical Evolution, Chemis­ try Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742 Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 2-5 PM Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room

1. Cooperative programs with India, Sri Lanka, Nigeria, and other countries. 2. AAAS global seminar on roles of scientific societies in technology transfer. 3. Distribution plans for education orientation guide for foreign stu­ dents. 4. Formation of an international so­ ciety for chemists. 5. International symposia planned for fall 1983 ACS national meeting. 6. Plans for 1984 Pacific Basin ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT Daniel MacDougall, chairman; Dow Chemical Conference. Pharmaceuticals—Canada, 380 Elgin 7. Cases of alleged violations of sci­ Mills Rd. East, Richmond Hill, Ont., entific freedom and/or human rights of chemists. Canada L4C 5H2 Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 2-3 PM Hyatt Regency, Veneer Room

LOCAL SECTION ACTIVITIES

Attila Ε. Pavlath, chairman; USDA Agricultural Research Service, Western Regional Research Lab, Same as below plus any related top­ Berkeley, Calif. 94710 ics. ACS members are invited to give Open Meeting short presentations on issues of con­ Monday, March 30, 3-4 PM cern to ACS. Such presentations Hyatt Regency, French Suite should not be more than five minutes. Please send copy of a proposed pre­ sentation to the Department of Pub­ 1. Report from executive session. lic Affairs before March 2 to ensure 2. Local section allotments. placement on the open meeting 3. Future of the local section. 4. Topics from the floor. schedule. Executive Session

Executive Session

1. Chairman's report; environmental 1. Chairman's report. 2. Petitions for council action: new issues of concern. 2. Subcommittee and task force re­ member commissions; quarterly ad­ mission of members; privileges of af­ ports: a. Symposium on cancer and the filiates. 3. Proposed new local section. environment. 4. Reports on subcommittees: annual b. Hazardous wastes. c. High school environmental reports review; Program Develop­ ment Fund; local section develop­ education. d. Energy and environmental ment; finance; divisional cooperation; ad hoc local section formation. chemistry symposia series. 5. Reports from committee liaisons. e. Acid rain symposium. f. Environmental analytical 6. Staff report. chemistry. MEETINGS & EXPOSITIONS 3. Information items: a. Conference on integrated pest Jack H. Stocker, chairman; Chemis­ try Department, University of New management. b. Division and local section en­ Orleans, Lake Front, New Orleans, La. 70122 vironmental activity. c. Regulatory update. Open Meeting d. ACS/EPA Cooperative Agree­ Sunday, March 29, 3-5 PM ment on TSCA, section 4, Testing Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room Standards. Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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Same as below plus topics from floor. Executive Session 1. Future meeting sites and dates: a. Spring and fall, 1987 and 1989. b. 3rd Chemical Congress of the North American Continent. 2. Subcommittee reports: C&EN Program Format; Expositions; Finance; Membership Questionnaire, International Meetings; Regional Meetings; Long-Range Projections for Meeting Room Needs. 3. Joint meetings with other societies (AIChE). 4. Scheduling of governance functions. 5. "Humanizing" national meetings. 6. Special needs of industrial chemists. 7. Petition for election of committee vice-chairman. 8. Hotel safety. 9. Registration fees (for 1982 and for nonmembers). 10. University sites for national meetings. 11. Services for the handicapped at meetings. 12. Old and new business. MEMBERSHIP AFFAIRS

W. Ml Tuddenham, chairman; 1828 Lincoln St., Salt Lake City, Utah 84105 Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 4-5 P M Hyatt Regency, English Suite 1. Report on executive session. 2. Items from the floor.

Executive Session 1. Review of amendments for council action or consideration. 2. Progress on study of alternate dues structure. 3. Funding for the emeritus program. 4. Progress on study of membership grades. 5. Scheduled action on recommendations of President's Conference on Industrial Chemists and ACS. 6. Status of employment aids program. 7. Membership development study. NOMINATIONS & ELECTIONS

David A. Shirley, chairman; Chemistry Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. 37916 Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 3-5 PM Hyatt Regency, Austrian Suite 1. Consideration of alternative procedures for ballot mailing and counting, including possible valid experiments to determine the desirability of a return to first-class mail. 2. Bylaw amendment to cover death, incapacitation, or withdrawal of candidates in society elections.

Open Meeting Tuesday, March 31, 2-4 PM Hyatt Regency, Austrian Suite Same as below plus any related topics. Executive Session 1. Compensation for employed inventors. 2. Federal government patent policy. 3. New projects. 4. Patent legislation. 5. Professional employment guidelines. 6. Symposia at national meetings. 7. Other committee activities and interests. PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS PLANNING & COORDINATING

Robert K. Neuman, secretary; ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036 Open Meeting Wednesday, April 1,1-5 PM Hyatt Regency, Dutch Suite

1. Activities of units represented on PROPPACC: a. Chemistry & Public Affairs. b. Committee on Professional Executive Session Relations. c. Corporation Associates. Preparation of slates (1982-84 term) d. Division of Professional Relafor Council Policy Committee and tions. Committee on Committees. e. Economic Status. f. Membership Affairs. g. Professional & Member RelaPATENT MATTERS & RELATED LEGISLATION tions. Walter E. Buting, chairman; 3839 h. Professional Training. i. Women Chemists Committee. Winding Way, Indianapolis, Ind. j . Younger Chemists Com46220 mittee. 2. Reports on other activities related to professionalism: a. Joint Subcommittee on Employment Aids. b. American Institute of Chemists. c. Engineers and Scientists Joint Committee on Pensions. 3. Priority ranking, ACS dues-supported professionalism programs. 4. Proposals for changes in composition of PROPPACC. 5. Other business, including topics from the floor. PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS

Phillip S. Landis, chairman; Mobil R&D Corp., Paulsboro, N.J. 08066

Georgia World Congress Center has exhibition and meeting space, 100

C&EN Feb. 16, 1981

auditorium

Open Meeting Monday, March 30, 4:30-5:30 PM Hyatt Regency, Veneer Room

1. Report on executive session. 2. Topics from floor. Executive Session 1. Subcommittee reports: Member Assistance, Professional Standards, Employment Aids, Licensure & Re­ lated Regulations, Local Section Li­ aison, Civil Service Liaison. 2. ACS-sponsored insurance plans. 3. Liaison reports: AIC, DPR, Eco­ nomic Status, and other ACS com­ mittees. PUBLICATIONS

Gordon L. Nelson, chairman; General Electric Co., 1 Plastics Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 01201 Open Meeting Monday, March 30,1:30-2:30 PM Hyatt Regency, Rembrandt Room

Council, board meetings The ACS Council meeting will begin at 8 AM, Wednesday, April 1, in the Condor Ballroom, Hyatt Regency. It will be pre­ ceded by a continental breakfast for councilors beginning at 7:30 AM in the ballroom. Councilors are asked to check in beginning at 7 AM and proceed to the breakfast area, keeping in mind that the meeting starts promptly at 8 AM. Space will be available for ACS members and nonmembers to observe the council in action. It is hoped that many will take advantage of this opportunity to learn firsthand of the society's operations. Alternate councilors and division and local section officers are particularly urged to attend. The ACS Board of Di­ rectors meeting, open to members who wish to observe, will be in Lancaster Rooms A&B, Hyatt Regency, from 10:30 AM to noon, and from 1:30 PM to 5 PM, on Sunday, March 29.

Same as below. Executive Session

SCIENCE

Warren E. Falconer, chairman; Bell Laboratories, WB l-L-246, Holmdel, N.J. 07733

1. Approval of minutes of Dec. 6, 1980, meeting. 2. Reports of subcommittees. Open Meeting 3. Report of C&EN editorial board. Tuesday, March 31, 2-4 PM 4. Books & Journals Division finan­ Hyatt Regency, Italian Suite cial review—five-year retrospective (1975-80). Same as below plus topics from the 5. C&EN financial review. floor. 6. SciQuest financial review. 7. Policy on subscription pricing. Executive Session 8. 1982 recommended subscription (open to councilors) prices. 9. Report on the method of billing 1. Council agenda petitions for action and term of member subscriptions. and for consideration. 10. Reports from liaisons to other 2. Reports and recommendations committees. from: 11. Old business: Bylaw III, Sec. a. Council Committee on Divi­ (e)(4) of ACS Bylaws. sional Activities. 12. Information items: b. Council Committee on Meet­ a. Committee roster. ings & Expositions. Jb. Subcommittee assignments. 3. Review of final-report drafts of the c. SCOP calendar of events. committee's task forces on Nonpublication Scientific Communications and Chemistry of the Future. PUBLIC RELATIONS 4. Statement of the responsibilities, Richard L. Moore, chairman; W. R. composition, and mode of operation Grace & Co., 1114 Ave. of the Ameri­ of the new joint board-council Com­ cas, New York, N.Y. 10036 mittee on Science. 5. Review of the Atlanta meeting Open Meeting videotaping, poster board, and in­ Monday, March 30,10 AM-noon formal meeting room experiments. Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room C 6. Reports and recommendations from the committee's subgroups: Review of current and planned public Scientific Activities, Science Policies, relations projects. and Scientific Publications; ad hoc task forces—Research Support and Executive Session Industrial/Academic Cooperation; (open to councilors) and special subcommittee to interface with the Committee on Com­ Same as for open meeting. mittees.

TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES

M. H. Campbell, chairman; 2119 Beech, Richland, Wash. 99352 Open Meeting Monday, March 30,10-11 AM Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room Β

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Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. Reports of subcommittees: a. Technician Symposia. b. Local TAG Activities. c. CTA/NCCTA Interaction. d. Bylaws. e. Educational Activities. 3. Reports by liaisons to other com­ mittees. 4. TAG leadership program— funding. 5. NCCTA report. WOMEN CHEMISTS

Maureen Chan, chairman; Room 7F 208, Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, N.J. 07974 Open Meeting Monday, March 30,10:30-11:30 AM Hyatt Regency, Condor Ballroom Report from executive session plus topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. Subcommittee reports: Status of Women, Future Symposia, Newslet­ ter, Project Identification, Member­ ship Promotion. 3. Surveys report. 4. Academic Information Service. YOUNGER CHEMISTS

Mark D. Frishberg, chairman; 904 Teasel Dr., Apt. Fl-7, Kingsport, Tenn. 37660 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 31, 4-5 PM World Congress Center, Room 212 Report from executive session plus topics from floor. Executive Session 1. Introduction and orientation of new members. 2. Presentations by liaisons from other ACS committees and discus­ sions by YCC liaisons to other com­ mittees. 3. Discussion of YCC budget. Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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4. Status reports and re-evaluation of ongoing YCC projects: a. Newsletter. b. Booth at national meetings— development of publicity and recruitment handouts. c. Forum at national meetings— preview of Atlanta forum on "What a Chemist Needs to Know—Other Than Chemistry"; review and potential repeat of Las Vegas "Passages" symposium; development of future symposia. d. Chemical Career Insights counseling programs—report on Chemical Career Insights 1980, identification of 1981 program sites and contacts, revision of the booklet "How To Run a Roadshow." e. Slide-tape career counseling project—review of introductory program, presentation on government careers program. f. Videotape career counseling project. g. Report and evaluation of cooperative education conferences. h. Membership survey. 5. Brainstorming session on new projects and directions.

ATLANTA Tours and Plant Trips Tickets for these events will be on sale only at the Hospitality Center, Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor A. The hours for the center are: Sunday, March 29, 3 PM to 8 PM; Monday through Wednesday, 9 AM to 4 PM; and Thursday, 9 AM to noon. Tickets should be purchased no later than 4 PM the preceding day. Advance purchase is recommended as attendance is limited. SUNDAY, MARCH 29

GP-101. 1 PM to 4 PM. Premeeting minitour of Atlanta. A driving tour with an experienced guide will move up famous Peachtree Street revealing the Fox Theatre, Colony Square, and the Atlanta Memorial Arts Center. Beautiful homes and sweeping lawns highlight a drive through the elegant residential northside. A return to downtown Atlanta and Peachtree Center precedes views of the capitol complex, Atlanta Stadium, the site of Underground Atlanta, urban wall paintings, Georgia State University, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memori102

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

al, and historic sites in the "Sweet Auburn'' area. A tour of the OMNI complex, including an overview of the Georgia World Congress Center, will end the excursion. Cost: $9.00; limit: 47. Please note that tickets for this tour must be purchased in advance since it precedes on-site registration.

Square, the largest shopping mall in the Southeast. Its 185 tenants include Rich's, Davison's, and Neiman Marcus. The elegant Phipps Plaza is a few blocks away. For lunch, the 25 eating establishments at Lenox should offer adequate choice of price and culinary sophistication. Those wishing to return to the hotel without visiting Lenox Square will be accommodated. Cost: $12; limit: 47.

TUESDAY, MARCH 31

GP-102. 8:30 A M to 12:30 P M . Micromeritics Instrument Corp. Micromeritics manufactures analytical instruments and accessories for particle technology and liquid chromatography. MIC products, sold worldwide, are supported by sales, service, R&D, applications laboratories, and complete manufacturing and production processes all located in Norcross, Ga. Micromeritics' particle technology instruments measure particle size, porosity, absolute density, B.E.T. surface area, and zeta potential. In high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Micromeritics offers a complete product line with state-of-the-art components and systems. The tour will begin with a program on the company's development and current operations in producing and marketing high-precision, technical instruments. Product specialists will conduct slide presentations on both product lines, followed by an informal question and answer session. A guided tour will follow product production from procurement of materials to machine shop, manufacturing, assembly, quality control, and shipping. Highlighting the tour will be a visit to the materials analysis laboratory that provides complete physical characterization of samples submitted by companies throughout the world. Cost: $6.00; limit: 45. GP-103. 10 AM to 3:45 PM. Scenic residential tour and shopping. Old and new Atlanta are enjoyed in beautiful counterpoint. The Swan House is Atlanta's most exquisite architectural expression of early 20th century preference for classicism; its creator has been called "the greatest living classical architect in America." Each room on the tour evokes the mood of a different historical style. The drive through the elegant residential northside will display the Governor's Mansion, which probably will be available for a brief tour. Sights to be enjoyed along Peachtree Street include the Fox Theatre, Colony Square, and the Memorial Arts Center. Visitors can shop at Lenox

GP-104.2 P M to 4:30 PM. Coca-Cola Co. technical center. Coca-Cola is the world's largest manufacturer of soft drinks, the leading producer of citrus juices, and is among the industry leaders in wine production and water desalinization technology. Tour of the company's headquarters in Atlanta includes the recently opened technical center, which houses the quality assurance and R&D laboratories, and the engineering development facility. In addition, the headquarters tower includes a noteworthy exhibit of selections from the company's art collection. No charge, courtesy CocaCola Co.; limit: 25. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1

GP-105. 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM. Antebellum homes. General Sherman, said by some to be the first director of urban renewal, left few antebellum homes in the Atlanta area. After an informative drive to Marietta, suburb north of Atlanta rich in Civil War history, the tour will visit two homes of that period. One of these predates the war and the other was built shortly thereafter. They are both private homes and the owners will meet the tour group. Both homes have been carefully restored and provide a fitting showcase for heirloom antiques, oriental rugs, and other beautiful furnishings. Cost: $12; limit: 47. GP-106. 12:15 P M to 4:45 PM. U.S. Geological Survey, National Water Quality Laboratory. The National Water Quality Laboratory-Atlanta is one of two laboratories providing chemical, physical, and biological analyses in support of the Geological Survey's program of water resource studies. The analyses performed encompass most of the water ecosystem—water, bottom materials, and biological samples. The laboratory operations are automated for highvolume routine analysis; about 500,000 determinations are performed on 4000 samples per year. Such parameters as nutrients, trace metals, and organic pollutants are

determined and phytoplankton and benthic invertebrate microorganisms are identified. More than 1000 different determinations can be performed including organochloride and organophosphorus pesticides, herbicides, volatile organic pollutants, PCB's, PNA's, phenolics, organic carbon, 40 different trace metals, nutrient and anionic parameters, and physical properties. Analysis reports are compiled in a central computer and transferred electronically to national headquarters. USGS scientists and other interested parties can retrieve analysis reports and perform statistical treatments of the data through a network of remote terminals which are a part of this national computer system. Cost: $6.00; limit: 40. GP-107. 4 PM to 8:45 PM. Stone Mountain evening. This 3200-acre park contains a unique blend of war memorial, historic sights, scenic beauty, and recreational facilities. After a short ride with an experienced guide, a visit to Memorial Hall will provide a closeup view and narration on the world's largest sculptured work of art. Visitors may choose to ride an enclosed cable car by the granite carving to the top of the mountain for a breathtaking view of the countryside, or to walk through the plantation, a complex of 19 authentic antebellum buildings. A bluegrass band will provide entertainment while the group enjoys an old-fashioned barbecue at the Lakeside Center. The tour concludes with a ride around Stone Mountain Lake on an authentic paddle wheel riverboat. Jeans or other casual attire is appropriate for this tour. Cost: $22; minimum: 300.

ATLANTA Special Events

ACS Awards Reception and Dinner.

Scheduled on Monday, March 30, a COD reception will begin at 6:30 PM in Salon West and the dinner at 7:30 PM in Ballroom West of the Atlanta Hilton. The general meeting will follow the dinner at 8:30 PM. Additional seating will be available for those wishing to attend only the general meeting at which Herbert C. Brown, 1981 recipient of the Priestley Medal, will speak on "Adventures in Research."

Middle Atlantic Regional Councilors Caucus. The caucus will convene on Tuesday, March 31, from 9 PM to 11 PM, in the Hyatt Regency, Italian Suite. Presidential Symposium. The symposium, entitled "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories," will be held on Tuesday, March 31, at 5:15 PM in the Hyatt Regency, Falcon Ballroom. Presentation: The Voyager Encounter with Saturn—Latest Results. A special presentation organized by the Geochemistry Division and cosponsored by the Chemical Education, Environmental Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, and Analytical Chemistry divisions. Open to the public, it will be held Wednesday, April 1, from 7 PM to 9:15 PM at the Atlanta's Peachtree Center has works of Condor Ballroom, Hyatt Regency. art among hotels, offices, shops Time, topics, and speakers: 7 PM, Rendezvous with a Ringed Giant, ACS Mixer. The mixer will be held on Bradford Smith, University of AriTuesday, March 31, from 9 PM to 11 zona; 7:45 PM, The Atmosphere of PM in the Hyatt Regency, Falcon Titan, Robert Eshleman, Stanford Ballroom. See Social Events, ticket University; 8:15 PM, The Infrared 17. Exploration of Saturn and Its Satellites by Voyager, Rudy Hanel, NASA, ACS Informal Meeting Area/ Rathskeller. Goddard Space Flight Center; 8:45 To promote discussion and supple- PM, Laboratory Simulation Studies ment the ACS Mixer, an informal of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan, Cyril meeting area and "Rathskeller" is Ponnamperuma, University of being provided in Exhibit Hall A of Maryland. the World Congress Center. This informal meeting area will be open from Seminar: Local Section Public Relations 8 AM to 6 PM, Monday through Is More Than Meeting Notices. The Wednesday, with light snacks avail- seminar will be offered on Monday, able on a COD basis. At 4:30 PM each March 30, from 1 PM to 5 PM, in the day the area will be converted into the Hyatt Regency, Phoenix Ballroom. "Rathskeller" with beer, wine, and soft drinks available on a COD Region I Councilors Caucus. The caucus basis. will convene on Tuesday, March 31, from 4:30 PM to 5:15 PM, in the Congressional Science Counselors Cau- Hyatt Regency, Austrian Suite. cus. The caucus will convene on Tuesday, March 31, from 3:30 PM to Region II Councilors Caucus. The caucus 5 PM, in the Atlanta Hilton, Milan will convene on Tuesday, March 31, Room. from 5 PM to 7 PM, in the Hyatt Regency, Italian Suite. Divisional Councilor Caucus. The caucus will convene on Saturday, March 28, Region V Councilors Caucus. The caucus from 3 PM to 5 PM, in the Hyatt Re- will convene on Sunday, March 29, gency, English Suite. from 7 PM to 8:30 PM, in the Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room C. Divisional Officers Caucus. The caucus will convene on Saturday, March 28, Southeastern Regional Councilors Caufrom 1:30 PM to 5 PM in the Hyatt cus. The caucus will convene on Regency, Tudor Room. Sunday, March 29, from 8 PM to 11 PM in the Hyatt Regency, Tudor Glenn T. Seaborg Address. The Nobelist Room. will address science teachers and students on the "The New Elements" Western Regional Councilors Caucus. on Sunday, March 29, from 2:30 PM The caucus will convene on Sunday, to 4 PM, in the Hyatt Regency, Fal- March 29, from 8 PM to 10 PM, in the con Ballroom. Hyatt Regency, Essex Room B. Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN 103

ATLANTA Preprints

Preprints of the following divisions' technical sessions may be purchased at the entrance to their meeting rooms or ordered by mail. Environmental Chemistry R. B. Pojasek Publications Manager c/o Roy F. Weston Inc., 165 U New Boston St. Woburn, Mass. 01801 (617)933-7851

Vol. 21

Fuel Chemistry Shirley B. Radding Director of Publications Fuel Chemistry Division 2994 Cottonwood Ct. Santa Clara, Calif. 95051 (415) 326-6200 Ext. 2875

Vol. 26 No. 1 $8.00 each

Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry John H. Lupinski Circulation Manager General Electric Co. P.O. Box 8, Bldg. K-1 Schenectady, N.Y. 12301 (518)385-8638

Vol. 44 $10b

Petroleum Chemistry Inc. James W. Bunger Treasurer 320 Browning Bldg. University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (801)581-8627

Vol. 26 No. 1, $8.00 Outside U.S. $9.00

Polymer Chemistry Inc. Frederick Dammont Circulation Manager Division of Polymer Chemistry P.O. Box 20453 Newark, N.J. 07101 (201)482-5744

Vol. 22 No. 1, $10a

No. 1, $7.00a

a Payment with order, b 1. For members of the division and ACS, no charge except $8.00 dues for divisional membership. 2. For affiliate members of the division, not members of ACS, no charge except $10 dues for affiliate membership of the division. 3. For libraries and individuals who are not affiliates or members, $10 per book or $20 per year shipped surface mail. (Airmail shipment will incur additional costs.) Payment with order. Back orders $8.00 per volume through Vol. 43, if available; payment with order.

ATLANTA Employment The National Employment Clearing House (NECH) will be available to members and student affiliates at the national meeting in Atlanta. It will be located in Hall A of the World Congress Center and will be open from 8 104

C&EN Feb. 16, 1981

AM to 5 PM, Monday through regulations on job discrimination in Thursday, March 30 through April 2. employment or we cannot accept Early registration for applicants only them. Employers unable to attend will begin Sunday, March 29, from 3 to and who have an opening(s) may 7 PM. Candidates are urged to submit submit a form for a fee of $25 per forms in advance to the national of- opening (a maximum of $100, refice. If this is not possible, register at gardless of number posted). You will the meeting as early as possible—no be billed following the meeting. Be later than Monday. Interviews are certain that the returned form indischeduled a half-day in advance, and cates you will not be in attendance the majority of registered employers and that all interested candidates do not remain for the entire meeting. should write to you directly. A candidate's records will not be Single copies of the candidates' placed on file to be reviewed by em- records (the summary form) will be ployers until the candidate reports in provided during the meeting at 50 Atlanta and completes all registration cents per copy. Personal résumés of requirements. Request forms for early candidates, if submitted, will be on submission from the ACS Employ- file for review. Copies of résumés may ment Aids Office, 1155—16th St., be obtained at 50 cents per résumé. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Orders for complete sets of candiPlease state that you want forms for dates' reproduced summary forms at the Atlanta meeting, as they differ $50 per set will be taken during the from the year-round clearinghouse meeting from registered employers. forms. Deadline for receipt of com- Orders for complete sets of the sumpleted forms at the national office mary forms from companies not in prior to the meeting is March 9. attendance will be accepted at $100 Both candidates for employment per set for 30 days following the and employer representatives must meeting. be registered and in attendance at the meeting to use NECH facilities. One-day-session tickets are not honored. The meeting registration fee may be waived for an unemployed member who wishes to use NECH. The waiver may be requested in adACS Officers vance or at the meeting. In advance, forward the preregistration form from this issue with your request to the Employment Aids Office. At the Albert C. Zettlemoyer, president meeting, come to the staff office in Robert W. Parry, president-elect NECH at the World Congress James D. D'lanni, immediate pastpresident Center. Employers may register beginning William J. Bailey, chairman, board of directors Monday, March 30, at 8 AM, to review candidates' applications and Raymond P. Mariella, executive director schedule interviews. Employer representatives must agree that no Rodney N. Hader, secretary placement charges will be made and John Κ Crum, deputy executive di­ rector/treasurer that candidates will be advised at the time of first contact the name of the employer, geographical location, and Divisional Officers nature of the position. Position Available postings re- Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. I. E. Liener, chairman; ceived from companies will be ready C. J. Mussinan, secretary-treasur­ for review after 1 PM, Monday, er, c/o International Flavors & March 30, by any person registered Fragrances, Research & Develop­ for the meeting. Copies will be availment, Union Beach, N.J. 07735. able for sale at 50 cents per position. Employers who wish to post a no- Division of Analytical Chemistry. tice of an opening may obtain stanW. E. Shults, chairman; R. F. dard forms in advance from the ACS Hirsch, secretary, Department of Employment Aids Office. A separate Chemistry, Seton Hall University, form should be submitted for each South Orange, N.J. 07079. opening. These may be returned to the national office before the meeting Division of Biological Chemistry. N. O. Kaplan, chairman; R. W. F. (by March 9) or delivered to NECH Hardy, secretary, Du Pont Co. during the meeting. All completed 04470, Wilmington, Del. 19898. forms must comply with all federal

ATLANTA

Division of Carbohydrate Chem­ istry. S. Hanessian, chairman; J. R. Vercellotti, secretary, V-Labs, 215 East Fourth Ave., Covington, La. 70433.

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Cellulose, Paper & Textile Divi­ sion. R. E. Read, chairman; T. L. Vigo, secretary-treasurer, USDA Textiles & Clothing Laboratory, 1303 West Cumberland, Knoxville, Tenn. 37916. Division of Chemical Education Inc. Β. Ζ. Shakhashiri, chairman; J. A. Bell, secretary, Department of Chemistry, Simmons College, 300 The Fenway, Boston, Mass. 02115. Division of Chemical Health & Safety. L. J. Doemeny, chairman; D. B. Walters, secretary, National Institute of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27709.

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Division of Geochemistry (Pro­ bationary). D. S. Montgomery, chairman; T. F. Yen, secretary, Department of Chemical & Envi­ ronmental Engineering, University Division of Chemical Information. of Southern California, University R. E. Buntrock, chairman; B. G. Park, Los Angeles, Calif. 90007. Prewitt, secretary, Rohm & Haas Co., P.O. Box 718, Bristol, Pa. Division of History of Chemistry. D. S. Tarbell, chairman; Ν. Μ. 19007. Foster, secretary-treasurer, De­ Division of Chemical Marketing & partment of Chemistry, Cedar Economics. S. T. Pender, chair­ Crest College, Allentown, Pa. man; J. L. Bevirt, secretary, 1211 18104. Kingsbury Ct., Midland, Mich. Division of Industrial & Engi­ 48640. neering Chemistry. C. M. BarDivision of Colloid & Surface tish, chairman; K. C. Taylor, sec­ Chemistry. J. A. Mann Jr., chair­ retary, GM Research Laboratory, man; E. L. Fuller, secretary, 1027 Physical Chemistry Department, West Outer Dr., Oak Ridge, Tenn. 12 Mile & Mound Rd., Warren, 37830. Mich. 48090. Division of Computers in Chemis­ Division of Inorganic Chemistry. try. C. G. Enke, chairman; E. EdH. Kaesz, chairman; R. N. Grimes, elson, secretary, Bell Laboratories, secretary-treasurer, University of 600 Mountain Ave., Murray Hill, Virginia, Department of Chemis­ N. J. 07974. try, Charlottesville, Va. 22901. Division of Environmental Division of Medicinal Chemistry. Chemistry. L. Laird, chairman; R. J. R. Dice, chairman; M. Gorman, L. Jolley, secretary, 120 North secretary, Eli Lilly Research Lab­ Seneca Rd., Oak Ridge, Tenn. oratories M930, Indianapolis, Ind. 37803. 46206. Division of Fertilizer & Soil Division of Microbial & Bio­ Chemistry. J. M. Stinson, chair­ chemical Technology. S. Bern­ man; H. C. MacKinnon, secre­ stein, chairman; R. W. Swartz, tary/treasurer, P.O. Box 3166, secretary/treasurer, Eli Lilly & Co., Tulsa, Okla. 74101. P.O. Box 685, Lafayette, Ind. 47902. Division of Fluorine Chemistry. B. E. Smart, chairman; R. J. de Pas- Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology. J. Hudis, chairman; quale, secretary/treasurer, 2878 R. W. Hoff, secretary, Lawrence N.W. Fourth Lane, Gainesville, Livermore National Laboratory, Fla. 32601. P.O. Box 808, Livermore, Calif. Division of Fuel Chemistry. R. C. 94550. Neavel, chairman; M. Farcasiu, secretary, 73 Gulick Rd., Princeton, Division of Organic Chemistry. P. N. J. 08540. G. Gassman, chairman; P. Beak,

secretary-treasurer, Rogers Adams Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 61801. Division of Organic Coatings & Plastics. S. S. Labana, chairman; M. J. S. Bowden, secretary, Bell Telephone Laboratories, Mountain Ave., Murray Hill, N.J. 07974. Division of Pesticide Chemistry. M. L. Leng, chairman; P. A. Hedin, secretary, Boll Weevil Research Laboratory, Box 5367, Mississippi State, Miss. 39762. Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc. E. K. Fields, chairman; W. V. Bush, secretary, Shell Develop­ ment Co., P.O. Box 1380, Houston, Tex. 77001. Division of Physical Chemistry Inc. W. H. Flygare, chairman; A. L. Kwiram, secretary-treasurer, De­ partment of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 98195. Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc. W. C. Wooten, chairman; J. J. O'Malley, secretary, Exxon Chemical Co., P.O. Box 4255, Baytown, Tex. 77520. Division of Professional Relations. S. W. Drigot, chairman; M. W. Wadley, secretary, 520 East Riverdale Ave., Orange, Calif. 92665. Rubber Division Inc. D. W. Gor­ man, chairman; T. Jones, secretary, 222 Perrine Ave., Piscataway, N.J. 08854. Division of Small Chemical Busi­ nesses. K. W. Greenlee, chairman; G. R. Hutchens, secretary, Galbraith Laboratories, P.O. Box 4187, Knoxville, Tenn. 37921. Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

105

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Continued from page 2 of regulatory approval, as suggested by Swallow, the Kastenmeier bill approach would leave the beginning of the patent term as it is now, but add to the term, or more properly restore to the term, a measured and defined "regulatory review period" of time during which the product was not able to be marketed because of need to meet requirements of regulatory statutes. Many in the patent profession feel that the measured "regulatory review period" approach responds most directly to the problem of regu­ latory delay, whereas beginning the 17-year period with date of marketing approval might give back to the patentee time not spent meeting regulatory requirements, but during which a product might not even have been under devel­ opment, a result many feel would be unjusti­ fied. I join Swallow in urging ACS support for this concept when the new Congress takes up the subject. Alan D. Lourie Vice President, Corporate Patents, SmithKline Corp., Philadeiphia

Report of earlier work SIR: I wish to comment on your report of Nov. 3, 1980, page 34, titled "Two-step synthesis de­ vised for Spanish fly active ingredient," by Re­ becca Rawls. In the early 1960's, Julius Hyman and his staff, of which I was a member, at the former Hyman Laboratories in Berkeley, studied the Diels-Alder addition to aromatic compounds under extremely high pressures (to 13,000 atm). This research was the basis of a U.S. patent (No. 3,177,245 dated April 6, 1965). Hyman before then had reached the same conclusions on pressure and reaction rates as reported in your article. The work was also reported to the staff of the Uni­ versity of California, Berkeley, by one of the Hyman Laboratories staff members, when he was also a graduate student there in the 1960's. Melvin Look El Cerrito, Calif., formerly with Hyman Labora­ tories

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Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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