181st ACS National Meeting March 29-April 3, 1981 - C&EN Global


181st ACS National Meeting March 29-April 3, 1981. Chem. Eng. News , 1981, 59 (7), pp 36– .... 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W.. Washington, DC 20036. 京...
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Final Program

ATLANTA

V1NVTLV 181st ACS National Meeting March 29-April 3,1981 Technical Program

41

Committee Agenda

Registration

82

Tours and Plant Trips

102

Housing

84

Special Events

103

Local Arrangements

85

Preprints

104

Chemical Exposition

88

Employment

104

Social Events

92

ACS Officers

104

Awards

94

36

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

95

Atlanta will be the site of the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society. More than 400 technical sessions covering a wide variety of topics have been scheduled by 27 ACS divisions, 10 ACS committees, and the Macromolecular Secretariat. These sessions reflect the broad range of research interests and professional, educational, and social concerns of modern chemists. Included among the sessions are ones on advances in coal characterization sponsored by the Analytical Chemistry Division; molecular structure and biological function of carbohydrates and polysaccharides by Carbohydrate Chemistry; state of the art for chemical educators: polymer chemistry by Chemical Education; OSHA cotton dust standards, and reproductive hazards in the workplace, both sponsored by Chemical Health & Safety; physicochemical properties of colloidal particles by Colloid & Surface Chemistry; treatment of water by granular activated carbon by Environmental Chemistry; advances in flue gas desulfurization by Industrial & Engineering Chemistry; electron distributions and the chemical bond by Inorganic Chemistry; hightemperature chemistry by Physical Chemistry; and professional liability problems faced by independent labs by Small Chemical Businesses. A first-time event will be a presidential symposium on Tuesday, March 31, on prudent practices for hazardous chemicals in laboratories. A complete listing of all symposia is on the following pages.

Divisions, other groups are offering diverse technical program Council Committee on Membership Affairs One of a continuing series, symposium on retirement is aimed not only at retired members but those who are making preliminary plans for retirement. Program includes in-depth treatment of financial and estate planning for retirement. Younger Chemists Committee Forum on What a Chemist Needs to Know—Other Than Chemistry explores job functions, skills these functions may require, and mechanisms the student and practicing chemist can use to develop these skills. Agricultural & Food Chemistry Symposium on nitrosamines (joint) provides forum for 27 speakers covering all aspects of this important problem. Symposia on Recombinant DNA Technology, Production and Conversion of Bioresources to Energy (joint), and Leather Chemistry. Analytical Chemistry Major topical symposia deal with combined use of electrochemical and spectrochemical techniques, use of surface science methods to solve analytical problems, and characterization of coal and related materials (joint). Carbohydrate Chemistry Molecular structure and biological functions of carbohydrates symposium describes use of physical methods to correlate the biological activities of macromolecules in the human body to their structure in the solid state and in solution. General session papers include first total synthesis of pentostatine, and synthesis of /3-lactam antibiotics using carbohydrates as chiral templates. Cellulose, Paper & Textile Symposium on Chemical Applications of Lignocellulose covers latest developments in conversion of lignocellulose to chemicals, and is complemented by three silvichemical-related symposia (joint). Three symposia on textile finishing focus on problems associated with formaldehyde release and on new finishes. Chemical Education Polymer chemistry (joint) is subject of state-of-the-art symposium. Symposium on New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Chemistry (joint) discusses the place of polymer topics in the physical chemistry course. Breakthrough and Perspectives Lectures will be presented by Ralph Pearson and John C. Bailar Jr., respectively. Chemical Health & Safety Symposium on OSHA cotton dust standards assesses state-of-the-art and future direction of rule governing cotton dust exposure.

Symposium on toxic chemical lab hood ventilation (joint) probes engineering design, performance testing guidelines, and meaning of health and safety legislation. Chemical Information Highlight is Herman Skolnik Award Address on Technical-Communications Fundamentals in an Era of Technological Change. Laws and government regulations, their effect on scientists, and scientists' actions and reactions to them are examined in a forum on the copyright law (joint) and in a symposium on the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Resource Conservation & Recovery Act (joint). Chemical Marketing & Economics Papers on specialty uses for workhorse commodity fibers—polyester, nylon, and cotton—lead off two-day symposium. Afternoon symposium on markets for specialty fibers rounds out first day. Another symposium (joint) covers outlook for both chemical by-products of the pulp and paper industry and chemicals consumed by them. Computers in Chemistry Formation, reliability, and availability of computerized systems are examined in a symposium on thermodynamic data bases (joint). Speakers from Japan, Canada, England, France, West Germany, and the U.S. discuss technical details and administrative characteristics of operating computerized data bases. Environmental Chemistry Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granular Activated Carbon covers both theoretical and practical aspects, including theory of carbon absorption, structure and surface effects, biological effects, and pilot studies. Symposium on Energy and Environmental Chemistry looks at fugitive hydrocarbon emissions and acid rain. Fuel Chemistry Recently developed methods and some traditional processes are treated in a symposium on Oxidative Degradation of Coal. Role of Hydrogen in Coal Chemistry symposium focuses on various chemistries and mechanisms involved in processes for hydrotreating coal. Symposium on Chromatography of Coal-Derived Products discusses latest research in synthetic fuel separation processes. Geochemistry (Probationary) Symposia on Humic Substances in Coals, Soils, and Aquatic Environments, and on Geology and Geochemistry of Coal will interest chemists and chemical engineers currently working with coals. Advances in Geochemical Techniques for Oil Exploration symposium covers modern techniques and instrumental approaches.

History of Chemistry Monday symposium features the contributions of eminent chemists from the South. General papers feature a presentation and discussion of the evaluation of history of chemistry museums and exhibits. Inorganic Chemistry Electron distributions and the chemical bond are probed in a broad selection of papers in a joint symposium. Solid state subdivision offers a symposium on the surface properties of inorganic compounds at high temperatures (joint). Organic Chemistry Radical and organometallic chemistry, synthetic methods, and target-oriented synthesis symposia head up program. Also featured are symposia on photochemistry and NMR spectroscopy. Pesticide Chemistry Toxicological concerns are explored in symposium on pesticide effects on animals. Symposium on Biochemical Responses Induced by Herbicides deals with interaction with biological entities, physicochemical interplays, and techniques. Petroleum Chemistry Enhanced Oil Recovery symposium (joint) surveys methods of producing some of the 30 to 70% of increasingly precious petroleum left in oil wells by conventional recovery. New methods of sulfur production from high-sulfur crudes and new uses for it are described in Sulfur Recovery and Utilization symposium (joint). Physical Chemistry Major symposia include Equilibrium and Dynamic Properties of Solutions; Critical Points and Tricritical Points of Multicomponent Fluids; and High Temperature Chemistry (joint). Professional Relations Symposium on Compensation for Employed Inventors (joint) looks at patent policies of both large and small companies. Symposium on Education for a Professional Life (joint) is directed toward the senior or graduate student. Macromolecular Secretariat Week-long symposium, joint with six divisions, provides update on developments in molecular characterization of polymers correlated with bulk strengths, surface properties, thermal stability, and resistance to degradation, microcrazing, cracking, and tear propagation. Macromolecules covered range from major industrial polymers such as polystyrene and polyethylene to biopolymer systems such as the sugars and proteins and glycoproteins. Note: These highlights are based on information provided by chairmen about their programs to the ACS Meetings & Divisional Activities Department.

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

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TECHNICAL MEETING SUMMARY MONDAY

AM

I

TUESDAY

PM

I

AM

Prudent practices for handling hazardous Λ Î * - S j chemicals in labs 41

Presidential Symposium |

WEDNESDAY PM

AM

THURSDAY

PM

AM

FRIDAY

PM

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AM

I

PM

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COMMITTEES Materials science as curriculumTn chemistry* 41

Chemical Education Chemistry & Public Affairs Copyrights

Funding industrial R&D 41 Documents & data bases 41

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Corporation Associates Environmental Improvement Membership Affairs Patent Matters & Related Legislation

Cancer & the environment

B^'ifef^SiiJ'^i^

The retirement decision 41

Compensation for employed inventors 41

Technician Activities Women Chemists

Chemical technicians 41 Reproductive hazards in the workplace 41

Younger Chemists

Education for a professional life 41

Legal & paralegal careers in chemistry 32

Education for a professional life

What a chemist need; to know other than chemistry 42

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I DIVISIONS Agricultural & Food Chemistry AGFD

Funding industrial R&D 41

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Legal & paralegal careers in chemistry Î2

Nutritional availability of iron 42

Production & conversion of bioresources to energy* 42

N-Nitroso compounds* 42

Recombinant DNA technology 43

Leather chemistry 43

General 42 MM*

Analytical Chemistry ANYL

Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules « 43 45 Advances in coal characterization & allied topics* 43 44

Use of surface science techniques in solving analytical problems 44 45 Electrochemistry & spectrochemistry of biological redox components 43 44 45

Divisional fellowship program 43 Chromatography

Standardized materials! for chromatography

Carbohydrate Chemistry CARB

43

award 43

General (atomic spectroscopy) 43

General (electrochemical analysis) 43

Analytical chemistry award 43

General 44

44

45

General (chromatography) 44

Poster session 44

Cellulose, Paper & Textile CELL

General

46

46 Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules 46 47

Chemical applications of lignocellulose 46

Textile finishing with reduced formaldehyde release 46

Functional finishes for cotton cellulose 47

Natural fats, oils & resins 47

Chemical Education CHED

New trends in chemical education for health professions 47

Chemical Health & Safety CHSA

Physicochemical properties of colloidal particles 47

47 Materials science as curriculum in" chemistry 47

Safety in school science laboratory 47

High school chemistry 47

Return of descriptive Perspectives lecture' chemistry to freshman 48 course 48

Breakthrough lecture I I * 47

Courses in chemical Poster session health & s a f e t y - ((advanced undergrad &| integrated labs) 47 47

Courses in chemical health & safety* 41

Reproductive hazards in the workplace* 41

General 48

50

NIOSH epidemiologic studies 49

Material substitution for hazard control 49

Problems in instituting chemical health & safety in colleges & universities 49

48 Academic standards 48 Toxic chemical laboratory hood ventilation* r

49

Procedures & standards for field emergency safety 49

control 49 Thermodynamic data bases

Data & information systems

50

50

Hazardous chemicals control*

Information careers for chemists 50 Professional liability problems faced by independent labs 50

Legal and paralegal careers in chemistry'

50

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General 48

Disadvantaged students

Health effects of ionizing radiation

Hazardous chemicals

Documents & data bases"*

Nontenure-track faculty status 48

48

OSHA cotton dust standards 48 49

':&S&*r-' :': ? ' I

Low wet pick-up finishing 47

State of the art for chemical educators III: polymer chemistry*

New directions in teaching physical chemistry* 47

Chemical Information CINF

In honor of Hermann Flaschka 45

Poster session (chromatography) 45

Molecular structures & biological functions of carbohydrates & polysaccharides 45

General (chromatography) 45

Chemical instrumentation award

NSF-supported R&D in information science applicable to chemistry 50

Toxic substances management programs 50

Underlined symposia titles have joint sponsorship; *after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue of C&EN.

AM Chemical Marketing & Economics CMEC

MONDAY | PM

I J

TUESDAY I PM

AM

Specialty uses for commodity fibers 50

I

WEDNESDAY MA I PM

1 AM

THURSDAY I PM

1 FRIDAY AM

Chemicals & the pulp & paper industry* 50 51 Natural fats, oils & resins 51 Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules

Surface Chemistry COLL

51 General

Kendall award

51

51

52

53 Surface science of catalysis

General catalysis & related topics 51

52

52

Physicochemical properties of colloidal particles*

Physicochemical properties of colloidal particles 51

52

52

Molecular processes at solid surfaces 51

Chemical physics of catalysis 52

52

Advances in coal characterization & allied topics

51

52

Inorganic reactions in organized media

51 Computers in Chemistry COMP Environmental Chemistry ENVT

52

Thermodynamic data bases*

General 53

Energy & environmental chemistry

General

53

53

Award for advances in environmental sciences & technology 53

General

Energy & environmental chemistry

General

54

54

54

Chromatography of coal-derived products

General 55

Treatment of water by granular activated carbon 53

54

Advances in flue gas desulfurization 53

Fuel Chemistry FUEL

Oxidative degradation of coal

Role of hydrogen in coal chemistry

54

54

55

55

54

55

55

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Production & conversion of bioresources 55

Residuum upgrading & coking

Advances in coal characterization & allied topics

Advances in flue gas desulfurization 54

55 Chemistry of enhanced oil recovery 55 Ε. V. Murphree award 55

Geochemistry GEOC

Humic substances in coals, soils & aquatic environments 55

Advances in geochemical techniques for oil exploration

Geology & geochemistry of coal

55

55

56

Chemistry of enhanced oil recovery 55

History of Chemistry HIST

Eminent southern chemists

General

56

56

Industrial & Engineering Chemistry INDE

Perspectives lecture 56 Mass transfer with chemical reactions in two-phase system

Commodity & engineering plastics* 56

57 Recent advances in separation technology*

Advances in flue gas desulfurization* 56

57 R&D/manufacturing interface

Funding of industrial R&D*

56

57

E.V. Murphree award*

Awards

62 Sulfur recovery & utilization 62 Toxic chemical laboratory hood ventilation

Chemical consideration for radioactive waste 5 T ~

Natural fats, oils & resins* 57

57

Inorganic Chemistry INOR

62

Treatability of industrial aqueous effluents

62

Electron distributions & the chemical bond*

62 Roles of transition metal complexes in oxidation of organic substrates*

Inorganic reactions in organized media* 62 Poster session

63

64

65 General (kinetics & mechanisms) '

General (organometallic compounds)

General (catalysis)

General (molybdenum chemistry)

General (transition metal compounds)

63

64

64

65

65

General (solid state)

Perspectives lecture III 64

General (main group chemistry) 65

General (lanthanides & actinides) 65

62 General (bioinorganic systems)

General (photochemical studies)

63

63

64

General (transition metal complexes) 63

Breakthrough lecture II

General (macrocyclic compounds) 64

63

Surface properties of inorganic compounds* 64 65 High-temperature chemistry

63

64

65

ACS creative invention award

Chemical consideration for radioactive waste 64~~

Medicinal Chemistry MEDI

Amino acid neurotransmitters 65

Nontricyclic antidepressant drugs 65

Computer graphics in medicinal chemistry 65

66

Garvan medal award address 66

Recent developments in allergy 66

General 66

In honor of Joseph H. Burckhalter

General

66

66

Underlined symposia titles have joint sponsorship; *after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue of C&EN.

MONDAY | PM

AM Nuclear Chemistry & Technology NUCL

Organic Chemistry ORGN

|

Deep inelastic reaction studies 66

TUESDAY | PM

AM

Heavy ion reaction mechanisms (award)

67 General 67

award 67

Mechanisms of addition & rearrangement 68

67

68

work in synthetic organic chemistry 68

68

69

69

Synthetic methodology

Synthesis

Reactions & synthetic methods

THURSDAY Ί PM

1 FRIDAY AM

I I

67

Ernest Guenther award

Chiral systems

AM

General

Silicon in organic synthesis

Strained & bridged systems 68

I I

Chemical consideration for radioactive waste* 67

Health effects of ionizing radiation*

Synthesis

Heteroaromatics

WEDNESDAY AM | PM Deep inelastic reaction studies 67

67

Fission product transport & release 66

Synthetic methodology

I I

Photochemistry of polychromophoric molecules

Silicon in organic synthesis 70

Spectroscopy 70

70

Nitro compounds & heterocycles 71

New methods & applications of NMR spectroscopy 69

69 Hypervalent species, phosphorus & sulfur compounds 69

68

69

69

Photooxidation & organoborane chemistry 68

Anions, radicals & carbenes

Reaction mechanisms

69

69

Photochemistry

Bioorganic & natural products

Gas phase & thermal reactions

General

70

70

71

70

Roles of transition metal complexes in oxidation of organic substrates 70 Oxygen heterocycles & thermal extrusion reactions 70

Organometallics 69

Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules

Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry ORPL

71

72

Commodity & engineering plastics 71

Plastics for the 1980's 72

72 Cyclopolymers & polymers with chain-ring structures 71

72 Reaction injection molding & fast polymerization reactions

General (new concepts in applied polymer science) 71

71

72 General (new concepts in applied polymer science)

Biological activities of polymers 71

72

72

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Borden award 71

Pesticide

Effects of chronic exposures to pesticides on animals

General

Developments in analytical chemistry

General 73

73

73

PEST

72

Biochemical responses induced by herbicides

73

N-Nitroso compounds

General

73

73

73

Impurities in pesticides

73

General 73

Petroleum Chemistry PETR

Chemistry of engine combustion products 73

Chemistry of enhanced oil recovery*

74

ACS creative invention award* 74

74

Advances in flue gas desulfurization 74 E. V. Murphree award

74

74

74

75

Residuum upgrading & coking*

Advances in separation recovery 74

Lubrizol award

Sulfur recovery & utilization*

74 Chemical physics of catalysis* 74 Transition metal complexes in oxidation of organic substrates 74

75

Surface properties of inorganic compounds and their relation to catalysis 74 75

Physical Chemistry PHYS

Critical & tricritical points of multicomponent fluids 75

Poster (general)

76

Poster (general)

76

77

Peter Debye award

High-temperature chemistry*

75

75

_

New directions in teaching physical chemistry

76

77

Nobel Laureate signature award 76

Poster

Equilibrium & dynamic properties of solutions

75

76

I

77

|

Electron distribution & the chemical bond 75

Polymer Chemistry POLY

76

77 Aqueous polymer systems

Cyclopolymers & polymers with chain-ring structures* 77 Dynamical properties of polymer fluids 77

78

79

78

79

79 Poster (special topics) 78

Dynamical properties of polymer fluids

Polymeric reagents

79

79

State of the art for chemical educators III: polymer chemistry

Witco award 78

78

79

Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules 78

79

80

Commodity & engineering plastics 78

Professional Relations PRFR

Compensation for employed inventors* 80

79 Education for a professional life* 80

Rubber RUBB Small Chemical Businesses SCHB

Legal & paralegal career options in chemistry 80 Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules 80

Compensation for employed inventors 80

Professional liability problems faced by independent labs * 80

True stories of small chemical businesses* 81

Starting up a small business 80

Hazardous chemicals control 80

Macromolecular Secretariat

Instrumental & physical characterization of macromolecules* 81

Special topics 80

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Technical Program

ATLANTA

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181st ACS National Meeting

PRESIDENT'S SYMPOSIUM Albert C. Zettlemoyer, President

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Falcon Ballroom (Terrace Level) 5:15—President's Symposium "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals In Laboratories"—Discussion of National Research Council

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON COPYRIGHTS

TUESDAY AFTERNOON MONDAY MORNING Forum on Documents and Data Bases: Use or Misuse? cosponsored with Division of Chemical Information (see page 50)

COMMITTEE ON CORPORATION —Dr. Anna J. Harrison, Mt Holyoke ASSOCIATES College —Dr. Howard E. Simmons, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON CHEMICAL EDUCATION J. A. Beel, Chairman

TUESDAY MORNING World Congress Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) Symposium on Materials Science as a Cur­ riculum in Chemistry J. A. Beel, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Materials: Technology or Science? G. R. Thomas. 9:50—2. Materials Research—The Chemistry Graduate. W. J. James. 10:35—Intermission. 10:45—3. The Chemist in Materials Science. K. R. Lawless. 11:20—Discussion.

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON CHEMISTRY AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS H. L. Finkbeiner,

Chairman

L. V. Triggiani, Chairman

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on the Funding of Industrial Re­ search and Development cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chem­ istry joint with Board-Council Committee on Chemistry and Public Affairs (see page 57)

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT D. MacDougall, Chairman

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Stuart Room (Meeting Level) Symposium on Cancer and the Environ­ ment

R. E. Olson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Recent Developments in Human Carcinogenesis. J. Higginson. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—2. Naturally Occurring Carcinogens. B. J. Wilson. 11:05—3. Mechanisms of Chemical Carci­ nogenesis. R. A. Neal. 2:00—4. Asbestos as a Carcinogen. M. Kuschner. 2:50—5. Extrapolation of Carcinogenesis Testing in Animals to Man. R. K. Boutwell. 3:40—Intermission. 4:00—6. The Risk of Cancer. R. Wilson.

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on the Funding of Industrial Re­ search and Development cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chem­ istry joint with Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 57)

W. M. Tuddenham, Chairman

F. H. Owens, Chairman

Albert C. Zettlemoyer, Presiding —Dr. Jerome A. Berson, Yale University

—Dr. Herbert O. House, Georgia Institute of Technology —Dr. Edwin D. Becker, National Institutes of Health —Dr. Bailus Walker, Occupational Safety & Health Administration —Dr. Eugene F. Meyer, Environmental Protection Agency —Dr. Robert W. Parry, ACS President-Elect

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AFFAIRS

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Omni International, Liberty Hall (2nd floor, Convention Center) Symposium on the Retirement Decision L. V. Sorg, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—1. Changing Retirement Roles in the 80*s. B. Payne. 2:20—2. Financial and Estate Planning. W. C. Thompson.

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room Β (Meeting Level) 26th National Technician Symposium G. J. Brien, Presiding 9:00—Open NCCTA Meeting. 10:20—6. Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Reso­ nance as a Method for Estimating Oil Shale Yields. S. W. Tyson. 10:45—7. Use of the Streaming Mercury Electrode for Measuring Reaction Rates Between a Thiol and Aqueous Silver Halide Dispersions. G. J. Brien, D. Neuberger. 11:30—8. The Important Role of the Techni­ cian in Accessing the Aquatic Toxicity and Environmental Fate of Chemicals. C. F. Callis, R. Kimerle. 2:00—9. Testing and Evaluation of Resin Systems for Rapid Runway Repair. F. A. Forster.

2:25—10. Heavy-Duty Laundry Powders. G. D. Carpenter.

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON PATENT MATTERS AND RELATED LEGISLATION W. Marcy, Chairman

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Compensation for Employed Inventors organized by Division of Profes­ sional Relations joint with Council Committee on Professional Relations, Divisions of Pro­ fessional Relations and Small Chemical Businesses (see page 80)

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES M. H. Campbell, Chairman D. Wonchoba, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room Β (Meeting Level) 26th National Technician Symposium

G. J. Brien, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Kinetic Studies Using a Batch Micro-Reactor System. J. Henegar. 9:35—2. Chromatographic Analysis With Open Tubular Columns. W. Cathcart. 10:00—Open CTA Meeting. 11:20—3. Laboratory Scale Procedures for Preparation of High Molecular Weight Polymers. L. H. Robertson. 2:00—4. Creatinine in Human Serum by HPLC. J. W. Smith, D. F. Ketchum, R. T. Ambrose. 2:25—5. Glutaraldehyde—A Potent Microbiocide For Industrial Cooling Water Ap­ plications. A. D. Galante, R. G. Eagar, Jr. 4:30—Closed NCCTA Meeting.

2:50—11. Synthesis of 1-Methyl-4-(arylsulfonyl)-methylidene-3,1-benzoxazine-2(1H)ones. W. B. Vreeland, II, M. J. Carmody.

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room Β (Meeting Level) Instrumental Seminar for Chemical Techni­ cians R. L. Julian, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—FT-IR in the Analytical Laboratory— Audio/Visual Presentation. 10:00—12. The FT-IR Technique and Addi­ tional Data Processing. R. L. Julian. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—13. Real Time Analysis of G. C. Ef­ fluents by FT-IR. W. Vidrine. 11:00—14. Library Searching Routines for Spectral Analysis. S. Lowry. 11:30—Discussion. 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—15. FT-IR as an Intelligent Detector for L. C. Effluents. W. Vidrine. 2:30—16. Surface Analysis via ATR, Spec­ ular and Diffuse Reflectance, and Photoacoustic FT-IR—W. Vidrine, S. Lowry. 3:30—Discussion. 3:45—Intermission. 4:00—17. MX-1 FT-IR Practical Demonstra­ tion. R. L. Julian.

WOMEN CHEMISTS COMMITTEE M. Chan, Chairman

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety (see page 49) TUESDAY MORNING Symposium on Education for a Professional Life organized by Division of Professional Relations joint with Council Committee on Professional Relations and Younger Chemists Committee (see page 80)

Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

41

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4:15—43. Pilot Scale Evaluation of Ozone/ GAC Combinations for THM Precursor Removal. W. H. Glaze, J. Wallace, K. Dickson, D. Wilcox, K. R. Johannsson, B. Scalf, R. Noack. 4:40—Panel Discussion. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour. 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 16 for details).

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Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) General

R. L. Jolley, Presiding 2:00—44. Optimization of Gas Chromatog­ raphy—Mass Spectrometry Data Acquisi­ tion, Manipulation and Processing from Complex Environmental Samples. A. S. Nakagawa, C. A. Kieda, H. G. Nowicki. 2:25—45. Oxidation of Molecular Tritium by Intact Soild. C. W. Sweet, C. E. Murphy, Jr. 2:50—46. High Volume Sampling of Chlori­ nated Hydrocarbons in Urban Air using Three Adsorbents. W. N. Billings, T. F. Bidleman. 3:15—47. Frontal Movement of PCB Vapors Through a Polyurethane Foam Column. N. F. Burdick, T. F. Bidleman. 3:40—Intermission. 3:50—48. Validation and Application of a Rapid Determination of BaP from Forest Fire Smoke by HPLC. J. D. White. 4:15—49. Hyperkeratotic Activity from the Photolysis Products of the Inactive 2,2',4,4',5,5'-Hexabromobiphenyl. R. H. Hill, D. G. Patterson, L. L. Needham, D. L. Orti, R. D. Kimbrough, J. A. Liddle. 4:40—50. Treatment of Form Forming Firefighting Wastewater with the Fluidized Granular Activated Carbon Anaerobic Bioreactor. M. T. Suidan, E. S. K. Chian, W. H. Cross, D. B. Chan. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour. 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A for details). WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granulated Activated Carbon. Pilot Studies J. DeMarco, Presiding 9:00—51. Experimental Error Estimates As­ sociated with Pilot-Scale Investigations of Trace Organic Removals. M. J. McGuire, T. S. Tanaka, M. K. Davis. 9:25—52. Performance Evaluation of GAC Pilot Columns in THM Removal at Louisville, KY. W. J. Doyle, G. C. Holdren. 9:50—53. Pilot Plant Study on the Use of Chloride Dioxide and Granular Activated Carbon. B. W. Lykins, J. DeMarco. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—54. A Comparison of Granular Acti­ vated Carbon and a Carbonaceous Resin for Removal of Volatile Halogenated Or­ ganics from a Groundwater. R. S. Chroback, P. C. Chrostowski, I. H. Suffet. 10:50—55. Experimental Studies of the Dis­ tribution Profiles of Substances Adsorbed on Fixed Beds of Granular Activated Car­ bon. K. Alben, K. Shpirt. 11:15—56. Monitoring of Granular Activated Carbon Filters: Comparison of American and French Experience. J. Mallevialle, F. Fiessinger, I. H. Suffet, P. R. Cairo. 11:40—Panel Discussion.

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Energy and Environmental Chemistry II. Acid Rain

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granular Activated Carbon. Pilot and Large Scale Studies

A. A. Stevens, Presiding 2:00—62. Removal of Chlorinated Brominated and lodinated Nonvolatile Compounds by GAC-Filtration. J. J. Rook. 2:25—63. Production of Volatile Halogenated Compounds upon Chlorination After Carbon Filtration. A. Graveland, J. C. Kruithof, P. A. N. M. Nuhm. 2:50—64. Interaction of Adsorption and Bioactivity in Full Scale Activated Carbon Filters: The Mont-Valerien Experiment. F. Fiessinger, J. Mallevialle, A. Benedek. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—65. Dynamic Behavior of Organics Removal in Full-Scale Granular Activated Carbon Columns. R. S. Summers, P. V. Roberts. 3:50—66. Utility of Pilot Scale Granular Ac­ tivated Carbon Configuration in Terms Relative to Full-Scale Implementation. N. V. Brodtmann, Jr., W. E. Koffskey, J. DeMarco. 4:15—67. Experiences in Operating a Full Scale Granular Activated Carbon System with On-Site Reactivation. J. DeMarco, R. Miller, C. Cole, D. C. Davis. 4:40—Panel Discussion.

Section Β Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) Symposium on Energy and Environmental Chemistry II. Acid Rain

G. E. Glass, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—68. Acidity and Related Minerals in Precipitation Across Florida: Spatial and Temporal Variations. P. L. Brezonik, C. D. Hendry, E. S. Edgerton. 2:35—69. pH and Alkalinity Changes During Snowmelt in Streams and Lakes of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) and Voyageurs National Park (VNP) of Northern Minnesota. G. E. Glass, L. J. Heinis, L. Anderson, C. Sandberg, J. Use, J. Rogalla, F. Boettcher, T. Roush. 3:00—70. Acid Precipitation Impact As. sessment in Minnesota Derived from Cur­ rent and Historical Data. J. D. Thornton, M. E. Hora, S. A. Heiskary. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—71. Chronology of Atmospheric De­ position of Acid and Metals in New England, Based on the Record in Lake Sediments. S. A. Norton, S. E. Johnston, C. T. Hess, R. B. Davis. 4:10—72. Critique of Methods to Measure Dry Deposition: U.S. EPA Workshop Summary. J. L. Durham, Β. Β. Hicks, M. L. Wesley. 4:40—73. Acid Precipitation: The Interface Between Biologists and Chemists. R. A. Linthurst, Ε. Β. Cowling. THURSDAY MORNING

Atlanta Hilton, Henry Room (2nd floor) General

J. I. Teasley, Presiding 9:00—79. Oxidation of Sulfur Dioxide in Aqueous Ammonium Sulfate Aerosols Containing Manganese as a Catalyst. D. J. Kaplan, D. M. Himmelblau, C. Kanaoka. 9:25—80. Estimation of Octanol/Water Par­ tition Coefficients for Organic Pollutants Using Reverse-Phase HPLC. B. McDuffie. 9:50—81. Fate of T.E.L. in Sea Water. J. W. Robinson, I. A. L. Rhodes, E. Kiesel. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—82. Development and Application of Chemical Actinometers for Solar Irradiance. T. Mill, D. Dublin, J. Davenport. 10:50—83. Negative Chemical Ionization Screening for Toxic Substances in Mother's Milk. J. E. Thean, R. C. Dougherty. 11:15—84. Photolysis of 2,4-6-Trinitrotoluene in Dilute Water Solution: Kinetics and Mechanisms. W. R. Mabey, T. Mill, A. Baraze.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) General L. H. Keith, Presiding 2:00—85. Inorganic Tracers of Petroleum Drilling Fluid Dispersion in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico. R. P. Trocine, J. H. Trefry, D. B. Meyer. 2:25—86. Organic Tracers of Petroleum Drilling Fluid Dispersal in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico. B. A. Weichert, R. H. Pierce, Jr., D. C. Anne, F. I. Saksa. 2:45—87. Potential Impact of Drilling Fluids on the Texas Flower Garden. J. H. Trefry, R. P. Trocine, R. H. Pierce, Jr., B. A. We­ ichert, D. B. Meyer, S. R. Piotrowicz. 3:10—88. Vessel-Related Inputs of Copper to the Coastal Zone. M. Sadoughi, J. H. Trefry. 3:35—89. Particle Size Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in Coke Oven Emissions in the Submicron Range. A. H. Miguel.

P. V. Roberts, Presiding 9:00—74. Performance and Cost of GAC Treatment for Trace Organic Removal. R. A. Hyde, T. Burke, T. F. Zabel. 9:25—75. Economic Comparison of Granular Activated Carbon and Anion Exchange Resin for Trihalomethane Precursor Re­ moval. S. J. Medlar, S. A. Turner, W. Keene. 9:50—76. GAC Treatment Designs and Costs for Controlling Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater. A. F. Hess, P. L. Busch, M. J. Barnes, J. E. Dyksen.

Section Β Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 43) Section C Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-l. FGD Scrubbers and Dry Re­ moval Systems organized by Division of In­ dustrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Environmental Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. {see page 56) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on Oxidative Degradation of Coal

R. E. Winans, Presiding 2:00—7. Oxidations of Illinois No. 6 Coal at and Below 60 C. F. R. Mayo, L. A. Pavelka. 2:30—8. Fourier Transform Infrared Studies of Coal Oxidation. P. C. Painter, C. A. Rhodes. 3:00—9. Thin Section Microscopic Studies of the Diffusion of Oxygen into Coal at Ele­ vated Temperatures. D. Brenner. 3:30—10. Chemical Studies of the Ames Oxydesulfurization Process. T. G. Squires, C G. Venier, L. W. Chang, T. E. Schmidt. 4:00—11. HPLC and Phase Transfer Catalysis in the Analysis of Oxidation Products of Lignite Liquids and Model Compounds. E. S. Olson, B. W. Farnum. Section Β Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 43)

Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-ll. Liquid Phase Reactions organized by Division of Industrial and Engi­ neering Chemistry joint with Divisions of En­ vironmental and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 56)

DIVISION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on the Role of Hydrogen in Coal Chemistry M. Siskin, Presiding

R. C. Neavel, Chairman M. Farcasiu, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

10:10—3. Oxidation .of Coal: A Mechanistic Puzzle. S. K. Chakrabartty. A Novel Method for Controlled Oxidation. Β. Μ. Benjamin, V. F. Raaen. 10:40—4. A Novel Method for Controlled Oxidation. B. M. Benjamin. V. F. Raaen. 11:10—5. The Fate of Sulfur Functions on Oxidation with Peroxytrifluoroacetic Acid. C. G. Venier, T. G. Squires, Y-Y. Chen, J. C. Shei, R. M. Metzler, B. F. Smith. 11:40—6. Evidence for Long Chain Aliphatic Structures in Sporinite Kerogen by Alkaline Potassium Permanganate Oxidation. J. Allen, S. R. Larter.

Section C

FUEL

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Paulding and Douglas Rooms (2nd floor) Symposium on Treatment of Water by Granular Activated Carbon. Design and Economic Factors

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—57. Interactive Effects of Ozone, Sul­ phur Dioxide, and Nitrogen Oxides on Vegetation: Potential Confounding by Acidic Precipitation. J. M. Skelly, B. I. Chevone. 9:50—58. Acidification of Rain in the Pres­ ence of S0 2> H 2 0 2 , 0 3 and HN0 3 . J. L. Durham, J. H. Overton. 10:20—59. Relationships of Chemical Wet Deposition to Precipitation Amount and Meteorological Conditions. G. S. Raynor, J. V. Hayes. 10:45—Intermission.

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

Section Β

Section A

G. E. Glass, Presiding

54

10:15—Intermission. 10:25—77. Trace Organic Chemical Removal from Contaminated Groundwater with Granular Activated Carbon. R. P. O'Brien, D. M. Jordan, W. R. Musser. 10:50—78. Design Considerations for GAC Adsorbers. B. A. Carnes. 11:15—Panel Discussion.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Section Β

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10:55—60. A Mass-Balance Atmospheric Sulfur Model for Florida. E. S. Edgerton, P. L. Brezonik. 11:20—61. Some Evidence for Acid Rain Resulting from HCI Formation During an Expendable Vehicle Launch from Kennedy Space Center. B. C. Madsen.

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on Oxidative Degradation of Coal

R. E. Winans, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Oxidative Fragmentation of Coals. N. C. Deno, K. W. Curry, A. D. Jones, R. D. Minard, T. Potter, W. J. Rakitsky, K. Wagner. 9:40—2. Oxidative Degradation Studies and Modern Concepts of the Formation and Transformation of Organic Constituents of Coals and Sedimentary Rocks. R. Hayatsu, R. E. Winans, R. L. McBeth, R. G. Scott, L. P. Moore.

9:00—12. The Role of Hydrogen in UK Coal Liquefaction. G. O. Davies, D. F. Wil­ liams. 9:40—13. Production of Distillate-Oils from German Coals. I. Romey, F. Friedrich, B. Strobel. 10:15—14. Interactions Between Solvent Components, Molecular Hydrogen and Mineral Matter During Coal Liquefaction. F. J. Derbyshire, P. Varghese, D. D. Whitehurst. 10:50—15. Evaluation of the Donor Ability of Coal Liquefaction Solvents. B. C. Bockrath, R. P. Noceti.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

11:25—16. Radical Pathways of Coal Disso­ lution in Donor Media During Reactions of Coals and Specifically Deuterated Tetralin. J. A. Franz, D. M. Camaioni. Section Β Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 44)

Section C Symposium on Advances in Flue Gas Desulfurization-lll. Thermodynamics and Solid Dissolution organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Environmental Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 56)

9:30—24. Application of On-Line Multidi­ mensional Chromatography to Solvent Refined Coal. J. A. Apffel, T. M. Chen, Η. Μ. McNair. 9:55—25. Coupled Column Chromatography Used for the Analysis of Coal Derived Liq­ uids. E. Katz, K. Ogan. 10:20—26. Characterization of High Boiling Components in Fischer-Tropsch Liquids. F. P. DiSanzo. 10:45—27. Calibration Curve for GPC Anal­ ysis of Asphalts. B. Brule. 11:10—28. Separation and Chemistry of Lignite Derived Preasphaltenes by GPC and NMR. R. J. Baltisberger, K. M. Patel, N. F. Woolsey. 11:40—29. The Use of Microreticular Resin for Separation of Coal Conversion Process Wastewater. J. I. S. Tang, F. K. Kawahara. 12:10—Divisional Luncheon (see Social Events, ticket 19 for details).

Section Β

Section D Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Geo­ chemistry (Probationary) (see page 74)

Symposium on Residuum Upgrading and Coking organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 74)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Section Ε Ε. V. Murphree Award Symposium Honoring G. Alex Mills: Advanced Catalytic Processes for Synthetic Fuels organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 57) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on the Role of Hydrogen in Coal Chemistry

M. Siskin, Presiding 1:30—17. An Isotopic Investigation of the Chemistry of Coal Hydroliquefaction. L. A. Heredy, R. P. Skowronski, J. J. Ratto, I. B. Goldberg. 2:05—18. Model Pathways for Hydrogen Transfer in Coal Liquefaction. P. S. Virk, D. H. Bass, M. J. Garry. 2:40—19. Participation of Hydrogen in the Hydrogenolysis and Hydrogénation of Coal-Related Codel Compounds Catalyzed by Zinc Halides. A. T. Bell, T. J. Fredrick. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—20. Hydrogenolysis of Dilute Solutions of Dibenzyl in Toluene at Coal Liquefaction Conditions. L. W. Vernon, R. Livingston, H. Zeldes. 3:50—21. ESR Study of Bibenzyl During Pyrolysis with and Without Hydrogen. R. Livingston, H. Zeldes, L. W. Vernon. 4:15—Joint Discussion. 4:45—22. Hydrogen-Carbon Monoxide Reactions in Low Rank Coal Liquefaction. C. L. Knudson, W. G. Willson, G. G. Baker. 5:30—Divisional Business Meeting.

Section Β Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Geo­ chemistry (Probationary) (see page 74) Section C Symposium on Advances in Coal Charac­ terization and Allied Topics organized by Division of Analytical Chemistry joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 44) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on Chromatography of Coal Derived Products L. T. Taylor, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—23. Coal Classification by HPLC and Three-Dimensional Detection. E. S. Yeung, M. J. Sepaniak.

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) Symposium on Chromatography of Coal Derived Products L. T. Taylor, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—30. Separation and Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Alkylphenols in Coal Derived Solvents. R. J. Hurtubise, T. W. Allen, A. Hussain, H. F. Silver. 2:05—31. A Comparative Study of HPLC Column Packings for the Separation of Aromatic and Polar Compounds in Fossil Fuel Liquids. A. Matsunaga, S. Kusayanagi. 2:35—32. Reverse Phase Liquid Chromato­ graphic Separation of Coal Liquefaction Solvents. F. P. Burke, R. A. Winschel, T. C. Pochapsky. 3:05—33. A Computer Data Reduction Sys­ tem for Tabulating Data from GC Runs and Correlating Changes in Product Composi­ tion with Process Conditions or Mutageni­ city. L. Raphaelian. 3:35—34. Liquid Chromatographic Class Separation and High Resolution Gas Chro­ matography of Shale Oil Polar Compounds. P. C. Uden, R. J. Crowley, W. F. Joyce, S. Siggia. 4:05—35. Chromatographic Separation of Functional Group Classes from Process Derived Recycle Solvents. G. A. Odoerfer, L. R. Rudnick, D. D. Whitehurst. 4:35—36. Specific Metal Detection in the Size Exclusion Separation of Solvent Re­ fined Coal. D. W. Hausler, L. T. Taylor. Section Β Symposium on Residuum Upgrading and Coking organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 74) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) General

J. W. Larsen, Presiding 9:00—37. Pyrolysis/(GC)2/MS as a Coal Characterization Technique. Β. Μ. Hughs, J. Troost, R. Liotta. 9:30—38. Effects of Calcium Minerals on the Rapid Pyrolysis of a Bituminous Coal. H. D. Franklin, W. A. Peters, J. B. Howard. 10:00—39. An Investigation of Yields and Characteristics of Tars Released During the Thermal Decomposition of Coal. J. D. Freihaut, D. J. Seery. 10:30—40. Coal Conversion in CO/H 2 0 Systems. D. S. Ross, Q..C. Nguyen. 11:00—41. Effect of Preoxidation on Reac­ tivity of Chars in Steam. K. Gomi, Y. Hishinuma.

Section Β Symposium on Production and Conversion of Bioresources to Energy organized by Di­ vision of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 42)

4:10—10. Observation of a Charge Transfer Band in Copper (II)—Fulvic and Humic Acid Solutions. R. L. Wershaw, D. M. McKnight, D. J. Pinckney. 4:40—Concluding Remarks. TUESDAY MORNING

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Geology and Geochemistry of Coal

Atlanta Hilton, Dusseldorf and Libson Rooms (3rd floor) General

F. O. Simon, I. A. Breger, Co-Chairmen F. O. Simon, Presiding

J. W. Larsen, Presiding 2:00—42. A Study of Deactivation and Re­ generation of Catalysts Used in the LCFining of Solvent Refined Coal. C. W. Curtis, J. A. Guin, R. Nalitham. A. Moshin, J. D. Potts, Κ. Ε. Hastings. 2:30—43. The Effects of Catalysts on SCT Liquefaction. M. G. Thomas, T. C. Bickel, B. Granoff. 3:00—44. ^Recent Developments in High Gradient Magnetic Separation for Coal Desulfurization. Y. A. Liu. 3:30—45. Investigation of the High-Temper­ ature Behavior of Coal Ash in Reducing and Oxidizing Atmospheres. G. P. Huffman, F. E. Huggins, G. R. Dunmyre. 4:00—46. Coal Structure Cleavage Mecha­ nisms: Scission of Diphenylmethane and Diphenyl Ether Linkages to Hydroxylated Rings. D. G. McMillen, W. C. Ogier, D. S. Ross.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—11. Geologic Factors in Coal Chemis­ try. J. A. Simon. 10:00—12. Coal Quality Information in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Coal Resources Data System (NCRDS). A. L. Medlin, K. K. Krohn, M. D. Carter. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—13. Natural Combustion of CoalRelease of C0 2 and Other Compounds to the Atmosphere. J. R. Herring. 11:10—14. Peat from the Everglades of Florida: A Study of the Origin of Coal and of Natural Gas. I. A. Breger, M. R. Krasnow, J. C. Chandler. 11:40—15. Mineral Associations of Chalcophile Elements in Illinois Basin Coal Wastes. E. M. Wewerka, J. M. Williams.

Section Β Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 74)

GEOC

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Geology and Geochemistry of Coal I. A. Breger, Presiding

DIVISION OF GEOCHEMISTRY (PROBATIONARY)

2:00—16. Organic/Inorganic Interaction: Its Geochemical Significance in Lignitic Coal Seams. R. N. Miller. 2:30—17. Organic Sulfur in Coal: Relationship to Macérais, Rank, and Depositional Environments. R. Raymond, Jr., T. D. Davies.. 3:00—18. Identification and Geochemical* Significance of Some Aromatic Components of Coal. C. M. White, N. C. Li, M. L. Lee. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—19. Aromatic Structures in Coal Macérai Kerogens and Solvent Extracts. S. Larter, J. Allan. 4:10—20. Solid-State 13C NMR Studies of Coalified Logs: A Revised Concept of the Early Coalification Process. P. G. Hatcher, I. A. Breger, G. E. Maciel. 4:40—Concluding Remarks.

D. S. Montgomery, Chairman T. F. Yen, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Humic Substances in Coals, Soils, and Aquatic Environments

I. A. Breger, M. Schnitzer, CoChairme η I. A. Breger, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Laser Pyrolysis of Humic Materials. W. J. Verzino, N. E. Vanderbough, R. E. Hermes. 9:40—2. Studies of the Origin of Humic Substances Using NMR. P. G. Hatcher, I. A. Breger, G. E. Maciel, L. E. Dennis. 10:10—3. Characterization of Functional Groups in Humic Acids and Fulvic Acids. C. Steelink, M. A. Mikita, R. L. Wershaw. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—4. Molecular Shapes and Weights of Humic and Fulvic Acids. M. Schnitzer. 11:20—5. Calculation of Molecular Weights of Humic Substances from Colligative Data: Application to Aquatic Humus and its Mo­ lecular Size Fractions. J.H. Reuter, Ε. Μ. Perdue.

Section Β Symposium on Chemistry of Enhanced Oil Recovery organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 74)

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room A (Meeting Level) Symposium on Advances in Geochemical Techniques for Oil Exploration

F. P. Miknis, T. F. Yen, Co-Chairmen F. P. Miknis, Presiding

Morris Schnitzer, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—21. Vertical Migration Mechanism in Petroleum Geochemical Exploration. M. J. Davidson. 9:40—22. Organic Geochemistry and Petro­ leum Exploration—Problems? L. C. Price. 10:10—23. Isotope Geochemistry of Shallow Groundwater as an Indication of Active Gas Migration. R. J. Drozd, J. Krushin, H. W. Rauch, D. Newton, D. A. Jeffrey. 10:40—Intermission.

2:00—6. Occurrence of Fulvic and Humic Acids in Uncontaminated Ground Waters. R. L. Malcolm, E. M. Thurman. 2:30—7. Nature and Source of Humic Sub­ stances Isolated from Surface Waters. E. M. Thurman, R. L. Malcolm 3:00—8. Origin and Nature of Humic Sub­ stances in the Waters of the Amazon River Basin. J. A. Leenheer. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—9. Metal Ion Complexation of Isolated Fulvic Acid and Natural Water Samples. J. H. Weber.

I Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN

55

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4. Status reports and re-evaluation of ongoing YCC projects: a. Newsletter. b. Booth at national meetings— development of publicity and recruitment handouts. c. Forum at national meetings— preview of Atlanta forum on "What a Chemist Needs to Know—Other Than Chemistry"; review and potential repeat of Las Vegas "Passages" symposium; development of future symposia. d. Chemical Career Insights counseling programs—report on Chemical Career Insights 1980, identification of 1981 program sites and contacts, revision of the booklet "How To Run a Roadshow." e. Slide-tape career counseling project—review of introductory program, presentation on government careers program. f. Videotape career counseling project. g. Report and evaluation of cooperative education conferences. h. Membership survey. 5. Brainstorming session on new projects and directions.

ATLANTA Tours and Plant Trips Tickets for these events will be on sale only at the Hospitality Center, Atlanta Hilton, Crystal Parlor A. The hours for the center are: Sunday, March 29, 3 PM to 8 PM; Monday through Wednesday, 9 AM to 4 PM; and Thursday, 9 AM to noon. Tickets should be purchased no later than 4 PM the preceding day. Advance purchase is recommended as attendance is limited. SUNDAY, MARCH 29

GP-101. 1 PM to 4 PM. Premeeting minitour of Atlanta. A driving tour with an experienced guide will move up famous Peachtree Street revealing the Fox Theatre, Colony Square, and the Atlanta Memorial Arts Center. Beautiful homes and sweeping lawns highlight a drive through the elegant residential northside. A return to downtown Atlanta and Peachtree Center precedes views of the capitol complex, Atlanta Stadium, the site of Underground Atlanta, urban wall paintings, Georgia State University, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memori102

C&ENFeb. 16, 1981

al, and historic sites in the "Sweet Auburn'' area. A tour of the OMNI complex, including an overview of the Georgia World Congress Center, will end the excursion. Cost: $9.00; limit: 47. Please note that tickets for this tour must be purchased in advance since it precedes on-site registration.

Square, the largest shopping mall in the Southeast. Its 185 tenants include Rich's, Davison's, and Neiman Marcus. The elegant Phipps Plaza is a few blocks away. For lunch, the 25 eating establishments at Lenox should offer adequate choice of price and culinary sophistication. Those wishing to return to the hotel without visiting Lenox Square will be accommodated. Cost: $12; limit: 47.

TUESDAY, MARCH 31

GP-102. 8:30 A M to 12:30 P M . Micromeritics Instrument Corp. Micromeritics manufactures analytical instruments and accessories for particle technology and liquid chromatography. MIC products, sold worldwide, are supported by sales, service, R&D, applications laboratories, and complete manufacturing and production processes all located in Norcross, Ga. Micromeritics' particle technology instruments measure particle size, porosity, absolute density, B.E.T. surface area, and zeta potential. In high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Micromeritics offers a complete product line with state-of-the-art components and systems. The tour will begin with a program on the company's development and current operations in producing and marketing high-precision, technical instruments. Product specialists will conduct slide presentations on both product lines, followed by an informal question and answer session. A guided tour will follow product production from procurement of materials to machine shop, manufacturing, assembly, quality control, and shipping. Highlighting the tour will be a visit to the materials analysis laboratory that provides complete physical characterization of samples submitted by companies throughout the world. Cost: $6.00; limit: 45. GP-103. 10 AM to 3:45 PM. Scenic residential tour and shopping. Old and new Atlanta are enjoyed in beautiful counterpoint. The Swan House is Atlanta's most exquisite architectural expression of early 20th century preference for classicism; its creator has been called "the greatest living classical architect in America." Each room on the tour evokes the mood of a different historical style. The drive through the elegant residential northside will display the Governor's Mansion, which probably will be available for a brief tour. Sights to be enjoyed along Peachtree Street include the Fox Theatre, Colony Square, and the Memorial Arts Center. Visitors can shop at Lenox

GP-104.2 P M to 4:30 PM. Coca-Cola Co. technical center. Coca-Cola is the world's largest manufacturer of soft drinks, the leading producer of citrus juices, and is among the industry leaders in wine production and water desalinization technology. Tour of the company's headquarters in Atlanta includes the recently opened technical center, which houses the quality assurance and R&D laboratories, and the engineering development facility. In addition, the headquarters tower includes a noteworthy exhibit of selections from the company's art collection. No charge, courtesy CocaCola Co.; limit: 25. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1

GP-105. 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM. Antebellum homes. General Sherman, said by some to be the first director of urban renewal, left few antebellum homes in the Atlanta area. After an informative drive to Marietta, suburb north of Atlanta rich in Civil War history, the tour will visit two homes of that period. One of these predates the war and the other was built shortly thereafter. They are both private homes and the owners will meet the tour group. Both homes have been carefully restored and provide a fitting showcase for heirloom antiques, oriental rugs, and other beautiful furnishings. Cost: $12; limit: 47. GP-106. 12:15 P M to 4:45 PM. U.S. Geological Survey, National Water Quality Laboratory. The National Water Quality Laboratory-Atlanta is one of two laboratories providing chemical, physical, and biological analyses in support of the Geological Survey's program of water resource studies. The analyses performed encompass most of the water ecosystem—water, bottom materials, and biological samples. The laboratory operations are automated for highvolume routine analysis; about 500,000 determinations are performed on 4000 samples per year. Such parameters as nutrients, trace metals, and organic pollutants are

determined and phytoplankton and benthic invertebrate microorganisms are identified. More than 1000 different determinations can be performed including organochloride and organophosphorus pesticides, herbicides, volatile organic pollutants, PCB's, PNA's, phenolics, organic carbon, 40 different trace metals, nutrient and anionic parameters, and physical properties. Analysis reports are compiled in a central computer and transferred electronically to national headquarters. USGS scientists and other interested parties can retrieve analysis reports and perform statistical treatments of the data through a network of remote terminals which are a part of this national computer system. Cost: $6.00; limit: 40. GP-107. 4 PM to 8:45 PM. Stone Mountain evening. This 3200-acre park contains a unique blend of war memorial, historic sights, scenic beauty, and recreational facilities. After a short ride with an experienced guide, a visit to Memorial Hall will provide a closeup view and narration on the world's largest sculptured work of art. Visitors may choose to ride an enclosed cable car by the granite carving to the top of the mountain for a breathtaking view of the countryside, or to walk through the plantation, a complex of 19 authentic antebellum buildings. A bluegrass band will provide entertainment while the group enjoys an old-fashioned barbecue at the Lakeside Center. The tour concludes with a ride around Stone Mountain Lake on an authentic paddle wheel riverboat. Jeans or other casual attire is appropriate for this tour. Cost: $22; minimum: 300.

ATLANTA Special Events

ACS Awards Reception and Dinner.

Scheduled on Monday, March 30, a COD reception will begin at 6:30 PM in Salon West and the dinner at 7:30 PM in Ballroom West of the Atlanta Hilton. The general meeting will follow the dinner at 8:30 PM. Additional seating will be available for those wishing to attend only the general meeting at which Herbert C. Brown, 1981 recipient of the Priestley Medal, will speak on "Adventures in Research."

Middle Atlantic Regional Councilors Caucus. The caucus will convene on Tuesday, March 31, from 9 PM to 11 PM, in the Hyatt Regency, Italian Suite. Presidential Symposium. The symposium, entitled "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories," will be held on Tuesday, March 31, at 5:15 PM in the Hyatt Regency, Falcon Ballroom. Presentation: The Voyager Encounter with Saturn—Latest Results. A special presentation organized by the Geochemistry Division and cosponsored by the Chemical Education, Environmental Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, and Analytical Chemistry divisions. Open to the public, it will be held Wednesday, April 1, from 7 PM to 9:15 PM at the Atlanta's Peachtree Center has works of Condor Ballroom, Hyatt Regency. art among hotels, offices, shops Time, topics, and speakers: 7 PM, Rendezvous with a Ringed Giant, ACS Mixer. The mixer will be held on Bradford Smith, University of AriTuesday, March 31, from 9 PM to 11 zona; 7:45 PM, The Atmosphere of PM in the Hyatt Regency, Falcon Titan, Robert Eshleman, Stanford Ballroom. See Social Events, ticket University; 8:15 PM, The Infrared 17. Exploration of Saturn and Its Satellites by Voyager, Rudy Hanel, NASA, ACS Informal Meeting Area/ Rathskeller. Goddard Space Flight Center; 8:45 To promote discussion and supple- PM, Laboratory Simulation Studies ment the ACS Mixer, an informal of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan, Cyril meeting area and "Rathskeller" is Ponnamperuma, University of being provided in Exhibit Hall A of Maryland. the World Congress Center. This informal meeting area will be open from Seminar: Local Section Public Relations 8 AM to 6 PM, Monday through Is More Than Meeting Notices. The Wednesday, with light snacks avail- seminar will be offered on Monday, able on a COD basis. At 4:30 PM each March 30, from 1 PM to 5 PM, in the day the area will be converted into the Hyatt Regency, Phoenix Ballroom. "Rathskeller" with beer, wine, and soft drinks available on a COD Region I Councilors Caucus. The caucus basis. will convene on Tuesday, March 31, from 4:30 PM to 5:15 PM, in the Congressional Science Counselors Cau- Hyatt Regency, Austrian Suite. cus. The caucus will convene on Tuesday, March 31, from 3:30 PM to Region II Councilors Caucus. The caucus 5 PM, in the Atlanta Hilton, Milan will convene on Tuesday, March 31, Room. from 5 PM to 7 PM, in the Hyatt Regency, Italian Suite. Divisional Councilor Caucus. The caucus will convene on Saturday, March 28, Region V Councilors Caucus. The caucus from 3 PM to 5 PM, in the Hyatt Re- will convene on Sunday, March 29, gency, English Suite. from 7 PM to 8:30 PM, in the Hyatt Regency, Lancaster Room C. Divisional Officers Caucus. The caucus will convene on Saturday, March 28, Southeastern Regional Councilors Caufrom 1:30 PM to 5 PM in the Hyatt cus. The caucus will convene on Regency, Tudor Room. Sunday, March 29, from 8 PM to 11 PM in the Hyatt Regency, Tudor Glenn T. Seaborg Address. The Nobelist Room. will address science teachers and students on the "The New Elements" Western Regional Councilors Caucus. on Sunday, March 29, from 2:30 PM The caucus will convene on Sunday, to 4 PM, in the Hyatt Regency, Fal- March 29, from 8 PM to 10 PM, in the con Ballroom. Hyatt Regency, Essex Room B. Feb. 16, 1981 C&EN 103

ATLANTA Preprints

Preprints of the following divisions' technical sessions may be purchased at the entrance to their meeting rooms or ordered by mail. Environmental Chemistry R. B. Pojasek Publications Manager c/o Roy F. Weston Inc., 165 U New Boston St. Woburn, Mass. 01801 (617)933-7851

Vol. 21

Fuel Chemistry Shirley B. Radding Director of Publications Fuel Chemistry Division 2994 Cottonwood Ct. Santa Clara, Calif. 95051 (415) 326-6200 Ext. 2875

Vol. 26 No. 1 $8.00 each

Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry John H. Lupinski Circulation Manager General Electric Co. P.O. Box 8, Bldg. K-1 Schenectady, N.Y. 12301 (518)385-8638

Vol. 44 $10b

Petroleum Chemistry Inc. James W. Bunger Treasurer 320 Browning Bldg. University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (801)581-8627

Vol. 26 No. 1, $8.00 Outside U.S. $9.00

Polymer Chemistry Inc. Frederick Dammont Circulation Manager Division of Polymer Chemistry P.O. Box 20453 Newark, N.J. 07101 (201)482-5744

Vol. 22 No. 1, $10a

No. 1, $7.00a

a Payment with order, b 1. For members of the division and ACS, no charge except $8.00 dues for divisional membership. 2. For affiliate members of the division, not members of ACS, no charge except $10 dues for affiliate membership of the division. 3. For libraries and individuals who are not affiliates or members, $10 per book or $20 per year shipped surface mail. (Airmail shipment will incur additional costs.) Payment with order. Back orders $8.00 per volume through Vol. 43, if available; payment with order.

ATLANTA Employment The National Employment Clearing House (NECH) will be available to members and student affiliates at the national meeting in Atlanta. It will be located in Hall A of the World Congress Center and will be open from 8 104

C&EN Feb. 16, 1981

AM to 5 PM, Monday through regulations on job discrimination in Thursday, March 30 through April 2. employment or we cannot accept Early registration for applicants only them. Employers unable to attend will begin Sunday, March 29, from 3 to and who have an opening(s) may 7 PM. Candidates are urged to submit submit a form for a fee of $25 per forms in advance to the national of- opening (a maximum of $100, refice. If this is not possible, register at gardless of number posted). You will the meeting as early as possible—no be billed following the meeting. Be later than Monday. Interviews are certain that the returned form indischeduled a half-day in advance, and cates you will not be in attendance the majority of registered employers and that all interested candidates do not remain for the entire meeting. should write to you directly. A candidate's records will not be Single copies of the candidates' placed on file to be reviewed by em- records (the summary form) will be ployers until the candidate reports in provided during the meeting at 50 Atlanta and completes all registration cents per copy. Personal résumés of requirements. Request forms for early candidates, if submitted, will be on submission from the ACS Employ- file for review. Copies of résumés may ment Aids Office, 1155—16th St., be obtained at 50 cents per résumé. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Orders for complete sets of candiPlease state that you want forms for dates' reproduced summary forms at the Atlanta meeting, as they differ $50 per set will be taken during the from the year-round clearinghouse meeting from registered employers. forms. Deadline for receipt of com- Orders for complete sets of the sumpleted forms at the national office mary forms from companies not in prior to the meeting is March 9. attendance will be accepted at $100 Both candidates for employment per set for 30 days following the and employer representatives must meeting. be registered and in attendance at the meeting to use NECH facilities. One-day-session tickets are not honored. The meeting registration fee may be waived for an unemployed member who wishes to use NECH. The waiver may be requested in adACS Officers vance or at the meeting. In advance, forward the preregistration form from this issue with your request to the Employment Aids Office. At the Albert C. Zettlemoyer, president meeting, come to the staff office in Robert W. Parry, president-elect NECH at the World Congress James D. D'lanni, immediate pastpresident Center. Employers may register beginning William J. Bailey, chairman, board of directors Monday, March 30, at 8 AM, to review candidates' applications and Raymond P. Mariella, executive director schedule interviews. Employer representatives must agree that no Rodney N. Hader, secretary placement charges will be made and John Κ Crum, deputy executive di­ rector/treasurer that candidates will be advised at the time of first contact the name of the employer, geographical location, and Divisional Officers nature of the position. Position Available postings re- Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. I. E. Liener, chairman; ceived from companies will be ready C. J. Mussinan, secretary-treasur­ for review after 1 PM, Monday, er, c/o International Flavors & March 30, by any person registered Fragrances, Research & Develop­ for the meeting. Copies will be availment, Union Beach, N.J. 07735. able for sale at 50 cents per position. Employers who wish to post a no- Division of Analytical Chemistry. tice of an opening may obtain stanW. E. Shults, chairman; R. F. dard forms in advance from the ACS Hirsch, secretary, Department of Employment Aids Office. A separate Chemistry, Seton Hall University, form should be submitted for each South Orange, N.J. 07079. opening. These may be returned to the national office before the meeting Division of Biological Chemistry. N. O. Kaplan, chairman; R. W. F. (by March 9) or delivered to NECH Hardy, secretary, Du Pont Co. during the meeting. All completed 04470, Wilmington, Del. 19898. forms must comply with all federal

ATLANTA

Division of Carbohydrate Chem­ istry. S. Hanessian, chairman; J. R. Vercellotti, secretary, V-Labs, 215 East Fourth Ave., Covington, La. 70433.