183rd ACS NATIONAL MEETING March 28-April 2 - C&EN Global


and educational concerns of chemists have been scheduled by 28 ACS divisions, eight of the society's committees, and the Macromolecular Secretaria...
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Final Program

183rd ACS NATIONAL MEETING March 28-April 2 Technical Program

45 I Chemical Exposition

107

Registration

94

Tours and Plant Trips

111

Housing

95

Special Events

113

Local Arrangements

96

Preprints

114

Social Events

98

Employment

114

Awards

100

ACS Officers

115

Committee Agenda

102

38

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

The spring meeting of the American Chemical Society will be held in Las Vegas. More than 260 technical sessions reflecting the wide variety of research interests and professional and educational concerns of chemists have been scheduled by 28 ACS divisions, eight of the society's committees, and the Macromolecular Secretariat. Among the sessions will be a symposium on the history of heterogeneous catalysis presented by the History of Chemistry Division and cosponsored by the Petroleum Chemistry and Physical Chemistry divisions. Other sessions will include discussions of acid precipitation sponsored by Environmental Chemistry; career options: academia vs. industry by Younger Chemists; mechanisms of plant resistance to insects by Pesticide Chemistry; teaching chemistry with simulations and games, including a hands-on computer session, by Chemical Education; colloidal properties of clay by Colloid & Surface Chemistry; nuclei far from stability by Nuclear Chemistry & Technology; and government/industry sponsorship of research by Industrial & Engineering Chemistry. A complete listing of all symposia is on the following pages.

Divisions, other groups offer varied technical program Society Committee on Chemical Education Fourth ACS National Student Affiliate Research Symposium (joint) provides unique opportunity for undergraduate students to present papers on their research to a national audience. Joint Board-Council Committee on International Activities Role of science in development symposium probes international science and technology transfer and exchange programs, assesses what U.S. chemists and chemical engineers can and must do. Younger Chemists Committee Symposium on career options, academia vs. industry, focuses on job opportunities for chemists of all degree levels, discusses the importance of short- and long-term goals and expectations from management as they relate to career decisions. Agricultural & Food Chemistry Three major symposia—on Maillard reaction (joint), bioavailability of zinc, and unconventional sources of dietary fiber— feature noted national and international speakers. Analytical Chemistry In addition to three award symposia, major symposia cover surface techniques, contributions of analytical chemistry in health care, developments in x-ray spectrometry, and lasers in analytical chemistry. Carbohydrate Chemistry Symposium details role carbohydrates play in the defense mechanisms plants use to protect themselves from fungal diseases. Other symposia examine the conversion of biomass to alcohol by microorganisms, use of genetic engineering to create microorganisms for converting cellulose to alcohol. Chemical Education Gilbert Newton Lewis symposium features Lewis' two chemist sons and a distinguished group of his students and colleagues. Exhibition/poster/social jamboree links symposium on art and craft of scientific illustration with symposium on teaching chemistry with simulations and games. Chemical Health & Safety Fire toxicity, toxicology safety (joint), and lab waste disposal (joint) symposia provide much new information on these areas for chemists. Chemical Information Herman Skolnik Award symposium features presentations on the role of theory in chemical information systems, on modern

chemical documentation, on classification for chemical sciences, and on information languages for chemistry.

onism of a second histamine receptor (H2). Another symposium discusses new hormones occurring in the brain and gut.

Colloid & Surface Chemistry Nuclear Chemistry & Technology Symposium on colloidal properties of clay j Four-part symposium on nuclei far from covers the role of clays in various industries stability reviews current knowledge of the and scientific disciplines, and clay surface properties of nuclei close to and even bechemistry, neutron and light scattering, yond the limits of nuclear stability. adsorption of ions and organic molecules, Organic Chemistry rheology, and interaction with water. Program features award symposia on physical organic chemistry, synthetic Computers in Chemistry methodology, rearrangements, target oriSymposium on the role of large centralized ented synthesis, asymmetric synthesis. computer facilities in support of research (joint) contrasts their role as opposed to the growing use of smaller dedicated comput- Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry ers in labs. A symposium on computer Symposia dealing with polymer properties, chemical modification of polymers (joint) graphics (joint) treats the range of chemistry composite materials, epoxy resins, and uses of these techniques from instruction inorganic coatings treat important aspects to sophisticated research applications. of applied polymer science. Environmental Chemistry Petroleum Chemistry Symposium on quality assurance for anaCatalysts symposium (joint) examines the lyzing samples from hazardous wastes rerelationship between structure and perviews sample preparation, analytical formance for a variety of supported catamethods, and characterization of waste lysts. Importance of solid-state structures sites. Symposium on acid precipitation is further evident in a symposium on ad(joint) includes meteorological aspects, vances in zeolite chemistry (joint). vegetation, aquatic, and geological effects. Fuel Chemistry Use of coal in fluidized bed combustors and the problems of coal use in conventional boilers caused by minerals are the subjects of a symposium on combustion chemistry (joint). Papers cover current work in Canada, West Germany, Japan, China, the U.K., and the U.S.

Physical Chemistry Symposia focus on three major areas— electron correlation in quantum chemical calculations; gas phase molecular collision processes; and the kinetics and statistical mechanics of condensed phases.

Polymer Chemistry Electroconducting polymers symposium covers synthesis and characterization of History of Chemistry such polymers and is preceded by a tutorial Two symposia are featured: one on eminent chemists from the western U.S., and the j introduction to conducting polymers. other on the history of heterogeneous catalysis (joint). Professional Relations Education for a professional life is the topic of a symposium (joint) exploring career Industrial & Engineering Chemistry development, employment agreements, Highlighting program are symposia on chemical safety, and toxicology. government/industry sponsorship of university research, and TSCA impacts on Small Chemical Businesses society and chemical industry (joint). Symposium on the new tax law will be helpful to small businessmen as well as Inorganic Chemistry others in the chemical profession involved Award addresses by Arthur W. Adamson on with general business principles. excited state photochemistry and Nobel Laureate Roald Hoffmann on the isolobal Macromolecular Secretariat analogy, a bridge between inorganic and Symposium on initiation of polymerization organic chemistry. Hoffmann also will discuss orbital interactions in extended sysand catalytic aspects of polymers, joint with tems as part of a symposium on electronic five divisions, covers initiation reactions of structure and bonding in solids (joint). diolefins, polar vinyl and epoxide monomers; polymeric catalysis systems; and use of the initiation step to design the molecular Medicinal Chemistry architecture of polymers. Symposium summarizes results of work to develop a new drug, cimetidine, for treating Note: These highlights are based on information provided by ulcers and the synthesis of improved drugs j chairmen about their programs to the ACS Meetings & Divisional Activities Department. working by the same mechanism—antag-

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

39

TECHNICAL MEETING SUMMARY 1 1 Presidential Lecture

MONDAY AM | PM

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TUESDAY AM | PM

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Science policy & funding for scientific research (starts Tuesday evening) 45

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WEDNESDAY AM | PM

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THURSDAY AM | PM

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FRIDAY j AM |

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I COMMITTEES Chemical Education

student affiliate research 51

Corporation Associates

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Marketing/R&D interface 64,67

Environmental mprovement

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M^ancaFin environmental sciences & technology 59

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Patents & Related Matters

I intellectual property \ I 54 I I

Role of science in

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28th national technician symposium 45,46

Poster session 46

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Younger Chemists

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DIVISIONS

46

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Workshop on using electronic recorders I 46 I

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^I^^I^I^H

Agricultural & Food Chemistry AGFD

Rec

Bioavailability of zinc 46

Quan

Analytical Chemisty

protein &

nonprotein I interactions

J?ac^PPeCtS ™™\ 4 7

Contribution to progress in health care

Trace metal quantitation 48

1*^*6 reaction in foods & nutrition' 47

|

Unconventional sources of dietary fiber ^ „

Liquid chromatography 48

Electroanalytical & thermal methods 47 I

° S f 2f a 2f? elns from waste 46

| General 46

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Separations 48

General

Chromatography award 49

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Analytical chemistry award

Recent developments in x-ray spectrometry 48

^^-rav^efhod'T I

Lasers in analytical chemistry JA j a '

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State of tho art for chemical educators V: counting molecules

I

51

Role of carbohydrates in biological recognition 50

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General 50

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

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I I 1 Carbohydrates, recognition & agriculture 50

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Biotechnological production of chemicals & fuels 50

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Selected determinations

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environmental

49

Chemical instrumentation award

Spectroscopy 49

Chemistry A safety tor toxicity testing of environmental chemicals 53

40

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Career options: ^jjjmjc^.

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Education for professional Hfe \ 92

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Technician Activities

Carbohydrate Chemistry CARB

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Acid precipitation 59.60,61

International

D,«#«^i««oi Professional Relations

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TSCA impacts on society & chemical industry 67,68

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Risk assessment at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites 45

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I | General I 50 1 MaiHard reaction In foods A nutrition 47

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Bold italic symposia titles have joint sponsorship; "after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue of C&EN. MONDAY AM

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Cellulose Paper & Textile CELL

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WEDNESDAY PM

AM

THURSDAY

PM

AM

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What can science educators leach about ,eachin 9 chemistry 51

I

Scientific illustration 52

Student affiliate research'

Breakthrough lecture 51

Chemical Health & Safety CHAS

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Poster session ι scientific illustration) levenmg) 52

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Poster session (computers) (evening) 52

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Teaching chemistry with simulations A Poster session' I games' (teaching chemistry)] 52 52

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I Safe disposal of laboratory wastes co

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Problems with foreign literature 54

on-line computer demonslra^on „

General 53

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I R&D for full-text searching 54

Herman Skolmk award 54

'^ρΐ^'' 54

'"tuSmdSllT chemist 72

Centralized computer facilities in support of research 58

Useofon-l.ne compute' systems m chemical marketing 54

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Safe disposal of laboratory wastes 53 I

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Chemical Marketing & Economics CM EC

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The chemist & food safety information

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I Research on I vitamins A hormones I 52 I

Fire toxicity

Personal computers \ A microcomputers' \ 54

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58

53

53

General 52

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Academic preparation & industrial careers m chemistry 52

Chemistry A safety for toxicity testing of environmental chemicals'

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Computer graphics—practical aspects

51

I Personal computers A microcomputers I 54

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Poster session 52

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AM

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Gilbert Newton Lewis: 1875-1946 51,52

State of the art for chemical educators: V: counting molecules' 51

FRIDAY PM

Initiation of polymerization A catalytic aspects of polymers 92,93

Chemical Education CHED

Chemical Information CINF

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, , K Methanol as fuel 55

U

Colloid & Surface Chemistry COLL

Evaluation of information 54

Managing SRI international's information services chemical marketing & systems research services I 54 I 54 I

TSCA im 3Cts

P

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on societ

Y * chemiulindustry 67,68

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Methanol as

Marketing chemicals through distributors'

feedstock

55

55

Colloidal properties of clays 55.56.57

General (catalysis) I 58 1

Liguid crystals & ordered fluids 55. 56, 57, 58 Effects of electnc fields on biological growth & repair processes 55

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Multimetaliic catalysts 55

Kendall award 56

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85

early effects of bioanachment 56.57

Structure & dynamics of colloidal dispersions 56,57

Relationship between catalyst structure A reactivity

Molecular processes of solid surfaces electronic structure of surfaces & adsorbates 57, 58

Liquid-solid interface

General (catalysis & related topics) 55,56

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Solid state chemistry A heterogeneous I catalysis' 57.58 I I

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Initiation of polymerization A catalytic aspects of polymers 92,93

General 55

Computers in :hemistry

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Centralized computer facilities in support of research' 58 Personal computers A microcomputers

54

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Computer graphics—practical aspects' 58.59

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:OMP

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General 58

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Teaching chemistry Poster session I ^ulaiions A (teaching chemistry) I games 52 52

witn

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Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

41

Bold italic symposia titles have joint sponsorship; 'after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue of C&EN.

I^^BBBW

I^^MJ

MONDAY

AM

!»hom
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1

PM

TUESDAY

AM

Analytical methods for monitoring hazardous wastes 59

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WEDNESDAY

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Award for advances in environmental sciences & technology 59

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THURSDAY

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FRIDAY

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1

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Analytical methods for monitoring hazardous wastes 60,61

Add precipitation* 59,60,61

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General 59

General 59,60

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EPA's analytical I scheme 6 1 1

Chemistry A safety for toxicity testing of environmental chemicals

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53

Nuorine Chemistry FLUO

Organofluorine compounds in medicine & biology 61

luel Chemistry FUEL

Theoretical aspects of fluorocarbon chemistry 61

Coal gasification 62

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I I Fluoropolymers 61

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Chlorocarbons in the environment 62

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General 62

Oxyfluorides 62

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Combustion chemistry' 62.63

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Processing of o shale, tar sands' 63

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Oil shale retorting 64,67

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I I Geochemistry GEOC

History Of Chemistry

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Geochemical & geomicrobiological problems on oil & gas production 63

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General 64

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Industrial & Engineering Chemistry INDE

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General 63,64

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Geochemistry of I geothermal energy I

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Stories of small \ chemical businesses 92

History of heterogeneous catalysis' 64

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| Research on I vitamins A hormones

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Marketing /RAD interface' 64,67

52

Government/industry sponsorship of university research 67

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TSCA Impacts on society & chemical industry' 67,68

I Processing shale, tar sands (AMAPM) 63

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| Thermodynamic behavior of electolytes in mixed solvents' 64,67 I I I

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Solid state chemistry A heterogeneous I catalysis 57,58 I

Chemical aspects of extractive mining A enhanced ore recovery 68

Gilbert Newton Lewis: 1875-1946 51,52

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Geochemistry of nuclear waste disposal 75,76

Eminent chemists from western US

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Combustion of synthetic fuels 86

Chemical & geological aspects of hydrocarbon migration 63

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Advances in hydrogen manufacture 86

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Oil shale retorting' 64,67

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C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

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E V Murphree award 67

Electrochemical energy conversion & storage 67,68

Chemistry of contemporary I problems award I

Structure, transport & interfacial phenomena in porous media 67,68

Advances in zeolite chemistry 85,86 I

Lubricant effects on fuel economy' 68 I

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Chemical aspects of extractive mining A enhanced ore recovery' I 68

Synthetic A petroleum-based lubricants I

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Bold italic symposia titles have joint sponsorship; 'after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue of C&EN. MONDAY

Inorganic Chemistry INOR

TUESDAY

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Awards 68

WEDNESDAY

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THURSDAY

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Platinum, gold & other chemotherapeutic agents 69

General (metal I complexes) I 70 I

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General (bioinorganic) 72

69

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Poster session (Tues I General (main group evening) 70 1 compounds) 70

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Medicinal Chemlstrv MEDI

New hormones in δΓ3ιη & 9u! 72

Gastric acid secretion 72

Toxicology & risk assessment* 72

Poster session (general) 72

71

Poster session (general) 72

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NOTIS award

fChemistry

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vitamins

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ORGN Organoselenium chemistry in synthesis 76,77

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Total synthesis 77

Physical organic 77

Stereochemistry 77

Main-group metal reagents in synthesis 69

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Synthetic organic

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Spectroscopy 77



^

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Guenther award

80

80

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^

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Creative invention

Heterocyclic chemistry

award

81.82

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Synthesis 80

Organometallics 80,81

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Oxidations 80

Synthesis— carbanions 81

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Photochemistry 80

Main-group metal reagents in synthesis 69

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Cycloadditions 80

General 80

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u n r L

| Micelles, complexes & heterogeneous I reactions 81

Properties of polymers correlation with chemical structure 83

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Epoxy resins 83,84

General; new concepts in applied polymer science 84

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Polymers in energy conservation II polymers in solar energy 90,91

Crown ethers A phase transfer catalysis in polymer chemistry 89.90.91 Initiation of polymerization A catalytic aspects of polymers 92.93

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Natural products 82

Biological organic | Amines, amino acids chemistry 80 & peptides 81

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Chemical modifications of polymers* 82,83

|

^

General 82

Carbanions 81

Polymer additives 82,83,84

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Interracial interactions & properties of composites 82

Inorganic coatings 82



Synthesis—alkaloids| & polycyclic | aromatic I hydrocarbons 81

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Physical organic— carpocations I 77

Sulfur & tellurium compounds 77

^

Laser isotope separation* 76

Garvan medal

chemistry award

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Geochemistry of nuclear waste disposal* 75.76

Synthesis—polyenes | &

76

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Nuclei far from stability ^ π General 75

m

General 75

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75

Organic

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Solid stale chemistry & heterogeneous I catalysis 57,58 I

Awards

Nuclear Chemistry & Technology NUCL

General and solid state 71

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General (solid state) I 72 I

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Information services] Alfred Burger Award A the medicinal symposium chemist* 72 75

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General (organometallic complexes) 71

General (transition I General (organoiron metal complexes) I complexes) 71

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General 72

General (spectroscopy) 71

Advances in zeolite chemistry 85 86

n_n.nir ur9fmc . Coatings & plastics Chemistry

AM.

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General (catalysts) 71

Electronic structure & bonding in solids* 69,70

General (magnetic I General (kinetics studies) 69 I and mechanisms)

_

~1

Inorganic reaction mechanisms 70.71

Main-group metal I General (platinum & reagents in l gold anticancer synthesis' 69 I compounds) 70

Main-group metal reagents in synthesis* 69

^

FRIDAY

PM

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General (Photochemistry) 68,69

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TSCA impacts on society A chemical industry 67.68

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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43

Bold italic symposia titles have joint sponsorship; * after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue of C&EN. | H | W B W j MONDAY I" TUESDAY l^^^^^Bl AM | PM | AM | PM «hl«/5«l. tnemisiry PtST

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Mechan sms of plant resistance to insects M 85

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General (photochemistry & environmental fate)

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General (toxicokinetics)

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84

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Relation between catalyst structure A rMCtivny

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General (fate studies)

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Lubrizol award

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Advances in hydrogen menulecture*

• I

1

II I I I

Combustion of synthetic fuels' 86 Lubricant effects on fuel economy 68 I I

Combustion chemistry

I

SoHd state chemistry A heterogeneous Processing of catalysis shah, tar sands 57,58 \ (AMSPM)

I

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Electron correlation in molecules

Poster session (spectroscopy)

87

Nobel Laureate signature award 87

Langmuir award 87 I

I Poster session I (condensed phase) I 87 I

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Oebye award 88

Molecular collisions: theory & experiment on quantum number dependence 88,89

Poster session I (condensed phase) I 88 I

Thermodynamic behavior of electrolytes in mixed solvents 64.67 I

Polvmer

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Witco award

POLY

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Laser isotope separation

76

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Poster session 90

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l

SCHB

Special topics 92

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Conducting polymers 89,90,91

Professional Relations PRFR

Businesses

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Initiation of polymerization A catalytic aspects of polymers 92,93

| Polymer science & engineering lecture | series 89

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Microdomains in polymer solutions 91

Chemical modification of polymers 82,83

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Small Chemical D .s!!L.Ja.

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"• 9 1

Crown ethers A phase transfer catalysis in polymer chemistry' 89,90,91

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Polymers in energy conservation II: polymers in solar energy'

' Microdomams in polymer solutions 89,90

Rubber RUBB

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History of heterogeneous catalysis 64

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89

Chemistry

Pure chemistry award 88

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63

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62,63

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Education for I professional life' 92

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Initiation of polymerization A catalytic aspects of polymers

Typical errors of companies 92

sma,ler

Opportunities for I chemical I entrepreneurs

92

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I Marketing/RAD interface

New tax law & small chemical businesses

92

Stories of small | chemical I businesses' \

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92

Macromolecular

Secretariat C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

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TSCA impacts on society A chemical industry 67,68

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6467

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chemicals thhugh distributors 55 |

Initiation of polymerization A catalytic aspects of polymers'

92,93

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History of heterogeneous catalysis 64

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Chemical kinetics of combustion' 87,88

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I Synthetic A petroleum-based lubricants' I 86 I

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FRIDAY AM

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Electronic structure A bonding in solids 69,70

Physical Chemistry PHYS

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86

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Chemical kinetics of combustion 87,88

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Oil shale retorting 64,67

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85

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Advances in zeolite chemistry'

85

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THURSDAY | PM

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I Toxicology A risk I assessment 72 I

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Genetic engineering I General (pesticides' synm plants 85 thesis, properties) I

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Chemistry PETR

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Analytical & toxicological significance of pesticide metabolites 84,85

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Petroleum

WEDNESDAY AM | PM

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usv*

183rd NATIONAL MEETING TECHNICAL PROGRAM

2:05—7. Case Histories of Responses to AFTERNOON Hazardous Waste Problem Sites in LouisiSymposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and ana. W. B. De Ville. Chemical Industry: II. Specific Effects on 2:40—8. Methodology for Assessing UnconDomestic Industry organized by Division of trolled Site Problems at the County Level. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with R. A. Young, A. B. Nelson. Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry 3:15'—9. Guidelines for Risk Assessment. R. and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings H. Dreith. and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical 3:50—Question Period. Businesses (see page 67)

WEDNESDAY

PRESIDENTIAL LECTURE Robert W. Parry, President

TUESDAY

EVENING

Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom C (Lobby Level) Science Policy and Funding for Scientific Research R. W. Parry, Presiding 7.00—George Key worth, Science Adviser

Presidential

SOCIETY COMMITTEE ON C H E M I C A L EDUCATION S. Kirschner,

Chairman

THURSDAY

Section B

MORNING

Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: III. Domestic and International Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses (see page 68) THURSDAY

AFTERNOON

Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: IV. Selected Societal Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses (see page 68)

Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 59) TUESDAY

MORNING

ACS Award Symposium for Creative Advances in Environmental Sciences and Technology in Honor of J. G. Calvert and Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 59) TUESDAY

AFTERNOON

Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 60)

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

Fourth ACS National Student Affiliate Research Symposium organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 51)

Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 60)

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Fourth ACS National Student Affiliate Research Symposium organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. {seepage 51)

JOINT B O A R D COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT D. MacDougall, Chairman P. D. Farnham, Secretary

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 60)

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON PATENTS AND RELATED MATTERS W. E. Buting, Chairman P. D. Farnham, Secretary SUNDAY

AFTERNOON

Sands Hotel, Grand Ballroom Symposium on Chemical Invention and the Effect of Recent Patent Legislation organized by the Joint Board-Council Committee on Patents and Related Matters joint with American Institute of Chemists, Inc. G. A. Samuels, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—1. Effect on the Patent Process. B. Collins. 2:30—2. Effect on Patent Enforcement. H. Wegner. 2:50—3. Effect on Inventor's Reward. W. Marcy. 3:20—4. Effect on Universities. R. Ditzel. 3:40—5. Effect on Innovative Incentives. K. Brunings. 4:00—6. Effect of Health and Safety Regulations. F. Rarig. 4:30—Question Period. TUESDAY

MORNING

Symposium on Intellectual Property and Recent Chemical Patent Decisions organized by Division of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision) (see page 54)

FRIDAY MORNING

BOARD COMMITTEE ON CORPORATION ASSOCIATES H. Stange, Chairman

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on the Marketing/R&D Interface organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Small Chemical Businesses {see page 64) WEDNESDAY

MORNING

Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: I. Some General Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses (see page 67)

MONDAY

MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 9 & 10, 2nd Floor Symposium on Risk Assessment at Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Sites F. Long, Presiding 9:00—1. Determining the Impacts on Human Health Attributable to Hazardous Waste Sites. V. N. Houk. 9:35—2. Monitoring Aspects. G. E. Schweitzer. 10:10—3. Coupling Effects, Pollution Monitoring and Population Distribution. B. J. Mason. 10:45—4. Analysis and Risk Assessment: Key to Effective Handling of Hazardous Waste Sites. D. Baeder. 11:20—5. Incorporation of Risk Assessment in RCRA Regulations. G. Dietrich. Section B Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 59) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 9 & 10, 2nd Floor Symposium on Risk Assessment at Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Sites F. Long, Presiding 1:30—6. Hazardous Waste Experiences in New York State. G. A. Carlson.

Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 61)

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS P. Landis, Chairman

JOINT B O A R D COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Symposium on Education for a Professional Life organized by Division of Professional Relations (see page 92)

C. Ponnamperuma, Chairman

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room 21, South Hall Symposium on the Role of Science in Development C. Ponnamperuma, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—1. Projects for Development by the United Nations Development Programme. M. Lees. 3:10—2. Role of American Scientists in Development. F. Seitz. 4:10—3. Role of the U.S. Government in Development. N. Brady.

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES M. H. Campbell, Chairman D. Wonchoba, Secretary MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 13, 2nd Floor 28th National Technician Symposium G. E. Davison, Presiding 9:30—Introductory Remarks. 9:40—1. Magnesia Spray Absorption for the Removal of S0 2 from Lue Gas. L. K. Felker, B. Z. Egan.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

45

10:05—2. A Study of Surfactant Adsorption by Total Carbon Analysis. R. M. Kelly, M. L Gum. 10:25—Intermission. 11:00—Open CTA Meeting. 12:00—Luncheon. 2:00—3. Techniques for the Preparation of Air-sensitive Actinide and Transition Metal Complexes.* K. V. Salazar. 2:25—4. Polymerization of Pu(IV) in Aqueous Nitric Acid Solutions. M. M. Osborne, L. M. Toth. 2:45—Intermission. 3:00—5. Sensitive and Seleptive Detection of Phenols by HPLC Using a Postcolumn Reactor. L. A. Weinstein, J. J. Lauff. 4:00—Closed NCCTA Meeting. * Performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy

TUESDAY MORNING Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 13, 2nd

Floor 28th National Technician Symposium G. E. Davison, Presiding 9:00—6. Hydrosilation of a Gaseous Olefin in a Fixed Bed Reactor, K. W. Hartman. 9:35—7. A Central Data Base System for Gamma Analysis. C. P. McLaughlin. 10:00—Intermission. 10:30—8. Keynote Address, Career Paths Opportunities for Technicians at a National Laboratory. W. D. Shults, J. J. Vost. 11:15—Open NCCTA Meeting 12:00—Luncheon. TUESDAY

YOUNGER CHEMISTS COMMITTEE M. D. Frishberg, Chairman D. L. McNabb, Secretary

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room D-1, East Hall Symposium on Career Options: Academia vs. Industry

J. Zdybak, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—1. Can I Do What I Want in Industry? J. M. King. 2:35—2. Academic vs. Industrial Research: What's in It for You. M. L. Good. 3:05—3. Academia: Challenges in Several Arenas. K. W. Morse. 3:35—4. Academia or Industry?—A MindBody Paradox of Choice. A. Trozzolo.

AGFD

AFTERNOON

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 11, Lobby Level Poster Session—28th National Technician Symposium G. E. Davison, Presiding

DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY

2:00—9. A Review of the Use of the Streaming Mercury Electrode for Measuring Reaction Rates between a Thiol and Aqueous Silver Halide Dispersions. G. J. Brien, D. Neuberger. 2:00—10. A Quality Assurance Program for Gas Chromatographic, Liquid Chromatographic, Ultraviolet and Infrared Analyses. G. Holton, D. F. Holley, B. J. Mitchell. 2:00—11. Silanes, Coupling Agents and Adhesion Promoters. R. Pickwell. 2:00—12. The Review of the E. I. duPont RHYTHM System. J. O. Noble.

A. Pour-El, Chairman C. J. Mussinan, Secretary/ Treasurer

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 13, 2nd Floor A Workshop for Technicians: Utilizing an Electronic Recorder to Enhance User Influence and Ease of Operation in Data Manipulation

F. W. Barney Jr, Coordinator A. H. Sancher, Jr. Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—What is an Electronic Recorder. 9:25—Why an Electronic Recorder. 10:00—Lab Automation. 10:30—History of the VideoChart Recorder—concept to reality. 11:00—1 Hour The VideoChart Recorder. —Features and Capabilities. —Integration—VideoCharts vs Integrators. 1:30—1 Hour Laboratory Applications: —X-Ray —GC —IR —Others 2:30—2 Hours Hands on Demonstration & Familiarization. 4:30—1/2 to 1 hour Discussion—Questions and Answers.

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C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms M-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Bioavailability of Zinc G. E. Inglett, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Experimental Zinc Deficiency in Man. A. S. Prasad. 9:35—2. Zinc Absorption in Human Subjects: Effects of Age, Sex and Food. R. L. Aamodt, W. F. Rumble, R. I. Henkin. 10:05—3. Abnormalities of Zinc Metabolism in Patients with Taste and Smell Dysfunction. R. I. Henkin, W. F. Rumble, R. L. Aamodt. 10:35—4. Utilization of Zinc by Human Subjects. S. J. Ritchey, L. J. Taper. 11:05—5. Zinc Bioavailability from Vegetarian Diets: Influence of Dietary Fiber and Ascorbic Acid. C. Kies. 11:35—6. Effect of Fiber and Oxalic Acid on Zinc Balance of Adult Human Subjects. J. L. Kelsay.

Section B Convention Center, Rooms N-1 & 3, East Hall General A. Pour-El, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9;05—7. Vitamin A (Vit A): Modes and Routes of Administration. E. Seifter, G. Rettura, S. M. Levenson. 9:25—8. Mutagen Formation in a Model Beef Boiling System. R. T. Taylor, E. Fultz, V. Shore. 9:45—9. Lymphopoiesis Due to Ingestion of Desiccated Thymus Glands. E. Seifter, A. barbul, D. Sisto, S. M. Levenson, G. Rettura. 10:05—10. Determination of Nonamphoteric Penicillins in Animal Tissue and Milk Using Thin-Layer and High Performance Liquid Chromatography. W. A. Moats. 10:25—11. Supplemental Arginine (Arg) and Ornithine (Cm) Promote Allograft Rejection. G. Rettura, S. M. Levenson, A. Barbul, E. Seifter.

10:45—12. Oat Constituents Responsible for Behaviour Modification of Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. K. L. Mikolajczak, B. Freedman, C. R. Smith Jr., W. E. Burkholder, B. Zilkowski. 11:05—13. A New Method for In Vitro Measurement of Protein Digestability. S. M. Mozersky, R. A. Panettieri. 11:25—14. Analysis of Carrot (Daucus carota) and Celery (Apium graveolens) for the Presence of Linear Furocoumarins (Psoralens). G. W. Ivie, R. C. Beier, D. L. Holt. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms M-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Bioavailability of Zinc

G. E. Inglett, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—15. Role of Phytate in Zinc Bioavailability and Homeostasis. D. Oberleas. 2:35—16. Dietary Phytate/Zinc Molar Ratio and Zinc Balance in Humans. E. R. Morris, R. Ellis. 3:05—17. Zinc Bioavailability from Processed Soybean Foods, J. W. Erdman Jr., R. M. Forbes. 3:35—18. Zinc Bioavailability from Cerealbased Foods. G. S. Ranhotra, J. A. Gelroth. 4:05—19. Bioavailability of Zinc in Infant Formulas and Cereals. B. G. Shah, B. Belonje. 4:35—20. Zinc Absorption from Composite Meals. W. Frpllch, B. M. Sandstr0m, G. Hallmans. 5:05—Nutrition Subdivision Business Meeting.

Section B Convention Center, Rooms N-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Select Protein and Non-protein Interactions J. P. Cherry, A. Esen, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—21. Polyphenols in Grain Sorghum: Chemistry and Nutritional Adversities of Condensed Tannins. J. N. Neucere. 2:05—22. Effect of Phenolic Compounds on the Quality of Oilseed Protein Products. F. A. Blouin. 2:35—23. Gossypol-Protein Interactions. L. C. Berardi, J. P. Cherry. 3:05—24. Removal of Phenolic Compounds for Improvement of Color and Flavor of Soybean Protein Isolates. C. V. Morr. 3:35—25. Interaction of Off-flavor Compounds with Soy Protein Isolate in Aqueous Systems: Effects of Chain Length, Functional Group and Temperature. J. A. Thissen, L. A. Wilson. 4:05—26. Relationship of Lipid Oxidation Products to Flavor and Proteins. A. J. St. Angelo. 4:35—27. Chemistry of Phytate-Cation Binding. T. J. Jacks, W. J. Evans. 5:05—28. Chemical Nature of the PhytateProtein Complex and its Removal from Soybean Protein Isolates. C. V. Morr. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms M-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Bioavailability of Zinc G. E. Inglett, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—29. Zinc Level of the U.S. Food Supply, 1909-80. S. Welsh, R. Marston. 9:35—30. Effect of Calcium and Phosphorus on the Zinc Balance in Man. H. Spencer, L. Kramer, M. DeBartolo, C. Norris, D. Osis. 10:05—31. Competitive Mineral-Mineral Interactions in the Intestine: Implications for Zinc Absorption in Humans. N. W. Solomons. 10:35—32. Assessment of Bioavailability of Dietary Zinc in Man Using the Stable Isotopes 70 Zn and 67 Zn. J. R. Tur-lund, J. C. King. 11:05—33. Zinc Transport by Isolated, Vascularly Perfused Rat Intestine and Brush Border Vesicles. R. J. Cousins, P. Oestreicher, M. P. Menard. 11:35—34. Stable Isotopes and Dietary Zinc Availability in Adult Humans. M. Janghorbani, N. W. Istfan, V. R. Young.

Section B Convention Center, Rooms N-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Unconventional Sources of Dietary Fiber: Physiological and In-vltro Functional Properties

I. Furda, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—35. What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Seeds as a Source of Dietary Fiber? B. F. Harland, J. P. Harwood, L. Prosky. 9:35—36. Effect of Non-Conventional Dietary Fibers in Colon Carcinogenesis. B. S. Reddy, K. Watanabe. 10:05—37. Leguminous Seed Fiber, its Effects on Carbohydrate Digestion In-vitro and Absorption In-vivo and its Potential Uses in Disease States. D. J. A. Jenkins, R. H. Taylor, T. M. S. Wolever, A. L. Jenkins, M. J. Thome, L. U. Thompson. 10:35—38. Structural Chemistry of Some Cell Wall Polysaccharides from Non-Cereal Sources of Dietary Fibre. G. O. Asplnall, H. K. Fanous, A. K. Sen. 11:05—39. Effects of Legumes and Their Soluble Fibers on Cholesterol-Rich Lipoproteins. J. W. Anderson, W.-J. L. Chen. 11:35—40. Locust Bean Gum in Food Products Fed to Familial Hypercholesterolemic Families. J. H. Zavoral, D. Fields, M. Hansen, P. Hannon, K. Kuba, I. Frantz, D. Jacobs. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms M-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Recovery of Proteins from Wastes

J. Finley, Presiding 2:30—Introductory Remarks. 2:35—41. Recovery of Proteins from Whey. R. R. Zall. 3:05—42. Recovery of Proteins from Oilseed and Cheese Whey by Coprecipitation Using Heat or Polyelectrolytes. L. U. Thompson. 3:35—43. Utilization of Proteins from Bio Mass By-Products. L. D, Satterlee. 4:05—44. Recovery of Egg Solids from Wastewater from Egg-Grading and Breaking Plants. W. A. Moats, J. M. Vandepopuliere, G. M. Battaglia, G. E. Valentine. 4:35—45. Coupled Production of Textured Protein and Biomass from Proteinaceous Waste and Carbamide. C. E. Eriksson. 5:05—Food Biochemistry Subdivision Business Meeting. Section B Convention Center, Rooms N-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Unconventional Sources of Dietary Fiber: Physiological and In-Vftro Functional Properties J. W. Anderson, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—46. Effect of Pectins and Guar Gum on Plasma Lipoproteins and Tissue Lipoprotein Lipase Activity in the Rat. N-G. Asp, H-G. Bauer, P. Nilsson-Ehle, M. Nyman, R. Oste. 2:35—47. Aminopolysaccharides—Their Potential as Dietary Fiber. I. Furda. 3:05—48. Purified Psyllium Seed Fiber, Human Gastro-lntestinal Tract Function and Nutritional Status. C. Kies. 3:35—49. Catabolism of Mucopolysaccharides, Plant Gums and Maillard Products by Human Colonic Bacteroides. A. A. Salyers. 4:05—50. Influence of Chitin and Chitosan on Element Utilization. D. T. Gordon. 4:35—51. Some In-Vitro and In-Vivo Properties of Dietary Fiber from Non-Cereal Sources. P. J. Van Soest, M. Allen, P. Horvath, J. Jeraci, M. McBurney.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms M-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on the Maillard Reaction in Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricutturai and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry

3:40—70. Maillard Reactions and Meat Flavor. M. E. Bailey. 4:05—71. Sensory Properties of Volatile Maillard Reaction Products. S. Fors. 4:30—72. Mechanism Responsible for Warmed-over Flavor in Cooked Meat. A. M. Pearson, J. I. Gray. 5:05—Divisional Business Meeting.

G. R. Waller, M. S. Feather, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—52. Seventy Years of the Maillard Reaction. S. Kawamura. 9:35—53. A New Mechanism of Maillard Reaction Involving Sugar Fragmentation and Free Radical Formation. N. Namiki, T. Hayashi. 10:00—54. Analytical- Use of Fluorescence-Producing Reactions of Lipid- and Carohydrate-Derived Carbonyl Groups with Amine End Groups of Polyamide Powder. W. L. Porter, E. D. Black, A. M. Drolet. 10:25—55. Strecker Degradation Products from [1-13C]-D-Glucose and Glycine. T. Nyhammar, K. Olson, P.-A. Pernemalm. 10:50—56. Chemical Interaction of Amino Compounds and Ribose. Effect of pH, Temperature and Molecular Structure. A. F. Mabrouk. 11:15—57. Nitrite Interactions in -Model Browning Systems. G. F. Russell, T. Shibamoto. 11:40—58. Studies on the Color Development in Stored Plantation White Sugars. H-t. Cheng, W-f. Lin, C-r. Wang. Section B Convention Center, Rooms N-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Unconventional Sources of Dietary Fiber: Physiological and In-Vitro Functional Properties

I. Furda, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—59. Metabolic Processes in Rats as Affected by Dietary Pectin. M. L. W. Chang. 9:35—60. Washed Orange Pulp—//? Vitro Properties. M. A. Porzio, J. R. Blake. 10:05—61. Influence of Pectin on Food Texture and Physiological Functions. R. A. Baker. 10:35—62. Properties of Dietary Fiber Components in Tropical Fruits and Vegetables. E. D. Lund, J. M. Smoot. 11:05—63. Chemistry of Polysaccharides Isolated from Citrus Pectin and Study of their In Vitro Interaction with Human Serum Low Density Lipoproteins. M. M. Baig, J. J. Cerda. 11:35—64. Characterization of Dietary Fiber from Citrus Wastes. S. V. Ting, R. L. Rouseff. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON A

Section

Convention Center, Rooms M-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on the Maillard Reaction in Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry M. S. Feather, S. Kawamura, Presiding 1:30—65. Formation and Decomposition of 1 -amino-1 -deoxy-2-ketoses (amador i Compounds) Ouring the Maillard Reaction. M. S. Feather. 1:55—66. Colored Compounds Formed by the Interaction of Glycine and Xylose. R. O'Reilly, H. E. Nursten. 2:20—Introductory Remarks—Flavors, Tastes and Odors. 2:25—67. Conditions for the Synthesis of Antioxidative Arginine-Xylose Maillard Reaction Products and Preliminary Results of Aroma Evaluation on Clupea harengus. G. R. Waller, R. W. Beckel, B. O. Adeleye, G. Lundgren, H. Lingnert, S. Svensson, C. E. Eriksson. 2:50—68. Variety of Odors Produced in Maillard Model Systems and How they are Influenced by the Reaction Conditions. M. J. Lane, H. E. Nursten. 3:15—69. Characteristics of Some New Aroma Compounds Produced by the Maillard Reaction. E. Dworschak, S. Turos, G. Vigh.

Section B Convention Center, Rooms N-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Unconventional Sources of Dietary Fiber: Physiological arid In-Vitro Functional Properties

C. Kies, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—73. Chemistry of Polysaccharide Resistance to the Human Digestive Process. A. C. Olson, M-c. Chiu, S. E. Fleming, G. M. Gray. 2:35—74. Dietary Fiber—The Properties of Wood Lignins. L. Jurasek, C. Paden, B. A. Pethica, P. Zuman. 3:05—75. Chemical and Physical Properties of Tobacco Fiber. V. D. Sheen, S. J. Sheen. 3:35—76. Influence of Three Dietary Fibers on Selected Nutritional Parameters in Rats. J. J. Sullivan, J. J. Majnarich, B. W. Tucker. 4:05—77. Biphenyl Hydroxylation in Intestinal and Liver Microsomes of Rats Fed Selected Types of Dietary Fiber. J. C. Opdycke, J. C. Street. 4:35—78. Identification of Biodegradation Products from Cyathus stercoreus. T. P. Abbott, C. James. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms M-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on the Maillard Reaction Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry G. R. Waller, H. Lingnert, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks—Food Technological Aspects. 9:05—79. Mailard Technology: Manufacturing Applications in Food Products. J. P. Danehy, B. Wolnak. 9:30—80. Maillard Reaction Products as Indicator Compounds for Optimizing Drying and Storage Conditions. K. Eichner, W. Wolf. 9:55—81. Characterization of Antioxidative Maillard Reaction Products from Histidine and Glucose. G. R. Waller, H. Lingnert, C. E. Eriksson. 10:20—82. Antimicrobial Effects of Maillard Reaction Products. H. Einarsson, B-G. Snygg, C. E. Eriksson. 10:45—83. A Maillard Product with Antioxidant Properties from Protein Hydrolysate and Sugar. C. E. Eriksson. 11:10—Introductory Remarks—Nutritional Aspects. 11:15—84. Effect of Browned and Unbrowned Corn Products on Absorption of Zinc, Iron and Copper in Humans. P. E. Johnson, G.Lykken, 'J. Mahalko, D. Milne, L. Inman, H. H. Sandstead, W. J. Garcia, G. E. Inglett. 11:40—85. Nutritional Value of Foods and Feeds in Relation to Processing Practices. J. E. Knipfel, T. N. McCaig, J. G. McLeod. Section B Convention Center, Rooms N-1 & 3, East Hall General S. Nagy, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—86. Evaluation of a New Peptide (LPhe-e-L-Lys) for Improving Bread Protein Quality. B. Sharif!, C. C. Tsen. 9:25—87. Rhizopous stolonifer Polygalacturonase Activity on Greenhouse Squash. A. Y. Al-Bakir, I. E. Naoum, El-Behadli, A. Al-Heeti. 9:45—88. Mechanism of the Thiol-Cyclopropene Reaction. N. E. Pawlowski, D. R. Titterington.

10:05—89. Pyrolysis of Tropical Vegetable Oils. J. W. Alencar, P. B. Alves, A. A. Craveiro. 10:25—90. Determination of Isoflavones in Soybean Flours, Protein Concentrates and Isolates. A. C. Eldrldge. 10:45—91. Chemical Enhancement and Alteration of Carbohydrate Content in Sweet Sorghum and Other Vegetable Crops. R. E. Leard, J. R. McCowan. 11:05—92. Field Corn Crop Yield Enhancement with Triacontanol, Auxins and Ca + 2 . A. J. Welebir. 11:25—93. Increases in Crop Yields Using 1-Triacontanol Formulations Containing Ca+ 2 and IAA. A. J. Welebir, N. S. Rowan.

ANYL DIVISION OF ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY H. L. Pardue, Chairman R. F. Hirsch, Secretary

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Convention Center Rooms M-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on the Maillard Reaction in Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry M. S. Feather, C. E. Eriksson, Presiding 1:30—94. Effect of the Maillard Browning Reaction on the Nutritional Value of Breads and Pizza Crust. C. C. Tsen, P. R. K. Reddy, S. K. El-Samahy, C. W. Gehrke. 1:55—95. Loss of Available Lysine in Protein in a Model Maillard Reaction System. B. W. Tucker, J. Liston. 2:20—96. Effect of Maillard Reaction Products on Protein and Carbohydrate Digestion and Absorption. R. Oste, M. Jagerstad, I. Bjorck, A. Dahlqvist, B. M. Nair, H. Sjostrom. w/Audience participation. 2:45—Panel Discussion—Food and Nutritional Benefits of Maillard Reaction Products. J. P. Danehy, C. E. Eriksson, M. Namiki, P. E. Johnson, J. E. Knipfel, V. M. Monnier, C. C. Tsen, H. E. Nursten, L. Mester. 6:00—Symposium Social Hour (see Social Events for details).

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms L-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Quantitative Aspects of Surface Techniques

N. Armstrong, Presiding 8:30—1. Quantitative Surface Analysis by Electron Spectroscopy. C. J. Powell. 9:05—2. Quantification of SIMS. G. H. Morrison. 9:40—3. Quantitative Aspects of Surface Analysis by Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy. D. L. Allara. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—4. Electrochemistry at Well-Defined Surfaces. A. T. Hubbard. 11:00—5. Quantitative AES of Metal and Metal Oxide Surfaces—Methods of Data Acquisition and Processing. M. Burrell, R. Kaller, B. Burrow, N. Armstrong. 11:35—6. Electron Microscopy of Surfaces and Interfaces: Towards Single Atom Visualization and Identification. O. L. Krivanek, J. M. Cowley. 12:10—Adjournment. Section B

FRIDAY MORNING Convention Center, Rooms M-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on the Maillard Reaction in Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry joint with Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry G. R. Waller, M. S. Feather, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks—Maillard Reactions In-Vivo. 8:35—97. Determination of Available Lysine by Various Procedures in Mai Hard-Type Products. H. F. Erbersdobler, T. R. Anderson, A. B. Holstein. 9:00—98. Nonenzymatic Browning In Vivo. V. M. Monnier, A. Cerami. 9:25—99. Maillard Reactions of Therapeutic Interest. L. Mester, L Szabados, M. Mester. 9:50—Introductory Remarks—Toxicological Aspects. 9:55—100. Evaluation of Nutritional and Toxicological Effects of Maillard Browned Proteins in Rats. S. J. Pintauro, T-C. Lee, C. O. Chichester. 10:20—101. Mutagens/Carcinogens in Food as Adverse Consequences of Maillard Type Reactions. J. H. Weisburger, Y. Y. Wang, L. L. Vuolo, N. E. Spingarn. 10:45—102. Mutagenic Activity in Fried Meat Products. M. Jagerstad, A. Laser-Reutersward, C. Skjoldebrand, A. Dahlqvist. 11:10—Panel Discussion—Toxicology of Maillard Reaction Products. G. E. Perkins, J. H. Weisburger, M. Jagerstad, G. F. Russell, C. E. Eriksson, T. C. Lee.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Convention Center, Room L-1, East Hall Symposium on Analytical Chemistry: Contribution to Progress in Health Care J. W o o , Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—7. Clinical Chemistry—Medical, Technical and Economic Perspectives. D. C. Cannon. 9:45—8. Multilayer Film Elements for Clinical Analysis: Design and Performance. H. G. Curme. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—9. Liquid Chromatography/Electrochemistry: Application to Determination of Clinically Significant Metabolites and Drugs in Body Fluids. P. T. Kissinger. 11:15—10. High Performance Liquid Chromatography in the Development of 99mTechnetium Radiopharmaceuticals for Skeletal Imaging. W. R. Heineman, E. Deutsch, T. W. Gilbert, J. P. Zodda, K. L. Libson, S. Tanabe, D. L. Ferguson, D. B. Chalk, T. C. Pinkerton. 11:50—Adjournment.

Section C Convention Center, Rooms M-1 & 3, East Hall Electroanalytical and Thermal Methods D. J. Curran, Presiding 8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—11. Pulsed-Laser Induced Photoelectrochemistry. Studies of Submicrosecond Photo-induced Processes at Semiconductor Electrodes. S. P. Perone, J. Richardson, J. Martin, S. Parus. 9:20—12. Comparison of Faradaic Response for Pulse Techniques Applied to Kinetic Systems. J. Osteryoung, M. Lovric, J. J. O'Dea. 9:40—13. Anodic Oxidation of Mercury in the Presence of Chloride Ions in Acetonitrile. M. Wojciechowski, J. Osteryoung. 10:00—14. Instrumentation for AC Voltammetry Based on a Digital Lock-In Amplifier. D. J. Curran, E. D. Kingsley. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—15. Potential of pH Glass Electrode with Varied Inner-to-Outer Electrode Membrane Surface Ratio. K. L. Cheng, H-p. I Chang.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

47

11:00—16. Calcium Ion-Selective Electrodes with Covalently-Bound Organophosphate Sensor Groups. A. T. Ellis, L. Ebdon, G. C. Corfield. 11:20—17. Error Correction in Purity Measurements. P. D. Garn, J. J. Houser, T. F. Habash. 11:40—18. Determination of the Orientations of Aromatic Molecules Adsorbed on Platinum Electrodes: The Influence of Iodide, a Surface-active Anion. M. P. Soriaga, A. T. Hubbard. 12:00—Adjournment. Section D State of the Art Symposium for Chemical Educators V: Counting Molecules—Approaching the Limits of Chemical Analysis organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (seepage 51) Section E Symposium on Chemistry and Safety foi Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety cosponsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 53) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms L-2 & 4, East Hall Liquid Chromatography D. J. Pietrzyk, Presiding 1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—19. Prediction of Retention Times for Phenols in Liquid Chromatography. T. Hanai, J. Hubert. 2:20—20. Ion Interaction Chromatography: Separation of Nitrate-Nitrite and other Inorganic Anions. D. J. Pietrzyk, Z. Iskandarani. 2:40—21. Determination of m-Phenylenediamine at Parts Per Billion Level by Reversed-Phase Ion-Pairing Liquid Chromatography. P. M. Surana. 3:00—22. Analysis of Aromatic Alkyl Substituted Sulfonic Acids by Reverse Phase Ion-Pair Liquid Chromatography. R. J. Crowley, P. L. Valint, Jr. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—23. Analysis of Low Molecular Weight Carboxylic Acids by HPLC with Conductivity Detection. D. L. Manning, M. P. Maskarinec. 4:00—24. Anion Retention in Reversed-Phase HPLC. W. E. Rudzinski, D. Bennett, V. Garcia, T. Haderxhanaj, M. Seymour. 4:20—25. HPLC Analysis of para-Aminotriphenylmethane Compounds of Environmental Importance. S. L. Abidi. 4:40—26. Rapid, Sub-Part Per Billion Quantitation, and Confirmation of 2,4- and 2,6Toluenediamine. R. C. Snyder, W. C. Brumley, C. V. Breder. 5:00—Adjournment. Section B Convention Center, Room L-1, East Hall Symposium on Analytical Chemistry: Contribution to Progress in Health Care J. Woo, Presiding 1:30—27. Differential Urine Protein Analysis Applied to Renal Function Monitoring. J. Woo, M. Floyd, D. C. Cannon. 2:05—28. Homogeneous Enzyme Immunoassays for Haptens and Proteins. J. Y. Chang. 2:40—Intermission. 3:00—29. Computer-Based Pattern Recognition Applied to Effective Utilization of the Clinical Laboratory. J. P. Bretaudiere. 3:35—Panel/Audience Dialogue. Panel to Consist of All Speakers. Section C Convention Center, Rooms M-1 & 3, East Hall Trace Metal Quantitation G. E. Pacey, Presiding 1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—30. Effects of Mineral Acids on ICP Analyses. J. M. Keller, D. R. Heine, C. Riegel. 2:20—31. Determination of Trace Elements in Brines by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. L. A. Powell, R. L. Tease.

48

C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

2:40—32. Determination of Aluminum in Biological Products Containing Aluminum Adjuvants by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. J. C. May, J. J. Progar, R. Chin. 3:00—33. Determination of Trace Metals in Biological Fluids using a New Type of Graphite Electrode. G. J. Patriarche, J. M. Kauffman, A. Laudet. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—34. Effects of Design and Operational Changes in a Constant Temperature Furnace for A.A. F. G. Dewalt, R. Woodriff. 4:00—35. Investigations into Synthetic Modifications of Crown Ethers for Analytical Application. G. E. Pacey, B. P. Bubnis, W. P. Wu, J. L. Steger. 4:20—36. Solvent Extraction Chemistry of Heptavalent Rhenium. D. J. Pruett. 4:40—37. Pre-Analysis Separation of Actinides with a Bifunctional Organophosphorus Solvent Extractant. J. D. Navratil, L. L. Martella. 5:00—Adjournment. Section D State of the Art Symposium for Chemical Educators V: Counting Molecules—Approaching the Limits of Chemical Analysis organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 51)

Section E Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety cosponsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 53) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms L-2 & 4, East Hall Liquid Chromatography T. W. Gilbert, Presiding 8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—38. Some Observations on the Analytical Utility of the Fluorescent Probe Detector System in High Performance Liquid Chromatography. J. M. Patterson III, P. N. Keliher, P. R. Dluzneski. 9:20—39. Characterization of a Multi-channel Fluorescence Detector for HPLC and its Application for the Determination of PAH's in Liquified Coal Samples. C. S. Clow, T. W. Gilbert. 9:40—40. Signal Enhancement of Trace Organometal Compounds Speciated by HPLC-GFAA using Automated Post-Column Treatment with Transition Metal Salts. K. L. Jewett, C. S. Weiss, F. E. Brinckman. 10:00—41. Development of a Repetitive Sampling HPLC Technique for the Preparative Fractionation of Carbohydrate Analogs having Poor TLC Resolution. R. N. Dreyer, A. F. Hadfield, A. C. Sartorelli. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—42. Role of the Solvent in Liquid Chromatography. H. J. Issaq. 11:00—43. HPLC Separations using Totally Aqueous Mobile Phases. R. K. Gilpin. 11:20—44. Application of Chemically Modified Polychlorotrifluoroethylene as a Column Packing Material in Reverse Phase and Ion Exchange HPLC. N. D. Danielson, J. A. Huth, R. W. Siergiej. 11:40—45. Chromatographic Selectivities of Silica, Diamine and Metal Complex Bonded Phase Columns on Disubstituted Benzenes. C. A. Chang, C.-F. Tu. 12:00—Adjournment. Section B Convention Center, Room L-1, East Hall ACS Analytical Chemistry Award Symposium P. T. Kissinger, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—46. Award Address. {ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry sponsored by Fisher Scientific Company). Electrochemistry at Solid Electrodes. R. N. Adams. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—47. Electrochemistry and Stability of Strongly Adsorbed, Amide-Linked and Polymerically Incorporated Catechols on Electrodes and Their Oxidative Catalysis of NADH and Ascorbic Acid. C. Ueda, H. Jaegfeldt, D. C.-H. Tse, G. Johansson, T. Kuwana.

11:00—48. Liquid Chromatography/Electrochemistry After Ten Years: Improved Performance Using Multiple Electrode Transducers. P. T. Kissinger. 11:45—Adjournment. Section C Convention Center, Rooms M-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Recent Developments in X-Ray Spectrometry D. E. Leyden, Presiding 9:00—49. Developments in Instrumental and Applications Techniques in XRF. D. E. Leyden. 9:30—50. Developments in Methods of Sample Preparation. V. E. Buhrke. 10:00—Intermission. 10:30—51. Combined Use of X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffractometry. R. Jenkins. 11:00—52. Developments in Fundamental Software in XRF. B. B. Jablonski. 11:30—Adjournment. Section D State of the Art Symposium for Chemical Educators V: Counting Molecules—Approaching the Limits of Chemical Analysis organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 51)

Section E Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety cosponsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 53) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms L-2 & 4, East Hall Separations (GC, LC, Field Flow Fractionation and Paper Extractions) K. D. Caldwell, Presiding 1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—53. Industrial Oil Spill Identification Procedures at ORNL. J. E. Attrill, H. G. Davis, B. R. Clark, B. M. Eisenhower, J. H. Stewart, Jr. 2:20—54. New Modes of Thermionic Detection of Gas Chromatograph Effluents. P. L. Patterson. 2:40—55. Gas Chromatographic Properties of Mixed High Temperature Nematic Liquid Crystal Phases. G. M. Muschik, J. Haky. 3:00—56. Quantitation of Flecainide Acetate (R-818), A New Antiarrhythmic, in Biological Fluids by Gas Chromatography with Electron Capture Detection. J. D. Johnson, G. L. Carlson, J. M. Fox, A. M. Miller, S. F. Chang, G. J. Conard. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—57. Ghost Peaks, Vacancy Peaks, and Peak Splitting in Reversed-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography: Mechanistic Interpretation and Simulation Based on Nonlinear Interactions. J. J. Stranahan, S. N. Deming. 4:00—58. Probability of Peak Overlap in Complex Chromatograms. J. M. Davis, J. C. Giddings. 4:20—59. Characterization of Biological Materials by Field-Flow Fractionation. K. D. Caldwell, M. N. Myers, J. C. Giddings. 4:40—60. Paper Extraction Technique for Sampling Inorganic Salts on Surfaces. J. D. Sinclair. 5:00—Adjournment. Section B Convention Center, Room L-1, East Hall ACS Analytical Chemistry Award Symposium T. Kuwana, Presiding 1:30—61. Single Liquid Chromatographic Column for the Determination of Catecholamines, Indoleamines, and Related Enzymes. C. L. Blank, M. C. Bulawa.

2:00—62. LCEC Determination of Tryptophan Hydroxylase and Tyrosine Hydroxylase Activities in Rat Brain Regions: Effects of Drug Treatments and Acute Stress. I. N. Mefford, J. D. Barchas. 2:30—63. In Vivo Electrochemistry with Microvoltammetric Electrodes. A. G. Ewing, R. M. Wightman. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—64. A Polarographic p02-pC0 2 Probe. P. A. Malachesky. 3:45—65. Evidence for Water Structure Making in the Inner Part of the Electrical Double Layer. D. M. Mohilner, T. Kakiuchi. 4:15—Adjournment. Section C Convention Center, Rooms M-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Recent Developments in X-Ray Spectrometry D. E. Leyden, Presiding 1:30—66. Developments in Computer Hardware and Software in XRS. J. C. Russ. 2:00—67. Developments in Portable Spectrometers. B. C. Clark. 2:30—Intermission. 3:00—68. Mecuric Iodide Detectors. A. J. Dabrowski. 3:30—69. Applications of Wavelength Dispersive XRF to Low Atomic Number Elements. R. W. Ryon, P. L. Anderson, G. J. Biggs. 4:00—Adjournment. Section D Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety cosponsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 53) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms L-2 & 4, East Hall American Chemical Society Chromatography Award Symposium L. R. Snyder, Presiding 9:00—70. Peak Compression in Liquid Chromatography by Solvent Change— Application in Sampling and Multistage Operation. J. F. K. Huber, C. Fioresi. 9:30—71. Effect of Thermal Conditions on the Efficiency in HPLC. H. Poppe. 10:00—Intermission. 10:30—72. Hold-up Volume and Perturbation in Multicomponent Mobile Phases in HPLC. J.-F. Erard, Cs. Horvath, W. R. Melander. 11:00—73. Dispersion in Packed Beds—Fact and Theory. R. P. W. Scott, E. Katz, K. Ogan. 11:30—74. Current and Future Trends in HPLC Column Technology. R. Eksteen. 12:00—Adjournment. Section B Convention Center, Rooms L-1, East Hall ACS Analytical Chemistry Award Symposium P. T. Kissinger, Presiding 9:00—75. Graphite Intercalation Compounds in Lithium Batteries. P. A. Malachesky. 9:30—76. Sealed Lead-Acid Aircraft Batteries. L. K. W. Ching, Jr. W. M. Hebb, T. M. Larkin, T. A. Lewis, E. T. Seo. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—77. Kinetics of Chlorpromazine Cation Radical Reactions. J. S.Mayausky, R. L. McCreery. 10:45—78. Multisulfur Electron Donors. Electrochemical Synthesis and Characterization. J. Q. Chambers, W. C. Anderson, J. R. Peterson. 11:15—79. Effect of Kinetic vs. Thermodynamic Acidity on the Redox Behavior of Several 9-Hydroxy- and 9-Methoxyfluorenes. C. Nuntnarumit, M. D. Hawley. 11:45—Adjournment. Section C Convention Center, Rooms M-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Lasers in Analytical Chemistry

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

F. E. Lytle,

Presiding

8:55—Introductory Remarks.

9:00—80. Interferometry—Killing Two Birds with One Stone in HPLC. E. S. Yeung, S. D. Woodruff. 9:30—81. Thermo-Optical Elements for Ultra-Trace Detection. J. M. Harris, C. A. Carter, R. A. Leach, M. J. Pelletier. 10:00—82. Laser Intracavity Absorption for Quantitative Analysis. T. D. Harris. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—83. Laser-Enhanced Ionization, Optogalvanic Resonance Detection, and A Laser Intra-Cavity Absorption Detector for Gas Chromatography. R. B. Green, J. E. Gardner, M. A. Nippoldt, J. D. Parli. 11:15—84. Analytical Implications of the Signal Collection Process in Laser Enhanced Ionization. J. C. Travis, G. J. Havrilla, G. C. Turk, P. K- Schenck. 11:45—85. Lasers in Time-Resolved Analytical Atomic Spectroscopy. G. M. Hieftje. 12:15—Adjournment.

Section D Convention Center, Room D-1, East Hall Clinical and Environmental D. W. Fink, Presiding 8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—86. Analytical Methods for Determining the Stability of the Avermectins. D. W. Fink, J. V. Pivnichny. 9:20—87. New Developments in Clinical and Other Health-Related Standard Reference Materials for Quality Assurance Applications. R. Alvarez. 9:40—88. New NBS Environmental Standard Reference Materials Certified for Priority Pollutants. R. Alvarez. 10:00—89. Determination of Gold Levels in Blood of Arthritic Patients by Zeeman Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. S. A. Tytko, S. K. Liska, J. Kerkay, K. H. Pearson. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—90. Analysis of the Photodecomposition of the DT Pesticide Methoxychlor by HPLC and Gc/ms Methods. S. K. Chaudhary, R. H. Mitchell, G. R. Branton, P. R. West. 11:00—91. Development of an Anion Exchange-Liquid Scintillation Procedure for Alpha Detection in Urine. E. R. Hinton, Jr. 11:20—92. Sensitive Analysis of Antimalarials in Blood by Fused-Silica Capillary Gas Chromatography with Nitrogen-Sensitive (N/P) Detection: Applications to the Assessment of Chloroquine Resistance in Strains of Plasmodium Falciparum. F. C. Churchill II, M. A. Staiger. 11:40—93. Combined Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry: GC/MS/MS and LC/MS/MS. D. D. Fetterolf, R. A. Yost. 12:00—Adjournment.

Section E Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety cosponsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry {see page 53) WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

Section B Convention Center, Room L-1, East Hall Mass Spectrometry and X-Ray Methods K. I. Mahan, Presiding 1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—98. Characterization of Polymer Systems by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. S. L. Rose, J. J. DeCorpo, R. J. Colton, J. E. Campaoa. 2:20—99. Development of MS/MS Methods for Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Physiological Fluids and Environmental Samples. S. V. Hummel, R. A. Yost. 2:40—100. Design and Applications of a Combined Field Desorption, Fast Atom Bombardment Ion Source. G. Hansen, D. N. Heller, J. Yergey, R. J. Cotter, C. Fen-selau. 3:00—101. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrom etry of Metal Halides: Elucidation of Cluster Ion Structures. T. M. Barlak, R. J. Colton, J. R. Wyatt, J. J. DeCorpo, J. E. Campana. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—102. Preconcentration Methods for the Analysis of Trace Metals in Natural Waters using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry. A. T. Ellis, D. E. Leyden. 4:00—103. Creating a User Friendly Atomated X-Ray Diffraction System. A. Cisar. 4:20—104. Determination of Uranium in Natural Waters at PPB Levels by Thin-Film X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry After Co-Precipitation with an Iron-Dibenzyldithiocarbamate Carrier Complex. G. S. Caravajal, K. I. Mahan, D. E. Leyden. 4:40—105. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Determination of Major and Trace Elements in Fluvial Sediment after Fusion in Lithium Tetraborate Glass. K. I. Mahan, G. S. Caravajal, D. E. Leyden. 5:20—106. Direct Addition of Fe-55 into the Sample as Source-Sample Excitation System for X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis. J. J. LaBrecque, W. C. Parker, P. A. Rosales. 5:40—Adjournment.

Section C Convention Center, Rooms M-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Lasers in Analytical Chemistry F. E. Lytle, Presiding 1:45—107. Recent Advances in Selectivity for Laser Spectroscopy. J. C. Wright. 2:15—108. Laser-Induced Matrix-Isolation Molecular Fluorometric Characterization of Complex Samples. E. L. Wehry, V. B. Conrad, M. B. Perry, J. R. Maple. 2:45—109. High Selectivity Fluorescence Techniques for Organic Pollutants. G. J. Small, J. M. Hayes, M. J. McGlade, J. Warren. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—110. Analytical Chemistry of the Electronically Excited State by Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy. W. H. Woodruff. 4:00—111. Coherent Raman Spectroscopy Near Zero Frequency. L. A. Carreira. 4:30—112. Study of the Dynamics of Aromatic Molecules in Solution by Picosecond Laser Spectroscopy. M. J. Wirth. 5:00—Adjournment.

Section A

Section D

Convention Center, Rooms L-2 & 4, East Hall American Chemical Society Chromatography Award Symposium C. Horvath, Presiding

Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety cosponsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry (see page 53)

2:00—94. Determination of the Pore Size Distribution, by Exclusion Chromatography, of Ion Exchange Polymers which Swell in Water. Th. Crispin, I. Halasz. 2:30—95. Comparison between Carbon and Silica-based Reverse Phase Packings in HPLC. K. Unger, H. Mueller, P. Roumeliotis. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—96. Different C 18 RP's, their Characterization and Optimization. H. Engelhardt, B. Dreyer. 3:45—97. Award Address, (ACS Award in Chromatography sponsored by SUPELCO, INC.) High Performance Ligand Exchange Chromatography. B. L. Karger. 4:45—Adjournment.

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms L-2 & 4, East Hall American Chemical Society Chromatography Award Symposium R. W. Giese, Presiding

9:00—113. Chromatography of Polypeptides on Chemically-bonded Microparticulate Alkylsilicas: Analysis of Several Factors Influencing Resolution and Solute Recovery. B. Grego, P. G. Stanton, M. T. W. Hearne. 9:30—114. Chromatographic Performance and Selectivity in Ion-pair Liquid Chromatography. B.-A. Persson. 10:00—Intermission. 10:30—115. A Critical Evaluation of the Use of 3 Micron Reversed Phase Columns. N. H. C. Cooke. 11:00—116. Experimental Comparison of Microbore and Open-tubular Capillary HPLC Columns. P. Kucera, W. Ludeking. 11:30—117. A Systematic Study of Column Reproducibility for Liquid Chromatography. J. R. Gant. 12:00—Adjournment.

Section B Convention Center, Room L-1, East Hall Analytical Division Chemical Instrumentation Award Symposium Hoporing H. L. Pardue—Automation and Kinetics

S. N. Deming, Presiding 9:00—118. Automation and Kinetic Methods of Analysis. H. V. Malmstadt. 9:30—119. Academic Research Since Purdue (SP?). S. N. Deming. 10:00—Intermission. 10:30—120. A different Look at the Photochromic Behavior of the Mercury(ll) Dithizonate. A. E. Goodwin, H. A. Mottola. 11:00—121. Evolution of a Laboratory Data Management System in the Pharmaceutical Industry. J. B. Landis, R. A. Johnson, G. R. Dukes. 11:30—122. Application of Microcomputers to Enhance Industrial Research. G. E. Mieling, K. J. Caserta. 12:00—Adjournment. Section C Convention Center, Rooms M-1 & 3, East Hall Spectroscopy J. M. Harris, Presiding 8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—123. Characterization of Ethylmercury Phosphate Adducts with Amino Acids and Ribonuclease by Indirect Detection of Mercury-199 NMR. D. A. Vidusek, M. F. Roberts, G. Bodenhausen. 9:20—124. Edge Monitoring for Enhanced Sensitivity in Thermal Lens Calorimetry. R. A. Leach, J. M. Harris. 9:40—125. Comparison of Instrumental Configurations for Thermal Lens Calorimetric Trace Analysis. C. A. Carter, J. M. Harris. 10:00—126. Detection of the Thermal Lens Effect with a Linear Photodiode Array. K. L. Jansen, J. M. Harris. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—127. Frequency Domain Signal Processing Techniques Applied to Methods of Time Resolved Fluorescence. M. J. Pelletier, J. M. Harris. 11:00—128. Cluster Analyses of Infrared Spectra of Organic Compounds. J. Gruninger, D. Frankel. 11:20—129. N-Dimensional Analytical Chemistry: Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy. D. H. Burns, J. B. Callis, G. D. Christian. 11:40—130. Complex Organic Mixtures Analysis of FTIR Spectra by Chemical Class. J. Gruninger, D. Frankel. 12:00—Adjournment. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms L-2 & 4, East Hall American Chemical Society Chromatography Award Symposium

N. H. C. Cooke, Presiding 2:00—131. Analysis of Nitrogen Bases from Petroleum. G. Guiochon, P. Arpino, J. M. Schmitter. 2:30—132. Chromatographic Fractionations of Mixtures of Oligomers. L. B. Rogers. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—133. RPLC of Nucleotides, Nucleosides and their Bases: Application in Cancer Studies. P. R. Brown.

3:45—134. Simultaneous Selectivity Optimization of Mobile and Stationary Phases in Reverse-Phase Liquid Chromatography by an Interactive Mixture-Design Statistical Technique. J. J. Kirkland, J. L. Glajch, J. G. Charikofsky, J. M. Minor. 4:15—135. High-performance Size Exclusion Chromatography of Synthetic Cationic Polymers. H. G. Barth. 4:45—Adjournment.

Section B Convention Center, Room L-1, East Hall Analytical Division Chemical Instrumentation Award Symposium Honoring H. L. Pardue—Imaging Detectors

S. P. Perone, Presiding 2:00—136. Applications of Vidicon Stopped-Flow Spectroscopy and Recent Developments in Other Flow Methods. D. W. Margerum. 2:30—137. Advantages of Parallel Detection in HPLC. B. G. Willis. 3:00—138. Spectrochemical Measurements Utilizing Photodiode Array Spectrometers. G. Horlick. 3:30—Presentation of Award. 3:45—139. Analysis of Problems as They Are: A New Frontier for Chemical Instrumentation. H. L. Pardue. 4:30—Adjournment.

Section C Convention Center, Rooms M-1 & 3, East Hall Selected Determinations H. V. Drushel, Presiding 1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—140. High Resolution Simultaneous Determination of Sulfur Compounds, Nitrogen Compounds, and Hydrocarbons using Fused Silica Capillary Columns and Element-Selective Detectors. H. V. Drushel. 2:20—141. Determination of Sulfur Compound Types in Naphthas at PPM Levels. H. V. Drushel. 2:40—142. Determination of Alkalinity in Saudi Waters by Autotitration Technique. J. Mee, I. M. Faruq, S. Al-Salem, S. Ahmad. J. L. Pflug, C. L. Hussey, T. B. Sheffler. 3:00—143. Development of a Multidetector Petroleum Oil-Water Monitor. R. W. Melvold, U. Frank. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—144. An Improved Continuous Flow Method for the Determination of Phenol in Water and Wastewater. A. E. Goodwin, J. L. Marton. 4:00—145. Equilibrium and Kinetics Study of the Formation of 12-Molybdophosphate and 12-Molybdosilicate. C. C. Kircher, S. R. Crouch. 4:20—146. Bromanine-N as a New Redox Titrant. N. M. Made Gowda, N. M. Trieff, G. J. Stanton. 4:40—147. Composition Determinations in Room Temperature Chloroaluminate Molten Salts. J. S. Wilkes, J. A. Levisky, J. L. Pflug, C. L. Hussey, T. B. Sheffler. 5:00—Adjournment. FRIDAY MORNING Convention Center, Rooms L-2 & 4, East Hall American Chemical Society Chromatography Award Symposium L. B. Rogers, Presiding 9:00—148. Recent Advances in Field Flow Fractionation. J. C. Giddings. 9:30—149. Regelation Separation. E. Grushka, C. Guttel. 10:00—Intermission. 10:30—150. Release Tags, A New Class of Analytical Reagents. R. W. Giese, R. Joppich-Kuhn. 11:00—151. Degassing of Mobile Phase Mixtures in HPLC. How Much is Too Much? L. R. Snyder. 11:30—Adjournment.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

49

Section A

Section B

Convention Center. Room P-1, East Hall Symposium on the Role of Carbohydrates in Biological Recognition

Symposium on the Maillard Reaction In Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 47)

TUESDAY MORNING

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CARB

V. Ginsberg, Presiding

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DIVISION OF CARBOHYDRATE CHEMISTRY G. D. McGinnis, Chairman D. C. Baker, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

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Section A

Convention Center, Room P-1, East Hall Symposium on the Role of Carbohydrates in Biological Recognition

O. Gabriel, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Glycolipid Antigens of Monoclonal Antibodies with an Apparent Specificity for Human Tumors. V. Ginsberg, J. L. Magnani, M. Brockhaus, L. C. Huang. 9:50—2. Probing of the Combining Sites of Monoclonal Antibodies and Lectins Usfng Synthetic Oligosaccharides. R. U. Lemieux. 10:35—3. Griffonia Simplicifolia l-B4 Isolectin Recognizes a-D-Galactosyl Groups in Animal Glycoproteins. I. J. Goldstein, D. E. Maddox, S. Shibata. 11:20—4. Sexual Agglutination Factors from the Cell Surface of Saccharomyces Kluyveri. J. M. Pierce, C. E. Ballou.

Section B Convention Center, Room P-2, East Hall General R. E. Harmon, Presiding 9:00—5. Studies Toward the Synthesis of Oxyapramycin and Apramycin from Paromamine. W. A. Szarek, O. R. Martin. 9:20—6. Acid-Catalyzed Reaction of Two Deoxy-5-Ketoaldoses. D. E. Kiely, J. W. Talhouk. 9:40—7. A Building-Block Derivative of DGalactosamine and its Incorporation into an Analog of the Terminal Trisaccharide of Blood Group Substance H. M. A. Nashed, L. Anderson. 10:00—Intermission. 10:05—8. Synthesis of a Partially Benzylated Chitobiose Derivative from 4-O-Acetyl3,6-Di-O-Benzyl 2-Deoxy-2-Phthalimidoa-D-Glucopyranosyl Chloride. M. M. El Sadek, C. D. Warren, R. W. Jeanloz. 10:25^-9. Nitrone Cycloadditions: A New Approach to the Synthesis of Amino Sugars. P. DeShong, C. M. Dicken, J. Leginus. 10:45—10. Branch-Chain Sugars. The Reaction of Methyl 2,3-Anhydro-5-o-Benzylr>Ribofuranosides with Diethylaluminum Cyanide. M. Bobek, S. Watnabe. 11:05—11. Synthesis of Pseudo-Antigenic Phytoalexin Elicitors. R. S. Sidhu, R. J. Kaufman. 11:25—12. Characterization of Cellulose Nitrates by NMR Model Compounds Studies. H. M. Bell, M. E. Reeder, C. A. lannaccone.

MONDAY AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room P-1, East Hall Symposium on the Role of Carbohydrates in Biological Recognition Y. C. Lee, Presiding 2:00—13. Mannose Specific Endocytosis of Glycoconjugates by Macrophages: Intracellular Pathways of Ligand Movement. P. Schlesinger, C. Tietze, P. Stahl. 2:45—14. Cell Surface Receptors of Lysomal Enzyme Uptake. G. W. Jourdian. 3:30—15. Endogenous Lectins: Multiple Functions in Developing and Adult Tissues. S. H. Barondes. 4:15—16. Thyroglobulin Biosynthesis and Degradation: Role of Carbohydrate Moieties. L. D. Kohn.

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C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

9:00—17. Bacterial Adhesion and Patterns of Lectin Reactivity. M. J. Heeb, O. Gabriel. 9:45—18. Effect of Glycoside Clustering on the Binding of Carbohydrates by Mammalian Hepatic Lectin Specific for Galactose/N-Acetylgalactosamine. Y. C. Lee, R. R. Townsend, M. R. Hardy, D. T. Connolly, W. R. Bell, J. Lonngren, J. Arnarp, M. Haraldsson, H. Lonn. 10:30—19. Interaction of the Hepatic Asialoglycoprotein Receptor with Synthetic Galactoside Surfaces. P. Weigel. 11:15—20. Analysis of the Sialyloligosaccharide Receptor Determinants of Influenza and Other Animal Viruses. J. C. Paulson, L. D. Cahan, S. M. Carroll, H. H. Higa, G. N. Rogers.

Section B Convention Center, Room P-2, East Hall Symposium on Carbohydrates, Recognition, and Agriculture

R. J. Kaufman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—21. Fungal Chitosan: Biosynthsis and Structure. S. Bartnicki-Garcia, L. L. Davis. 9:55—Intermission. 10:00—22. Cellulose Biosynthesis in Plants and Bacteria. D. P. Delmer, U. Rotschild, N. C. Carpita, A. Bacic, M. Benziman. 11:00—23. Role of Secreted Carbohydrates in Two Plant Cell Recognition Systems: Fertilization and Fungal Infection. A. E. Clarke, J. Hinch, S-L. Mau. TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

Section A Convention Center, Room P-1, East Hall Symposium on Biotechnological Production of Chemicals and Fuels K. Grohmann, Presiding 1:30—32. Aerobic Production of Ethanol from Glucose. A. Fiechter, O. Kappeli, I. Lorences. 1:55—33. Exploring for Microbial Oil. R. Fall, D. Spindler, N. Burris. 2:20—34. Fluidized-Bed Bioreactors Using Zymomonas Mobilis for Ethanol Production. C. D. Scott. 2:45—35. Development of Cellulose-to-AIcohol Process. K. J. Bevernitz, G. H. Emert. 3:10—Coffee Break. 3:40—36. Stability of Hydrogenase and the Mechanisms of its Activation. Y. Berliet,«G. Faugue, J. LeGall, P. Lespinat, P. O. Ljungdahl. 4:05—37. A Stereochemical Model of the Reduction of Acetoin to 2,3-Butanediol. M. Voloch, M. R. Ladisch, V. W. Rodwell, G. T. Tsao.

Section B Symposium on the Maillard Reaction in Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry {see page 47)

AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room P-1, East Hall Symposium on Carbohydrates, Recognition, and Agriculture

R. J. Kaufman, Presiding 2:00—£4. Strategies Employed by Plants in Defense Against Microbes. P. Albersheim. 3:00—Intermission. 3:05—25. Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry, and the Immunization of Plants Against Disease. T. L. Graham, R. S. Sidhu, G. H. Klemm, B. J. Castanbo, R. J. Kaufman. 4:05—26. Rhizobium Cell Surface Polysaccharides and Symbiotic Specificity. W. D. Bauer. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Convention Center, Room P-1, East Hall Symposium on Biotechnological Production of Chemicals and Fuels

R. Villet, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—27. Increasing the Accessibility of Biomass Using Water and High-Pressure Oxygen Pretreatments. G. D. McGinnis, P. N. Meyers, W. W. Wilson. 9:35—28. Development of Recombinant DNA Methodology for the Bacterium Zyniomonas Mobifis. H. W. Stokes, E. L. Delli, D. E. Eveleigh. 10:00—Coffee Break. 10:30—29. Recombinant DNA Technology for Ethanolic Xylose Fermentations. J. Polaina, M. Wiqgs. R. H. Villet, K. Grohmann. 10:55—30. Recent Studies on Biomass Degradation and Fermentation by Selected Fusarium Strains. A. A. Antonopoulos, E. G. Wene. 11:20—31. A Survey of Anaerobic, Thermophilic Microorganisms of Potential Industrial Utility. M. Himmel, L. Leighton, J. Janssens, R. Askeland, K. Grohmann.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room P-1, East Hall General G. D. McGinnis, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—38. Utility of Diethylaminosulfur Trifluoride (DAST) in the Synthesis of Polyfluorinated Carbohydrate Derivatives. R. J. Kaufman, G. H. Klemm, R. S. Sidhu. 9:25—39. Alkyl Glucopyranoside Liquid Crystals. G. A. Jeffrey, S. Bhattacharjee. 9:45—40. Synthesis and High Performance Liquid Chromatography of Maltulose and Cellobiulose. K. B. Hicks, P. E. Pfeffer, E. V. Symanski. 10:05—41. A New Micromethod for Determining the Glycosidic Linkages in Oligosaccharides—A Preliminary Report. K. Nakanishi, H. W. Liu, J. Golik, J. Furukawa. 10:25—Intermission. 10:30—42. Low Molecular Weight Carbohydrates in Tobacco. I. R. Siddiqui, N. Rosa. 10:50—43. Solution Parameters of Hydrolyzed S. salivarius Levan Assessed from Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS). S. S. Stivala, B. A. Khorramian. 11:10—44. Thermal Decomposition of Methyl Glycopyranosides. F. H. Hemgemihle, G. D. McGinnis.

3:15—48. A Novel Capsular Polysaccharide from Klebsiella K39. G. G. S. Dutton, D. Leek. 3:35—49. Conjugated Bile Alcohols in the Bile of Subjects with Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis(CTX). B. Dayal, G, S. Tint, G. Salen. 3:55—50. Trehalose: Sterocomplementary Hydrolytic and Glucosyl Transfer Reactions with a- and /8-D-Glucosyl Fluoride. E. J. Hehre, T. Sawai, C. F. Brewer, M. Nakano, T. Kanda. 4:15—51. Reaction of Carbohydrates with Water and High Pressure Oxygen. G. D. McGinnis, S. Prince, C. R. Mullen. Section B Symposium on the Maillard Reaction In Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 47)

FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room P-1, East Hall General D. C. Baker, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—52. Synthesis of 6-o-Alkyl Guanosine Derivatives. B. L. Gaffney, R. A. Jones. 9:25—53. Approaches to the Synthesis of 4-(D-Ribofuranosyl)-Pyrazole-3-Carboxaldehyde, A C-Nucleoside Precursor. H. S. El Khadem, D. L. Swartz, N. Baggett. 9:45—54. Conformational and Configurational Studies on N-Glycopyranosylamine Derivatives by High Resolution PMR Spectroscopy. L. Wang,-T. S. Lin, A. C. Sartorelli. 10:05—intermission. 10:10—55. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a Series of 5-Substituted Pyrimidine 2',3'-Dideoxyribonucleoside Analogs. Y-S. Gao, T. S. Lin, W. H. Prusoff. 10:30—56. An Efficient Two-Step Synthesis of Novel 15N-Labeled Cyclonucliotide: 2',3'-Anhydro-1-/3-r>Fructofuranosyluracil-15N2-'1'.6'-Diphosphate. R. M. Davidson, S. A. Margolis, B. Coxon. 10:50—57. Ultraviolet Photoelectron Measurements of Nucleoside Ionization Potentials. C. Yu, T. J. O'Donnell, P. R. LeBreton. 11:10—58. Synthesis of 3-MethyM//-Uridine, 3-Methyl-i^-lsocytidine and their 2'-Deoxy Analogs. K. Pankiewicz, A. Matsuda, K. A. Watanabe, J. J. Fox. 11:30—59. Phosphinic Acid and a-Hydroxyphosphonic Acid Analogues of Nucleotides and Carbohydrate Phosphates. B. Mlotkowska, B. Gotlinsky, R. Gandhi, N. Lalinde, B. E. Tropp, R. Engel. Section B Symposium on the Maillard Reaction In Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 47)

CELL

Section B Symposium on the Maillard Reaction in Foods and Nutrition organized by Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 47) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room P-1, East Hall General W. A. Szarek, Presiding 2:00—45. Elimination of Allergy Reactions. S. R. Erlander. 2:20—46. Agricultural Applications of Microbial Polysaccharides. G. T. Colegrove, N. J. lammarino, J. K. Baird. 2:50—47. Biosynthesis of D-Glucosyl Polyisoprenyl Diphosphate in Particulate Preparations of Micrococcus lysodeikticus. T. Yamazaki, D. W. Laske, A. Herscovics, C. D. Warren, R. W. Jeanloz. 3:10—Intermission.

CELLULOSE, PAPER AND TEXTILE DIVISION I. S. Goldstein, Chairman R. D. Gilbert, Secretary-Treasurer

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 92)

Section B

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room A-5, East Hall State of the Art Symposium for Chemical Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization Educators V: Counting Molecules—Apand Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with proaching the Limits of Chemical Analysis Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, organized by Division of Chemical Education, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Analytical ChemPolymer Chemistry, Int., Rubber, Inc. (see istry page 93) J. C. Wright, Presiding WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—8. Counting the Atoms. G. S. Hurst. 9:50—9. Approaching the Limit in Atomic Spectrochemical Analysis. G. M. Hieftje. 11:00—10. Laser Excited Molecular Fluorescence of Solution. F. E. Lytle.

2:45—24. Trace Analysis at the Part-Per Trillion Level Using High Resolution Methods in GC/MS and Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry. M. L. Gross. 3:50—25. Detection Limits in Trace Organic Analysis with Bioanalytical Systems Based Upon Mass Spectrometry. E. C. Horning, D. I. Carroll, J. G. Nowlin, R. N. Stillwell.

Section C Convention Center, Room S-1, East Hall Fourth ACS National Student Affiliate Research Symposium organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Society Committee on Chemical Education Medicinal Chemistry-Biochemistry

Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, B. White, Presiding Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Section C Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. {see Convention Center, Room S-1, East Hall 2:40—26. Synthesis of a Fentanyl Analogue. page 93) C. Lassiter, R. F. Borne. Fourth ACS National Student Affiliate Re3:05—27. Amipaque—A New Contrast Mesearch Symposium organized by Division of dium for Myelography. J. Jaworowicz, C. THURSDAY MORNING Chemical Education V. Alexander, G. Edwards. Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization Analytical-Physical-Medicinal Chemistry 3:20—28. Development of a Radiometric and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized Assay for the Tryptic-like Enzyme in the H. Gotts, Presiding by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Brain. M. E. Beck. Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, 9:00—introductory Remarks. G. A. 3:40—29. High Resolution 1H-NMR Spectral Orgahic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Crosby. Analysis of Novel Carbohydrate-derived Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see 9:10—11. Analysis of River Sediments: Tetrahydropyranones. C. M. Crowder, T. E. page 93) Evaluation of Both the Digestion Procedure Goodwin, R. B. White. and the Trace Meta Determinations by 4:00—30. Synthesis and Evaluation of HisAtomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. G. tamine H2-receptor Antagonists. R. WalS. Caravajal, D. E. Leyden, K. I. Mahan. dron, T. Goodwin, T. Riley. 9:30—12. A Microcomputer-Automated Data 4:20—31. ESR Studies of Bovine Plasma Acquisition and Analysis System for Use in Amine Oxidase and Bovine Liver MonoChromatography. J. L. Hunt, R. L. amine Oxidase. K. T. Tan, K. T. YasuJohnson. nobu. 9:50—13. Post-Column Reactor for the Se4:40—32. Halogenated Prostanoic Acid Delective Determination of Salicylates by rivatives From An Octocoral. P. T. K. Yu, HPLC. S. K. Loh, J. M. Harris, R. A. P. J. Scheuer. Leach. 5:00—33. Influence of Anions on Ferrocyto10:10—14. Drug Analysis by Circular Dichrome c Autoxidation Kinetics. T. L. chroism Spectropolarimetry. M. D. Ivie, J. Carrier, J. P. Harrington. M. Bowen, N. Purdie. 5:30—Student Affiliates Reception (see 10:30—15. Development and Application of DIVISION OF CHEMICAL Social Events for details). an Inexpensive Photoacoustic SpectromEDUCATION, INC. eter. R. J. Krupa, B. D. Pollard. TUESDAY MORNING Section A 10:50—16. Analysis of Tetracyclines in Urine G. A. Crosby, Chairman by Circular Dichroism. N. E. Stacy, J. M. Convention Center, Room A-4, East Hall J. A. Bell, Secretary Bowen, N. Purdie. Symposium on Gilbert Newton Lewis: 11:10—17. Investigations of the Separation J. W. Moore, Program Chairman 1875-1946 organized by Division of Chemical of L Propranolol by HPLC. T. Zieske, D. J. Education, Inc. joint with the Division of HisPietrzyk. 11:30—18. Technique for Photolysis and tory of Chemistry Analysis of Diethylcarbonate-d5. T. J. Lee, R. N. Lewis, D. A. Davenport, SUNDAY AFTERNOON W. E. Farneth. Presiding 11:50—19. Inhibition of Ice Nucleation by Convention Center, Room 4, Lobby Level 9:00—Introductory Remarks. Synthetic Polymers. E. A. Allegretto, G. Teachers Tutorial on Coal Gasification co9:10—34. A Pioneer Spirit From a Pioneer Caple, L. B. Culbertson. Family. R. N. Lewis. sponsored with Division of Fuel Chemistry 12:10—20. Synthesis of New Dialkylamino 9:25—35. Gilbert Newton Lewis: His Influence Derivatives of Haemopyrrole. P. E. Morris, K. S. Vorres, Presiding on My Research and on the Physical-OrJ. M. Beaton. 2:00—1. Origin and Nature of Coal. R. C. ganic Chemists at Berkeley. M. Calvin. Neavel. 10;10—36. G. N. Lewis: The Disciplinary Section D 2:40—2. Chemistry of Coal Gasification. K. Setting. J. W. Servos. S. Vorres. Symposium on Personal Computers and 10:45—37. Gilbert N. Lewis and the Ther3:20—3. Coal Gasification Processes. W. H. Microcomputers In Handling Information ormodynamics of Strong Electrolytes. K. S. Wiser. ganized by Division of Chemical Information Pitzer. 4:00—4. Some Economic Aspects of Coal joint with Division of Computers in Chemistry11:25—38. G. N. Lewis and the Beginnings of Gasification. S. P. Babu. (see page 54) Isotope Chemistry. J. Bigeleisen. 8:00—Social Hour, honoring speakers and guests (see Social Events for details). MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Section B

CHED

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-4, East Hall Symposium on What Can Science Educators Teach Chemists About Teaching Chemistry? J. D. Herron, Presiding 9:00—5. HoW Can Chemists Teach Problem Solving? Suggestions Derived from Studies of Underlying Cognitive Processes. F. Relf. 9:45—Discussion. 10:00—6. How Can Chemists Improve Learning from Textbooks and Journals? W. G. Holliday, A. M. Chastko. 10:45—Discussion. 11:00—7. Improving Learning Through Use of Research. M. B. Rowe. 11:45—Discussion.

Convention Center, Room A-4, East Hall Breakthrough Lecture G. A. Crosby, Presiding 1:30—21. Breakthrough Lecture IV. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Spectroscopy. J. L. Beauchamp. Symposium on What Can Science Educators Teach Chemists About Teaching Chemistry?

J. D. Herron, Presiding 2:45—22. How Can Chemists Use Educational Technology Effectively? J. A, Kulik. 3:30—Discussioi. 3:45—23. Two Competing Theories of Learning: One We Believe In and One We Use. J. W. Rermer. 4:30—General Discussion.

Section B

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Convention Center, Room A-5, East Hall State of the Art Symposium for Chemical Educators V: Counting Molecules—Approaching the Limits of Chemical Analysis organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry

J. C. Wright, Presiding 9:00—39. Improved Detection Limits Through Laser Desorption and Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry. R. G. Cooks, K. L. Busch. 9:50—40. Limits to Sensitivity in Laser Enhanced Ionization. J. C. Travis. 10:40—Intermission. 11:00—41. Mass-Selective Laser Photoionization. R. E. Smalley.

Section C

Convention Center, Room A-5, East Hall State of the Art Symposium for Chemical Educators V: Counting Molecules—Approaching the Limits of Chemical Analysis organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry

Convention Center, Room E-3, East Hall Fourth ACS National Student Affiliate Research Symposium organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Society Committee on Chemical Education Physical-lnorganic-Organic Chemistry

J. C. Wright, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. S. Kirschner.

9:10—42. Kinetic Studies by Stopped Flow. J. T. McDevitt, D. G. Williamson. 9:30—43. Studies of the Influence of LiCI Concentrations on the Viscosity of DMSO-Water Systems. D. Osborne, J. O'Brien. 9:50—44. Radiation Sensitization and Chemical Studies on lsoindole-4,7-Diones, J. A. Vera, S. Burgos, J. W. Castro, P. Guzman, G. A. Infante, J. A. Myers. 10:10—45. Synthesis by S0 2 Extrusion: Photochemical and Thermal Reactions of Cinnamyl Benzyl2 Sulfone. K. S. Prowse, P. L. Wylie. 10:30—46. Propeller Twisted Adenine/Thymine Pairs in the DNA Double Helix in Solution. B. J. Wagner, C. K. Mitra, R. H. Sarma. 10:50—47. Promotion Alkyl-CO MigratoryInsertion with an Organo transition Metal Lewis Acid. W. B. Tolman, A. R. Cutler, S. J. LaCroce, J. R. Markham. 11:10—48. Hydrolysis Kinetics of Some Arsenite Triesters. C. Silva, C. D. Baer. 11:30—49. Synthesis, Characterization, and Chemistry of New Rhodim Complexes with a PN Chelating Ligand. B. J. Johnson, L. H. Pignolet. 11:50—50. Reaction of Organoboranes with Diisobutylaluminum Hydride. A Novel Approach to Alkylaluminums Using Mild Conditions. D. M. Josephs, J. L. Hubbard 12:10—51. Effect of Electron Withdrawing Groups on Carbocation and Free Radical Stability. B. Benage, X. Creary, K. Hilton. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-4, East Hall Symposium on Gilbert Newton Lewis: 1875-1946 organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of The History of Chemistry E. S. Lewis, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—52. Research Style of G. N. Lewis: Acids and Bases. G. T. Seaborg. 2:55—53. Generalized Lewis-Acid-Base Theory; Surprising Recent Developments. L. Brewer. 3:35—Intermission. 3:45—54. Reflections on the Electron Theory of the Chemical Bond: 1900-1925. A. N. Stranges. 4:20—55. Abegg, Lewis, Langmuir and the Octet Rule. W. B. Jensen. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 113). 8:45—56. Award Address. (ACS Award in Chemical Education sponsored by Union Carbide Corporation). In pursuit of New Initiatives. A. J. Harrison. Section B Convention Center, Room A-5, East Hall Fourth ACS National Student Affiliate Research Symposium organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Society Committee on Chemical Education Organic Chemistry

S. Washburn, Presiding 2:00—57. Bis-Cyclononatetraenyl Dianion. B. A. Bucklin, S. Staley. 2:20—58. Aminolyses of Esters of Substituted 2-Hydroxy Pyridines and 2-Hydroxy Bipyridines. C. E. Digby, P. K. Miller, R. M. Propst, III, L. S. Trzupek. 2:40—59. Carbon Isotope Effects for Ethoxide-promoted Dehydrohalogenation of 2Phenyl-1-halopropane-1-14C. J. C. Evans, H. F. Koch, G. Lodder, W. Tumas. 3:00—60. Kinetics and Transition-State Structure of the Hydrazinolysis of Phenyl Acetate. B. Harmon, R. L. Schowen. 3:20—61. Ethyl N-chloro-N-lithiocarbamate. M. R. Macha, H. H. Gibson, Jr. 3:40—62. Determination of Activation Energies of Benzoquinone Epoxidation Using Computer Simulation. E. W. Moomaw, E. M. Hairfield. 4:00—63. Synthesis and Reactivity in the Benzocyclobutene Series. L. A. Viscogliosi, M. R. DeCamp. 4:20—64. Metal-Ammonia Reductions of Aromatic Acids and Esters. D. Wetzel, L. Day, C. Husted, P. Rabideau.

J. Grassle, Presiding

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

51

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4:40—65. Synthesis and Photocyclization of Some Benzils and Corresponding a-Phenylacetophenones. A. S. Atilano, E. I. Becker. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location). 6:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for details). 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A for details).

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WEDNESDAY MORNING

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Section A

Convention Center, Room A-4, East Hall Symposium on Gilbert Newton Lewis: 1875-1946 organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of The History of Chemistry G. A. Crosby, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—66. G. N. Lewis and the Nature of the Chemical Bond. L. Pauling. 9:55—67. Triplet State: A Case History of G. N. Lewis' Research Style. M. Kasha. Perspectives Lecture V organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of The History of Chemistry

J. J. Lagowski, Presiding 11:00—68. Perspectives Lecture V: Highlights of Research on Vitamins and Hormones. K. Folkers.

Section B Convention Center, Room A-5, East Hall Poster Session: General

K. Cohn, Presiding 9:00—69. Males and Females Performance on Piagetian-Type Tasks and College Chemistry. L. Milakofsky, D. S. Bender. 9:00—70. Chemical of the Semester: Clays. V. Thielmann. 9:00—71. Vignettes from Inorganic Qualitative Analysis. P. L. Samuel. 9:00—72. Techniques for Organic Chemistry. K. Cohn, A. A. Russell, P. Perez. 9:00—73. Partition Function Exercise for the Physical Chemistry Lab. J. F. O'Brien. 9:00—74. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules—Part of a Biochemically Oriented Chemistry Major. D. M. Steffenson.

Section C Symposium on Computer Graphics—Practical Aspects organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry {see page 58) WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Convention Center, Room A-4, East Hall Symposium on the Art and Craft of Scientific Illustration D. A. Davenport, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—75. A Chemist/Artist Collaboration for Visualizing Molecular Concepts. R. E. Dickerson, I. Geis. 2:50—76. Representation of the Surfaces of Macromolecules. R. J. Feldmann. 3:30—77. Designing, Illustrating, and Producing Chemistry Texts. N. Patterson, R. Ishikawa, D. Salmon. 4:15—78. Scientific American and the Art of Illustration. D. Flanagan. 4:50—Concluding Remarks. Section B Convention Center, Room A-5, East Hall Symposium on Academic Preparation and Industrial Careers in Chemistry C. A. Clausen, Presiding 2:45—Introductory Remarks. 2:50—79. A Perspective on Academic Preparation and Industrial Careers in Chemistry. C. A. Clausen, III. 3:15—80. What Industry Expects of New Chemists. P. L. Pickard. 3:40—81. Changing Role of the Chemist in the Petrochemical Environment. C. M. Noble. 4:05—82. Why Have Chemical Engineers Become More Valuable to Industry Than Chemists? A. L. McClelland. 4:30—83. What Kind of Chemical Engineering Should B.S. Chemists Know? O. L. Hollis. 4:55—Concluding Remarks.

52

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

Section C Symposium on Computer Graphics—Practical Aspects organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry (see page 58)

WEDNESDAY EVENING Preamble to Skeleton Abstracts for Poster Session on The Art and Craft of Scientific Illustration: Metaphors Made Visible D. A. Davenport, Presiding Chemists are amongst the most pictorially minded of scientists. Not for them, the ndimensional space of the mathematician or the strange concepts of the nuclear physicists which in spite of their charm and colour are far from palpable. From Dalton on, chemists' imaginations have bodied forth the forms and shapes of things unseen. Illustrators, publishers and teachers are contributing to this poster session/exhibit in an attempt to set forth examples of a necessary craft which now and then rises to the level of art. Section A Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level Poster Session/Social Hour: The Art and Craft of Scientific Illustration: Metaphors Made Visible 6:00—84. A Chemist/Artist Collaboration for Visualizing Molecular Concepts. R. E. Dickerson, I. Geis. 6:00—85. Representation of the Surfaces of Macromolecules. R. J. Feldman. 6:00—86. Making and Illustrating of Chemistry Texts. D. Salmon, R. Ishikawa, N. Patterson. 6:00—87. Some Illustrations for Pauling and Hayward's Architecture of Molecules. N. Patterson. 6:00—88. Stereochemical Illustrations in the Scientific Literature. O. B. Ramsay. 6:00—89. Projection Templates for Teaching Chemical Instrumentation. J. P. Walters. 6:00—90. Computer-Generated Graphics for Textbook Illustrations. J. W. Moore, W. G. Davies. 6:00—91. From Author's Concept to Final Illustration. A. Vinnicombe. 6:00—92. Making of Graven Images. C. W. Mills. 6:00—93. What is the Use of a Book Without Pictures or Conversations? M. Wasserman. 6:00—94. Pictures for an Exhibition. J. Carey. 6:00—95. Look Here Upon This Picture. P. Hagopian. 6:00—96. Pictures for the Page Atone. H. Pantzis. 6:00—97. As Imagination Bodies Forth. G. W. Payne. 6:00—98. Of Imagination All Compact. B. Perry. 6:00—99. Gentle Art of Selling Textbooks. J. Vondeling. 6:00—100. Chemists in Caricature. W. B. Jensen, D. A. Davenport. 6:00—101. Last Annual Chemical Template Art Competition. D. A. Davenport. Section B Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level Poster Session—Symposium on Computers and Microcomputers—Hands On! J. W. Moore, Presiding 6:00—102. Computers and Microcomputers—Hands On! J. W. Moore. 6:00—103. Instrumental Methods and Computer Graphics. D. D. Gilbert. 6:00—104. Teaching Digital Filtering Techniques via Microcomputer Simulation. G. S. Owen. 6:00—105. Microcomputer as a Physical Chemistry Playground. G. M. Barrow. 6:00—106. Integration of Rate Equation Systems, in Pascal for Apple Computer. J. P. Chesick. 6:00—107. Teaching Organic Chemistry with a Microcomputer. S. Smith. 6:00—108. Simulations for Introductory Chemistry—Lecture and Laboratory. R. E. Snelling, R. D. Koehn, J. I. Gelder. 6:00—109. Computer Simulation of Rutherford's Alpha-Particle Scattering Experiment. R. C. Rittenhouse. 6:00—110. Development of CAI Materials for Microcomputers. J. Harrison, W. Butler. 6:00—111. Simulations for Demonstration and Study. G. E. Palmer.

6:00—112. ORPET—Drawing and Rotating Three-Dimensional Structures on a Microcomputer. P. F. Schatz. 6:00—113. Microcomputer Programs for Physical Chemistry. J. A. Spencer. 6:00—114. Nuclear Casino—Using Computer Games to Teach Basic Concepts in Chemistry. R. D. Bishop. 6:00—115. Computer-Simulated Experiments—Tool or Tutorial? J. J. Lagowski, J. P. Suits. 6:00—116. Simulations in the Environmental Technology Laboratory. P. C. Flath. 6:00—117. Laboratory Simulations and Chemical Gaming with the TRS-80 Microcomputer. J. P. Birk, J. Foster. 6:00—118. "Metabolic Cyclist" A Computer Game of Metabolic Pathways. S. Zimmerman.

9:45—135. Simulations of Social Issues in Chemistry. D. H. White. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—136. Apple-Based Studies in Physical Chemistry. G. M. Barrow. 11:00—137. Programming as a Problem Solving Activity in an Instrumental Analysis Course. J. P. Walters. 11:30—138. Decision Making in ComputerSimulated Experiments. J. J. Lagowski, J. P. Suits.

THURSDAY MORNING

Symposium on Safe Disposal of Laboratory Wastes organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety {see page 53)

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-4, East Hall Symposium on the Art and Craft of Scientific Illustration J. DeKorte, Presiding 9:00—119. Chemical Illustration Before 1800. D. A. Katz. 9:30—120. Illustration and the Introductory Chemistry Text: 1800-1960. W. B. Jensen. 10:00—121. Art of Chemical Simplication and Vice Versa: How Far to Go? A. E. Grosser, D. Ariol. 10:20—Intermission. General

J. DeKorte, Presiding 10:30—122. Box-and-Whisker Plots. R. D. Larsen. 10:50—123. Spatial Visualization Testing to Identify Students Who May Have Trouble with Stereochemistry. D. H. White, R. J. Pfeiffer, E. Lampkin. 11:10—124. State of the Art of Computer Applications in High School Chemistry. M. L. James. 11:30—125. Introduction of a New Stereochemistry Term: Quadri-variant Tetrahedral (QVT) Center. R. Starkey.

Section B Convention Center, Room A-5, East Hall Symposium on Academic Preparation and Industrial Careers in Chemistry

G. Mattson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—126. What Should be Taught in an Industrial Chemistry Course. G. Mattson. 9:30—127. Industrial Chemistry—It's Fall and Rise in American and European Universities. D. K. Bates, A. B. Ponter. 9:55—128. Percolation of Industrial Chemistry Concepts Throughout the B.S. Curriculum. T. C. Ichniowski. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—129. Teaching Business to Chemistry Majors. P. J. Chenier. 10:55—130. Are Physical Chemistry Courses Doing All They Could to Prepare Students for Industrial Chemistry Careers. P. S. Lamprey. 11:20—131. An Industrially Oriented Organic Chemistry Course. G. B. Lucas. 11:45—132. Attaining the Expertise to Teach Industrial Chemistry. E. N. Losey.

Section C Convention Center, Room D-1, East Hall Symposium on Teaching Chemistry with Simulations and Games organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Computers in Chemistry J. W. Moore, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:45—133. Teaching Chemistry with a Microcomputer. S. Smith. 9:15—134. Experiences in the Development and Distribution of Computer Based Educational Materials for Chemical Engineering. D. M. Himmelblau.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Section D Symposium on Computer Graphics—Practical Aspects organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry {see page 58) Section E

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-4, East Hall General A. Russell,

Presiding

2:00—139. Use of Simplified Effective Nuclear Charge in General Chemistry Courses. J. R. Blackburn. 2:20—140. Treatment of Key Industrial Organic Reactions in Organic Textbooks. K. E. Kolb, D. K. Kolb. 2:40—141. Use and Evaluation of Videodisc Technology in the Chemistry Laboratory. A. A. Russell, M. G. Staskun. 3:00—142. Role and Content of a Sophomore Level Inorganic Chemistry Course at Northern Arizona University. J. M. DeKorte. 3:20—143. Chemistry at the Air Force Academy: A View From the Inside and the Outside. H. W. Schiller, M. L. Druelinger. 3:40—144. An Analysis of Chemistry in the Professional Pharmacy Curriculum of the University of the Pacific, 1955-1982. A. J. Matuszak. Section B Convention Center, Room A-5, East Hall Symposium on Academic Preparation and Industrial Careers in Chemistry B. J. Luberoff, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—145. Experiences of a Beginning Chemist. D. L. McNabb. 2:30—146. Role That Co-op Plays in Preparing Chemists for Industrial Careers. R. W. Ridgway. 2:55—147. Who Says You Can't Be Creative?! J. T. Arrigo. 3:20—148. Industrial Surveys and Polymer Chemistry. C. G. Gebelein, S. W. Shalaby, K. N. Edwards. 3:45—Intermission. 3:55—149. Preparation for Industrial Chemistry Careers—One Approach. K. E. Kolb, M. A. Taylor. 4:20—150. An Industrial Chemistry Model Program for Colleges in a Chemical Industries Setting. J. F. Bieron. 4:45—151. Compleat Chymist. B. J. Luberoff. 5:10—Concluding Remarks. Section C Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level Poster Session—Symposium on Teaching Chemistry with Simulations and Games organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. joint with Division of Computers in Chemistry J. W. Moore, Presiding 2:00—152. Instrumental Methods and Computer Graphics. D. D. Gilbert. 2:00—153. Teaching Digital Filtering Techniques via Microcomputer Simulation. G. S. Owen. 2:00—154. Integration of Rate Equation Systems, in Pascal for Apple Computer. J. P. Chesick. 2:00—155. Simulations for Introductory Chemistry—Lecture and Laboratory. R. E. Snelling, R. D. Koehn, J. I. Gelder.

2:00—156. Iodide Oxidation and Equilibrium Reactions. L. M; Julien, R. Wigent, A. R. Barko, D. L. Hunter, R. D. Hunter, R. H. Hurt; D. R. Tighe. 2:00—157. Development of CAI Materials for Microcomputers. J. Harrison, W. Butler. 2:00—158. ORPET—Drawing and Rotating Three-Dimensional Structures on a Microcomputer. P. F. Schatz. 2:00—159. Nuclear Casino—Using Computer Games to Teach Basic Concepts in Chemistry. R. D. Bishop. 2:00—160. Simulations in the Environmental Technology Laboratory. P. C. Flath. 2:00—161. Examples and Discussion of Programming as a Problem Solving Activity in an Instrumental Analysis Course. J. P. Walters. 2:00—162. KISS—Kinetic Investigation Simulation System. W. T. Wlpke, D. P. Dolata. 2:00—163. Computer Simulation in Physical Chemistry. J. W. Schilling. 3:30—164. Simulations in the Physical Methods Laboratory. H. M. Bell. 3:30—165. Microcomputer as a Physical Chemistry Playground. G. M. Barrow. 3:30—166. Teaching Organic Chemistry with a Microcomputer. S. G. Smith. 3:30—167. Computer Simulated Organic Qualitative Analysis. L. D. Wescott, Jr. 3:30—168. Computer Simulation of Rutherford's Alpha-Particle Scattering Experiment. R. C. Rittenhouse. 3:30—169. Simulations for Demonstration and Study. G. E. Palmer. 3:30—170. Microcomputer Programs for Physical Chemistry. J. A. Spencer. 3:30—171. Computer-Simulated Experiments—Tool or Tutorial? J. J. Lagowski, J. P. Suits. 3:30—172. Laboratory Simulations and Chemical Gaming with the TRS-80 Microcomputer. J. P. Birk, J. Foster. 3:30—173. Design-A-Drug. A Medicinal Chemistry Microcomputer Game. J. L. Melsenheimer. 3:30—174. Chemical Game Analogues of Popular Commercial Games. J. R. Blackburn, F. L. Wiseman, A. F. Cornett, D. S. Crawley, R. E. Matson, P. A. Satchwell. 3:30—175. "Metabolic Cyclist" A Computer Game of Metabolic Pathways. S. Zimmerman.

Section D Symposium on Computer Graphics—Practical Aspects organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry (see page 59)

Section E Symposium on Safe Disposal of Laboratory Wastes organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety (see page 53)

CHAS DIVISION OF CHEMICAL HEALTH AND SAFETY M. M. Renfrew, Chairman D. B v Walters, Secretary

9:05—1. An Overview of Analytical Chemistry Requirements for Toxicity Testing. C. W. Jameson. 9:35—2. Structure-Activity Prediction of the Carcinogenicity Chemicals. C. T. Helmes, C. C. Sigman, P. A.Sullivan. 9:55—3. Problems of Testing Commercial Grade Chemicals. E. J. Woodhouse, E. A. Murrill, K. M. Stelting, R. D. Brown, C. W. Jameson. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—4. Data Evaluation and Management. S. S. Olin. 10:50—5. Inventory Management and Data Storage for Chemicals Used In Coded Toxicity Testing. D. R. Boline, L. H. Keith, D. B. Walters. 11:10—6. Effect of GLP's on Chemistry Requirements for Toxicity Testing. C. K. Greishaber, C. E. Whitmire.

Section B Convention Center, Conference Rooms 7 & 8, 2nd Floor Symposium on Fire Toxicity J. A. Young, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—7. Studies on Combustion Product Toxicity of Both Natural and Synthetic Materials. B. C. Levin. 10:00—8. Laboratory Predictions of Combustion Products, Toxicity of Douglas Fir. I.- N. Einhorn, M. L. Grunnet. 11:00—9. Physiological and Pathological Response in Laboratory Animals to the Thermal Decomposition and Combustion Products of Douglas Fir. M. L. Grunnet, I.N. Einhorn. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Conference Room 14, 2nd Floor Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals cosponsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry J. E. Tomaszewski, Presiding Chemical Vehicle Mixing and Analysis in Toxicity Testing 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—10. Methods Development for Mixing Chemicals in Rodent Feed. G. O. Kuhn, J. J. Rollheiser, B. A. Schworer, C. W. Jameson. 2:25—11. Formulations of Insoluble and Immiscible Test Agents In Liquid Vehicles For Toxicity Testing. J. M. Fitzgerald, V. F. Boyd. 2:45—12. Analysis of Dosed Feed Mixtures. E. A. Murrill, G. O. Kuhn, J. J. Rollheiser, C. W. Jameson. 3:05—Intermission. 3:20—13. Stability Determinations of Chemical/Vehicle Mixtures. C. W. Jameson, G. O. Kuhn, J. J. Rollheiser. 3:40—14. Chemical/Vehicle Mixing and Analysis Problems at a Bioassay Laboratory. R. J. Wheeler. 4:00—15. Evaluation of Dosage Analysis Data From A Problem Solving Point of View. J E. Tomaszewski, L. Scheer. 5:00—Divisional Wine and Cheese Reception (see Social Events, ticket 105). 7:15—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 106). Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 7 & 8, 2nd Floor Symposium on Fire Toxicity

J. A. Young, Presiding MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 14, 2nd Floor Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals cosponsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry

2:00—16. Is Smoke Released by Thermal Decomposition of Synthetic Polymeric Materials More Toxic Than Smoke Released by Wood? Y. Alarie. 3:00—17. Why Do People Die In Fires? We Don't Know! G. Vickery. 4:00—Panel Discussion. Symposium Speakers.

C. W. Jameson, Presiding Chemistry Considerations In Toxicity Testing 9:00—Introductory Remarks.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

5:00—Divisional Wine and Cheese Reception (see Social Events, ticket 105). 7:15—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 106).

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 14, 2nd Floor Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals cosponsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry T. R. Lewis, Presiding The Chemistry in Inhalation Toxicology 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—18. Inhalation Toxicology. An Overview. T. R. Lewis. 9:25—19. Methods for Generation of Test Atmospheres. R. T. Drew. 9:45—20. Monitoring Vapor Concentrations in Test Atmospheres. B. A. Burgess, D. P. Kelly. 10:05—Intermission. 10:20—21. Chemical Monitoring of Aerosols in Inhalation Chambers. O. R. Moss, J. R. Decker. 10:40—22. Detecion Of Degradation Products in Inhalation Test Atmospheres. D. H. Steele, J. M. Chloakis, J. W. Cox. 11:00—23. Analytical Monitoring for Inadvertent Test Chemical Release During the Conduct of Inhalation Toxicity Studies. G. W. Klein, D. L. Geary.

D. B. Walters, Presiding Chemical Health and Safety Concerns in Toxicity Testing—Part I 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—24. Chemical Health & Safety for Toxicity Testing. An Overview. D. B. Walters. 2:30—25. Preparation of Chemical Safety and Toxicity Documents. A. T. Prokopetz, D. B. Walters. 2:50—26. Requirements and Pitfalls For Laboratory Worker Medical Surveillance. G. S. Young. 3:10—intermission. 3:25—27. Safety Training Programs for Chronic Bioassay Studies. C. J. Grubbs. 3:45—28. A Respiratory Protection Program For Toxicology Laboratories. J. A. Coco. 4:05—29. Barrier Laboratory Facilities: A Fire Control Manager's Perspective. R. G. Nemchin. 4:30—Divisional Business Meeting.

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 14, 2nd Floor Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals cosDonsored with Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry N. B. Jurinski, Presiding Chemical Health and Safety Concerns in Toxicity Testing—Part II 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—30. Bulk Chemical Management for Chronic Toxicity Studies. S. W. Graves, E. J. Woodhouse, K. M. Stelting, C. W. Jameson. 9:25—31. Practical Aspects of Packaging and Shipping Test Chemicals for Research. R. L. Trammed, L. H. Keith. 9:45—32. Industrial Hygiene Monitoring of Chemical Contaminants at Bioassay Laboratories. J. J. Beres, D. B. Walters. 10:05—Intermission. 10:20—33. A Risk Assessment Program For Toxicology Laboratory Waste Disposal. R. G. Nemchin, J. A. Coco. 10:40—34. Chemical Contaminated Waste Management: Disposal Concerns, Regulations and Surplus Chemicals. N. B. Jurinski. 11:00—35. Incinerator Design for Disposal of Hazardous Chemicals. M. Hunt.

R. S. Stricoff, Presiding

2:05—36. Chemical Containment: Criteria for Toxicity Testing Facilities. D. B. Walters, R. S. Stricoff, J. M. Harless. 2:25—37. Health and Safety In The Design of Toxicity Testing Laboratories. R. S. Stricoff, E. R. Hoyle, D. B. Walters. 2:45—38. Design Considerations For A Toxic Chemicals Handling Laboratory. J. M. Harless, D. B. Walters. 3:05—Intermission. 3:20—39. Laboratory Hood Performance. E. R. Hoyle, R. S. Stricoff. 3:40—40. Safety Problems Encountered in a Chemical Testing Program. H. Mahar, R. E. Shaff, R. K. Larsen. 4:00—41. Human Factor Considerations In The Handling of Toxic Chemicals. E. J. Phelan, D. B. Walters.

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 14, 2nd Floor Symposium on Safe Disposal of Laboratory Wastes organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. W. P. Taggart, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—42. Laboratory Waste Disposal: The A C S Viewpoint. K. A. Ream. 9:45—43. How Does OSHA Regulate Laboratory Waste? C. S. E. Marlowe. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—44. Health Risk Assessments of Mismanaged Hazardous Chemical Wastes and the Need for Health Data. D. Wanamaker, W. P. Taggart. 11:00—45. "Here Comes a Lab Pack": Management of Mixed Laboratory Chemicals Shipments. N. A. Brill, S. S. Davis, M. M. Heaney. 11:30—46. Lab Samples—From A to B. H. E. Parker. 1:00—Introductory Remarks. 1:10—47. Laboratory Waste Handling— Safety & Health Aspects. W. G. Mikell. 1:40—48. Chemical Degradation of Carcinogens in Laboratory Wastes. G. Lunn, E. B. Sansone. 2:10—49. Waste Disposal Alternatives. D. D. Hedberg, D. A. Pipitone. 2:40—Intermission. 2:55—50. Chemical Waste Disposal: One University's Solution. S. C. Sawyer, D. R. Miller. 3:25—51. Personnel Training Under the Resource Conservation & Recovery Act. A. H. Clarke, J. H. Clarke. 3:55—52. Laboratory Waste Disposal and the Law. J. B. Leuzarder. 4:25—53. Do the RCRA and NPDES Programs Accomplish the Control of Laboratory Waste Disposal in the Environment? D. Bottrell, J. R. Swanson, K. A. Mumy. 4:55—Concluding Remarks.

FRIDAY MORNING Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 14, 2nd Floor Symposium on General Chemical Health and Safety

E. Seifter, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—54. Reduction of High Dose Aspirin Toxicity by Dietary Vitamin A. E. Seifter, G. Rettura, J. Padawer, F. Stratford, S. M. Levenson, J. Seifter. 9:25—55. Supplemental Vitamin A and Beta Carotene Reduce Mortality Rates in Mice Subjected to 7-lrradiation. G. Rettura, F. Wong, F. Stratford, P. Goodwin, S. M. Levenson, E. Seifter. 9:35—56. Influence of Inorganic Pigments on the Formation of N-Nitrosodiethanolamines. T. Motoi, T. Yoneya, Y. Nishijima, T. Hayashi, M. Kurokawa. 10:00—Intermission. 10:10—57. Determination of Hexavalent and Trivalent Chromium Compounds in Industrial Work Environments. R. C. Voborsky, S. J. Liaw. 10:25—58. Asbestos Exposure, Cigarette Smoking, and Pulmonary Functions. S. K. Hall, P. Paquin, J. H. Cissik. 10:50—Concluding Remarks.

Chemical Health and Safety Concerns in Toxicity Testing—Part III 2:00—Introductory Remarks.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

53

CINF DIVISION OF CHEMICAL INFORMATION J. G. Marcali, Chairman P. B. Moses, Secretary W. V. Metanomski, Program Chairman

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room D-2, East Hall Symposium on Personal Computers and Microcomputers in Handling Information organized by Division of Chemical Information joint with Divisions of Chemical Education Inc., Computers in Chemistry

A. Zamora, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Mini- versus Micromputers for Handling Laboratory Data. C. L. Wilkins. 9:35—2. Intelligent Control of Laboratory Experiments Utilizing the Microprocessor: A Discussion of New Technologies and Future Trends. S. T. Kirk, R. A. Landsman 10:05—3. M crocomputers for Editorial Operations of ACS Primary Journals. L. R. Garson, J. T. Keys. 10:35—4. VIDEO PATSEARCH: A New Concept in Information Retrieval. P. J. Terragno. 11:05—5. Evaluation and Dissemination of Micromputer-Based Instructional Modules. J. W. Moore. 11:35—6. What Has Been Done, What Can Be Done, and What Will Be Done With Microcomputers in Chemical Education. R. D. Cornelius. Section B

2:40—15. Coping with Foreign Literature in I 9:50—29. Patentability of Computer Cona Special Library. J. S. Peterson. trolled Chemical Processes. R. E. Wick3:05—16. Coping with Chemicals in Foreign ersham. Literature. P. L. Schuyler. 10:35—30. Review of PCT, EPC and National 3:30—17. Problems with Foreign Patents as Patent Systems. W. H. Dreger. Technical and Legal Information Sources. 11:20—31. New Developments in Copyright: J. P. Daniszewski. The Old Law Needs the New Technology. R. L. Cairney. 4:00—18. Role of Citation Indexing in Overcoming Linguistic Barriers to Information 12:00—Divisional Luncheon. Speaker: E. Retrieval. T. G. DiRenzo. Stefferud. Subject: The Role of Computer Mail in Office Automation {see Social 4:30—Divisional Business Meeting. Events, ticket 000 for details).

Section B Convention Center, Room D-1, East Hall Symposium on the Chemist and Food Safety Regulation. II. Currently Pending Food Safety Legislation and its Compatibility with Today's Chemistry organized by Division of Chemical Information {Chemistry and the Law Subdivision) M. J. Gilroy, Presiding 1:30—19. Strains of Technology Transfer. R. J. Ronk. 2:00—20. Hatch Bil and Other Proposals to Amend the Food Safety Laws: How They Would Operate to Bring the Law up to Date with Advances in Chemistry and Related Sciences. M. R. Taylor. 2:30—21. Absence of Significant Risk—Can the Concept be Applied. J. R. Brunton. 3:00—22. Chemical Implications of Proposed Food Safety Amendments. H. R. Roberts. 3:30—Panal Discussion: Public Policy and Food Safety. Given the state of the art in chemistry, do either existing law or proposed legislation adequately reflect scientific reality? Would alternative legislation be better? All speakers. 4:30—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location).

Section A

Convention Center, Room D-2, East Hall Herman Skolnik Award Symposium J. G. Marcali, Presiding 2:00—Presentation of the Award to Robert Fugmann. 2:15—32. Role of Theory in Chemical Information Systems (Award Address). R. Fugmann. 2:55—33. Fragmentation Codes in Modern Chemical Documentation. A. Kolb, R. Fugmann, H. Pichler. 3:30—34. Evolution of Analytico-Synthetic Structure of Colon Classification for Chemical Sciences. M. A. Gopinath. 4:05—35. Syntactic^ Tools and Semantic Relationships in Information Languages for Chemistry. G. Vladutz. 4:40—Discussion. 5:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details).

Section C

Section B Symposium on Information Services and the Medicinal Chemist organized by Division of Medicinal Chemistry (see page 72)

TUESDAY MORNING

Symposium on Role of Centralized Computer Facilities in Support of Research organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry (see page 58)

Section C Section A

Convention Center, Room D-2, East Hall Symposium on Research and Development for Full-Text Searching S. N. Rhodes, Presiding

A. J. Jeater, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. I 1:40—13. Foreign Literature Challenges t o ! Chemical Abstracts Service. J. T. DickThe Committee on Meetings & man, G. O. Platau. 2:10—14. Foreign Literature at the British Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or Library Lending Division. K. P. Barr. committee meetings

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Symposium on Role of Centralized Computer Facilities in Support of Research, organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry (see page 58)

Convention Center, Room D-1, East Hall Symposium on the Chemist and Food Safety Regulation. I. Chemical Foundations of To- I 9:00—Introductory Remarks. day's Food Safety Regulation organized by 9:15—23. American Chemical Society Online Primary Journal Database Experiment. S.W. Division of Chemical Information (Chemistry Terrant, S. M. Cohen, L. R. Garson, B. E. and the Law Subdivision) Meyers. G. R. White, Presiding 9:45—24. Fuil-Text Searching: The LEXIS and 9:00—Chemistry and the Law Subdivision's NEXIS Experience. J. L. Ebersole. Role and Objective. H. M. Peters. 10:15—25. Specialized Hardware for Imple9:05—Introductory Remarks. M. J. Gilroy. menting Full-Text Retrieval Systems. L. A. 9:15—7. Chemist in FDA History. W. F. Hollaar. Janssen. 10:45—26. Videodiscs for Full-Text 9:35—8. Chemical Foundations of DecSearching. P. B. Schipma, S. M. Ziemer. isionmaking. J. A. Staffa. 11:15—27. Omni-Font Optical Character 9:55—9. FDA Chemist in the Field. M. J. Recognition (OCR)—A Unique Automated Gilroy. Text Entry System. A. Derfall. 10:15—Summary and Discussion. 11:45—Panel Discussion—Questions and 10:30—10. Today's Food Safety Laws: Answers. Complex, Compound, Without Solution. J. 12:00—Divisional Luncheon. Speaker: E. T. O'Reilly. Stefferud. Subject: The Role of Computer 10:55—11. Today's Chemical Realities. W. Mail in Office Automation (see Social Horwitz. Events, ticket 108). 11:20—12. Today's Enforcement Dilemma. J. V. Rodricks. Section B 11:45—Summary and Discussion. Convention Center, Room D-1, East Hall Symposium on Intellectual Property and Section C Recent Chemical Patent Decisions organized by Division of Chemical Information (ChemSymposium on Role of Centralized Computer Facilities in Support of Research organized istry and the Law Subdivision) joint with by Division of Computers in Chemistry (see Board-Council Committee on Patents and page 58) Related Matters H. E. Dubb, Presiding MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A 9:00—Introductory Remarks. Convention Center, Room D-2, East Hall 9:05—28. Practical Implications to Chemists of the Canadian Supreme Court Monsanto Symposium on Problems with Foreign LitDecision. M. J. Marcus. erature

54

Section C Symposium on Role of Centralized Computer Facilities in Support of Research organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry (see page 58)

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room D-2, East Hall Symposium on Evaluation of Information H. J. Hall,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—36. Market Planning Information: Separating Fantasy from Fact. J. F. Frank. 9:40—37. Information Analysis—The Elusive Imperative. C. C. Wallin. 10:15—38. Negative Values of Wasted Effort. H. J. Hall. 10:50—39. Improving the Quality of the Information Product. V. J. Arterbery. 11:20—40. Evaluation Procedures for Quality of Data in Toxicology. P. Y. Lu, C. B. Haberman. 11:50—Discussion. Section B Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: I. Some General Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 67) WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

Section A Convention Center, Room D-2, East Hall Symposium on Managing Information Services and Systems J. M. Lommel, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—41. Managing Information Services and Systems in Bell Laboratories. V. J. Fortney. 2:40—42. Managing Du Pont's Information Services and Sources. R. H. Westcott. 3:10—43. Total Chargeback for Information or You Get What You Pay For. F. H. I Owens.

3:40—44. Information Resource Management in Pharmaceutical Research & Development. H. D. Brown. 4:10—45. Development of a Network of Information Centers Within a Corporation. W. G. Stanley.

Section B Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: II. Specific Effects on Domestic Industry organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 67) THURSDAY MORNING Section A Convention Center, Room D-2, East Hall Symposium on SRI International's Chemical Marketing Research Services—Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How S. L. Soder, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—46. Overview of SRI's Multiclient Services on Chemical and Related Industries. S. L. Soder. 9:20—47. Chemical Economics Handbook Program. B. J. Johnson. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—48. Directory of Chemical Producers Program. E. M. Klapproth. 10:45—49. World Petrochemicals—An International Market Research Service. S. L. Soder. 11:30—Question and Answer Session.

Section B Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: III. Domestic and International Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 68) THURSDAY

AFTERNOON

Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: IV. Selected Societal Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 68)

CMEC DIVISION OF CHEMICAL MARKETING AND ECONOMICS F. Y. Chan, Chairman J. L. Bevirt, Secretary

MONDAY

MORNING

Convention Center, Room N-4, East Hall Symposium on the Use of On-Line Computer Systems in Chemical Marketing and Economics J. B. Torkelsen, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—1. Strategic Market Planning in the Chemical Industry—The DRI Experience. C. J. Skidmore. 9:10—2. Marketing Research Using On-Line Data Bases. B. Gersh. 9:40—3. Development and Uses of Chemical-Econometric Models. F. M. Peterson. 10:10—Intermission.

10:25—4. CAS ON-LINE—Marketing Applications of a Chemical Substance Search System. R. G. Dunn. 10:55—5. Effective Use of Econometrics in Corporate Planning. J. Petralia. 11:25—6. Value of Literature and Statistical Data Bases to the Chemical Industry. G. Newton. 11:55—Closing Remarks.

MONDAY AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room E-3, East Hall Symposium on On-Line Computer Demonstration: Vendors Will Display the Capabilities of and Provide Hands-On-Look at OnLine Computer Systems That Are Being Used for Chemical Marketing and Economics J. B. Torkelsen, Presiding 2:00-5:00 On-Line information will be provided by the following organizations and companies: Dialog Information Services, Inc., Predicasts, Inc., Chemical Abstracts Service, Chase Econometrics, Inc., DRI, SAGE DATA, Inc. TUESDAY

MORNING

Convention Center, Room N-4, East Hall Symposium on Methanol as a Fuel

R. L. Dickenson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—7. Use of Oxinol Blends of Methanol, TBA in Gasoline. J. DeJovine, E. G. Guetens, Jr., G. J. Yogis. 9:40—8. For the Bank of America the Fuel of the Future Is Here Today. M. Fisher, (withdrawn) 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—9. Potential Application of Methanol as a Fuel for Electric Power Generation. M. J. Gluckman. 11:05—10. Fuel Methanol—Status and Outlook. R. L. Dickenson, A. J. Moll, D. R. Simbeck. TUESDAY

AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room N-4, East Hall Symposium on Methanol as a Feedstock

W. J. Hassink, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—11. Chemical Uses for Methanol and Their Future. J. D. McVey. 2:35—12. New Routes to Chemicals from Methanol: A Technological Prospective. D. L. King. 3:05—Intermission. 3:15—13. Carbonylation Chemistry. The Emerging Alternative. B. Juran. J. L. Ehrler. 3:45—14. Acetic Acid from Methanol: Perspectives. P. W. Evans, L. C. McCune. 4:15—15. New Chemical Markets from Methanol. G. B. Hegeman. WEDNESDAY

MORNING

Convention Center, Room N-4, East Hall Symposium on Marketing Chemicals Through Distributors organized by Division of Chemical Marketing and Economics joint with Division of Small Chemical Businesses M. E. Strem, Presiding 9:15—Introductory Remarks. 9:20—16. Functions of Distribution in a Marketing Channel. L. H. T. Dehmlow. 9:50—17. Role of the Specialty Chemical Distributor in the Marketing of Chemicals in the U.S. and Canada. R. G. Brooks. 10:20—Intermission. 10:35—18. Role of the International Trading Company as a Chemicals Distributor. J. S. Hoegl. 11:05—19. What the Modern Chemical Distributor Brings to the Market Place. R. F. Tomeo.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Section D Convention Center, Room 4, Lobby Level Symposium on Multimetallic Catalysis R. J. Madon, J. L. Carter, Presiding

COLL DIVISION OF COLLOID AND SURFACE CHEMISTRY G. L. Haller, Chairman E. L. Kugler, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

9:00—18. Bimetallic Catalysts. Application In Catalytic Reforming. J. L. Carter, G. B. McVicker, W. Weissman, J. H. Sinfelt. 9:45—19. Hydrogenolysis over Supported Ir/Pt Bimetallic Catalysts. G. L. Haller, T. C. Wong, C. T. Chang, C. Gigola. 10:20—20. Sintering of Alumina-Supported Pt-lr Catalysts. S. E. Wanke. 10:55—21. Methanation and Fischer-Tropsch Studies over Well-Characterized SilicaSupported Pt-Ru Bimetallic Clusters. H. Miura, R. D. Gonzalez. 11:30—22. Selectivity and Activity Studies of Silica-Supported Iron and Bimetallic Iron Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts. K. B. Arcuri, J. B. Butt, L. H. Schwartz.

Section A

Convention Center, Room 1, Lobby Level Colloidal Particles: Colloidal Properties of Clays. I. P. F. Low, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—1. Pharmaceutical Aspects of ClayOrganic Interactions. J. L. White. S. L. Hem. 9:20—2. Role of Clays in Ceramics. B. Rand. 10:00—3. Clays in the Petroleum Industry. H. van Olphen. 10:40—4. Importance of the Colloidal Properties of Clays in Soil Mechanics. J. K. Mitchell. 11:20—5. Clay in Soil: Its Nature and Its Impact on Soil-Bound Processes. G. H. Bolt.

Section B Convention Center, Room 2, Lobby Level Symposium on Liquid Crystals and Ordered Fluids

Section E Convention Center, Room 16, North Hall General Papers on Catalysis and Related Topics

R. D. Gonzalez, Presiding 9:00—23. Angular and Velocity Distributions of NO Scattered from the Pt(111) Crystal Surface. T.-H. Lin, W. L. Guthrie, S- T. Ceyer, G. A. Somorjai. 9:30—24. Ammonia Adsorption on the Ag(110) Surface. J. L. Gland, B. A. Sexton, G. E. Mitchell. 10:00—25. Ammonia Synthesis over WeilDefined Iron and Rhenium Catalysts. N. D. Spencer, R. C. Schoonmaker, G. A. Somorjai. 10:30^26. Surface Raman Spectroscopy: A Versatile In Situ Probe of Surface Reaction Dynamics. A. Campion, J. K. Brown, V. M. Grizzle, B. C. Howard. 11:00—27. A Video-LEED Study of CO on Pt(100): Adsorption, Desorption and Reconstruction. P. A. Thiel, R. J. Behm, P. R. Norton, G. Ertl.

R. S. Porter, Presiding 9:00—6. Overview of Liquid Crystals. G. H. Brown. 9:30—7. Some Novel Ferro-Electric Smectic Liquid Crystals. J. W. Goodby, T. M. Leslie. 9:50—8. Liquid Crystalline Esters of Phenylhydroquinone and 3-Phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoic Acid. W. Volksen, R. J. Cox, B. L. Dawson. 10:10—9. Analysis of Liquid Crystal Mixtures, with and without Dyes, by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LCMS). T. I. Martin, W. E. Haas. 10:30—10. Synthesis and Characterization of some Perylene and Anthraquinoic Dichroic Dyes for Liquid Crystal Display Applications. T. M. Leslie, J. W. Goodby, R. W. Filas. 10:50—11. Synthesis of Some Deuterated Mesomorphic Compounds. M. E. Neubert. 11:10—12. Some New Thermotropic Discogens. P. Le Barny, J. Billard, J. C. Dubois. 11:30—13. Synthesis and Properties of Liquid Cyrstalline Heterocycloalkanes. H. Zaschke, A. Isenberg, H.-M. Vorbrodt.

Section C Convention Center, Room 3, Lobby Level Symposium on Effects of Electric Fields on Biological Growth and Repair Processes

A. A. Pi I la, Presiding 9:00—14. Natural Radio Frequency Electrical Oscillations in the Living State. H. A. Pohl. 9:35—15. Effects of Induced Electromagnetic Fields on Hormonal Responses on Osteoblasts in vitro. R. A. Luben, C. D. Cain. 10:10—Coffee Break. 10:25—16. Effects of Electric Fields on Neurite Growth in vitro. M-m. Poo, N. Patel. 11:00—17. Synergy of Polymer Immunomodulation and Pulsatile Electromagnetically Induced Currents in Inhibition of Growth of Murine Malignant Melanoma. L. Norton, L. Tansman, W. Regelson, S. Geller, A. A. Pilla.

Section F Convention Center, Room 19, South Hall General A. I. Medalia,

Presiding

9:00—28. Detection of an Activated Covalent Intermediate from Amino Acids Heated on Clay or Silica. D. H. White, R. M. Kennedy, J. W. Macklin. 9:25—29. Role of Singlet Oxygen in the Photochemistry of Aqueous ZnO Dispersions. J. R. Harbour, S. L. Issler. 9:50—30. Copper(l) Benzenethiolate Surface Coatings for CdS Films. M. Cocivera, J. H. Reeves. 10:15—31. An Improved Maximum-BubblePressure Method and Its Application to Define the Effect of Molecular Structure on Aqueous Association of Bile Acid Salts. K. J. Mysels, A. Roda, A. F. Hofmann. 10:45—32. Liquid-Vapor Wetting Layer. O'D. Kwon, D. Beaglehole, W. W. Webb, B. Widom. 11:10—33. Dynamic Surface Light Scattering Studies from Stereoregular Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Monolayers. L. B. Shih, B. J. Klnzig, R. V. Edwards, J. A. Mann. 11:35—34. Calculation of Visco-Elastic Coefficients from Dynamic Light Scattering Data. J. A. Mann, L. B. Shih, R. V. Edwards, B. J. Kinzig. 12:00—35. Reaction Models in Microemulsions. R. A. Mackay, C. Hermansky, R. Agarwal. Section G Symposium on Relation between Catalyst Structure and Reactivity organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. {see page 85) Section H Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. {see page 92)

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room 1, Lobby Level Colloidal Particles: Colloidal Properties of Clays. II. J. J. Fripiat, Presiding 1:30—36. Surface Functional Group Chemistry of Clays. G. Sposito. 1:55—37. Organomineral Derivatives of Minerals. J. M. Serratosa, E. Ruiz-Hitzky, B. Casal, J. M. Rojo. 2:20—38. Surface Acidity of Clay Minerals. M. M. Mortland. 2:45—39. Molecular Dynamics in Clays by X-ray and Neutron Diffraction and Neutron Scattering. J. M. Adams, C. Breen, C. Riekel. 3:10—40. Neutron Scattering from Clay Particles and Water in Clays. J. W. White. 3:35—41. Optical Anisotropy of Bentonite Suspensions by Light Scattering. R. L. Rowell, J. W. Parsons, K. M. Kidnie. 4:00—42. Luminescence in Clays. N. Lahav. 4:25—43. Room Temperature Luminescence in Natural Kaolin Produced by Organic Amines. L. Coyne, G. Pollock.

Section B Convention Center, Room 2, Lobby Level Symposium on Liquid Crystals and Ordered Fluids

L. V. Azaroff, Presiding 1:30—44. X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Some Cyano-Esters. P. E. Cladis, P. L. Finn, J. W. Goodby. 1:50—45. Effects of Molecular Length on Nematic Mixtures. IV. Structure Effects on Viscosity of Ester Mixtures. J. D. Margerum, S.-M. Wong, J. E. Jensen. 2:10—46. Orientational Disorder in Smectic Liquid Crystals: An Aspect of Structure that Has To Be Included. A. de Vries. 2:30—47. Crystal Structure and Liquid Crystallinity in the 4-nitrophenyl 4'-n-alkoxybenzoates. R. F. Bryan, K. A. Woode. 2:50—48. Relationships Between Molecular Structure and the Incidence of Crystal B and Hexatic B Phases. J. W. Goodby. 3:10—49. Effects of Reversing the Central Ester Linkage in Some Cyano Esters. J. W. Goodby, T. M. Leslie, P. E. Cladis, P. Finn. 3:30—50. Unusual Glass Transition of Smectic Liquid Crystal in p-n-Hexyloxybenzylidene-p'-butylaniline. M. Sorai, H. Yoshioka, H. Suga. 3:50—51. Some Electric Field Effects in Nematic Liquid Crystals. E. F. Carr, R. W. H. Kozlowski. 4:10—52. Application of GVDW Theory to Homologous Nematogens. Part 1: Trans4-Ethoxy-4'-n-alkanoyloxyazobenzenes. A. C. Pineda, T. J. Jones, G. R. Van Hecke. 4:30—53. Application of Regular Solution Theory to Discotic Mesophases: Calculation of Phase Diagrams Exhibiting Minima. R. A. Wheeler, G. R. Van Hecke. 4:50—54. Extension of McMillan's Model to Liquid Crystals of Disc-Like Molecules. S. Chandrasekhar, K. L. Savithramma, N. V. Madhusudana.

Section C Convention Center, Room 3, Lobby Level Symposium on Effects of Electric Fields on Biological Growth and Repair Processes

H. A. Pohl, Presiding 2:00—55. Effects of Weak Pulsating Current on Vitality in Paramecium. J. Smith-Sonneborn. 2:35—56. Non-Equilibrium Models of Cell Membrane Interactions with Weak Electromagnetic Fields. W. R. Adey. 3:10—Coffee Break. 3:25—57. A Generalized Electrochemical Kinetic Model for Cell Membrane Impedance. A. A. Pilla. 4:00—58. Surface Processes in the Control of Ion Transport Across Membranes. M. Blank, W. P. Kavanaugh, G. Cerf. Section D Convention Center, Room 4, Lobby Level Symposium on Multimetallic Catalysis J. L. Carter, R. J. Madon, Presiding 2:00—59. Individual Atom Properties on Catalysis by Alloys. V. Ponec.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

55

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o z z o d o o

2:35—60. Reactivity of Metal Monolayers on Single Crystal Surfaces of Other Metals: Gold, Silver, Copper, and Potassium on Platinum. E. L. Garfunkel, J. W. A. Sachtler, G. A. Somorjai. 3:10—61. Ligand and Geometric Effects due to Alloying. W. E. Spicer, M. L. Shek, D. Weissman-Wenocur, D. Collins. 3:45—62. Pt-Ru Bimetallic Clusters for Methanol Fuel Cell. S. C. Fung, S. J. Tauster, R. L. Garten. 4:20—63. Supported Bimetallic Pt-Mo and Pd-W Catalysts: Surface Characterization and Model Reaction Studies. H. S. Gandhi, H. C. Yao, K. M. Adams. 4:55—64. Bimetallic Catalysts from MixedMetal Clusters. J. R. Shapley. Section E Convention Center, Room 16, North Hall General Papers in Catalysis and Related Topics A. Campion, Presiding 2:00—65. Effect of Potassium on the Catalyzed Reactions of n-Hexane over the Pt(111) Single Crystal Surfaces. F. Zaera, G. A. Somorjai. 2:30—66. Coadsorption of CO and H on Pd(110) at Low Temperatures. R. J. Behm, G. Ertl, V. Penka. 3:00—67. Methanation and Fischer-Tropsch Studies on Alkali Promoted Silica-Supported Ru Catalysts. H. Miura, M. L. McLaughlin, R. D. Gonzalez. 3:30—68. Temperature Programmed Desorption of H2 and NO from a Silica-Supported Rhodium Catalyst. A. A. Chin, A. T. Bell. 4:00—69. Surface Infrared and Surface Enhanced Raman Vibrational Spectra of Monolayer Assemblies in Contact with Rough Metal Surfaces. W. G. Golden, W. Knoll, M. R. Philpott. 4:30—70. Do Foreign Metal Adatoms Effect an Electronic Ligand Interaction on Semimetal Substrates?: K/Bi(0001). C. T. Campbell, T. N. Taylor. Section F Symposium on Relation between Catalyst Structure and Reactivity organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 85) Section G Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. {see page 93) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room 1, Lobby Level Colloidal Particles: Colloidal Properties of Clays. III. J. P. Quirk, Presiding 8:30—71. Surface Properties and Organization of Silica-Aluminas. P. G. Rouxhet, F. Bartoli, L. Petit, A. J. Herbillon. 8:55—72. Influence of Organic Acids on Hydrolytic Products of Aluminum. P. M. Huang. 9:20—73. Comparison of the Influence of Organic and Inorganic Ligands on Surface Reactivity of Aluminum Oxyhydroxides. A. Violante, P. M. Huang. 9:45—74. Selective Accumulation of Al-lons by Clays: Influence on the Degree of Hydrolysis. M. G. M. Bruggenwert, G. H. Bolt. 10:10—75. Selective Accumulation of Al-lons by Clays: Influence on Precipitation of the Hydroxide. G. H. Bolt, M. G. M. Bruggenwert. 10:35—76. Use of an Automated Tension Cell to Measure Physical Properties of Colloidal Systems. J. R. Feldkamp, D. Swartzendruber, I. Shainberg. 11:00—77. Chemistry of Phosphate Adsorption on Synthetic Aluminum Substituted Iron Oxide Compounds. C. C. Ainsworth, M. E. Sumner. 11:25—78. Effect of Mechano-Chemical Reactions on the Surface and Structure of Synthetic Iron Oxides. E. Mendelovici, R. Villalba, A. Sagarzazu.

56

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

12:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). 12:30—Divisional Luncheon (see Social Events, ticket 109). Section B Convention Center, Room 2, Lobby Level Symposium on Liquid Crystals and Ordered Fluids A. C. Griffin, Presiding 9:00—79. Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Polymers with Mesogenic Groups and Flexible Spacers in the Main Chain. A. Blumstein, J. Asrar, R. B. Blumstein. 9:30—80. Effects of Structures of Mesogenic Units and Spacers on the Thermotropic Liquid Crystal Properties of Main Chain Polyesters. R. W. Lenz, J.-I. Jin. 9:50—81. Role of Sequence Distribution on Liquid Crystalline Properties of Aromatic Copolyesters. J. Tsay, W. Volksen, J. Economy. 10:10—82. Diffusion of Rigid Polyamides Through Swollen Gel of Same. S. M. Aharon!. 10:30—83. Molecular Influences on the Splay, Twist and Bend Elastic Moduli of a Polymer Liquid Crystal. D. B. DuPre, E. F. Jagodzinski, J. R. Fernandes. 10:50—84. Physics of Nematic Phases of Semiflexible Polymers. D. Y. Yoon, G. Ronca, G. Sigaud, A. C. Griffin. 11:10—85. Effect of Chemical Constitution of Mesogenic Repeated Units on Liquid Crystalline Behavior of Polymers. I. I. Konstantinov, V. S. Grebneva, Y. B. Amerik, A. A. Sitnov. 11:30—86. Mesogenic Benzanilides II. R. A. Vora, N. Dixit. 12:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A) 12:30—Divisional Luncheon (see Section A)

Section C Convention Center, Room 3, Lobby Level General Papers on Catalysis and Related Topics J. L. Gland, Presiding 9:00—87. Mechanism of Nitrogen Insertion in Ammoxidation Catalysis. J. D. Burrington, C. T. Kartisek, R. K. Grasselli. 9:30—88. Effect of Composition and Pretreatments on the Activity of CopperChromium Based Catalysts for Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide. F. Severino, J. Laine. 10:00—89. Catalytic Oxidation of Methanol at Low Concentrations. Y. Y. Yao. 11:00—90. Effect of Catalyst Pore Structure on Hydrotreating of Heavy Oil. M. Shlmura, Y. Shiroto, C. Takeuchi. 11:30—91. CO Hydrogenation on Supported Molybdenum Catalysts. G. L. Bartholomew, C. H. Bartholomew. 12:00—92. Comparison of Nitrate and Carbonyl Impregnated Metals on Oxide Supports. J. M. Stencel, J. R. Diehl, C. A. Spitler, K. J. Mbadcam, G. A. Melson. 12:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A). 12:30—Divisional Luncheon (see Section A). Section D Convention Center, Room 4, Lobby Level Kendall Award Symposium on Solid Surfaces R. Vanselow, Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 8:50—93. Studies of Surface Structural Properties Using Helium Diffraction. T. Engel. 9:35—94. Reconstruction of Metal Surfaces. P. J. Estrup. 10:20—95. Structural Studies of BCC {001} Surfaces. W. R. Graham, R. T. Tung, A. J. Melmed. 11:00—96. Award Address. (ACS Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry sponsored by The Kendall Co.). Direct Observation of Atoms on Metals. G. Ehrlich. 12:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A). 12:30—Divisional Luncheon (see Section A).

Section E Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 93)

4:00—118. Structure and Function of Fibronectin in Cell Adhesion. K. M. Yamada, S. K. Akiyama, M. Hayashi. 4:30—119. Lectin-Carbohydrate Interactions between Bacterial Cells. P. Kolenbrander. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location). Section D

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room 1, Lobby Level Colloidal Particles: Colloidal Properties of Clays. IV. M. M. Mortland, Presiding 2:00—97. Cesium Ion Equilibria in lllite Clay. E. Brouwer, B. Baeyens, A. Maes, A. Cremers. 2:25—98. Exclusion of Chloride Ions from Clay Surfaces in Concentrated and Dilute Aqueous Solutions of Electrolytes. J. P. Quirk. 2:50—99. Effect of Electrolytes on the Rheological Properties of Aqueous Clay Dispersions. H. M. M. Diz, E. Pekenc, B. Rand. 3:15—100. Dielectric Dispersion Due to Electrochemical Double Layer. P. N. Sen. 3:40—101. Quantum Chemical Calculations on a Model Smectite Clay Structure. S. Aronowitz. 4:05—102. Problems in Identification of 2:1 Clay Minerals in Soils and Sediments. P. H. Hsu. 4:30—103. Membrane Behavior of Clay-Rich Rocks in Diagenetic Environments. D. L. Graf, W. M. Benzel, P. Haydon. 4:55—104. Quick Clays and the Sulfur Cycle. G. J. P. Lessard, J. K. Mitchell. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting. Section B Convention Center, Room 2, Lobby Level Symposium on Liquid Crystals and Ordered Fluids G. H. Brown, Presiding 2:00—105. Nonaqueous Liquid Crystals with Lecithin. S. E. Friberg, M. El-Nokaly. 2:20—106. Diamagnetic Anisotropy of Lyotropic Nematic Mesophases. M. E. M. Helene, C. Robinson, L. W. Reeves. 2:40—107. Physical Models of Lipid Membranes in Latent Cancer Cells. Ordering Effects of Petroleum Hydrocarbons. A. W. Horton, G. R. Penk. 3:05—108. Lyotropic Cholesteric and Nematic Phases of Disodium Cromoglycate in Magnetic Fields. H. Lee, M. M. Labes. , 3:25—109. Adiabatic Compression: A New Method to Measure Latent Heats in Phospholipid Bilayers. N. D. Russell, P. J. Collings. 3:45—110. Anisotropy of the Electrical Conductivity in Amphiphilic Liquid Crystals. P. Photinos, A Saupe. 4:05—111. Conformationally and Orientationally Restricted Analogs of Phospholipids in Bilayers. M. K. Jain, J. Rogers, F. Ramirez. 4:25—112. On the Orientation of Liquid Crystals by Monolayers of Amphiphilic Molecules. K. Hiltrop, H. Stegemeyer. 4:45—113. Liquid Crystalline Structures of Amphipatic Liposaccharides. B. Gallot, M. Gervais, A. Douy. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location) Section C Convention Center, Room 3, Lobby Level Symposium on the Liquid-Solid Interface— Early Effects on Bioattachment G. Loeb, Presiding 2:00—114. Specific and Non-specific Attachment of Bacteria to Solid Surfaces. W. A. Corpe. 2:30—115. Detection of Organic Films at the Solid-Liquid Interface by Photo-Acoustic Spectroscopy. S. C. Dexter, K. E. Lucas. 3:00—116. AES Studies of Molecular Film Adsorption to Metals from a Bacterial Culture. M. E. Schrader, J. A. Cardamone. 3:30—117. A Chemical Characterization of Fouling Films. B. J. Little, A. Zsolnay.

Convention Center, Room 4, Lobby Level Kendall Award Symposium on Solid Surfaces R. Vanselow, Presiding 2:00—120. What Elementary Electronic Structure Tells about Surfaces. W. A. Harrison. 2:45—121. Noble Gas Adsorption on Metals. M. B. Webb. 3:30—122. Excited Atom Scattering from Tungsten Surfaces. T. A. Delchar 4:15—123. Application of Surface Analytic Techniques to the Study of Surface Reaction Controlled Corrosion Processes. R. S. Polizzotti, G. Luckman. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location). Section E Convention Center, Room 16, North Hall Symposium on Structure and Dynamics of Colloidal Dispersions I. R. Rajagopalan, E. E. Uzgiris, Presiding 2:00—124. Fluorescence and Raman Scattering by Colloids. M. Kerker. 3:00—125. Transient Electro-Optical Studies of Colloidal Morphology and Interactions. B. R. Jennings. 4:00—126. Structure and Dynamics of tRNA in Solution. B. Chu, A. Patkowski. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location). Section F Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 93) WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Convention Center, Room 1, Lobby Level Colloidal Particles: Colloidal Properties of Clays. V. G. Sposito, Presiding 8:30—127. Water in Clay-Water Systems. P. F. Low. 8:55—128. Molar Absorptivity of Iriterparticle Water in Clay-Water Systems. D. J. Mulla, P. F. Low. 9:20—129. Near Infrared Properties of Water Adsorbed on Hectorite Saturated by Monovalent and Bivalent Cations. R. Prost. 9:45—130. A Spectroscopic Study of Hydrated Kaolinite. M. Lipsicas, C. Straley, P. Costanzo, R. Giese. 10:10—131. Thermodynamic and Microdynamic Behavior of Water in Clay Suspensions and Gels. J. Fripiat, J. Cases, A. Francois, M. Letellier. 10:35—132. Thermodynamical Properties of Water Adsorbed by Allophane. S. Iwata. 11:00—133. Apparent Specific Heats of Clay-Water Mixtures Near 0°C. J. L. Oliphant, A. R. Tice. 11:25—134. Rheological Model of Pore Water. I. Ravina, Y. Gur. Section B Convention Center, Room 2, Lobby Level Symposium on Liquid Crystals and Ordered Fluids F. E. Stafford, Presiding 8:30—135. A Pulsed NMR Study of Transient and Persistant Molecular Order in Nematic Liquid Crystals. P. A. Mitchel, C. E. Tarr. 8:50—136. Effect of Twist on Biaxial Ordering and on Self-Diffusion in the Cholesteric Phase. Z. Yaniv, M. E. Neubert, J. W. Doane. 9:10—137. Deuteron Magnetic Relaxation and Molecular Dynamics in Thermotropic Liquid Crystals. R. R. Void, R. L. Void.

9:35—138. Effective Proton Hyperfine Tensor for Di-tertbutylnitroxide in a Liquid Crystal. B. L. Bales, R. Dolin, R. N. Schwartz. 9:55—139. Orientation-Dependent Interactions and Biphasic Equilibria in Low Molecular Weight Nematogens. P. A. Irvine, P. J. Flory, W. Da-Cheng. 10:20—140. Alkyl Chain Flexibility in Liquid Crystals. H. Toriumi, E. T. Samulski. 10:40—141. A Modified Mean Field Theory and Resulting Elastic Constants of Nematic Liquid Crystals. P. Palffy-Muhoray, D. A. Dunmur, D. A. Balzarini 11:00—142. Effect of the Tricritical Region on the Smectic A-Smectic C Transition. C. C. Huang. 11:20—143. Spatial Correlations in Nematic Liquid Crystals. C.-W. Woo, K. Feng, P. Sheng. 11:45—144. Molecular Structure and Ordering in Liquid Crystals. J. S. Prasad, N. C. Shivaprakash. Section C Convention Center, Room 3, Lobby Level Symposium on the Liquid-Solid InterfaceEarly Effects on Bioattachment M. Schrader, Presiding 9:00—145. Isolation of High Molecular Weight, Adhesion enhancing Organics from Coastal Seawater by Immunoaffinity Chromatography. R. Revuelta, R. F. Bard, T. R. Tosteson. 9:10—146. Adhesion Enhancing, High Molecular Weight Exudates Produced by Bacteria Isolated from Aluminum and Titanium Surfaces Exposed to Coastal Seawater. B. R. Zaldi, R. F. Bard, T. R. Tosteson. 9:20—147. Sugar Specific Macromolecules in Intraspecific Marine Microbial Surface Interactions. S. H. Imam, R. F. Bard, T. R. Tosteson. 9:30—148. Bacterial Glycocalyx—Its Role in Attachment and in Biocide Resistance. J. W. Costerton, R. M. Ventullo. 10:00—149. Early Events in the Attachment of Diatoms to Clean Surfaces. K. E. Cooksey. 10:30—150. Chemical and Biological Alteration of the Liquid-Solid Interface through Bacterial Microzone Formation. H. W. Paerl, P. T. Bland. 11:00—151. Surface Thermodynamic Aspects of Bacterial Adhesion. D. R. Absolom, F. V. Lamberti, Z. Policova, W. Zingg, C. J. Van Oss, A. W. Neumann 11:30—152. Adhesion and Substrate Choice in Mussels and Barnacles. D. J. Crisp, G. Walker, A. Young, A. Yule. Section D Convention Center, Room 4, Lobby Level Symposium on Molecular Processes of Solid Surfaces: Electronic Structure of Surfaces and Adsorbates R. Rye, Presiding 9:00—153. XPS and UPS Coupled with MO Model Cluster Calculations for Studying the Electronic Structure of Adsorbates. C. R. Brundle, P. S. Bagus, K. Hermann. 9:40—154. Ion-Surface Reactions and Charge Exchange Processes in the Low Energy-Near Threshold Region. J. W. Rabalais, D. A. Baldwin, N. Shamir, T. Darko, P. Hochmann. 10:20—155. Electronic Structure of Surfaces and Adsorbates. W. A. Goddard III. 11:00—156. Electronic Properties of S Segregated to Single Crystal Surfaces of Ni and Fe.ft. DIDio, E. W. Plummer. 11:40—157. Ion-Surface Reactions and Charge Exchange Processes in the Low Energy-Near Threshold Region. T. Darko, D. A. Baldwin, J. Rabalais, P. Hochmann.

Section E Convention Center, Room 16, North Hall Symposium on Structure and Dynamics of Colloidal Dispersions. II.

R. Rajagopalan, E. E. Uzgiris, Presiding 9:00—158. Molecular Theory of Fluid Microstructures. H. T. Davis, L. E. Scriven. 10:00—159. Brownian Motion Modeling of Taylor Dispersion-Like Physicochemical Transport Phenomena, H. Brenner, P. M. Adler, L. H. Dill.

11:00—160. Rheology of Foams and Highly Concentrated Emulsions. I. Elastic Properties and Yield Stress of a Cylindrical Model System. H. M. Princen. Section F Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. {see page 93) WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

3:20—180. Substrate Interfacial Properties and their Relevance to Short Term Cell Adhesion. L. M. Smith, J. D. Andrade, J. B. Hibbs, Jr. 3:50—181. Fibroblast Cell Proliferation on Charged Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate Copolymers. S. Hattori, J. D. Andrade, J. B. Hibbs Jr., D. E. Gregonis, R. N. King. f 4:20—182. Surface Energy and the Adhesion of the Marine Chlorella Vulgaris Beij. G. Loeb, B. R. Zaidi, T. R. Tosteson. 4:30—183. Effects of Substratum Surface Energy and Medium Surface Tension on Bacterial Attachment. M. M. Fletcher. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details).

Section A

Section D

Convention Center, Room 1, Lobby Level Colloidal Particles: Colloidal Properties of Clays. VI. R. Prost, Presiding

Convention Center, Room 4, Lobby Level Symposium on Molecular Processes of Solid Surfaces: Electronic Structure of Surfaces and Adsorbates C. T. Campbell, Presiding

1:30—161. Mechanism of Clay-Swelling. J. P. Quirk. 1:55—162. X-ray Determination of the Relation between Swelling Pressure and Interlayer Distance for Smectites. B. E. Viani, C. B. Roth, P. F. Low. 2:20—163. Swelling of Vermiculite. J. A. Rausell-Colom. 2:45—164. Longitudinal Acoustic Phonons in Vermiculites by Inelastic Neutron Scattering. D. J. Cebula, R. P. Humes, R. K. Thomas. 3:10—165. Influence of Exchangeable Cations on DLVO and Hydration Forces between Mica Surfaces. R. M. Pashley. 3:35—166. Crystalline Swelling of Smectites. D. H. Fink. 4:00—167. Effect of Iron Oxidation States on Clay Swelling. J. W. Stucki, C. B. Roth. 4:25—168. Imbibometry in Clay Investigation. J. Konta. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). Section B Convention Center, Room 2, Lobby Level Symposium on Liquid Crystals and Ordered Fluids R. J . Cox, Presiding 2:00—169. New Liquid Crystals, Monomeric and Polymeric, Derived from Binaphthyl. A. J. East, B. C. Benicewicz. 2:20—170. lonenomeric Liquid Crystals. E. T. Samulski, L.-P. Yu. 2:40—171. Mesomorphic Properties of an Homologous Series of Alkyl-Terminated Enamine-Ketone Containing Liquid Crystals. B. C. Benicewicz, S. J. Huang, J. A. Pavlisko, J. F. Johnson. 3:00—172. Influence of Polysiloxane Segments on the Phase Transitions of Liquid Crystalline Polymers. C. Aguilera, H. Ringsdorf, A. Schneller. 3:20—173. Liquid Crystalline Polymers with Amphiphilic and Non Amphiphilic Side Chains—Structure and Phase Behavior. H. Finkelmann, B. Luhmann, G. Rehage, H. Stevens. 3:40—174. Synthesis and Characterization of a New Class of Fluoroalkyl Substituted Liquid Crystals. M. E. Oxsen. 4:00—175. Nematogeneity of Some Hydrocarbons. R. Eidenschink, M. Roermer, F. V. Allan. 4:20—176. Some Heterocyclic Analogues of Biphenyl Mesogens. D. J. Byron, D. Lacey, R. C. Wilson. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details).

2:00—184. Electronic Structure of Surfaces and Adsorbates as Viewed by Photoemission. D. Eastman. 2:40—185. Surface Structure Studies by Means of High-Energy Angle-Resolved Photoemission from Adsorbate Core Levels. C. S. Fadley. 3:20—186. Interfacial Photoemission as a Probe of the Physical and Energetic Structure of the Metal-Electrolyte System. T. E. Furtak. 4:00—187. Role of Mechanistic and Kinetic Factors in the Water Formation Reaction on Pt(111). G.B.Fisher. 4:40—188. Temperature Dependence of X-ray Photoelectron Diffraction Effects and Possible Relationship to Surface Melting Phenomena. R. Trehan, P. J. Orders, C. S. Fadley. 5:00—189. Bonding and Energy Level Shifts of Ammonia Adsorbed on Iron and Nickel Surfaces: Cluster Models. K. Hermann, P. S. Bagus. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). Section E Convention Center, Room 16, North Hall Symposium on Structure and Dynamics of Colloidal Dispersions. III. E. E. Uzgiris, R. Rajagopalan, Presiding 2:00—190. Structure of Nonionic Micelles Determined with X-ray Scattering Techniques. H. H. Paradies. 2:25—191. Dielectric and Fluorescent Probe Studies on the Microstructure of Micelles. A. N. Sunder Ram, K. Chinnaswamy, D. O. Shah. 2:50—192. Photon-Correlation Spectroscopy of Microemulsion Polymerization of Styrene. P. L. Johnson, H. I. Tang, E. Gulari. 3:15—193. Laser Light Scattering Investigation of Interparticle Interactions in Concentrated w/o Microemulsions. W. B. Bedwell, E. Gulari. 3:40—194. Dynamic Behavior of Poly (alpha-methylstyrene) in Moderately Concentrated Solution. J. C. Selser. 4:05—195. Structure of Colloidal Solutions of Grignard Compounds. H. H, Paradies. 4:30—196. Effect of Small Ion Dynamics on Polyion Diffusion as Inferred from Dynamic Light Scattering Techniques. K. S. Schmitz, N. Parthasarathy, M. Lu, J. Gauntt. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details).

Section F Section C Convention Center, Room 3, Lobby Level Symposium on the Liquid-Solid InterfaceEarly Effects on Bioattachment

T. R. Tosteson, Presiding 2:00—177. Bioadhesion to Low Energy Surfaces: Significance of the yc Window. M. E. Schrader. 2:20—178. Hydrophilic-Hydrophobic Copolymers as Cell Substrates: Effects on 3T3 cell Growth Rates. T. A. Horbett, M. B. Schway, B. D. Ratner. 2:50—179. Erythrocyte Adhesion to Polymer Surfaces Influence of Electrical Charges. D. R. Absolom, Z. Policova, W. Zingg, C. J. van Oss, A. W. Neumann.

Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. {see page 93) THURSDAY MORNING

8:55—198. Surface Characterization in the Adsorption of Metal-Amino Acid Complexes on Clay Minerals. J. G. Dillard, D. L. Crowther. 9:20—199. A Theoretical Study of the Interaction of Metal Ions and Amino Acids: Possible Mechanisms for the Adsorption of Amino Acids on Clays. A. Gupta, G. H. Loew, J. Lawless. 9:45—200. Adsorption of Nucleotides onto Homoionic Clays. J. G. Lawless, J. Mazzurco, F. Church, J. B. Orenberg, R. L. Huff, A. Cook. 10:10—201. Oxidative Coupling of Phenols by. Copper (II)—Amine Intercalated Smectites, D. N. Hendrickson, W. L. Nehmer, J. W. Stucki. 10:35—202. Alcohol Adsorption by Kaolinite from Aqueous Solutions. P. Levitz, J. J. Fripiat. 11:00—203. Adsorption of Water-Soluble Polymers on High Surface Area Solids. H. Ahmed, J. E. Glass. 11:25—204. A New Semi-Empirical Model Describing Adsorption Behaviour of the <5-Mn02 Surface for Cu. S. Stroes-Gascoyne, J. B. Kramer, W. J. Snodgrass. 11:50—205. Application of Higher-Order UV/VIS Derivative Spectrophotometry to Clay Minerals. G. Talsky, E. E. Kohler.

Section B Convention Center, Room 2, Lobby Level Symposium on Liquid Crystals and Ordered Fluids

E. M. Barrall II, Presiding 9:00—206. Alignment of Liquid Crystal Molecules on Various Surfaces: Myths, Theories, Facts. J. A. Castellano. 9:20—207. Development of Dual-Frequency Addressable Liquid Crystals. R. L. Hubbard, J. C. H. Liang, K. R. Koehler/Beran. 9:40—208. Dielectric Studies of Monoester and Diester Nematogens. M. Bone, A. H. Price, M. G. Clark, D. G. McDonnell. 10:00—209. Intermolecular Guest-Host Interactions ana the Optical Order Parameter of Pleochroic Dyes. F. C. Saunders, L. Wright, M. G. Clark. 10:20—210. Considerations for High Contrast Transmissive Twisted Nematic Displays. G. A. Dir. 10:40—211. Liquid Crystal Alignment on Substrate Surfaces; A Collective Phenomenon? H. Birecki. 11:00—212. Permittivity of Aligned Smectic A Liquid Crystals. G. J. Sprokel, N. Chou, J. Addy. 11:30—213. Nematic—Substrate Interaction and Boundary Layer Phase Transitions. P. Sheng.

Section C Convention Center, Room 3, Lobby Level Symposium on Solid State Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

I. E. Wachs, A. W. Sleight, Presiding 8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—214. Molybdate Oxidation Catalysis. U. Chowdhry, C. J, Machiels, F. Ohuchi, A. W. Sleight, J. F. Weiher. 9:30—215. Evolution of the Active Mass in V2O5—M0O3 Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of Benzene. M. Najbar. 10:00—216. Interfacial Effects In Mild Oxidation Catalysts. P. Courtine. 10:30—217. Characterization of Vanadium Oxide Catalysts in Relation to Activities and Selectivities for Oxidation and Ammoxidation of Alkyl-pyridines. A. S. Andersson, S. L. T. Andersson. 11:00—218. Structure and Catalytic Activities of Niobates and Tantalates of Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. B. T. Huie, R. A. Innes, A. J. Perrotta. 11:30—219. Electro-Oxidation of Organics on Noble-Metal Pyrochlores. H. S. Horowitz, J. M. Longo, H. H. Horowitz.

Section A

Convention Center, Room 1, Lobby Level Colloidal Particles: Colloidal Properties of Clays. VII. J. M. Serratosa, Presiding 8:30—197. Pillaring Reactions of Smectite Clays. R. Raythatha, M. S. Tzou, T. J. Pinnavaia.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

57

12:00—220. Titration of Surface Sites on Magnetite-Based Water-Gas Shift Catalysts. C. R. F. Lund, J. E. Kubsh, Y. Chen, J. A. Dumesic. Section D Convention Center, Room 4, Lobby Level Symposium on Molecular Processes of Solid Surfaces: Electronic Structure of Surfaces and Adsorbates

J. S. Murday, Presiding 9:00—221. Electronic Excitations and Auger Spectra of Molecules Adsorbed at Surfaces. J. A. D. Matthew. 9:40—222. Experimental Aspects of HoleHole Interaction in Auger Electron Spectroscopy. J. E. Houston, R. R. Rye. 10:20—223. Properties of Pt on Ti and Its Oxides. J. M. White, J. A. Schreifels, D. N. Belton, B.-H. Chen, R. L. Hance. 11:00—224. Auger Spectroscopy as a Probe of Electronic Structure and Electron/Photon Stimulated Desorption. D. E. Ramaker. 11:40—225. Chemical Reactions of Hyperthermal Beams at Solid Surfaces: The Effect of Translational Energy. D. A. Baldwin, N. Shamir, J. W. Rabalais.

Section E Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 93) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room 1, Lobby Level General Papers on Catalysis and Related Topics C. H. Bartholomew, Presiding 2:00—226. Effects of Nonreactive Diluent Gases on the Desorption of Surface Oxides from Graphite. J. A. Britten, J. L. Falconer, L. F. Brown. 2:30—227. Chemical Characterization of Active Sites in Alkali Catalyzed Carbon Gasification. C. A. Mims, J. K. Pabst. 3:00—228. Using the Heterogenizing Homogeneous C o + + + Ion as Catalyst for the Synthesis of Peracetic Acid. T-C. Chou, C. C. Lee. 3:30—229. Catalytic Oxidation of Ethylene by Silver Supported on Zirconium Phosphate. S. Cheng, A. Clearfield. 4:00—230. Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexene by Cu(ll) Exchanged Zirconium Phosphate. H. Cheung. A. Clearfield. 4:30—231. Infrared Studies of Zirconium Phosphate Catalysts. D. S. Thakur, A. Clearfield. 5:00—232. Structure of Rh Supported Catalysts II TEM Characterization on Deactivation by Coke. S. Fuentes, M. J. Yacaman, F. Madera. Section B Convention Center, Room 2, East Hall Symposium on Liquid Crystals and Ordered Fluids

J. F. Johnson, Presiding 1:30—233. Optical Properties of the Blue Phase of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals. P. P. Crooker, J. H. Flack, D. L. Johnson, S. Long. 1:50—234. Lattice Parameters in Blue Phase Mixtures. J. T. Ho, J. Her. 2:10—235. Blue Phase Structure Analysis by Optical Bragg Diffraction'. D. W. Berreman. 2:30—236. Dislocation Motion and Pinning the "Blue" Phase. M. Marcus. 2:50—237. Colloidal Crystals and Glasses. P. M. Chaikin, P. A. Pincus. 3:10—238. Self Diffusion Coefficient and Viscosity of Charged Polystyrene Colloids. B. Dozier, H. M. Lindsay, P. M. Chaikin, H. Hervet, L. Leger. 3:30—239. Influence of Molecular Conformation on the Helical Twisting Power of Terpenes in Nematic Liquid Crystals. P. R. Gerber.

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C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

3:50—240. Effects of Low Applied Pressures on the Optical Transmission Properties and the Birefringence of a Mixture of 2-(2-Ethoxy Ethoxy)Ethyl Carbonate and Cholesteryl Erucate. E. O. Gbogi, P. F. Waters. 4:10—241. Metastable Crystalline Phases of 4 Cyano 4' Octyloxy biphenyl—A Raman Kinetics Study. B. J. Bulkin, J. R. Sloan. 4:30—242. Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Due to Orientational Fluctuation in Smectic Liquid Crystals. S. Miyajima, N. Nakamura, H. Chihara. 4:50—243. NMR Studies on Molecules Oriented in Mixed Thermotropic Liquid Crystals of Opposite Diamagnetic Anisotropy. C. L. Khetrapal, A. C. Kunwar.

Section C Convention Center, Room 3, Lobby Level Symposium on Solid State Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. I. E. Wachs, A. W. Sleight, Presiding 2:00—244. Structure and Catalytic Activity of A Multicomponent Ammoxidation Catalyst. J. C. J. Bart, N. Giordano. 2:30—245. Relationship Between Solid State Structure and Catalytic Activity of Rare Earth Containing Bismuth Molybdate Ammoxidation Catalysts. J. F. Brazdil, R. K. Grasselli. 3:00—246. Catalysis by Noble Metal Sulfides. J. D. Passaretti. 3:30—247. Properties of Bulk and Supported Cobalt Sulfides. A. Wold, K. Dwight, K. Kim. 4:00—248. On the Hydroisomerization Activity of Some Synthetic Smectites. R. A. van Santen, K. H. W. Robschlager, C. A. Emeis. 4:30—249. TPD Study of Methanol Decomposition and Adsorption of CO and C 0 2 on Perfect and Defect ZnO Surfaces. H. H. Kung, W. H. Cheng. 5:00—250. 7-AI2O3: Structural Model of A Defect Oxyhydroxide. S. Soled. Section D Convention Center, Room 4, Lobby Level Symposium on Molecular Processes of Solid Surfaces: Electronic Structure of Surfaces and Adsorbates

J. S. Murday, Presiding 2:00—251. Electronic Structure of Ni, and Pd Alloys. J. C. Fuggle. 2:40—252. Local Surface Electronic Structure: Study of the Interaction of Hydrogen, Oxygen and Nitrogen with the Si(111) Surface by Stimulated Desorption and Auger Spectroscopy. M. L. Knotek, J. E. Houston, C. C. Parks, B. E. Koel. 3:20—253. Understanding McHecular Auger Spectra. D. R. Jennison. 4:00—254. C(KVV) and O(KVV) Auger Lineshapes of Chemisorbed CO on Ni(100) Measured by X-ray Excited Auger Electron Spectroscopy. B. E. Koel, J. M. White. 4:20—255. Auger Electron Spectra of Lithium Compounds. F. D. Schowengerdt, J. S. Forrest, G. H. Kennedy. 4:40—256. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering from Vapor-Deposited Copper, Silver and Gold. Excitation Profiles, Temperature Dependence and Catalytic Activity. D. E. Tevault, H. D. Ladouceur, R. R. Smardzewski. 5:00—257. Potassium Monolayers on the Pt(111) Surface and Their Strong Interaction with Co-Adsorbed Carbon Monoxide. E. L. Garfunkel, J. E. Growell, G. A. Somorjai.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room K-1, East Hall Symposium on Role of Centralized Computer Facilities in Support of Research organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Information

COMP

R. W. Counts, Presiding 1:30—14. Computerized Molecular Design at Abbott Labs. T. J. O'Donnell, Y. C. Martin, T. Koschmann. 2:00—15. Automating the Acquisition, Interpretation and Reporting of Scientific Data. H. Woodruff. 2:30—Closing Remarks. R. W. Counts.

DIVISION OF COMPUTERS IN CHEMISTRY D. A. Pensak, Chairman D. Edelson, Secretary C. L. Wilkins, Program Chairman

Section B Convention Center, Room K-2, East Hall General

D. Lunney, Presiding MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room K-1, East Hall Symposium on Role of Centralized Computer Facilities in Support of Research organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Information R. W. Counts, Presiding 9:00—Opening Remarks. 9:15—1. Role of the Computer Center of Institute for Molecular Science. K. Morokuma. 9:45—2. Centralized Computational Support for Chemistry in the United Kingdom. J. A. Altmann. 10:15—3. Function of the Centralized Research Computer in Atmospheric Science and Oceanography. W. Maclntyre. 10:45—4. What Role Should a National Computational Resource Play in Chemical Research? G. M. Maggiora. 11:15—5. Is Computational Chemistry a Cottage Industry? P. Lykos. Section B Symposium on Personal Computers and Microcomputers in Handling Information organized by Division of Chemical Information joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. {see page 54) MONDAY

AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room K-1, East Hall Symposium on Role of Centralized Computer Facilities in Support of Research organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Information R. W. Counts, Presiding 1:30—6. Role of Centralized Computing Services in Support of Research at the Du Pont Experimental Station. E. Abrahamson. 2:00—7. Bell Laboratories Central Computing: Some Views From the Chemical Community. R. C. Haddon, K. Raghavachari, L. A. Farrow, T. A. Weber, A. R. Strom, Jr. 2:30—8. Organizational Considerations in a Chemical Computation Research Group. D. Pensak. 3:00—9. Computational Chemistry in the Design of Biologically Active Molecules at Lilly. D. B. Boyd, M. M. Marsh.

TUESDAY MORNING Convention Center, Room K-1, East Hall Symposium on Role of Centralized Computer Facilities in Support of Research organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Information R. W. Counts, Presiding 9:30—10. Diversified Computational Requirements for a Large Industrial Laboratory. M. P. Teter. 10:00—11. SKF's Extensible VAX/E & Sbased System for Molecular Modeling. R. Cramer. 10:30—12. Establishment of a Non-Centralized Computing Facility. J. M. McKelvey. 11:00—13. Molecular Modeling and Drug Design Using VAX-CHEMLAB. A. J. Hopfinger.

1:30—16. Molecular Dynamics with an Array Processor. P. H. Berens, K. R. Wilson. 1:50—17. A Computer-Controlled Olfactometer for Behavioral Assays of the Sense of Smell. T. H. Morton, M. P. Castro, H. Eichenbaum. 2:10—18. Voice Operated Titration for Students with Upper Limb Disabilities. R. C. Morrison, D. Lunney, R. Terry, J. Hassell. 2:30—19. A Portable Laboratory Microcomputer with Speech Output for Visually Impaired Science Students. D. Lunney, R. C. Morrison, A. D. Salt, R. T. Mills. WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room K-1, East Hall Symposium on Computer Graphics—Practical Aspects organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. C. L. Wilkins, Presiding 9:00—Welcome to the Symposium. D. F. DeTar. 9:05—20. An Introduction to Molecular Graphics. L. J. Soltzberg. 9:40—21. Use of Computer Graphics in the Teaching of Chemistry. S. Smith. 10:20—22. A Microcomputer-Interfaced Stopped-Flow Kinetics Apparatus with Interactive Graphics. J. W. Moore, K. W. Hicks, J. Vidolich, S. T. Pittenger, K. Gehring, R. G. Williams. 10:45—23. GRAMPS: An Interactive Graphics Language for Widening Chemical Graphics Applications. A. J. Olson, T. J. O'Donnell. 11:25—24. Computer Studies of Protein Structure. B. Honig. L. L. Shipman,

Presiding

1:30—25. Phase and Quantization in Color. E. J. Heller. 1:55—26. Chemical Image Acquisition and Analysis. B. R. Kowalski, M. Griffith, B. Vandeginste. 2:35—27. Applications of MOVIE.BYU. H. N. Christiansen, M. B. Stephenson. 3:15—28. Chemical and Biological Applications of Computer Graphics at Du Pont. L. L. Shipman, D. A. Pensak. 3:55—29. Molecular Modeling on Microcomputers: I: Stick Models. G. S. Owen, J. O. Currie. 4:35—30. High Resolution Computer Pictures of Molecular Models. N. L. Max. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room K-1, East Hall Symposium on Computer Graphics—Practical Aspects organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc.

A. Olson, Presiding 9:00—31. Microcomputer Graphics for Chemistry: What to Look For. J. L. Graef. 9:45—32. Elements of a Computer Graphics System. P. Walden. 10:30—33. True Three Dimensional Display of Computer Data. H. Stover. 11:15—34. Three-D Colored Molecules by Computer Graphics. J. D. Kennedy, G. L. Wilson.

Section B Symposium on Teaching Chemistry with Simulations and Games organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 52) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room K-1, East Hall Symposium on Computer Graphics—Practical Aspects organized by Division of Computers in Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. D. F. DeTar, Presiding 1:30—35. New Graphic Hardware-Software Package for the Laboratory Microcomputer. A. Wiliinger. 2:15—36. High Performance Computer Graphics for the Everyman. M. W. Mantle. 3:00—37. Chromatics CGC7900 as a Chemical Research Tool. M. S. Morgan. 3:45—38. Applications of Color Graphics in Spectral Analysis. M. Lennon, D. Parker, S. Lowry, J. Petersen.

Session on Meteorological Aspects 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—8. Acid Rain—an Overview. E. Gorham. 9:10—9. U.S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program. C. Bernabo. 9:30—Discussion. 9:45—10. Wintertime Precipitation Chemistry in North Georgia. M. T. Dana, A. A. N. Patrinos. 10:05—11. Air Pollutant Trajectories in Precipitating Storms. P. Michael, J. M. Hales. 10:25—Intermission. 10:30—12. Analysis of Wind and Precipitation Data for Assessments of Transboundary Transport and Wet Sulfur Deposition Between Canada and the United States. B. L. Niemann. 11:00—13. Atmosphere as Delivery Vehicle and Reaction Chamber for Acid Precipitation. R. W. Shaw. 11:30—14. Models of the Effects of Air Motions in Different Size Storms on Acid Precipitation. C. W. Kreitzberg. 11:55—Concluding Remarks.

Section B Poster Session—Teaching Chemistry with Simulations and Games organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 52)

Section C Convention Center, Room A-3, East Hall General S. S. Sandhu,

Section B Convention Center, Room A-2, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement

J. C. Durham, Presiding Session on Chemistry of Particles, Fogs, and Rain 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—28. Mathematical Modeling of Aerosol Growth and Acidification. M. E. Bassett, J. H. Seinfeld. 2:10—29. Acidification of Rain by the Oxidation of Dissolved S0 2 and the Absorption of HN0 3 . J. L. Durham, H. M. Barnes, J. H. Overton, Jr. 2:45—30. Formation, Occurrence, and Neutralization of Acidic Aerosols. P. T. Cunningham, B. D. Holt, S. A. Johnson, D. L. Drapcho, R. Kumar. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—31. S0 2 and N0 2 Reactions in Cloud Droplets. A. W. Gertler, D. F. Miller, D. Lamb, U. Katz. 4:10—32. Observations of Acid Particles and Droplets in the Troposphere. P. Winkler. 4:45—Concluding Remarks. 5:00—Divisional Reception {see Section A for details).

Presiding

Section C

9:00—Introductory Remarks.

ENVI DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY R. L. Jolley, Chairman J. D. Johnson, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-1, East Hall Symposium on Quality Assurance and Analytical Methods for Monitoring Hazardous Wastes

E. P. Meier, Presiding

9:05—15. Evaluation of Sample Preparation Techniques for the Analysis of PCBs in Oil. S. Sonchik, J. Longbottom, D. Madeleine, P. Macek. 9:25—16. Destruction of PCBs in Transformer Oil. D. J. Brunelle, D. A. Singleton. 9:50—17. Water Chlorination: Environmental Fate of Reactive Oxidant Species. R. L. Jolley. 10:15—18. Fluoride and Nitrate Concentration in Saudi Ground and Potable Waters. J. M. Mee, M. Jahangir, A. Abdul-Karim, I. M. Faruq. 10:35—Intermission. 10:45—19. Leaching of Trace Metals From Coal and Oil Fly Ash. W. R. Harris, O. G. Raabe, D. R. Silberman. 11:10—20. Selection of Bacterial Transformation of Xenobiotic Chemicals Using Candicidin. D. L. Lewis, H. W. Holm, G. E. Michaels. 11:35—21. Environmental Impact of the Aquatic Trace Elements on Fish. A. K. Koli, R. Whitmore.

Section D Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry (see page 53)

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:45—1. How Much Testing is Enough? EPA's Policy with Respect to RCRA Testing Problems. D. Friedman. 9:10—2. Environmental Protection Agency's Uncontrolled Hazardous Wastesite Analysis Program. A. F. Haeberer, S. P. Kovell. Session on Quality Assurance for Analysis of Samples from Waste Sites

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room A-1, East Hail Symposium on Quality Assurance and Analytical Methods for Monitoring Hazardous Wastes

G. Easterly, Presiding

G. Easterly, Presiding

9:35—3. Quality Assurance of Support Functions in a Large Hazardous Wastes Analytical Laboratory. R. E. Meierer, P. L. Ragsdale, P. E. Mills. 10:00—4. Quality Assurance Support for Water Related Analyses in the Hazardous Wastes Program. J. A. Winter. 10:25—5. Evaluation of Automated Programs for bata Interpretation According to the Priority Pollutant Protocol. M. H. Carter, M. D. Neptune, L. E. Slivon, D. G. Aichele, D. C. K. Lin. 10:50—6. Management of RCRA Analytical Quality Control Data. W. L. Budde, T. Reed, Jr., R. L. Prairie, R. J. Mahler, P. W. Britton, B. P. Almich. 11:15—7. Control and Assurance of Data in the Examination of Hazardous Waste Samples in a USEPA Regional Laboratory. S. R. Sax, W. F. Gersting.

Section B Convention Center, Room A-2, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement

C. Bhumralker, Presiding

Session on Quality Assurance for Analysis of Samples from Waste Sites 2:00—22. Specialized Methodology and Quality Assurance Procedures Used Aboard Mobile Laboratories for the Analysis of Hazardous Wastes. M. Gruenfeld, U. Frank, D. P. Remeta. 2:25—23. Quality Assurance of Macroreticular Resin (MRR) Samplers in Trace Organic Analysis. I. H. Suffet, B. A. Najar, J. Gibs. 2:50—24. Influence of the Time of Acidification After Sample Collection on the Preservation of Drinking Water Samples for Lead Analysis. R. G. Miller, J. U. Doerger, P. K. Roberson, F. C. Kopfler. 3:15—25. Quality Assurance Data for Analysis of Extraction Procedure Liquids from Municipal Sludges. E. J. Subak, Jr., D. Costick, B. K. Osborn, E. S. Papay, W. Trent. 3:40—26. Relative Response Factors of Deuterated VS. Nondeuterated PNAs Using GC-FID. W. D. Pyle, J. M. Harless. 4:05—27. Protocol for Developing Validated Trace Analytical Methods. D. W. Bristol, D. E. Bradway, T. R. Edgerton. 5:00—Divisional Wine and Cheese Reception (see Social Events, ticket 105).

Convention Center, Room A-3, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement

R. M. Carlson, Presiding 1:50—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—33. Acid Precipitation and Lake Susceptibility in the Central Washington Cascades. R. A. Logan, J. C. Derby, L. C. Duncan. 2:20—34. Solution Rate of Acidity and Related Ions From Ambient Aerosols. M. E. Perry, A. W. Elzerman. 2:40—35. Ecological Effects of Aluminum Complexes in Freshwater r-ish ana ineir Environments. T. K. Morris, G. L. Krueger. 3:00—36. Sensitivity of Aquatic Organisms to Acidic Environments. J. M. Eilers, R. Berg, G. E. Glass. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—37. Seasonal Variability in Limnological Features of Two Minnesota Lakes Exposed to Acidic Precipitation. J. R. Hargis, G. Rapp, Jr., G. E. Glass. 3:50—38. Use of Forest Site Index for Evaluating Terrestrial Resources at Risk From Acidic Deposition. O. L. Loucks. G E. Glass. 4:10—39. Role of Sediments in Buffering Lakewater pH in Softwater Lakes Receiving Atmospheric Inputs of Acidity. P. L. Brezonik, L. A. Baker, E. S. Edgerton. 4:30—40. Nitrogen Oxide/Sulfur Dioxide Reactions of Potential Importance of Acidic, Atmospheric Aerosols. C. L. Gu, D. S. Ross, D. G. Hendry. 4:50—41. Kinetics and Mechanisms of the Catalyzed Autoxidation of Dissolved S0 2 in Aqueous Solution. Heterogeneous Catalysis by Solid-Supported Metal Phthalocyanine Complexes. P. A. Hong, L. M. Moberly, M. R. Hoffmann, S. D. Boyce. 5:10—Concluding Remarks. 5:15—Divisional Reception (see Section A for details). Section D Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry (see page 53) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-1, East Hall General A. K. Koli, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks.

9:05—42. Aqueous Solution Kinetics of a Wet Flue Gas Scrubber System. D. Littlejohn, S. G. Chang. 9:35—43. Thermal Oxidation Kinetics of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons. S. M. Senkan, A. K. Gupta, H. Valeiras. 10:00—44. Speciation of Tributyltin Compounds in Seawater and Estuarine Sediments. H. E. Guard, W. M. Coleman, III, A. B. Cobet. 10:25—Intermission. 10:35—45. Physical and Chemical Transport Processes for Naphthalene and Lindane in the Aquatic Environment. F. Y. Saleh, K. L. Dickson, J. H. Rodgers, Jr. 11:00—46. Kinetics and Products of Hydrolysis of 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP). N. E. Burlinson, L. A. Lee, D. H. Rosenblatt. 11:25—47. Development of an Analytical Method for DBCP in Drinking Water and its Application for Evaluation of Activated Carbon Removal. H. G. Nowicki, T. H. Schaefers, J. L. Fisher. 11:40—48. Occurrence and Environmental Significance of Aromatic Nitrogen Compounds in Coal-Conversion Process Streams. J. R. Stetter, V. C. Stamoudis. 12:00—Concluding Remarks.

Section B Convention Center, Room A-2, East Hall ACS Award Symposium for Creative Advances in Environmental Sciences and Technology in Honor of J. G. Calvert and Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement

J. G. Calvert, R. L. Jolley, Presiding 8:50—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—49. Kinetic Studies of Sulfite Oxidation in Aqueous Solution. L. R. Martin, D. E. Damschen. 9:35—50. Kinetics and Mechanisms of the Catalytic Autoxidation of Dissolved S0 2 in Aqueous Solution: Free Radical, Polar and Photoassisted Pathways. M. R. Hoffmann. 10:10—51. Gas-Aqueous Reactions of Sulfur and Nitrogen Oxides in Liquid-Water Clouds. S. E. Schwartz. 10:45—Intermission. 10:55—52. Aerosol as a Reactant for Acid Formation in the Atmosphere. J. R. Brock, J. L. Durham. 11:30—53. Award Address. (ACS Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology sponsored by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.). Mechanisms of the Gas Phase Oxidations of S0 2 , NO, and N0 2 in the Atmosphere. J. G. Calvert. 12:05—Concluding Remarks.

Section C Convention Center, Room A-3, East Hall General R. A. Mi near, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—54. Utilization of Two-Stage Aeration and Sequential Reaction Kinetics tor Optimal Wastewater Treatment. M. A. Vivona. 9:30—55. A Method for the Computerized Calculation of SIM (Selected Ion Monitor) Data from Hewlett-Packard GC/MS Systems. L. A. Raphaelian. 9:55—56. Concentrations and Atmospheric Deposition of Organic Pollutants at Rural and Marine Sites. E. L. Atlas, K. F. Sullivan, C. S. Giam. 10:15—57. Use of Test Plot Aerial Spray Data to Estimate Potential for Pesticide Drift and Exposure from Forestry Applications. M. Ghassemi, P. Painter, M. Powers, N. Akesson, M. Dellarco. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—58. Environmental Fate of Hydrazine Fuels. D. E. Damschen, H. S. Judeikis. 11:15—59. Smog Chamber Simulations of Atmospheric Photochemistry Under Transport Conditions. W. A. Glasson. 11:35—60. Factors Affecting the Sampling and Analysis of Atmospheric Carbonaceous Particulate Matter. S. H. Cadle, P. J. Groblicki, P. A. Mulawa. 12:00—Concluding Remarks.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

59

5 < QC

Section D Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry {see page 53)

Q.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

< O

Convention Center, Room A-1, East Hall Symposium on Quality Assurance and Analytical Methods for Monitoring Hazardous Wastes G. Easterly, Presiding

2 z o

Hi> z

LU

Section A

Session on Quality Assurance for Analysis of Samples from Waste Sites 2:00—61. Preparation of Quality Assurance Analytical Standards for Hazardous Waste Analyses, Part I. A. W. Nichols, J. M. Harless. 2:25—62. Preparation of Quality Assurance Analytical Standards for Hazardous Waste Analyses, Part II. J. M. Harless, A. W. Nichols. 2:50—63. Quality Control Protocol for the Fused Silica Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Determination of Semivolatile Priority Pollutants. V. Lopez-Avila. 3:15—64. Formation of Artifacts in Environmental Analysis. A. L Lafleur, N. Pangaro. 3:40—65. Matrix Effects in Volatile Organic Analysis. T. R. Smith, E. A. Lawler, M. F. Scott, N. Stewart. 4:05—66. Development of a National QA Program for Asbestos Analysis. E. P. Brantly, Jr., D. E. Lentzen, M. E. Beard, J. J. Breen. 4:30—Concluding Remarks. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 114).

Section B Convention Center, Room A-2, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement B. B. Hicks, Presiding Session on Deposition Both Wet and Dry 1:50—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—67. Evaluation of Wet/Dry Chemical Deposition in North America. J. H. Gibson. 2:20—68. A Field Intercomparison of Sulfate Dry Deposition Monitoring and Measurement Methods. D. A. Dolske, D. F. Gatz. 2:40—69. Acidic Pollutants in Air and Precipitation at Selected Rural Locations in Canada. L. A. Barrie, K. A. Anlauf, H. A. Wiebe, P. Fellin. 3:00—70. OSCAR Experiment. R. C. Easter. 3:20—intermission. 3:30—71. Dry Deposition of Nitrogen Containing Species. G. J. McRae. 3:50—72. Combined Analysis of Air Quality and Precipitation Chemistry Data. G. M. Hidy, R. J. Countess. 4:10—73. A Comparison of Precipitation Composition at Coastal and Inland Sites in Central Florida. B. C. Madsen. 4:30—74. Distribution and Nature of Acid Precipitation in Central and Northern New Mexico. C. J. Popp, R. W. Ohline, D. K. Brandvold, L. A. Brandvold. 4:50—75. Examination of the Acidic Deposition Gradient Across the Lake States Region. R. Becker, J. M. Eilers, G. E. Glass. 5:10—Concluding Remarks. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A). 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A).

Section C Convention Center, Room A-3, East Hall General D. R. Boline, Presiding 2:00—76. Reactions of Organic Pollutants in Bottom Sediments. J. R. Pierce, N. L. Wolfe. 2:25—77. Degradation of Chlorpyrifos in Sediment-Water Systems. D. L. Macalady, N. L. Wolfe.

60

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

2:50—78. Pollutant Degradation by Enzymes in Natural Waters and Sediments. N. L. Wolfe, D. Macalady, J. Pierce. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—79. Sizing of Particles in Water by Sedimentation FFF. M. E. Hansen, G. Karaiskakis. 3:55—80. Preparation of Soil, Sludge and Sediment Material for Determination of Total Arsenic. S. S. Sandhu. 4:20—81. Adsorption of Di(2-ethyhexyl) phthalate and Aroclor 1254 From Seawater Onto Sedimentary Particles. K. F. Sullivan, C. S. Giam. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A). 7:30—Divisional Dinner (see Section A). Section D Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry (see page 53) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-1, East Hall Symposium on Quality Assurance and Analytical Methods for Monitoring Hazardous Wastes

W. Reynolds, Presiding Session on Sample Preparation and Analytical Methodology 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—82. Gel Permeation Chromatography in the GC/MS Analysis of Organics in Sludges. R. H. Wise, R. T. Williams, D. F. Bishop, B, M. Austern. 9:00—83. Organic Compound Extraction Procedures for High Concentration Hazardous Waste Samples. L. W. Strattan, R. L. Garnas, K. H. Driscoll. 9:25—84. Inorganic Analytical Screening and Preparation Schemes for Analysis of Hazardous Waste Samples. J. H. Lowry, R. C. Ross, T. L. Law. 9:50—85. Intercomparison of Gas Chromatographic (GC) Methods of Analysis of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB's). M. T. Homsher, C. Carpenelli, S. P. Levine. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—86. Determination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Soils, Sediments, Sludges, and Oils. B. N. Colby, C. S. Parsons. 10:50—87. Methodology for the Survey Analysis of Organic Constituents of Hazardous Waste. H. C. Miller, R. H. James, M. D. Neptune, M. H. Carter. 11:15—88. Interlaboratory Comparison of a GC-MS Method to Determine Semivolatile Organic Compounds in Solid Waste. J. S. Warner, L. E. Slivon, P. W. Meehan, M. C. Landes, T. A. Bishop. 11:40—89. Matrix Effects in Volatile Organic Analysis. T. R. Smith, E. A. Lawler, M. F. Scott, N. Stewart.

Section B Convention Center, Room A-2, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement R. A. Linthurst, Presiding Session on Direct and Indirect Effects of Acid Deposition on Vegetation 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—90. An Ecosystem Approach to the Acid Rain Problem. R. M. Klein. 9:10—91. Characterization of Injury to Birch and Bean Leaves by Simulated Acid Precipitation. E. T. Paparozzi, H. B. Tukey, Jr. 9:40—92. Biogeochemical and Physiological Responses of Forest Canopies to Acid Precipitation. C. S. Cronan. 10:10—93. Assessing the Possibility of a Link Between Acid Precipitation and Decreased Growth Rates of Pitch Pine {Pinus Rigida), Shortleaf Pine (Pinus echinata), and Red Spruce (Picea rubens). A. H. Johnson, R. S. Turner, D. G. Lord, T. G. Siccama. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—94. Effects of Acid Deposition on Microbial Response and its Implication for Plant Productivity. M. K. Firestone, J. G. McColl. 11:20—95. Acid Deposition and Forest Tree Disease Caused by Fungal Pathogens. W. H. Smith.

11:50—96. Effects of Acidic Precipitation on Plant Diseases. R. I. Bruck, S. R. Shafer. 12:15—Concluding Remarks.

Section C Convention Center, Room A-3, East Hall General

R. L. Trammel I, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—97. Use of Cs-137 and Pb-210 for Dating Recent Sediments of Major Streams in the Grants Mineral Belt, New Mexico. C. J. Popp, M. Dehn, J. W. Hawley. 9:30—98. Analysis of Nitrosubstituted Munition Compounds in Environmental Samples. J. J. Mousa, D. H. Powell, A. L. Shroads, C. M. Mark, A. C. Moore. 9:55—99. Test Procedures for Pesticides in Industrial Effluents. D. M. Victor, J. M. Allan, M. G. Winslow, S. A. Whitlock. 10:20—100. Facile Fractionation of Fulvic Acid. P. W. Jennings, R. A. Ekeland. 10:45—101. Chlorinolysis of Hydrazine Fuels and Nitrosodimethylamine. R. Rianda, M. P. Easton, H. S. Judeikis, S. S. Adams. 11:15—Concluding Remarks. Section D Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry (see page 53)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Session on Aquatic Effects 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—110. Effect of Lake pH on Allochthonous Litter Decomposition. A. J. Francis, H. L. Quinby, G. R. Hendrey. 2:25—111. pH Related Changes in Attached Algal Communities of Softwater Lakes. P. M. Stokes. 2:45—112. Aquatic Ecosystem Acidification in the Sierra Nevada, CA: Potential for Chemical and Biological Changes. K. Tonnessen. 3:05—113. Changes in the Behaviour and Structure of Plankton Systems at Intermediate pH. D. R. Marmorek. 3:25—Intermission. 3:35—114. Fish Population Responses During the Experimental Acidification of a Small Lake. K. H. Mills. 3:55—115. Species Composition of Fish Communities in Northern Wisconsin Seepage Lakes: Relationship to pH. J. G. Wiener, P. J. Rago, J. M. Eilers. 4:15—116. Fisheries in the pH Range of 5 to 6 in Relation to Acidic and Non-acidic Conditions. J. R. M. Kelso, J. M. Gunn. 4:35—117. Elevated Metals and Enhanced Metal Uptake in Fishes in Acid-Stressed Waters. H. H. Harvey, P. J. Dillon, G. A. Fraser, K. Somers, P. E. Fraser, C. Lee. 5:00—Concluding Remarks.

Section C Symposium on Chemistry and Safety for Toxicity Testing of Environmental Chemicals organized by Division of Chemical Health and Safety joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry (see page 53)

Section A Convention Center, Room A-1, East Hall Symposium on Quality Assurance and Analytical Methods for Monitoring Hazardous Wastes

W. Sovocool, Presiding Session on Methods for Analysis of Samples from Waste Sites 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—102. Analytical Procedures for Analysis of Dioxins. J. R. Donnelly, W. D. Reynolds, D. F. Gurka, J. S. Huang. 9:00—103. Analytical Methodology for Determination of Chlorodibenzodioxins and Chlorodibenzofurans in Fly Ash and Stack Effluents From Municipal Waste Incinerators. T. O. Tiernan, M. L. Taylor, J. G. Solch, G. F. VanNess, R. L. Harless, J. H. Garrett. 9:25—104. General Applications of Fused Silica Capillary Column Chromatography to the Analysis of Non-priority Pollutant Organics—A Series of Environmental Case Studies. G. T. Hunt, M. Hoyt. 9:50—105. Strategies for the Identification and Quantitation of Priority Pollutants Using Fused Silica Capillary Column GC/MS. B. N. Colby, P. W. Ryan, J. E. Wilkinson. 10:15—106. GC/MS Analysis of Hazardous Waste Extracts Using Fused Silica Capillary Columns: A Comparison Study With Traditional Packed Columns. R. G. Beimer, M. K. O'Rell, A. D. Sauter. 10:40—107. Predicting GC/MS Response Factors For Organic Compounds. A. D. Sauter, W. L. Fitch, V. Lopez-Avila. 11:05—108. Theoretical Approach to the Calculation of GC/MS Relative Sensitivity Ratios. W. L. Fitch, A. D. Sauter, V. Lopez-Avila. 11:30—109. GC/FT-IR/MS; Applications for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste Samples. K. H. Shafer, T. L. Hayes, J. E. Tabor, R. J. Jakobsen.

Section B Convention Center, Room A-2, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement G. R. Hendrey, Presiding

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-1, East Hall Symposium on Quality Assurance and Analytical Methods for Monitoring Hazardous Wastes

W. Sovocool, Presiding Session on Methods for Analysis of Samples from Waste Sites 8:30—118. Direct Analysis of Organics in Environmental Matrices Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. D. F. Hunt, T. M. Harvey, M. Coates, J. Shabanowitz. 8:55—119. Triple Quadrupole MS/MS For Analysis of Complex Environmental Samples. R. A. Yost. 9:20—120. Series Dual-Electrode LCEC Detection of Explosives in the Environment. K. Bratin, P. T. Kissinger. 9:45—121. ICP Ionization Techniques for Elemental and Organic Mass Spectrometry. R. S. Houk, J. Olivares, J. J. Thompson. 10:05—122. Determination of Heavy Metals Municipal Sewage Sludges. S. A. Katz, S. W. Jenniss. 10:30—123. Speciation of Arsenic Compounds in Solid Wastes Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. T. R. Acciani, E. A. Burns. 10:55—124. Determination of Arsenic (III) and Arsenic (V) in Hazardous Waste Leachates. M. P. Miller, B. C. Garrett, D. L. Sgontz. 11:20—125. A Literature Assessment of MultiElement Analytical Techniques for* Analysis of Priority Pollutant Metals in Hazardous Wastes. J. Oppenhelmer, A. Eaton, L. Leong. 11:45—126. A Comparison of AA, ICP, XRF and INAA for Analysis of Hazardous Waste Samples. A. Eaton, G. Oelker, S. Briggs, R. Giaque, H. Michel. 12:10—127. Development of the EPA Interim Method for Asbestos in Bulk Samples. E. P. Brantly, Jr., D. E. Lentzen, K. W. Gold, L. E. Myers, J. J. Breen, M. E. Beard.

Section B Convention Center, Room A-2, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement

O. P. Bricker, Presiding

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Geological Aspects of Acid Rain 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—128. Geochemical Mass Balance for Sulfur- and Nitrogen-Bearing Acid Components, Eastern United States. W. D. Bischoff, V. Paterson, F. T. Mackenzie.

9:00—129. Chronology, Magnitude, and Paleolimnological Record of Changing Metal Fluxes Related to Atmospheric Deposition of Acids and Metals in New England. J. S. Kahl, S. A. Norton, J. S. Williams. 9:30—130. Acid Rain Neutralization by Geologic Materials. N. M. Johnson. 10:00—131. Aluminum Speciation in Dilute Acidified Surface Waters of the Adirondack Region of New York State. C. T. Driscoll, J. P. Baker, J. J. Bisogni, C. L. Schofield. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—132. Ion Balances Between Precipitation Inputs and Rhode River Watershed Discharges. D. L. Correll, N. M. Goff, W. T. Peterjohn. 11:10—133. Regional Watershed Analysis for Assessing Sensitivity to Acidic Deposition for Central Ontario. D. W. Cowell, A. E. Lucas. 11:40—134. Terrigenous Response to Acidic Deposition in the Lake States' Region (Minnesota/Ontario, Wisconsin, and Michigan). G. Rapp, Jr., G. E. Glass. 12:00—135. Validation and Refinement of Computer Derived Aquatic Sensitivity Mapping. J. D. Thornton, S. A. Heiskary. 12:20—Concluding Remarks.

Section C Convention Center, Room A-3, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement

P. L. Brezonik, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—136. Relationships Between Susceptibility to Acidification and Factors Controlling Water Quality. G. E. Glass, J. M. Eilers, K. E. Webster, T. Bydalek. 9:30—137. Some Considerations in Relations Water Quality in Northern Wisconsin Lakes to Atmospheric Deposition. J. M. Eilers, K. E. Webster, A. Pollack, G. E. Glass. 9:50—138. Development of Susceptibility Criteria/Measures for Assessing Aquatic Resources at Risk From the Deposition of Airborne Pollutants. J. R. Hargis, G. Rapp, Jr., G. E. Glass. 10:10—139. Solubility of Metal Ions in Rain Water. D. F. Gatr. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—140. Relative Impact of NOx and SOx to the Phenomenon of "Acid Rain" (Panel Discussion). R. M. Carlson, G. Rapp, Jr. 11:40—Concluding Remarks. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-1, East Hall Symposium on Quality Assurance and Analytical Methods for Monitoring Hazardous Wastes

G. Pearson, Presiding Characterization of Waste Sites 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—141. Field Methods for Detection of Various Toxic Substances at Hazardous Waste Sites. R. E. Snyder, B. E. ScrtuKe, E. T. McHale. 2:30—142. Screening Procedures For Detection of Various Hazardous Substances in Sludge-Type Wastes. R. E. Snyder, B. E. Schulte, M. E. Tonkin, E. T. McHale. 2:55—143. Mutagenic and Biochemical Monitoring of Hazardous Wastes. W. R. Lower. 3:20—144. Chemical Fractionation and Bioassay of Complex Wastes. G. E. Walsh. 3:45—145. Leachate Tests and the Environmental Behavior of Chromium From Electric Arc Furnace Baghouse Dust. A. W. Elzerman, S. F. Robinson, T. J. Overcamp. 4:10—146. Leachability of Heavy Metals in Ash Residues From Municipal Waste-toEnergy Facilities. B. Chrlstensen, J. Schuck. 4:35—147. "Type Characterization of Hazardous Wastes". I. Lysyj. 5:00—Concluding Remarks.

T. D. Crocker, Presiding Economic Perspectives on Acid Deposition Control 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—148. Acid Rain—Does Science Dictate Policy or Policy Dictate Science? A. M. Gorsuch. 2:30—149. Economically Relevant Response Estimation and the Value of Information: The Case of Acid Rain. R. M. Adams, T. D. Crocker. 2:50—150. Acidification Impact on Fisheries: Substitution and The Valuation of Recreation Resources. F. C. Menz, J. K. Mullen. 3:10—151. Economic Impact of Acid Precipitation: A Canadian Perspective. B. A. Forster. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—152. Economics of State Liability for International Environmental Degradation. A. V. Kneese. 4:05—153. Effect of Global Optimization on Locally Optimal Pollution Control: The Case of Acid Rain. S. A. Atkinson. 4:25—154. Transferable Discharge Permits and Electric Public Utilities. J. T. Tschirhart. 4:45—155. How Remote Clients Can Improve Benefit-Cost Analyses of Acid Rain. T. D. Crocker. 5:05—156. Normative Economics and the Acid Rain Problem. L. Eubanks, R. Gabe. 5:25—Concluding Remarks.

Section C Convention Center, Room A-3, East Hall Symposium on EPA's Master Analytical Scheme

E. D. Pellizzari, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—157. Master Analytical Scheme: An Overview of Revised Procedures. A. W. Garrison, E. D. Pellizzari. 2:30—158. Master Analytical Scheme for the Analysis of Organic Compounds in Water: Extractable Organic Compounds. L. S. Sheldon, R. A. Zweidinger, M. A. Jones, M. Warner, E. D. Pellizzari. 2:55—159. Fractionation of Wastewater Extracts for Capillary Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectrometry Analysis. R. A. Zweidinger, J. Albert, E. D. Pellizzari. 3:20—160. Master Scheme for the Analysis of Organic Compounds in Water: Low Molecular Weight, Water Soluble Organic Compounds. L. S. Sheldon, J. P. Goforth, E. D. Pellizzari. 3:45—161. Development of a Comprehensive Method for the Analysis of Volatile Organics on Soils, Sediments, and Sludges. J. J. Ellington, R. A. Zweidinger, E. D. Pellizzari. 4:10—162. Development of a Master Analytical Scheme for Purgeable Organics in Soils, Sediments and Sludges. E. D. Pellizzari, L. C. Michael, J. M. Turlington, R. A. Zweidinger. 4:35—163. Solvent Selection in the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds From Soils and Sediments. R. A. Zweidinger, P. A. Hyldburg, E. D. Pellizzari. 5:00—164. Extraction of Volatile Organic . Compounds From Sludge: A New Approach. R. A. Zweidinger, P. A. Hyldburg, E. D. Pellizzari. 5:25—Concluding Remarks. FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-1, East Hall Symposium on Quality Assurance and Analytical Methods for Monitoring Hazardous Wastes

G. Pearson, Presiding Characterization of Waste Sites 9:00—165. Groundwater Quality Monitoring Near Underground Coal Gasification Sites. F. Wang, D. Stuermer, S. W. Mead. 9:25—166. Delineation and Monitoring of Hazardous Waste Sites Using an Integrated System of Geophysical Methods. R. A. Glaccum, R. C. Benson, M. R. Noel.

Section B Convention Center, Room A-2, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement

9:50—167. A Crosswind Integration Technique for Measuring Emission Rates of Vapors and Gases From Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Area Sources. D. T. Mage, J. M. Hans, Jr. 10:15—168. Measurement of Corrosion Rate and EP Toxicity Hexavalent Chromium For RCRA Samples by Voltammetric Techniques. J. H. Lowry, R. C. Ross, E. L. Bour. 10:40—169. Procedures For Sampling Hazardous Wastes: Practical Considerations. P. J. Ford, P. Turina, P. Fennelly, C. Fitzsimmons.

Section B Convention Center, Room A-2, East Hall Symposium on Acid Precipitation organized by Division of Environmental Chemistry joint with Committee on Environmental Improvement

J. L. Schnoor, Presiding Modeling of Total Acid Precipitation Impacts 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—170. Use of Atmospheric Trajectory Models For Diagnosing the Sources of Acid Precipitation. P. J. Samson, M. J. Small. 9:00—171. Eulerian Modelling of the Transport and Chemical Processes Affecting the Long Range Transport of S0 2 and Sulfate. G. R. Carmichael, L. K. Peters. 9:20—172. Kinetic Models for Precipitation Acidity in Texas. H. M. Liljestrand, J. A. Feeley. 9:40—173. Norwegian Models for Surface Water Chemistry. R. F. Wright. 10:00—Intermission. 10:10—174. Modeling Acid/Base Chemistry of Dilute Acidified Waters in the Adirondack Region of New York State. C. T. Driscoll, J. J. Bisogni. 10:30—175. U.S./Canada Aquatic Impacts Assessment: Integration of Experimental Studies, Monitoring and Modeling of Acidic Deposition Effects. O. L. Loucks, G. E. Glass. 10:50—176. Modeling Impacts of Acid Precipitation For Northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. J. L. Schnoor, W. D! Palmer, Jr., F. A. Van Schepen, J. M. Eilers, G. E. Glass. 11:10—177. Development and Calibration of the Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) Model. C. W. Chen, S. A. Gherini, J. D. Dean, R. J. M. Hudson, R. A. Goldstein. 11:40—178. Modeling the Interrelationship of Ground Water and Surface Water. T. C. Winter. 12:00—179. Modelling the Reacidification Rates of Neutralized Acidic Lakes Near Sudbury, Ontario. W. A. Scheider, P. J. Dillon. 12:20—Concluding Remarks.

FLUO DIVISION OF FLUORINE CHEMISTRY A. W. Jache, Chairman P. R. Resnick, SecretaryTreasurer

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room N-2, East Hall Symposium on Organofluorine Compounds in Medicine and Biology

K. V. Scherer, Jr., Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

8:50—1. Perfluorochemicals and Blood Replacement. R. P. Geyer, K. Taylor, R. Eccles, T. Zerbonne, C. Keller. 9:25—2. Fluorinated Ethers as Inhalation Anesthetics. R. C. Terrell, L. Speers. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—3. Radiopaque Fluorocarbon Compounds are Useful as Diagnostic Agents and Have Unique Biological Functions. D. M. Long, C. M. Sharts, D. F. Shellhamer, F. Multer, R. Mitten. 10:50—4. Evaluation of Four New Perfluorochemicals as Oxygen Transporting Emulsions. C. M. Heldebrant, H. Okamoto, M. Watanabe, A. M. McLaughlin, K. Yokoyama. 11:25—5. Synthesis and Physical Properties of Perfluorocompounds Useful as Blood Substitute Components. R. E. Moore, L. C. Clark, Jr. R. P. Geyer, Presiding 2:00—6. Advances in Blood Substitution Using Perfluorochemicals as Oxygen Carriers. J. R. Riess. 2:35—7. A New Perfluorination Technique Using 100% Fluorine in Solution: Application to Candidate Compounds for Fluorochemical Emulsion Blood Substitutes. K. V. Scherer, Jr., K. Yamanouchi, K. Yokoyama, R. Naito. 3:00—8. Synthesis for Perfluorocarbon Compounds of Novel Structure for Use as Oxygen Carriers. R. J. Lagow, R. E. Aikman, D. Persico, W. Lin. 3:35—Intermission. 3:50—9. Screening of New Perfluorochemicals (PFC's) as Candidates for Use in Fluorochemical Emulsion Blood Substitutes—Structure and Biological Properties. K. Yokoyama, C. Fukaya, Y. Tsuda, T. Suyama, R. Naito, K. Yamanouchi, K. Scherer. 4:25—10. New Synthesis and Reactions of Perfluoro-tert-Butyl Chloroformate. M. Hudlicky. TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room N-2, East Hall Symposium on Theoretical Aspects of Fluorocarbon Chemistry H. F. Koch, Presiding 8:40—Introductory Remarks. 8:45—11. Localized versus Delocalized Carbanion Intermediates. H. F. Koch, J. G. Koch, A. S. Koch, S. W. Kim. 9:15—12. A Theoretical Study of Nucleophilic Substitution on Vinyl Carbon. R. D. Bach, G. Wolber. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—13. Visible and Infrared Photochemistry of Gas-Phase Ions. J. I. Brauman, P. S. Drzaic, J. M. Jasinski, C. R. Moylan. 10:45—14. Fluorine and the "Forbidden" World of Chemistry. N. D. Epiotis. 11:30—15. Paradoxes in Strain Energies of Fluorinated Molecules. A. Greenberg, J. F. Liebman. B. E. Smart, Presiding 2:00—16. Cycloadditions of Fluorinated Allenes. Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of 4-(Difluoromethylene)-1-Pyrazolines. W. R. Dolbier, Jr., C. H. Burkholder. 2:45—17. Substituent Effects in Cyclopropyl Derivatives—An Ab Initio Approach. A. Skancke. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—18. Reactivity of Fluorinated Homocyclobutadienes. D. Wirth, D. M. Lemal. 4:00—19. Regularities in Fluorine Chemistry. J. F. Liebman. 4:45—20. A Novel Method for the Addition of BrF to Alkenes using Elemental Fluorine. S. Rozen, M. Brand. 5:05—Divisional Business Meeting. WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room N-2, East Hall Symposium on Fluoropolymers K. J. L. Paciorek, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—21. Fluoropolymers in Fluid and Lubricant Applications. C. E. Snyder, Jr., L. J. Gschwender. 9:05—22. Synthesis of Perfluorocarbon Polyethers by Direct Fluorination. R. J. Lagow, D. Persico, W. Bailey.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

61

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9:25—23. Thermal Oxidative Degradation Reactions of Perfluoroalkylethers. W. R. Jones, K. J. L. Paciorek, T. I. Ito, R. H. Kratzer. 9:45—24. Copolymerization Studies of Fluorinated Epoxides. K. J. L. Paciorek, T. I. Ito, J. H. Nakahara, R. H. Kratzer. 10:05—Intermission. 10:20—25. Synthesis of New Perfluorocarbon Polymers with Phosphonic Groups. M. Kato, S. Munekata, M. Yamabe. 10:50—26. Fluorocarbon Ether Elastomers. W. R. Griffin. 11:10—27. Synthesis of Fluorocarbonether Triazine Polymers. C. H. Cheng, R. W. Rosser. 11:30—28. Elastomeric Polyimides from ct,co-Bis(aminomethyl)polyoxyperfluoroalkylene and Tetracarboxylic Acids. E. Strepparola, G. Caporiccio, E. Monza.

P. R. Resnick, Presiding 2:00—29. Review of Perfluoroalkylene-Linked PMR Polyimide and Imide-Modified Epoxy Resins and Composites. T. T. Serafini. 2:20—30. Long-Term Performance of Some Fluorinated Polyurethane Coatings. J. R. Griffith. 2:40—31. 13C and 19F NMR Chemical Shifts and the Microstructures of Fluoropolymers. A. E. Tonelli, F. C. Schilling, R. E. Cais. 3:00—32. Fluorinated Waxes by Pyrolysis of Polytetrafluoroethylene and Telomerization of Tetrafluoroethylene. J. Kuhis, R. Hartwimmer. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—33. Pentafluorosulfur Di Acetylenes: Monomers and Polymers. T. A. Kovacina, R. A. De Marco, A. W. Snow. 3:55—34. Bis(methylthio)perfluoroalkene. M. S. Toy, R. S. Stringham. 4:15—35. A New and Easy Synthesis of Hexafluoroacetone, Trifluoroacetyl Fluoride and Hexafluoroisobutylene from Hexafluorothioacetone Dimer. L. G. Anello, M. Van Der Puy, M. Robinson, R. E. Eibeck. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). 7:00—Fluorine Award Banquet and Award Address—W. J. Middleton, recipient (see Social Events, ticket 118).

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

2:45—47. Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment, Instrumentation and Calibration. R. A. Rasmussen, P. Simmonds, S. Crawford, J. E. Lovelock. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—48. Atmospheric Lifetime of Fluorocarbon-11. D. M. Cunnold, F. N. Alyea, C. A. Cardelino, R. G. Prinn, R. A. Rasmussen, P. G. Simmonds. 3:30—49. Atmospheric Lifetimes of CFC 11 and CFC 12. A. J. Owens, J. M. Steed, C. Miller, D. L. Filkin, J. P. Jesson. 3:45—50. Effect of Coupled Anthropogenic Perturbations on Stratospheric Ozone. D. J. Wuebbles, F. M. Luther, J. E. Penner. 4:00—51. A Two-Dimensional Zonal Mean Model for Stratospheric Ozone. M. K. W. Ko, N. D. Sze. 4:15—52. Uncertainties in Knowledge on Effects in the Stratospheric Ozone Issue. H. L. Wiser. 4:30—53. F 11 and F 12 Abundances, Trends, and Residence Times Determined from 1977-1981 Measurements at NOAA/ GMCC Baseline Stations. W. D. Komhyr, E. G. Dutton, T. M. Thompson. 4:45—54. 1960's Ozone Increase Followed by a Decrease in Ozone over North America During the 1970's. W. D. Komhyr, E. G. Dutton, R. D. Grass, R. K. Leonard.

FRIDAY MORNING Convention Center, Room N-2, East Hall Symposium on Oxyfluorides

A. W. Jache, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—55. Pentafluorotellurium Hypofluorite. C. J. Schack, W. W. Wilson, K. O. Chrlste. 9:35—56. Tellurium Hypohalites and Reactions with Fluorocarbons. C. J. Schack, K. O. Christe. 10:00—57. Novel Cycloaddition Reactions of 2-Trifluoromethyl-3,3-difluorooxaziridine. W. Y. Lam, D. D. DesMarteau. 10:25—58. Methanolysis of Xenon Difluoride: Formation of Methyl Hypofluorite. D. F. Shellhamer, C. M. Curtiss, D. E. Hollingsworth, R. E. Richardson, V. L. Heasley, G. E. Heasley. 10:50—59. Reaction of Metal Fluorides with Fluorosulfuryl Isocyanate. H. C. Yeh, J. F. McKinsey, R. E. Noftle.

1:30—42. Product Identification of CION02 Photolysis. P. L. Trevor, J. R. Barker, D. M. Golden. 1:45—43. Height Profiles of NO in the High Latitude Winter Stratosphere. D. R. Hastie, B. A. Ridley, J. T. Bruin, M. Majerovic, H. I. Schiff. 2:00—44. Stratospheric CIO and 0 3 Measurements by Microwave Limb Sounding. J. W. Waters. 2:15—45. Measurement of Stratospheric CIO by Ultra-Sensitive Ground-Base MM-Wave Spectroscopy. R. de Zafra, P. Solomon, A. Parrish, J. Barrett. 2:30—46. Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment: Global Measurements of CFCI3, CF2CI2, CH3CCI3, CCU, and N 2 0. R. Prinn, R. Rasmussen, S. Crawford, R. Rosen, J. Lovelock, P. Simmonds, F. Alyea, C. Cardelino, D. Cunnold.

62

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

M. M. Ahmed, D. L. Keairns, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—7. Effect of Potassium Carbonate on the Gasification of Illinois No. 6 Coal. A. H. Pulsifer, J. F. McGehee, L. E. Saroff. 2:05—8. Catalytic Effects of Alkali Metal Salts in the Gasification of Coal Char. D. W. McKee, C. L. Spiro, P. G. Kosky, E. J. Lamby. 2:35—9. Kinetics of Potassium Catalyzed Gasification. P. Knoer, H. W. Wong. 3:05—Intermission. 3:15—10. Evolution and Removal of Pollutants from the Gasification of a Subbituminous Coal in a Fluidized Bed Reactor. R. M. Felder, J. K. Ferrell, M. J. Purdy. 3:45—11. Direct Methanation—A New Method of Converting Synthesis Gas to SNG. H. S. Meyer, V. L. Hill, A. Flowers, J. Happel, M. A. Hnatow. 4:15—Concluding Remarks.

Section B Symposium on Oil Shale Retorting—Latest Developments organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 67)

J. M. Steed, Presiding

R. T. Watson, Presiding

Section B Symposium on Oil Shale Retorting—Latest Developments organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. {see page 64)

Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall Symposium on Coal Gasification

Convention Center, Room N-2, East Hall Symposium on Chlorocarbons in the Environment 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—36. Kinetics Studies of Stratospheric Reactions. A. R. Ravishankara. 9:20—37. Free Radicals in the Stratosphere: How Well do Recent Experimental Results Constrain Predicted Ozone Changes Resulting from Increased Fluorocarbon and Nitrous Oxide Concentrations. J. G. Anderson. 10:05—Intermission. 10:20—38. Stratospheric Chemistry: Progress and Problems. M. B. McElroy. 11:05—39. Rate Constant for the Reaction O + H0 2 - > OH + 0 2 , L. F. Keyser. 11:20—40. Kinetics of the Reaction of OH Radicals with Pernitric Acid. C. Smith, L. T. Molina, J. Lamb, M. J. Molina. 11:35—41. Kinetics Studies of the H0 2 + H0 2 Reaction. S. P. Sander, M. Peterson, R. T. Watson.

9:05—2. Effects of Preoxidation on Pyrolysis Behavior and Resultant Char Structure of Caking Coals. D. J. Maloney, R. G. Jenkins. 9:35—3. Influence of Particle Structure Changes on the Rate of Coal Char Reaction with C0 2 . K. A. Debelak, M. A. Clark, J. T. Malito. 10:05—Intermission. 10:15—4. An Entrained Flow Reactor with In Situ FTIR Analysis. P. R. Solomon, D. G. Hamblen. 10:45—5. Coal Pyrolysis at High Temperatures and Pressures. S. S. Tamhankar, J. T. Sears, C. Y. Wen. 11:15—6. Simulation of Entrained-Flow Hydropyrolysis Reactors. A. Goyal, D. Gidaspow. 11:45—Concluding Remarks.

FUEL

TUESDAY MORNING Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall Symposium on Coal Gasification—PANEL

D. L. Keairns, Presiding

DIVISION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY K. S. Vorres, Chairman M. F. Farcasiu, Secretary

SUNDAY 2:00—Teachers Tutorial on Coal Gasification cosponsored with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (seepage 51) MONDAY MORNING

Section A

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—Assessment of Fuel Gas Cleanup Systems. W. A. Blecher, F. L. Robson. 9:15—Comparison of Hot and Cold Gas Cleaning in Coal Gasification for Combined-Cycle Power Generation. B. Robson. 9:50—Combined Cycle Hot and Cold Gas Cleaning and Environmental Control Evaluation. N. H. Ulerich, D. L. Keairns, F. Gigliotti. 10:25—Intermission. 10:30—Introduction of Panel. 10:40—Panel: W. A. Blecher, B. Robson, N. H. Ulerich, A. M. Squires, N. Holt. 11:55—Concluding Remarks.

Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall Symposium on Coal Gasification M. M. Ahmed, Presiding

TUESDAY

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—1. Coking Properties of Coal at Elevated Pressures. M. S. Lancet, F. A. Sim, G. P. Curran.

R. Sivasubramanian, Presiding

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall General 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—12. Mineral Ores as Disposable Catalysts in Coal Liquefaction. V. K. Mathur, V. Venkataramanan. 2:05—13. Effect of Organometallic Catalysts on Coal Liquefaction and Product Distribution. R. K. Sharma, G. Moffett. 2:35—14. SRC-II Processing of Western Coals with Added Pyrite. B. F. Alexander, R. P. Anderson.

3:05—Intermission. 3:15—15. Batch Autoclave TemperaturePressure Studies on the Direct Catalytic Liquefaction of Victorian Brown Coal. P. J. Cassidy, F. P. Larkins, W. R. Jackson. 3:45—16. Effect of Catalyst Distribution in Coal Liquefaction. D. Garg, E. N. Givens. 4:15—17. Catalytic Hydropyrolysis of Coal to Distillate Oils. S. A. Qadar. 4:45—Concluding Remarks.

WEDNESDAY MORNING Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall General

R. Sivasubramanian, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—18. Application of FT-IR and Solid State 13C NMR to the Characterization of a Set of Vitrinite Concentrates. D. W. Kuehn, A. Davis, R. W. Snyder, M. Starsinic, P. C. Painter, J. Havens, J. L. Koenig. 9:35—19. Characterization of Fractionated Coal Liquids by 13C NMR and FT IR Spectroscopy. K. S. Seshadri, D. C. Cronauer. 10:05—20. Oxidation and Formation of Deposit Precursors in Hydrocarbon Fuels. F. R. Mayo, S. E. Buttrill, Jr., B. Lan, G. A. St. John, D. Dublin. 10:35—Intermission. 10:40—21. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction of Retained Pyridine from Pyridine Extracts of Coal. B. F. Smith, C. G. Venier, T. G. Squires, J. C. Shei, J. D. Hunt. 11:00—22. Reaction—Induced Temperature Deviations During Coal Devolatilization in a Heated Grid. J. D. Freihaut, M. F. Zabielski, D. J. Seery. 11:30—23. Trace Element Distribution in the Three Ton Per Day H-Coal Process Development Unit. H. B. Booher, J. W. Adkins, A. W. Wells, J. Schultz. 11:55—Concluding Remarks. 12:00—Divisional Luncheon {see Social Events, ticket 116). WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall Symposium on Combustion Chemistry organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. H. Pohl, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:40—24. Variations in the Inorganic Chemistry of Coal. W. S. Fyfe, B. I. Kronberg, J. R. Brown. 2:10—25. Analysis of Sub-Micron Mineral Matter in Coal Via Scanning Transmission Electron Microscoy. R. M. Allen, J. B. VanderSande. 2:40—26. Determination of Mineral Distributions in Bituminous Coals by Electron Microscopy. L. A. Harris. 3:10—27. Fate of Alkalis in Coal Combustion. G. W. Stewart, C. D. Stinespring, P. Davidovits. 3:40—28. Coal Ash Sintering Model and The Rate Measurements. E. Raask. 4:10—29. Capture and Retention of Sulfur Species by Calcium Containing Compounds During Pulverized Coal Combustion. M. P. Heap, P. L. Case, C. W. McKinnon, R. Payne, D. W. Pershing. 4:40—30. Titanium as a Tracer for Determining Coal Burnout. R. S. Pace, P. O. Hedman, L. D. Smoot. 5:10—Concluding Remarks. THURSDAY MORNING Section A Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall Symposium on Combustion Chemistry organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. W. Well, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—31. Bed Agglomerates Formed by Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion of a North Dakota Lignite. S. A. Benson, F. R. Karner, G. M. Goblirsch, D. W. Brekke. 9:10—32. Experimental Research on Lignite Fluidized Bed Combustion. Y. Min-Shin, Y. Li-Dan, B. Yi-Lin, C. Yu-Kun. 9:40—33. Pilot Plant of a Coal Fired Fluidized Bed Boiler in Japan. S. Tamanuki, H. Katayama, S. Kawada. 10:10—34. Research and Development of Coal-Fired Fluidized-Bed Boiler. B. DongWen, R. Yi-Shao.

10:40—35. A Data Acquisition and Control System for a Fluidized Bed Combustion Unit. D. W. Church, D. G. Pincock. 11:10—36. Sampling System for Fluidized Bed Applications—Results of Four Years of Testing on B&W/EPRI's 6' X 6' Fluidized Bed Test Facility. K. L. Loudin, P. W. Maurer, W. Howe. 11:40—37. Influence of Varying Operational Parameters on Both the Combustion Efficiency In and the Emission of Pollutants from Fluidized Bed Plants. W. Peters. H. D. Schilling, H. Miinzner. 12:10—Concluding Remarks. Section B Symposium on Advances In Hydrogen Manufacture organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 86)

Section C Symposium on Solid State Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Divisions of Inorganic Chemistry, Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. {see page 57) Section D Symposium on the Combustion of Synthetic Fuels organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 86) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall Symposium on Combustion Chemistry organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. W. Wells, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:40—38. Sulfur Capture and Nitrogen Oxide Reduction on the 6' X 6' Atmospheric Fluidized Combustion Test Facility. T. M. Modrak, J. T. Tang, C. J. Aulisio. 2:10—39. Particle Entrainment and Nitric Oxide Reduction in the Freeboard of a Fluidized Coal Combustor. P. M. Walsh, J. M. Beer, T. Z. Chaung, A. Dutta, A. F. Sarofim. 2:40—40. "NO x " Formation and Kinetics of "NO x " Reduction in Fluidized Bed Combustion of Carbonaceous Materials. T. Furusawa, T. Tsunoda, S. Sudo, S. Ishikawa, D. Kunii. 3:10—41. Reduction of Nitric Oxide by Carbonaceous Solids in an Atmospheric Pressure Fluidized-Bed Reactor. Z. Huang, G. T. Che, C. Y. Wen, J. Y. Shang, J. S. Mei, J. E. Notestein. 3:40—42. Effect of Coal Particle Size on the Performance of a Fluidized Bed Coal Combustor. M. Brikci-Nigassa, E. S. Garbett, A. B. Hedley. 4:10—43. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on the Combustion Rates in a Batch Fed Fluidized Bed. E. S. Garbett, A. B. Hedley. 5:10—Concluding Remarks. Section B

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—44. An Analysis of Kerogen Distribution in Green River Oil Shale. J. F. Patzer, II. 9:30—45. Characterization of Oil Shale by FTIR Spectroscopy. D. C. Cronaue, R. W. Snyder, P. C. Painter. 9:55—46. Kinetics of Thermal Decomposition of Morroccan Oil Shale by Thermogravimetry. D. S. Thakur, H. E. Nuttall. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—47. Metallorganic, Organic, and Mutagenic Properties of Oil Shale Retort Waters. A. P. Toste, R. B. Myers, R. Pahl, K. B. Olsen, C. L Wilkerson, R. A. Pelroy. 10:55—48. A Physico-Chemical Investigation of Eastern and Western Shale Oils Produced by the IGT Hytort and Fischer Assay Processes. D. A. Netzel, F. P. Miknis. 11:20—49. Thermal Degradation of Shale Oil. D. S. Thakur, J. P. Vora, E. S. Wilkins, H. E. Nuttall. 11:45—Concluding Remarks.

9:30—2. Incorporation of Arsenic in MetalContaining Macromolecules in Shale Oil as Determined by Multielement-Specific Size Exclusion Chromatography. C. S. Weiss, F. E. Brinckman, E. J. Parks. 9:55—3. Surface Charge Properties of Sands, Sandstones and Shales. M. M. Sharma, T. F. Yen. 10:20—4. Fingerprinting and Speciation of Vanadyl (V0 2 + ) Compounds in Heavy Crude Oils and Removal of Vanadyl Ion with Multidentate Ligands. J. J. Komlenic, R. H. Fish. 10:45—5. Studies of Porphyrins in Coal and Oil Shale for Understanding their Genesis. Y. D. Gu, L. S. Wang, S. Mobashery, T. F. Yen. 11:10—6. Aromatics and Phenols Found in Waste of Coal Processing. F. K. Kawahara. 11:35—7. Water Partition of Polar Molecules from Heavy Crude, Coal Liquids and Shale Oils. Y. Wang, W. H. Wu, T. F. Yen. E. C. Donaldson, Presiding

3:00—22. Satellite and Aircraft Spectral Detection of Fluid Migration Effects. M. D. Matthews. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—23. Light Hydrocarbons as Indicators of Migration. R. H. Reitsema. 4:10—24. Light Hydrocarbon, Hydrogen and Helium Anomalies in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. W. C. Sidle, N. T. Jones.

2:05—8. Tricyclic Terpanes in the Athabasca Oil Sand. O. P. Strausz, C. M. Ekweozor. 2:30—9. Bacteria Induced De-emulsification of Water in Oil Petroleum Emulsion. A. L. Symposium on the Combustion of Synthetic Stewart, N. C. C. Gray, W. L. Cairns, N. Fuels organized by Division of Petroleum Kosaric. Chemistry, Inc. (see page 86) 2:55—10. Bacteria Induced De-emulsification of Oil in Water Petroleum Emulsion. A. FRIDAY AFTERNOON L. Stewart, N. C. C. Gray, W. L. Cairns, N. Kosaric. Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall 3:20—11. Screening Tests for Bacterial Symposium on Processing of Oil Shale, Tar Enhanced Oil Recovery: A Study of BacSands, and Heavy Oils organized by Division terial Transport. L. K. Jang, T. F. Yen. of Fuel Chemistry joint with Divisions of In3:45—12. Bacterial Fouling of a Model Core dustrial and Engineering Chemistry, Petroleum System. J. C. Shaw, N. C. Wardlaw, J. W. Chemistry, Inc. Costerton. J. H. Gary, Presiding 4:10—13. Plugging Problems Associated with the Injection of Anaerobic Bacteria and 1:30—Introductory Remarks. Their Growth Substrates into Oil Reservoirs 1:35—50. Fluidized Bed Pyrolysis of Oil for Enhanced Oil Recovery. T. R. Jack, B. Shale. J. H. Richardson, E. B. Huss. G. Thompson, E. diBlasio, B. Bramhill. 2:05—51. Jet Fuels from Shale Oil by Sin4:35—14. Cell Growth on Petroleum Polar gle-Stage Hydrocracking. A. M. Tait, A. L. Extract and Indole Individually as Sole Hensley. Carbon Sources. P. W. Chang, T. F. Yen. 2:35—52. Characterization of Organic Bases in Hydrocracked Shale Oil Fuels. D. Hardy, TUESDAY MORNING Section A N. Hazlett, J. Solash. 3:05—53. Transportation and Marketing of Convention Center, Room O, East Hall Shale Oil. G. L. Baughman, R. L. Gist, E. H. Symposium on Chemical and Geological Bentzen. 3:35—Intermission. Aspects of Hydrocarbon Migration 3:45—54. Coking Kinetics of Arab Heavy T. J. Weismann, Presiding Vacuum Residuum by Thermogravimetric 8:30—Introductory Remarks. Analysis. R. C. Schucker. 8:35—15. Chemical and Physical Constraints 4:15—55. Oxidation of Fractions of Fuel Oil oh Primary and Secondary Petroleum MiNo. 6 by Differential Scanning Calorimetry gration. C. D. McAuliffe. and Thermogravimetry. J. A. Ayala, J. Ruiz, 9:20—16. Solubility of Crude Oil in Methane M. E. Rincon. at Elevated Temperatures and Pressure. L. 4:45—56. Quantitative NMR Study of Shale C. Price, L. M. Wenger, C. W. Blount. Oil Derived Jet Fuels. D. M. Barnhart, D. A. 9:40—17. Generation of Petroleum Deposits Netzel. by Cross-Formational Gravity-Flow of 5:15—Concluding Remarks. Ground Water. J. Toth. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—18. Chemistry and Dynamics of Sedimentary Basin Waters. G. A. Cooke. 11:00—19. Determination of Migration Pathways Using Crude Oil and Extract Correlations. W. F. Kardosh, G. G. Janezic, D. A. Jeffrey.

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—25. Applications of Fluid Inclusion Studies to Petroleum Migration; Fatch Field, Dubai. R. K. McLimans, B. Horsfield. 9:10—26. Use of Near-Surface Methane Measurements in the Study of Gas Migration. B. Bernard. 9:45—27. Isotope Geochemistry of Light Hydrocarbons from Shallow Sediments Offshore California. E. Faber, W. Stahl, B. D. Carey. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—28. Upward Migration of Hydrocarbons from Gas and Oil Deposits. L. Horvitz. 11:00—29. Hydrocarbon Migration and Maturity. J. Whelan, J. Hunt, J. Jasper.

Section B

GEOC

Section B

Symposium on Advances in Hydrogen Manufacture organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 86) Section C Symposium on Solid State Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Divisions of Inorganic Chemistry, Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 58)

DIVISION OF GEOCHEMISTRY T. Wildeman, Chairman P. G. Hatcher, Secretary/ Treasurer

Section D Symposium on the Combustion of Synthetic Fuels organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 86) FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room E-1, East Hall Symposium on Processing of Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Heavy Oils organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry joint with Divisions of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. H. Gary, Presiding

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room O, East Hall Symposium on Geochemical and Geomicrobiological Problems on Oil and Gas Production

Symposium on Geochemistry of Nuclear Waste Disposal organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 76) TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room O, East Hall Symposium on Chemical and Geological Aspects of Hydrocarbon Migration V. T. Jones, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—20. Carbon Isotope Aspects of Petroleum and Gas Migration. S. R. Silverman. 2:15—21. Natural Rock Fractures and the Migration of Fluids in the Natural Environment. R. A. Hodgson.

T. R. Jack, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. A Non-Isothermal Pyrolysis Study of Sulfur Isotope Fractionation in Fossil Fuels. H. R. Krouse, R. G. S. Ritchie, R..S. Roche.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Section B Symposium on Geochemistry of Nuclear Waste Disposal organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page

WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Convention Center, Room O, East Hall Symposium on Chemical and Geological Aspects of Hydrocarbon Migration T. J . Weismann, Presiding

Section B Symposium on Geochemistry of Nuclear Waste Disposal organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room O, East Hall Symposium on Chemical and Geological Aspects of Hydrocarbon Migration V. T. Jones, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—30. Metal Species in Natural Ground Waters. S. L. Phillips. 1:55—31. Crystallization Kinetics: The Influence of Solid/Solution Ratio on the Calcite Reaction Rate Constant. M. M. Reddy. 2:15—Intermission. 2:25—32. Isotope and Fluorescence Measurements on the Products of Pyrolysis of a Suite of Shales. A. W. A. Jeffrey, R. C. Pflaum, C. W. Kennicutt II, L. A. Barnard, B. D. Carey, Jr., J. M. Brooks. 2:40—Intermission. Symposium on Geochemical Aspects of Geothermal Energy A. J . Aducci, Presiding 2:50—Introductory Remarks. 2:55—33. Accurate Chemical Models in Geothermal Brine Behavior. J. H. Weare. 3:15—34. Substrate Effects on Scale Nucleation. L. A. Casper. 3:35—35. Geothermal Chemistry: New Vistas for Inorganic Chemists and Chemical Engineers. D. E. Michels. Section B Symposium on Chemical Aspects of Extractive Mining and Enhanced Ore Recovery: I. In Situ Leaching organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 68) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room O, East Hall General D. S. Montgomery, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—36. Determination of the Rare Earth Elements in Geological Materials by ICAP-Optical Emission Spectroscopy. T. R. Wildeman, J. C. Crock, F. E. Lichte.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

63

9:30—37. Mount St. Helens May 18, 1980, Ashfall: Impact on Minerals Exploration Geochemistry in Washington, Idaho, and Montana. S. C. Smith. 9:55—38. Nuclear Fission Phenomena in Sedimentary Uranium Deposits. M. Attrep, Jr., M. E. Mathis. 10:10—Intermission. 10:20—39. Relative Transport Rates of A g + and Pb 2+ from their Binary Mixtures with Several Uni- and Bivalent Cations using Dicyclohexano-18-Crown-6 in an Emulsion Membrane. M. P. Biehl, R. M. Izatt, J. D. Lamb, J. J Christensen. 10:40—40. Modelling the Facilitated Transport of Metal Cations through Liquid Membranes by Macrocyclic Carriers. P. R. Brown, R. M. Izatt, J. L. Oscarson, J. D. Lamb, J. J. Christensen. 11:00—41. Limestone Donor Barite Deposition. N. E. Pingitore, Jr., M. P. Eastman, R. Luna, J. T. Farraro. 11:20—42. Coprecipitation of Ba 2 + with Calcite. M. P. Eastman, N. E. Pingitore, R. Luna, J. T. Farraro. 11:40—43. Application of the Simplex Method to the Assignment of Mineralization. M. P. Eastman, G. Kostal, G. G. Ashe.

10:10—Intermission. 10:20—56. Surface Studies of Acid-treated Feldspar. D. L. Perry, L. Tsao, K. A. Gaugler. 10:40—57. Organic Geochemistry of DSDP Site 467, Middle Miocene to Lower Pliocene Strata. L. W. Elrod, B. J. Katz. 11:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

Section B Symposium on Gilbert Newton Lewis: 1875-1946 organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 52)

HIST

Section C Perspectives Lecture V: Highlights of Research on Vitamins and Hormones organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 52)

DIVISION OF THE HISTORY OF CHEMISTRY T. A. Koeppel, Chairwoman N. M. Foster, Secretary/Treasurer

Section B Symposium on Chemical Aspects of Extractive Mining and Enhanced Ore Recovery: II. Solution Mining and Salts Processing organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 68) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room O, East Hall General E. W. Baker,

Presiding

2:00—44. Identification of Carboxylic Acid Metal Salts in Green River Oil Shale. S.-L Chong, J. F. McKay, D. R. Latham. 2:30—45. Characterization of Organic Matter Recovered from Green River Oil Shale at Temperatures Below 400°C. J. F. McKay, S.-L. Chong. 3:00—46. Kinetic Model for LaboratorySimulated Kerogen Maturation. M. Baur, H. I. Halpern, I. R. Kaplan. 3:30—47. Estimation of Squalene in Petroleum Asphaltenes and Pyrolysis Properties of the Non Volatile Portion of Asphaltenes Related to Depth of Burial and Geological Age. D. S. Montgomery, M. M. Ekwenchi, O. P. Strausz. 4:00—48. An NMR Method for Determining Thermal Transformations of Source Rocks. F. P. Miknis, J. W. Smith, E. K. Maughan, G. E. Maciel. 4:30—49. Titanium Environments in Coals and Coal-Derived Products. D. H. Maylotte, J. Wong, R. L. St. Peters, F. W. Lytle. 4:50—50. Electrochemical Behavior of Saudi Ground Waters. J. M. Mee, P. Khan, S. Salaitain, M. Jahangir. 5:10—51. Geochemistry of Ni- versus VOPetroporphyrins. S. K. Hajlbrahim. 5:35—52. Geochemistry of Coal versus Shale Porphyrins. S. K. Hajlbrahim. Section B Symposium on Chemical Aspects of Extractive Mining and Enhanced Ore Recovery. III. Advances in Froth Flotation organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry {see page 68)

FRIDAY MORNING Convention Center, Room O, East Hall General D. S. Montgomery, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—53. A Comparison of the PhysicalChemical Properties of Natural Estuarine Colloids Collected by Ultrafiltration and XAD-8 Resin Techniques. J. C. Means, S. Ostazeski, R. Wijayaratne. 9:30—54. Amino Acid and Carbohydrate Composition of Estuarine and Patricuiate Material. A. C. Sigleo, P. E. Hare. 9:55—55. Surface Studies of Basalt Using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). D. L. Perry, L. Tsao, K. A. Gaugler.

64

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

10:25—14. Herman Pines and Organic Heterogeneous Catalysis. N. E. Hoffman. 10:50—15. P. W. Selwood as a Teacher and Research Pioneer. R. P. Eischens. 11:10—16. Ernest W. Thiele and DiffusionReaction in Catalyst Pellets. A. Varma. 11:35—17. Early Catalysis Research with Para-Hydrogen and Heavy Hydrogen. A. Farkas.

MONDAY

AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room K-2, East Hall General J. H. Wotiz, Presiding 2:00—1. Historical and Modern Day Aspects of Wine as a Therapeutic Agent. P. P. Mazzella. 2:20—2. Kekule of Kekule: J. H. Wotiz, S. Rudofsky. 2:40—Intermission. Symposium on Eminent Chemists from the Western U.S.A. R. B. Seymour, Presiding 2:45—3. Eminent Western Chemists. R. B. Seymour. 3:00—4. Harold Clayton Urey (April 29, 1893-January 6, 1981). R. J. Field. 3:15—5. Eminent Chemists from New Mexico. J. A. Schufle. 3:45—6. Eminent Chemists in Colorado. F. A. Moore, D. M. Smith, J. E. Smith. 3:55—7. Eminent Chemists of Wyoming. E. G. Meyer. 4:15—8. Eminent Chemists from Utah. H. S. Broadbent, M. S. Cannon, C. J. Christensen, G. R. Hill, M. Tuddenham. 4:30—9. Eminent Chemists (Deceased) from the State of Washington. V. Sivertz. 4:45—10. Eminent Chemists in Idaho. L. C. Lewis, M. A. Wade.

TUESDAY MORNING Symposium on Gilbert Newton Lewis: 1875-1946 organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 51) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Symposium on Gilbert Newton Lewis: 1875-1946 organized by Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 51)

Section B Symposium on True Stories of Small Chemical Businesses—Some Gambles Which Paid Off organized by Division of Small Chemical Businesses (see page 92) WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Convention Center, Room K-2, East Hall Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of The History of Chemistry joint with Divisions of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc., Physical Chemistry

WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room K-2, East Hall Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of The History of Chemistry joint with Divisions of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc., Physical Chemistry W. P. Hettinger, Presiding 2:00—18. Vladimir N. Ipatieff as I Knew Him. H. Pines. 2:25—19. Sir Hugh Taylor, The Man. J. E. Benson, M. Boudart. 2:55—20. Catalysis Research at Princeton 1931-1981. J. Turkevich. 3:15—21. Paul H. Emmett: Six Decades of Contributions to Catalysis. R. L. Garten. 3:40-7-22. Langmuir's Contributions to Heterogeneous Catalysis. G. L. Gaines, Jr., G. Wise. 4:10—23. Methanol: A Bright Past; A Brilliant Future? A. B. Stiles. 4:35—24. Frank Ciapetta, W. P. Hettinger, Jr. 6:00—Symposium Reception (see Social Events for details).

INDE DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY R. A. Stowe, Chairman G. K. Smith, Secretary

SUNDAY EVENING 8:00—Chemical Industry Hospitality Suite, Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room R-1, East Hall Symposium on the Marketing/R&D Interface organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates J. Diekmann, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Role of the Interface in Setting R+D Objectives. J. M. Morris. 9:55—2. Information and Resource Requirements Across the Interface for Successful Plans. E. M. Miller. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—3. Overcoming the Interface Barrier: The Use of Cross-Impact Analysis. J. K. Craver. Section B

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room K-2, East Hall Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of The History of Chemistry joint with Divisions of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc., Physical Chemistry

G. W. Keulks, Presiding 9:00—25. Murray Raney—Pioneer Catalyst Producer, R. B. Seymour. 9:25—26. History of Automobile Exhaust Catalysis. L. L. Hegedus. 9:55—27. Contributions of Eugene J. Houdry and the Houdry Process Corporation to the Development of Catalytic Cracking. A. G. Oblad. 10:25—28. Invention of Zeolite Cracking Catalysts—A Personal Viewpoint. C. J. Plank. 10:50—29. History of Catalysis: Development of Fluid Catalytic Cracking. C. E. Jahnig. 11:15—30. Development of Hydrocracking. R. F. Sullivan, J. W. Scott, Jr. 11:45—31. Infrared Spectra of Adsorbed Molecules. R. P. Eischens. 2:00—32. Fundamental Studies of Acid Catalysis of Mellon Institute, 1950-70. W. K. Hall. 2:30—33. Fixed Nitrogen Research Laboratory. P. H. Emmett. 3:15—34. Platforming Process—Past, Present and Future. V. Haensel. 3:45—35. Applications of Magnetic Resonance to Catalytic Problems. W. S. Brey. 4:15—36. Chain Growth and Iron Nitrides in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. R. B. Anderson. 4:45—37. Attempts to Measure the Number of Active Sites. R. W. Maatman.

B. H. Davis, Presiding 9:00—11. Early History of Heterogeneous Catalysis. R. L. Burwell, Jr. 9:25—12. Selective Oxidation by Heterogeneous Catalysis. R. K. Grasselli. 9:55—13. Otto A Beeck and His Colleagues in Catalysis. J. N. Wilson. The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Convention Center, Rooms R-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Thermodynamic Behavior of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Physical Chemistry W. F. Furter, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—4. Thermally Induced Destructuring in D 2 0-H 2 0 Mixtures. L. Leifer, R. J. Wigent, G. F. Reynolds. 9:35—5. Walden Product and Solvent Structure in Water-Rich Mixtures. Ionic Conductances in Water Sulfolane, WaterAcetonitrile, and Water-Dimethylsulfoxide. G. Petrella. 10:00—6. Response Mechanisms of IonSelective Electrodes in Mixed Solvents. J. F. Coetzee. 10:25—Intermission. 10:40—7. Solvation of Amino Acid Hydrobromides in Mixtures of Water and Dimethylformamide. M. Booij, G. Somsen. 11:05—8. Selective Solvation of Copper (I) Iodide in Acetonitrile-Water Mixtures. V. V. Giridhar, C. Kalidas. 11:30—9. Ion-Solvent Interactions in Some Aquo-Organic Solvents. K. K. Kundu, A. Bhattacharya, K. Das, P. K. Bhattacharya. Section C Convention Center, Room R-3, East Hall Symposium on Oil Shale Retorting—Latest Developments organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry, Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. M. T. At wood, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—10. Oil Shale Processing—What Next? A. E. Lewis. 9:40—11. Development of T3 Process. C. Y. Cha. 10:10—12. Determination of the Temperature and Grade Dependent Thermal Diffusivity of Saline Zone Oil Shale: A Simplified Approach. B. Tedla, D. S. Thakur, H. E. Nuttall, R. S. Burton III, B. E. Weichman. 10:40—Intermission.

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY • 1155 Sixteenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036/(202) 872-4600

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Dues There are four start dates for membership: 1 January, 1 April, 1 July and 1 October. We are anxious to begin your membership as soon as possible and will therefore enroll you immediately upon approval by the Admissions Committee. Dues for 1982 are $58.00. Your membership will begin at the nearest quarter and you will be billed accordingly. Please send no money now. Student Dues If you are a student majoring in the chemical sciences a 50% reduction on membership is available. To apply you must be registered for at least six credit hours as an undergraduate or be enrolled as a full-time graduate student. I am D an undergraduate student enrolled as described above. • a graduate student enrolled as described above. Name"oTcoiiege or university National Affiliation National affiliates pay three-quarters dues (i.e. $43.50) and likewise will receive a prorated bill based on the quarter national affiliation begins. Husband/Wife Dues If you are the spouse of a member receiving C&EN, 23% (or the prorated amount) will be deducted from your bill. This is the portion that is allotted for C&EN. If you are eligible, please give the name of your spouse and his/her membership number.

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11:00—13. Improvements to the TOSCO II Process. W. M. Broman. 11:30—14. Paraho Project. H. Pforzheimer, Jr. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room R-1, East Hall Symposium on the Marketing/R&D Interface organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates

J. Diekmann, Presiding 2:00—15. Marketing/R+D Interface: Panel Discussion with Audience Participation. J. M. Morris, E. M. Miller, J. K. Craver, M. E. Strem. 8:30—Mobay Award Reception, (see Social Events for details).

Section B Convention Center, Rooms R-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Thermodynamic Behavior of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents organized by Division of industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Physical Chemistry W. F. Furter, Presiding 2:00—16. A Review of the Solubility of Some Gases in Aqueous Electrolyte Solution. H. L. Clever. 2:25—17. Diffusivity of Carbon Dioxide in Aqueous Solutions of Binary Electrolytes. A. Yasunishi. 2:50—18. Electrolytes in Mixed Solvent Systems: The Link Between Preferential Solvation and Vapour-Liquid Equilibria. K. E. Newman. 3:15—19. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of DMSO-Water Mixtures Saturated with Sodium Chloride and Potassium Chloride. R. B. Perry, D. W. Krieg. 3:40—20. A Critical Comparison of Methods for the Correlation of Liquid-Vapour Equilibrium Datajor Binary Solvent Mixtures Saturated with Salts. D. Jaques. 4:05—21. Salt-Effect Distillation and the Gasohol Program. W. F. Furter. 8:30—Divisional Award Reception (see Section A). Section C Convention Center, Room R-3, East Hall Symposium on Oil Shale Retorting—Latest Developments organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry, Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. R. F. Sullivan, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—22. Geokinetics Horizontal In-Situ Retorting Process. M. A. Lekas. 2:40—23. BX In-Situ Oil Shale P r o j e c t Status Report. P. M. Dougan. 3:10—24. Oil Shale Technology in Brazil. J. Rezende, E. M. Piper. 3:40—25. Oxy Modified In-Situ Update. R. Ellington. 4:10—26. Retorting of Oil Shale—Background, Status and Potential of the Lurgi Ruhrgas (LR) Process. H. Weiss. 8:30—Divisional Award Reception (see Section A). TUESDAY

MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms R-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Government/Industry Sponsorship of University Research cosponsored with American Institute of Chemical Engineers S. A. Heininger, C. J. King, Presiding I. Changing Role of Government in R&D Funding 9:00—27. National Science Foundation Support of University Research. R. N. Langenberg. 9:40—28. Support of University Research by the Department of Energy. J. S. Kane. 10:20—Intermission. II. New Approaches to Increased Industry Funding 10:30—29. Initiatives from the Professional Society: The ACS View. R. G. Smerko, R. W. Parry.

11:10—30. New Approaches to Increased Industry Funding—Initiatives from the Professional Societies: The AlChE View. W. H. Corcoran. 12:00—E. V. Murphree Award Reception and Luncheon (see Social Events, ticket 110).

Section B Convention Center, Room R-1, East Hall Symposium on Thermodynamic Behavior of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Physical Chemistry W. F. Furter, Presiding 9:00—31. XI. Thermodynamic Studies of Aqueous 2-1 Ternary Systems. Application of Pitzer's Equations. R. N. Roy, J. J. Gibbons, D.P. Bliss, Jr. 9:25—32. Activity Coefficient of CaCI2 in Mixtures with 1-1 Electrolytes. G. Atkinson, J. Ananthaswamy, R. N. Roy, B. L. Atkinson. 9:50—33. Activity of Hydroxide and Aikoxide Ions in Water-Alcohol Mixtures. P. Zuman, P. Jandik, L. Meites. 10:15—Intermission. 10:40—34. Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Chloride in Propylene Glycol (Propane1,2-Diol)-Water Mixtures from EMF Measurements. V. V. Sastry, C. Kalidas. 11:05—35. Single and Mean Ionic Activity Coefficients of Simple Electrolytes in Aqueous Solutions Containing Polyelectrolytes. P. Ander, L. Leung-Louie, M. Casiero. 11:30—36. Three Experimental Methods for Getting Data Available for Thermodynamic Evaluation of the Behavior of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvent. 2. Adamcova. 12:00—Divisional Award Reception and Luncheon (See Section A for details).

Section C Convention Center, Rooms S-1 & 3, East Hall E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry

H. Heinemann, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—37. 31 Years of Applied Kinetics. J. M. Smith. 9:20—38. Chemisorption of Simple Gases on Molybdena-Alumina. W. K. Hall. 10:05—39. Coal Liquefaction Perspective: Politics, Chemistry, Economics. M. Orchin. 10:50—40. Award Address. (E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry sponsored by Exxon Research and Engineering Company). Surface Chemistry, Catalyst Characterization, and Standardized Test Methods. S. W. Weller. 12:00—Divisional Award Reception and Luncheon (see Section A for details).

Section D Symposium on Advances in Zeolite Chemistry organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 85) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

III. IMPLICATIONS OF GREATER INDUSTRIAL INVOLVEMENT IN UNIVERSITY RESEARCH 3:00—43. Pragmatic Implications of Greater Industrial Involvement in University Research. R. B. Park. 3:40—44. University Issues: Benefits, Expectations, and Concerns. N. Hackerman. 4:20—45. An Industrial Outlook. H. D. Doan. 5:00—Symposium Reception (see Social Events for details). Section B Convention Center, Room R-1, East Hall Symposium on Thermodynamic Behavior of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Physical Chemistry W. F. Furter, Presiding 2:00—46. Standard Potentials and Related Thermodynamic Quantities of Strong Hydrohalic Acids in Mixed Solvents at Different Temperatures. R. N. Roy, J. J. Gibbons, K. K. Kundu, K. Das. 2:25—47. First and Second-Stage Dissociations of Tricine in 10, 30, and 50 Mass % Monoglyme-Water Mixtures at Various Temperatures from 278.15 to 328.15 K. R. N. Roy, J. J. Gibbons, K. Buechter, S. Faszholz. 2:50—48. Free Energies of Transfer of Complex Cations from Water into Water+Co-solvent: Comparison with Free Energies of Transfer of Simple Ions and of Complex Cations in Transition States. G. S. Groves, I. M. Sidahmed, C. F. Wells. 3:15—49. Selective Transport of Cations by Macrocyclic Ligands in Bulk and Emulsion Liquid Membranes. R. M. Izatt, J. D. Lamb, M. P. Biehl, P. R. Brown, J. J. Christensen. 3:40—50. State of Lithium Picrate Solubilized in 1,2-Dichlorobenzene by Hexamethylphosphoramide or by a Polyether, Glyme-5. W. R. Gilkerson, M. D. Jackson. 4:05—51. Solubility of Water/Ionic Surfactants Combinations in Alcohols. S. E. Friberg, B. Bendiksen, T. Flaim.

Section C Convention Center, Rooms S-1 & 3, East Hall The American Chemical Society Award in the Chemistry of Contemporary Technological Problems sponsored by Mobay Chemical Corporation

M. Shelef, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—52. Recent Progress in Solid State Electrochemistry. R. A. Huggins. 2:40—53. Internal Combustion Engine—A Synergism of Applied Sciences. P. N. Blumberg, T. Morel. 3:15—54. Behavior of Automobile Exhaust Catalysts with Cycled Feedstreams. K. C. Taylor, R. M. Sinkevitch. 3:50—55. Contributions of J. T. Kummer to the Chemistry of Technical Problems. P. H. Emmett. 4:25—56. Award Address. Heterogeneous Catalysis—Empiricism or Exact Science. J. T. Kummer.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—57. TSCA—After Five Years, An Overview. E. H. Hurst. 9:55—58. Future for Innovation Under TSCA. C. W. Umland. 10:35—59. Chemical Industry Initiatives to Modify TSCA Regulations. D. F. Zoll. 11:05—60. Control on Existing Chemicals. E. H. Blair.

Section B Convention Center, Room R-1, East Hall Symposium on Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage I. Electrochemical Processes

J. Jorne, Presiding 9:00—61. Most Needed Researches in Electrochemical Energy Conversion. J. O'M. Bockris. 9:30—62. Chemically Regenerative Redox Fuel Cells. J. T. Kummer, D-G. Oei. 9:50—63. Six Kilogram Scale Electrorefining of Plutonium Metal. L. J. Mullins, A. N. Morgan, S. A. Apgar III, D. C. Christensen. 10:10—64. Rechargeable Batteries for Traction Purposes. H. Wroblowa. 10:30—65. Zinc-Chloride Energy Storage Systems. P. Carr, C. J. Warde. 10:50—66. Fundamental Aspects of ZincBromine Battery Chemistry. E. Kantner, R. Bellows, P. Grimes, K. Newby, A. Young. 11:10—67. Effect of AC Charging Methods on Zinc Electrode Morphology. J. McBreen, E. Gannon, D-T. Chin, R. Sethi. 11:30—68. Testing of Refuelable Aluminum-Air Multi-Cell Batteries. K. K. Burr, J. F. Cooper, R. V. Homsy, B. J. McKinley. 11:50—69. A Comparison of Alkaline Fuel Cell and Fuel Battery Systems in Electric Vehicle Applications. J. F. Cooper.

Section C Convention Center, Room R-3, East Hall Symposium on Structure, Transport, and Interfacial Phenomena in Porous Media R. A. Greenkorn, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—70. Theory of Transport in Chaotic Porous Media. P. Pathak, H. T. Davis, L. E. Scriven. 9:45—71. Analysis of Transport Processes Within Granular Media Using Constricted Tube Models. H. Pendse, H. W. Chiang, C. Tien. 10:15—72. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Dry and Liquid-Bearing Porous Media. J. B. Sweeney, E. H. Loesch, L. E. Scriven, H. T. Davis. 10:50—Intermission. 11:00—73. Megascopic Dispersion in Layered Geologic Media. L. Smith, F. W. Schwartz. 11:30—74. Stochastic Analysis of Macrodispersion in Three-Dimensionally Heterogeneous Aquifers. L. W. Gelhar, C. L. Axness. Section D Symposium on Advances in Zeolite Chemistry organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 86)

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms R-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Government/Industry Sponsorship of University Research cosponsored with American Institute of Chemical Engineers S. A. Heininger, C. J. King, Presiding II. New Approaches to Increased Industry Funding 1:30—41. Some University/Industry Initiatives at Exxon. P. J. Lucchesi. 2:10—42. Council for Chemical Research. A. L. Kwiram. 2:50—Intermission.

Section E Section D Symposium on Advances in Zeolite Chemistry organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 86) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Presiding

WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms R-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: I. Some General Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates G. W. Ingle,

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Symposium on Synthetic and Petroleum Based Lubricants organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 86)

Convention Center, Rooms R-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: II. Specific Effects on Domestic Industry organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates H. M. Peters, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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2:15—75. Management of TSCA Mandated Information Requirements. C. Elmer, J. R. Condray. 2:55—76. Impacts on Corporate Structure and Procedures, Including Research and Development. D. R. Harlow. 3:35—77. Effects of TOSCA on Small Chemical Companies. J. R. Yost. 4:15—78. Impact of TSCA on Market Introduction of New Chemicals. D. G. Bannerman.

Section B Convention Center, Room R-1, East Hall Symposium on Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage II. Photoelectrochemistry

J. Jorne, Presiding 2:00—79. Hydrogen Generating Electrochemical Solar Cells. A. Heller. 2:50—80. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using Surface-Modified Photocathodes. J. A. Bruce, T. Murahashi, M. S. Wrighton. 3:20—81. Photoelectrochemical Cells for Power Generation. B. Miller. 4:10—82. Regenerative Photoelectrochemical Cells: Evaluation of Their Use for Practical Conversion of Sunlight to Electricity. G. Hodes, D. Cahen. 4:40—83. Effect of Surface Films on Solar Cell Electrodes. S. R. Morrison.

THURSDAY MORNING

Convention Center, Rooms R-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: III. Domestic and International Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates

K. W. Greenlee, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—95. Impact on the Toxic Substances Control Act on the Reactive Polymer Industry. S. C. Oslosky, L. W. Keller. 9:55—96. Impact of TSCA on the Metalworking Fluids Industry. H. M. Fribush. 10:35—97. Confidentiality of Information. J. O'Reilly. 11:05—98. Different Songs and Different Singers: Harmonizing the Regulation of New Chemicals. B. A. Biles. Section B Convention Center, Room R-1, East Hall Symposium on Lubricant Effects on Fuel Economy organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

R. F. Bridger, Presiding Section C

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—99. Distribution of Frictional Losses in Convention Center, Room R-3, East Hall Production Gasoline Engines. D. H. Oetting, Symposium on Chemical Aspects of ExG. Schwarze, W. Ebbinghaus. tractive Mining and Enhanced Ore Recovery: 9:35—100. Multifunctional Friction Reducers I. In Situ Leaching organized by Division of for Lubricants. A. G. Horodysky, J. J. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Kaminski, W. L. Maxwell. Division of Geochemistry 10:05—101. Influence of Crankcase LubriP. R. Ammann, Presiding cant Viscosity on Fuel Consumption in a Medium-Speed Diesel Engine. J. C. Wall. 2:00—Introductory Remarks. P. R. Ammann, 10:35—Intermission. R. C. Kirby. 10:55—102. Friction Calibration Oils—Nec2:10—84. Chemical Technology Associated essary Tools for Laboratory Engine Fuel With In Situ Copper Leaching. J. C. AgarEconomy Testing. C. R. Smith, G. R. Farnwal, D. H. Davidson. sworth. 2:35—85. Application of Process Petrography 11:25—103. Maximum and Probable Fuel to In-Situ Mining Problems. G. Rainville. Economy of Automobiles. H. P. Marshall. 3:00—86. A Kinetic Model of U0 2 Dissolution by H 2 0 2 in Acid Solution That Includes Section C Uranium Peroxide Hydrate Precipitation. L. E. Eary, L. M. Cathles. Convention Center, Room R-3, East Hall 3:25—Intermission. Symposium on Chemical Aspects of Ex3:40—87. An Overview of the Chemical As- tractive Mining and Enhanced Ore Recovery: pects of Mineral-Solution Interaction in Leach Systems. D. R. Cole, J. Apps, R. M. II. Solution Mining and Salts Processing orCapuano, C. L. Kusik, D. Langmuir, M. E. ganized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of GeoWads worth. 4:05—88. In Situ Leach Mining in the United chemistry States. D. V. D'Andrea. P. B. Altringer, Presiding 4:30—89. Geochemical Kinetics Model for In Situ Leach Mining. R. D. Schmidt, S. E. 9:00—Introductory Remarks. P. B. Altringer, R. C. Kirby. Follin, K. A. Peterson, E. V. Level. 9:10—104. Comparison of Lime and Sulfide Precipitation of Metal Values From GeoSection D thermal Brine. L. E. Schultze, D. J. Bauer. Convention Center, Room P-2, East Hall 9:35—105. Resin Development for Tungsten Symposium on Structure, Transport, and Extraction From Searles Lake Brines. P. B. Interfacial Phenomena in Porous Media Altringer, T. H. Jeffers, P. T. Brooks. 10:00—106. Chemical Aspects of the ReE. I. Franses, Presiding covery of Tungsten From Searles Lake 2:00—Introductory Remarks. Brine. S. Natansohn, S. Su. 2:05—90. A Derivation of Mean and Variance 10:25—Intermission. of Darcy Velocity From a Random Perme- 10:40—107. Multimineral In Situ Resource ability Distribution. D. H. Tang. Recovery System. S. S. Sareen. 2:35—91. Thermodynamic Analysis of Cap- 11:05—108. Extraction of Boron and Calcium illary Pressure Hysteresis in Porous Media. by Hydroxyoxime From Magnesium ChloJ. C. Melrose. ride Brines. R. Neelameggham, E. W. 3:10—92. Pore-Level Distribution of ImmisBarlow, J. F. Reilly. cible Fluids in Porous Media. K. K. Moh- 11:30—109. Applications of Salt Gradient anty, H. T. Davis, L. E. Scriven,. Solar Ponds in Solution Mining. J. Giuli3:45—Intermission. anelli. 3:55—93. Motion of Immiscible Drops in Flow Through Model Porous Media. W. L. Olbricht. 4:30—94. X-Ray Computed Tomography Investigation of Rock and Fluid Flow Through Sandstone. D. H. Maylotte, R. L. St. Peters, The Committee on Meetings & L. Levien.

Section E Symposium on Synthetic and Petroleum Based Lubricants organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 86)

68

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

Section D

Section A

Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Convention Center, Room P-2, East Hall Symposium on Structure, Transport, and Interfacial Phenomena in Porous Media

R. A. Greenkorn, Presiding 9:00—110. Prediction of Oil Recovery and Saturation Distribution of an Unstable Immiscible Displacement in the Absence of Capillary and Gravity Forces. S. Vossoughi, F. A. Seyer. 9:35—111. Hydrodynamic Adsorption Effects of Macromolecules in Porous Media. Y. Cohen, S. M. Dinh. 10:10—112. Flow and Surface Gel Buildup of Viscous Hydroxyethyl Cellulose Polymer Solutions in Porous Media. R. S. Torrest. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—113. Flow Behavior of Foam in Porous Media. 0. S. Owete, L. M. Castanier, W. E. Brigham. 11:20—114. Effect of Pore Size on Thermal Conductivity in Open Cell Silica Bodies. R. D. Shoup. 11:50—General Discussion. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

3:00—126. A New Method of Analyzing Flotation Kinetics. R. W. M. Lai, T. F. Braden, A. Stojsic. 3:25—Intermission. 3:40—127. Effects of pH Preconditioning Temperature on Oleate Adsorption onto Bastnaesite. S. D. Steiner, R. W. Smith. 4:05—128. Selective Flotation Separation of a Bastnaesite Ore with Alkylhydroxamate Collector. D. W. Fuerstenau. 4:30—129. Solution Chemistry and Electrokinetic Behavior of Alunite. S. G. Dixit, J. D. Miller.

FRIDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Processing of Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Heavy Oils organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 63)

INOR

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms R-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: IV. Selected Societal Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates L. Keller, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:15—115. TSCA and the Universities: Educating the Environmental Chemical Professional. R. L. Perrine 2:55—116. Impact of TSCA on Public and Occupational Health. M. J. Lipsett. 3:35—117. Quantitative Analysis as a Basis for Decisions under TOSCA. D. W. North. 4:15—118. TSCA: Overall Costs and Benefits. J. C. Davies.

Section B Convention Center, Room R-1, East Hall Symposium on Lubricant Effects on Fuel Economy organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. S. Korcek, Presiding 2:00—119. Diesters of Doecanedioic Acid—Low Friction and Low Wear in Fuel Efficient Oils. R. W. Begland, E. E. Sommers, V. J. Tomsic. 2:30—120. Design and Testing of a Procedure for Evaluating Fuel-Efficient Crankcase Lubricants. T. M. Naman. 3:00—121. Synthetic Lubricant Performance Improved by Hydrogenation. W. T. McShea, R. M. Heck, G. R. Patel, A. E. Eleazar. 3:30—Intermission. 3:50—122. Optimizing Oil Formulations for Fuel Economy. V. F. Smith, S. W. Harris, T. L. Zahalka. 4:20—123. Effects of Engine Friction on Fuel Economy. J. T. Kovach, E. A. Tsakiris, L. T. Wong.

Section C Convention Center, Room R-3, East Hall Symposium on Chemical Aspects of Extractive Mining and Enhanced Ore Recovery. III. Advances in Froth Flotation organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Geochemistry

M. C. Fuerstenau, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. M. C. Fuerstenau, R. C. Kirby. 2:10—124. Electrochemical Potential Control on the Flotation Response of Sulfide Minerals. P. E. Richardson. 2:35—125. Interaction Between Sphalerite and Beta-Mercaptoethanol. S. Raghavan, D. Jennings.

DIVISION OF INORGANIC CHEMISTRY L. V. Interrante, Chairman R. N. Grimes, Secretary G. J. Long, Program Chairman

SUNDAY EVENING 6:00—Social Hour, Organometallic Subdivision (see Social Events for details). MONDAY

MORNING

Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level Awards Symposium

L. V. Interrante, Presiding 9:00—Introduction of the Inorganic Chemistry Award Winner. L. V. Interrante. 9:05—1. Award Address. (ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Monsanto Company). The Isolobal Analogy—A Bridge Between Inorganic and Organic Chemistry. R. Hoffmann. 10:00—Introduction of the Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry Award Winner. C. Kutal. 10:05—2. Award Address. (ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Mallinckrodt, Inc.). In Search of the Reactive Excited State in Inorganic Photochemistry. A. W. Adamson. General—Photochemical Studies

C. Kutal, Presiding 11:10—Introductory Remarks. 11:15—3. Ligand Field Theory, Excited State Distortions, and Metal Photochemistry. J. I. Zlnk. 11:40—Discussion. 11:45—4. Ligand Photosubstitution Processes. N. A. P. Kane-Maguire. 12:10—Discussion. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level Symposium on the Chemistry and Biochemistry of Platinum, Gold, and Other Chemotherapeutic Agents: Platinum Anticancer Drugs, I S. J. Lippard, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—5. Mechanism of Action of Platinum Anticancer Drugs. B. Rosenburg. 2:00—Discussion.

2:05—6. DNA as the Target for Antitumor Platinum Coordination Compounds. J. J. Roberts, M. F. Pera, Jr., C. J. Rawlings. 2:30—Discussion. 2:35—7. Biological Consequences of Pt-DNA Crosslinks in Mammalian Cells. L. A. Zwelling. 3:00—Discussion. 3:05—8. Use of Nucleases to Probe the Binding of c/s-Diamminedichloro-platinum(ll) to DNA. T. D. Tullius, W. R. Bauer, S. J. Lippard. 3:30—Discussion. 3:55—9. Physico-chemical and Structural Studies of the In Vitro Interactions Between Pt{il) Compounds and DNA. J. P. Macquet, J. L. Butour, N. P. Johnson. 4:00—Discussion. 4:05—10. Platinum-Oligonucleotide Structures, Relevance to Platinum-DNA Interaction. J. C. Chottard, J. P. Girault, J. Y. Lallemand, G. Chottard. 4:30—Discussion. 4:35—11. Palladium(H) as an Indicator of Platinum(ll) Reactions at Equilibrium. R. B. Martin. 5:00—Discussion.

Section B Convention Center, Room 18, South Hall Symposium on Applications of Main Group Metal/Transition Metal Reagents in Synthesis organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Organic Chemistry

J. Schwartz, Presiding 2:00—12. Methylene and Hydride Ligand Stabilization by Aluminum Alkyls. F. N. Tebbe. 2:45—Discussion. 2:50—13. Organic Chemistry of (775C5H5)2T"iCH2 and Related Complexes. R. H. Grubbs, D. A. Straus, J. Stille, S. Ho, S. Hentges. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—14. Carbonyl Methylenation Using the Tebbe Reagent. S. Pine, B. A. Hanson, R. Pettit, K. Bravo, C. Gailego. 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—15. Alkylidene-Bridged Heterobimetallic Complexes. F. W. Hartner, Jr., J. Schwartz. 4:55—Discussion.

Section C Convention Center, Room 19, South Hall General—Photochemical Studies

C. Kutal, Presiding 2:15—16. Applications of Luminescence Spectroscopy to the Photochemistry of Transition Metal Complexes. R. J. Watts, S. Sprouse. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—17. Excited-State Energy and Electron Transfer Processes of Ruthenium(ll) Photosensitizers. J. N. Demas, K. Mandal, B. A. Hauenstein, B. A. DeGraff. 3:10—Discussion. 3:15—18. Evidence for Photoionization of Adsorbed Tris(2,2'-bipyridine)-ruthenium(ll) and Electron Migration in a Porous Vycor Matrix. H. D. Gafney. 3:40—Discussion. 3:45—19. Inorganic Oxidation-Reduction Photochemistry of Polynuclear Complexes. H. B. Gray, L G. Butler, C.-M. Che, M. D. Hopkins, A. W. Maverick, D. G. Nocera, S. F. Rice, T. P. Smith, J. R. Winkler, T. C. Zietlow. 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—20. Photoactivation of Surface-Confined Ruthenium Carbonyl Catalysts. M. S. Wrighton, D. K. Liu. 4:40—Discussion. 4:45—21. The Nature of the Reactive Excited States of Biological Important Transition Metal Complexes Such as Vitamin B 12 and Carbonylhemoglobin. A. Vogler. 5:10—Discussion.

Section D Convention Center, Room 20, South Hall General—Magnetic Studies

G. J. Long, Presiding 2:00—22. New Iron(lll) Spin Crossover Systems with Hexadentate Ligands. R. J. Butcher, M. Pouriam, T. Thanyasiri, R. J. Aviles, E. Sinn.

2:20—23. Structural and Magnetic Properties of Copper(ll) and Iron(ll) Complexes with Substituted Pyrazine Ligands. C. L. Kiein, L. M. Trefonas, C. J. O'Conner, R. J. Majeste. 2:40—24. A Study of the Magnetic Properties of Iron(lll) Molybdate, by Susceptibility, Mbssbauer, and Neutron Diffraction Techniques. P. D. Battle, A. K. Cheetham, G. J. Long, G. Longworth. 3:00—25. Synthesis and Characterization of a Hydroxyl Bridged Iron(lll) Dimer of N, N'Ethylenebis(Salicylideneamine). L. Borer, L. Thalken, C. Ceccarelli, M. Glick. 3:20—26. Effects of Phenyl Substituents on the Spin State of Perchlorato-tetraarylporphinatoiron{lll) Complexes. A. Gold, G. Toney, R. Sangaiah. 3:40—27. First Ferromagnetic Co(ll) Binuclear; Binucleation and Production of Ferromagnetic Chlorine-Bridge Mn(ll), Cu(ll). R. Aviles, G. A. Brewer, R. J. Butcher, O. R. Rodig, R. K. Schlatzer, R. L. Shaw, E. Sinn. 4:00—28. Crystal Structure and Magnetic Susceptibility of [(C2H5)2NH2]2 Cu4Br10C2H5OH. R. D. Willett, J. J. Hansen, R. Fletcher. 4:20—29. Magnetic Studies of Spin 1/2 Alternating Chains in A 2 Cu 2 CI 6 Salts. R. D. Willett, S. O'Brien, R. Gaura, H. J. M. deGroot, L. J. deJongh. 4:40—30. Magneto-Structural Correlations in Symmetrically Bibridged Copper(ll) Halide Salts. R. D. Willett. 5:00—31. Synthesis and Structural and Magnetic Characterization of Copper Halide Complexes of 4-Methylthiazole. W. E. Marsh, W. E. Hatfield, D. J. Hodgson. 5:20—32. Heterotrinuclear Complexes of 1,3,5,7-Tetraketonates Containing Two U 0 2 + 2 Ions and One Transition Metal Ion. Structural, Magnetic, and Spectral Properties. R. L. Lintvedt, B. A. Schoenfelner, C. Ceccarelli. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Section C I Convention Center, Room 20, South Hall General—Photochemistry

J. D. Petersen, Presiding 9:00—43. Transition Metal Photochemistry in the Gas Phase. X. Yang, C. Kutal. 9:20—44. Spectroscopy and Photochemistry of Oxometal Complexes. J. R. Winkler, H. B. Gray. 9:40—45. Luminescence of Group 6b Metal Carbonyls in Fluid Solution. A. J. Lees. 10:00—46. Thermal and Photochemical Racemizations of Tri(chelate) Complexes d 6 Metal Complexes. J. D. Petersen, J. F. Geldard, Y. J. Wong, K. D. Van Tassel. 10:20—47. 436 nm Photochemistry and Biacetyl Photosensitization of Mn2(CO). R. R. Ruminski, A. J. Poe. 10:40—48. Thermal and Photochemical Properties of Ru(ll) Monometallic and Bimetallic Complexes Containing 2,2'-Bipyrimidine and Related Bridges. R. R. Ruminski, J. D. Petersen, K. J. Pfenning. 11:00—49. Photochemical and Thermal Reactions of a Surfactant Bromopentaminecobalt (III) Complex. W. Mooney, D. G. Whitten. 11:20—50. Photolytic Electron Transfer in Aqueous Solutions of Copper {l)-Ammonia Complexes. K. L. Stevenson, J. Harber, T. Braish. 11:40—51. Solvent Isotope Effect on the Photophysics of Ru(bpy)32+ and Ru(phen)32+ in Aqueous Solution. R. Sriram, M. Z. Hoffman. 12:00—52. Photochemical Properties of [CpRu(benzene)]+. T. P. Gill, K. R. Mann. 12:20—53. Ligand Effects on the Dynamics of Ligand Field Excited States. Photosubstitution Reactions of Cis- and trans-Tetraaminerhodium (III) Complexes Rh(NH3)4XYn+ in 298K Aqueous Solution. D. A. Sexton, P. C. Ford, L. Skibsted, D. Magde.

Convention Center, Room 18, South Hall Symposium on the Chemistry and Biochemistry of Platinum, Gold, and Other Chemotherapeutic Agents: Platinum Anticancer Drugs, II L. G. Marzilli, Presiding 9:00—33. 195Pt NMR Studies of Anti-tumor Complexes. I. M. Ismail, P. J. Sadler. 9:25—Discussion. 9:30—34. Platinum(ll)a-Pyridone Chemistry: A Model for c/s-Diammine-platinum(ll) Reactions with Nucleobases. S. J. Lippand, L S. Hollis. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—35. Platinum(ll) Complex Formation with Uracil and Thymine. B. Lippert. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—36. Conformational Properties of Purine and Pyrimidine Complexes of Cis Pt: Implications for Pt-DNA Cross-Linking Modes. T. J. Kistenmacher, J. D. Orbell, L. G. Marzilli. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—37. EXAFS Studies of PlatinumNucleoside and Palladium-Nucleoside Complexes. R. Bau. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—38. Complexes of Platinum with DNA Bases, Nucleotides, and DNA. B. Lippert, C. J. L. Lock. 11:55—Discussion. Section B Convention Center, Room 19, South Hall Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Bonding in Solids organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. H. F. Franzen, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—39. Orbital Interactions in Extended Systems. R. Hoffmann, T. R. Hughbanks, S. D. Wijeyesekera. 10:00—40. Tight-Binding Theory of SolidState Properties. W. A. Harrison. 11:00—41. Structure and Electronic Properties of Conducting Ternary Iron Oxides. H. Leiva, K. Sieber, K. Dwight, A. Wold. 11:30—42. Metal-Insulator Transitions and Electronic Structures in Oxides. J. M. Honig.

Section E

Symposium on Advances in Zeolite Chem• istry organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry {see page 85) TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room 18, South Hall Symposium on the Chemistry and Biochemistry of Platinum, Gold, and Other Chemotherapeutic Agents: Gold and Other Metals

C. F. Shaw III, Presiding 2:00—65. Overview and Current Status of Gold Containing Antiarthritic Drugs. B. M. Sutton. 2:25—Discussion. 2:30—66. EXAFS and Edge Studies of GoldBased Anti-Arthritic Drugs and Metabolites. R. C. Elder, K. G. Tepperman, M. Eidsness, M. J. Hegg, C. F. Shaw III. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—67. Gold Thiolate Complexes In Vitro and In Vivo. D. H. Brown, W. E. Smith. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—68. Osmium-Carbohydrate Polymers as Anti-Arthritic Drugs. C. C. Hickley, J. N. BeMiller, L. E. Strack, L. D. Russell. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—69. Tumor Inhibition by Metallocene Dihalides of Early Transition Metals: Chemical and Biological Aspects. H. Kopf, P. Kopf-Maier. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—70. Interactions of Ruthenium Ions with Nucleic Acid Constituents and Possible Relations to the Oncological Properties of Some Transition Metal Ions. M. J. Clarke. 4:55—Discussion. 6:00—Symposium Social Hour (see Social Events for details). 6:30—Divisional Social Hour and Poster Session (See Social Events for details).

Section D Convention Center, Room 16, North Hall General—Kinetics and Mechanisms

G. R. Dobson, Presiding 9:00—54. An Investigation of the Vibrational Barrier to Electron Transfer: The Role of Metal-Chlorine Vibrational Modes in Determining Xi tor Weakly-Coupled MixedValence Dimers. K. A. Goldsby, T. J. Meyer. 9:20—55. Gas Phase Reactions of Catechol with BF3. L. M. Babcock, G. E. Streit. 9:40—56. Thermal Decomposition of Aqueous Trithionate and Tetrathionate. B. Meyer, M. Ospina. 10:00—57. Ligand-Competition and Isotopic Labeling Studies of (o-Phenanthroline) Tetracarbonylmetal (0) Complexes (M = Cr, Mo). G. R Dobson, K. J. Asali, N. S. Binzet. 10:20—58. Thermal Decomposition of Potassium Ferricyanide Under Reducing Atmosphere. H. Mousty, A. Abou-Kais, B. S. Clausen, E. G. Derouane, H. Topspe, J. Villadsen. 10:40—59. Mechanisms of Substitution Reactions of Ligandopentaammine-cobalt(lll) Complexes. W. L. Reynolds, M. Glavas, E. Dzelilovic. 11:00—60. Mechanism of Formation of Co(lll) Complexes by Oxygenation of Co(ll). M. Maeder, P. R. Mitchell, H Macke. 11:20—61. A pH Study of the Reaction of Co{en) 2 S0 3 H 2 0 + with Imidazole. N. S. Rowan, H. F. Rexroat. 11:40—62. Electron Transfer Self-Exchange Rate Constants of the Co(NH 3 ) 6 2+/3+ , Co(en) 3 2 + / 3 + and Co(sep) 2+/3 + Systems. Molecular Strain Energy Minimization Calculations. R. Geue, R. Pizer, A. M. Sargeson. 12:00—63. Reactions of Triethylenetetramine with Nickel(ll)-Polyamine Complexes. K. E. Gilmore, G. K. Pagenkopf, J. P. Storvick. 12:20—64. Specific Cation Medium Effects in the Oxiation of Ascorbic Acid by Hexachloroiridate(IV) and Hexabromoiridate(IV). W. D. Drury, W. E. Broderick, S. R. Wooldridge, J. M. DeKorte.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Section B Convention Center, Room 19, South Hall Symposium on Applications of Main Group Metal/Transition Reagents in Synthesis joint with Division of Organic Chemistry R. H. Grubbs, Presiding 2:00—71. Palladium Catalyzed Coupling of Organic Halides with Tetraorganostannanes. P. Davis, J. Godschalx, J. Labadie, J. K. Stille. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—72. Palladium- or Nicel-Catalyzed Cross Coupling. E.-l. Negishi. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—73. Highly Selective Grignard CrossCoupling Reactions by Nickel and Palladium Catalysts. M. Kumada, T. Hayashi, K. Tamao, M. Konishi, A. Minato. 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—74. Novel, Low-Valent Nickel-Mediated Organic Reactions. E. Wenkert. 4:55—Discussion. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour and Poster Session (see Section A for location).

Section C Convention Center, Room 20, South Hall Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Bonding in Solids joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. M. Honig, Presiding 2:00—75. Study of Electron States in Solids by Techniques of Electron Spectroscopy. C. N. R. Rao. 3:00—76. Structural-Electronic Relationships in the Solid State. J. K. Burdett. 4:00—77. Normal Structural Bonding and Defects in Covalent Amorphous Solids. D. Adler. 4:30—78. The Electronic Structure and Bonding of TiS. D. K. Misemer. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour and Poster Session (see Section A for location). Section D Symposium on Advances in Zeolite Chemistry organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 86)

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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TUESDAY EVENING Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level General—Poster Session

W. M. Reiff, Presiding 6:30-8:30—79. Binculear Iron Site in Violet Acid Phosphatases: A Hemerythrin Analog? E. Sinn, C. J. O'Connor, J. de Jersey, B. Zerner. 6:30-8:30—80. Interaction of Porphyrins with Polynucleic Acids. R. E. Pasternack, E. J. Gibbs. 6:30-8:30—81. Reactions of Hexahydrobis(Trimethylphosphine)Triboron( 1 +) Octahydrotriborate(1—) with Trimethylphosphine and Some Other Lewis Bases. M. Kameda, G. Kodama. 6:30-8:30—82. An XPS Study of the Bonding in Tricobalt Nonacarbonyl Complexes and Related Compounds. S. F. Xiang, W. L. Jolly. 6:30-8:30—83. Low Temperature Magnetic Properties of Mnin(2,2'-Bipy)Cl3. B. Rappoli, E. Witten, W. M. Reiff. 6:30-8:30—84. Photolysis and Thermal Hydrolysis of Complexes of Rhodium(lll) with Optically Active Tetramine Ligands. L. M. Torres, S. Sanchez, A. R. Colon, M. M. Muir. 6:30-8:30—85. Reactions of the Singly-Bent Aryldiazenido Ligand in [CpRe(CO)2N2R][BF 4 ]. C. F. Barrientos-Penna, D. Sutton. 6:30-8:30—86. Photochemical Investigations of Cationic Ruthenium Complexes. B. V. Johnson, A. L. Steinmetz. 6:30-8:30—87. Photo-Assistance as a Mechanistic and Kinetic Probe of Organometallic Catalysts. J. R. Peterson, L. D.. Spicer. 6:30-8:30—88. Tris{Trimethylsilyl)Methyl Substituent in Phosphorus Chemistry. J. E. Kiduff, A. H. Cowley. 6:30-8:30—89. Crystal and Molecular Structure of Dichloro-1,2-bis(diethyl amino)-3-Diphenylphosphinopropanezinc (II). L. W. Houk, P. K. Sen Gupta, M. B. Hossain, D. Van der Helm. 6:30-8:30—90. 95 Mo NMR of Molybdenum(0)-Dinitrosyl-Complexes. M. Minelli, J. H. Enemark. 6:30-8:30—91. Structure Reactivity Relationships for Cd 2 + and N i 2 + complexation by Multidentate Ligands. W. R. Harris, D. Ingersoll. 6:30-8:30—92. Mechanistic Studies of the Photoreactions of Ruthenium Carbonyl Clusters. M. F. Desrosiers, R. J. Trautman, P. C. Ford. 6:30-8:30—93. Substitution Reactions of Metal Hydride Carbonyl Complexes of the Iron Triad. Reactions with Organophosphites. D. J. Taube, P. Yarrow, P. C. Ford. 6:30-8:30—94. Chemiluminescent Reactions Involving Coordination Compounds. L. M. El-Sayed, A. Vogler, A. W. Adamson. 6:30-8:30—95. Valence Electronic Structure of Bridging Vinylidene Complexes: Hel/Hell UPS Study of (M2-CCH2)[{7?5-C5H5„n(CH3)n} Mn(CO)2]2 (n = 0, 1, and 5). D. L. Lichtenberger, L. Pang. 6:30-8:30—96. Synthesis and Characterization of Nitroheterocyclic Pentaamminecobalt(lll) Perchlorates. W. Fleming, J. W. Fronabarger, M. L. Lieberman, V. M. Loyola. 6:30-8:30—97. Synthesis, Reactions and Structure of a Rh(lll) sigma-Nortricyclyl Complex and Its Reversible Rearrangement to a Rh{l) Norbornadiene Complex. L. H. Pignolet, M. F. McGuiggan. 6:30-8:30—98. Kinetics of Reduction of Ferrichrome. A. L. Shorter, S. A. Kazmi, J. V. McArdle. 6:30-8:30—99. Synthesis and Structure of a Metallophosphinite-Uranium(IV) Complex. R. T. Paine, E. N. Duesler, D. C. Moody. 6:30-8:30—100. Synthesis and Characterization of Niobium(lll) and Tantalum(lll) Dimers Containing Bidentate Sulfur and Oxygen Anions. F. I. Keen, T. M. Brown. 6:30-8:30—101. Synthesis, Characterization and Polymerization of Ethers by Dimeric Niobium(lll) and Tantalum(lll) Complexes. F. I. Keen, T. M. Brown. 6:30-8:30—102. Synthesis of Phenoxo- and Hydroxo- Group VI Complexes. T. J. McNeese. 6:30-8:30—103. Redox Reactions of the Tetrahydroxoargentate(lll) Ion. L. J. Kirschenbaum, E. T. Borish, J. D. Rush.

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6:30-8:30—104. Reactivity Patterns for the Base Hydrolysis of Organonitrile Complexes of Pentamminecobalt(lll). R. L6pez-de la Vega, W. L. Purcell. 6:30-8:30—105. Spectral Characterizations of Tetrazolatopentaaminecobalt(lll) Linkage Isomers. J. H. Hall, W. L. Purcell. 6:30-8:30—106. Linkage Isomerization Kinetics of Tetrazolatopentaammine-cobalt(lll) Complexes. W. L. Purcell. 6:30-8:30—107. New Arsenic V Compounds. R. R. Holmes, R. O. Day, A. C. Sau, J. M. Holmes, J. A. Deiters. 6:30-8:30—108. Extraction of Ce(lll) and Eu(lll). A. M. Olivares, M. E. Castro. 6:30-8:30—109. Kinetics and Mechanism of Formation of Violet Peroxychromate. S. N. Witt, D. M. Hayes. 6:30-8:30—110. Synthesis and Properties of Trihydridotriironnonacarbonyl-alkyidyne Complexes. J. Vites, K. S. Wong, T. K. Dutta, R. L. KeKock, T. P. Fehlner. 6:30-8:30—111. Preparation and Molecular Structure of 1,4,7-Trithiacyclononane Molybdenum Tricarbonyl. D. L. Lichtenberger, M. T. Ashby. 6:30-8:30—112. Binuclear and Monoclear Copper(II) Complexes of 2,2'-Pyridylmethylktazine. C. J. O'Conner, R. J. Romafiach, D. Robertson, E. E. Eduok, F. Fronczek. 6:30-8:30—113. Studies on a Cytochrome Oxidase Model. Bending of a Conjugated Macrocycle Ring. G. A. Brewer, E. Sinn, R. H. Petty, L. J. Wilson. 6:30-8:30—114. Structural and Magnetic Changes in Copper—Other Metal Binuclears. G. A. Brewer, E. Sinn. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room 18, South Hall Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Bonding in Solids joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

A. Wold, Presiding 9:00—115. Structural Phase Transitions in Transition Metal Compounds. F. J. DiSalvo. 10:00—116. Cation-Cation Charge Transfer Pigments. A. W. Sleight, R. V. Kasowski, R. K. Waring. 10:30—117. Influence of Dopants on the Electronic Structure and Excited-State Properties of Cadmium Sulfide. A. B. Ellis, M. K. Carpenter, R. L. Mackey, P. M. Smiley, H. H. Streckert. 11:00—118. Bonding in Molecular and Solid Oxides. M. O'Keefe, G. V. Gibbs. 11:30—119. In Quest of the Metal-Nonmetal Transition: Electron-Electron Interactions in Expanded-Metal Compounds. A. Stacy, P. P. Edwards, M. J. Sienko.

Section B Convention Center, Room 19, South Hall Symposium on Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms: Perspectives and Progress

T. J. Meyer, Presiding 9:00—introduction to the Symposium. 9:10—120. Henry Taube at Chicago— 1946-55. J. P. Hunt. 9:40—121. Some Reaction Systems Revisited. H. Taube. 10:30—Discussion. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—122. Aqueous Chemistry of Low Oxidation States of Bipyridine Complexes. C. Creutz, H. A. Schwarz, N. Sutin. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—123. Formation and Reactions of a Pentaamminecobalt{lll)- Organo-Chromium(lll) Complex. R. B. Jordan, W. C. Kuperfschmidt. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—124. Reaction Mechanisms in Excited State Chemistry: Photosubstitutions of Hexacoordinate d 6 Metal Complexes. P. C. Ford. 11:50—Discussion. 11:55—125. Technetium Chemistry and Technetium Radiopharmaceuticals. E. Deutsch. 12:15—Discussion.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Section C Convention Center, Room 20, South Hall General—Platinum and Gold Anticancer Compounds D. B. Brown, Presiding 9:00—126. Determination and Location of Platinum Metals in Biological Samples by Neutron Activation and Microprobe Analyses. M. E. Farago, P. J. Parsons. 9:20—127. A New Class of Antitumor Platinum Complexes. D. B. Brown, A. R. Khokhar, J. J. McCormack, M. P. Hacker. 9:40—128. [(dien)PtCI]CI Binding to Poly(dG-dC)-Poly(dG-dC) Reversibly Facilitates the Ethanol Induced B —* Z Conformational Transition. H. M. Ushay, R. M. Santella, J. P. Caradonna, D. Grunberger, S. J. Lippard. 10:00—129. Platinum Complexes with Anticancer Potential and Their Evaluation by a Colorimetric Inductest. B. Das Sarma, R. K. Elespuru. 10:20—130. Ethidium Bromide Alters the Binding Mode of c/s-DiamminedichloroPlatinum(ll) to DNA. C. M. Merkel, T. D. Tullius, S. J. Lippard. 10:40—131. CD Spectra of Oligonucleotide-cis diammine Platinum II Chelates. G. Chottard, J. P. Girault, J. Y. Lallemand, J. O. Chottard. 11:00—132. EXAFS Studies of a Pt-Hydroxy Dimer Complex. A. P. Hitchcock, C. J. L. Lock, W. M. C. Pratt. 11:20—133. Antitumor-Palladium Complexes: Structure-Activity Relationship. D. S. Gill. 11:40—134. Chemical and Biological Changes Induced in Myochrisine™ (Sodium Gold Thiomalate) Solutions by Heat and Ultra-Violet Light. D. A. Harvey, C. J. L. Lock, W. F. Kean, D. Singh. 12:00—135. Ligand Exchange Reactions of Gold Drugs in Vitro and in Red Cells. M. T. Razi, G. Otiko, P. J. Sadler. 12:20—136. Syntheses, Kinetics, and Mechanism of Formation of Polynuclear Hydroxo-Bridged Complexes of 1,2-Diaminocyclohexaneplatinum(ll). D. S. Gill, B. Rosenberg.

Section D Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level General—Main Group Compounds

R. H. Neilson, Presiding 9:00—137. Polarographic Studies of Some Singly and Doubly Charged Boron Cations. M. A. Mathur, R. E. Popham, S. Chouchoiy. 9:20—138. Formation and Characterization of Nonahydro(Trimethylphosphine) (Tetraborate(1—) Ion. M. Shimoi, G. Kodama. 9:40—139. Another Form of Ammoniate of Tetraborane(10). S. A. Snow, G. Kodama, R. W. Parry. 10:00—140. Polyhedral Cage Fluxionality in Carbon-Rich Carboranes, R4C4B8H8 (R = CH3, C2H5, C3H7). High-Resolution NMR and X-ray Diffraction Studies. R. B. Maynard, T. L. Venable, R. N. Grimes. 10:20—141. Boranametallacarboranes. Synthesis and Structures of BoraneMetal-Carborane Sandwich Complexes. L. Borodinsky, R. N. Grimes. 10:40—142. Studies on Ring Size Interconversions of Cyclopolyphosphines. S. Pirakitigoon, J. L. Mills, R. Wolcott. 11:00—143. Scramble Reactions of Diphosphines. L. R. Avens, J. L. Mills. 11:20—144. Reactions of Phosphorus TrtAlkyls and -Aryls with Phosphrous Trihalides. G. G. Arzoumanidis. 11:40—145. Structuring in Phosphoric Acid; an X-ray Diffraction Study. D. L. Wertz, G. A. Cook. 12:00—146. Silicon-Nitrogen-Phosphorus Compounds with P-H or P-P Bonds. R. H. Neilson, H. R. O'Neal, A. K. Roy. 12:20—147. Reactions of (Silylamino)Phosphines with CCI4. P. Wisian-Neilson, R. R. Ford, L. Bei-Li, R. H. Neilson.

Section E Symposium on Advances in Zeolite Chemistry organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry {see page 86)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room 18, South Hall Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Bonding in Solids joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. M. J. Sienko, Presiding 2:00—148. Bonding in P- and N- Doped Polyacetylene: A Qualitative Approach. A. G. MacDiarmid, A. J. Heeger. 2:25—149. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Polyacetylene. A. J. Heeger, A. G. MacDiarmid. 2:50—150. Oxygen Nonstoichiometry in Manganese Perovskites. K. R. Poeppelmeier, M. E. Leonowicz, J. M. Longo. 3:15—151. Structure and Luminescence of Some LnW04CI—Type Rare Earth Halo Tungstates. L. H. Brixner, H. Y. Chen. 3:40—152. Structure of Incommensurate Superlattices of 2H-TaSe2. R. L. Withers, L. A. Bursill (withdrawn). 4:05—153. Unusual Oxidation State and Electronic Configuration of Iron. G. Demazeau, B. Buffat, M. Pouchard, P. Hagenmuller. 4:30—154. An ESR and Optical Study of V 4 + in Zircon-Type Crystals: An "Accidental" Dynamic Jahn-Teller Effect." S. Di Gregorio, M. Greenblatt, J. H. Pifer, M. D. Sturge.

Section B Convention Center, Room 19, South Hall Symposium on Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms: Perspectives and Progress

T. J. Meyer, Presiding 2:00—155. Chemical Reactivity of Free Radicals Generated by the Homolysis of Organochromium(lll) Complexes. J. H. Espenson. M. Shimura, A. Bakac, J.-T. Chen, R. C. McHatton. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—156. Studies on Oxygen Transfer and Rates of Solvent Exchange with Some Aquo-Oxy-lons of Molybdenum. R. K. Murmann. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—157. Electron Transfer Reactions of Chlorine Dioxide. D. M. Stanbury, L. A. Lednicky. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—158. Chlorite Based Oscillators. I. R. Epstein, K. Kustin. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—159. Differences in Redox Reactivity of Cytochrome C and High Potential Iron Protein with Classical Metal Complexes. L. E. Bennett, J. R. Walton, M. Shepard, R. X. Ewall, T. Roemer. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—160. Face-to-Face Porphyrins: MultiElectron Redox Catalysts. J. P. Collman, F. C. Anson. 4:40—Discussion.

Section C Convention Center, Room 20, South Hall General—Metal Complexes

K. B. Merles, Presiding 2:00—161. Evidence for Doublet State Reactivity of the Tris(Ethylenediamine) Chromium(lll) Ion in Aqueous Solution. X. Yang, C. A. Sutton, C. Kutal. 2:20—162. A Study of the Cu
4:00—167. Reactivity of Excited States of Complexes Containing Multiple Metal-Metal Bonds. D. G. Nocera, H. B. Gray. 4:20—168. On the Nature of the [lr(bpy) 2 {H 2 0)(bpy)] 3+ Cation. A Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Story. N. Serpone, P. H. Bird, W. A. Wickramasinghe, R. J. Watts, P. Spellane. 4:40—169. Binding and Transfer of Hemin to Serum Proteins. R. F. Pasternack. 5:00—170. Kinetics of Reduction of Ferrichrome A. S. A. Kazmi, A. L. Shorter, J. V. McArdle. 5:20—171. Macroscopic Binding Constants for Gallium Transferrin by Difference-UV Spectroscopy. W. R. Harris, V. L. Pecoraro, K. N. Raymond. Section D Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level General—Transition Metal Complexes R. L. Lintvedt, Presiding 2:00—172. Polyether Complexes of First Row Transition Metals. J. J. Lagowski, J. N. Ramsden. 2:20—173. Tetrachloroferrate and Other Solute Species in Solutions Prepared from Iron(lll) Chloride and Hydrochloric Acid. D. L. Wertz, M. D. Luter, D. C. McCain. 2:40—174. Heavy Alkali Metal Complexes of Optically Active Cobalt Compounds, Preparation and Properties. L. H. O'Connor, K. H. Pearson. 3:00—175. Chemistry of Cobalt(lll)-Sulfenyl Iodide Complexes. A Comparison to Related Organic Species. D. L. Nosco, J. D. Lydon, D. Smith, E. Deutsch. 3:20—176. Structures and Reactions of -NO and -N0 2 Complexes of Cobalt. T. D. Bailey, M. Farnia, R. D. Feltham. 3:40—177. Structural Studies of {NiNO}10 Complexes. J. Kriege-Simondsen, R. D. Feltham. 4:00—178. Facile Synthesis of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Divalent Cobalt and Nickel. M. M. Aly, M. A. Abu-Elgheit. 4:20—179. Characterization of Square Planar Ni(ll) and Pd(ll) Complexes with Linkage Isomeric Ligand. M. M. Aly, M. A. El-Dessouky, M. A. Abu-Elgheit. 4:40—180. 1,4,7-Trithiacyclononane, A Novel Tridentate Thioether Ligand and Its Nickel(ll), Cobalt(ll), and Copper (II) Complexes. W. N. Setzer, C. A. Ogle, G. S. Wilson, R. S. Glass. 5:00—181. Two Electron Transfer in Binuclear (Cu(ll), Ni(ll)Cu(ll), and Ni(ll) Complexes. R. L. Lintvedt, L. S. Kramer. 5:20—182. Copper Complexes of Binuclear Ligands. T. N. Sorrell, D. L. Jameson, M. R. Malachowski. 5:40—183. Synthesis and Characterization of Copper Complexes of Tripod Ligands. T. N. Sorrell, D. L. Jameson. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room 18, South Hall Symposium on Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms I: Perspectives and Progress H. Tennent, Presiding 9:00—184. Base Catalyzed Substitution Reactions in Amine Metal Ion Complexes. A. M. Sargeson. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—185. Cooperativity and Anticooperativity in Metal Complex Ion Systems. E. L. King. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—186. Studies of Cobalt(lll)Carbonic Anhydrase. M. J. Rhee, C. B. Strom, L. Mona, J. B. Hunt. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—187. Nuclear, Electronic, and Frequency Factors in Electron Transfer Reactions. N. Sutin. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—188. Aqueous Solution Dynamics and the Fe 2 + :Fe^ + Electron Exchange. H. L. Friedman. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—189. Structural and Photochemical Probes in Simple Electron-Transfer Reactivity. J. F. Endicott. 11:50—Discussion. 11:55—190. Intramolecular Electron Transfer at Metal Surfaces. K. L. Guyer, S. W. Barr, M. J. Weaver. 12:15—Discussion.

Section B

Convention Center, Room 16, North Hall

General—Catalysis

General—Organoiron Complexes

D. W. Bennett,

J. W. Connolly, Presiding

Presiding

9:00—191. Novel Catalytic Transformations of Olefins by Solvated Lanthanide Metal Cations and Their Tertiary Phosphine Derivatives. A. Sen, R. R. Thomas. 9:20—192. Relative Transport Rates of A g + Alkali, Alkaline Earth, Tl + , and Pb 2+ Cations in an H20-CHCI3-H20 Liquid Membrane System Using Macrocyclic Ligands as Carriers. D. V. Dearden, R. M. Izatt, J. D. Lamb, J. J. Christensen. 9:40—193. Relative Transport Rates of T l + , Alkali, Alkaline Earth, and.Pb ++ Cations in an H20-CHCI3-H20 Liquid'Membrane System Using Macrocyclic Ligands as Carriers. G. A. Clark, R. M. Izatt, J. D. Lamb, J. J. Christensen. 10:00—194. Homogeneous, Transition Metal Catalyzed Copolymerization of Carbon Monoxide with Olefins. A. Sen, T.-W. Lai. 10:20—195. Kinetics of the Reppe Reaction Catalyzed by Iron Petacarbonyl. R. Massoudi, A. D. King, Jr., R. B. King. 10:40—196. Charge Densities on Metal Carbenes: Effects on Catalytic Activity. D. W. Bennett, J. T. Guy, S. A. Chmielewski. 11:00—197. Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Activation by Low Valent Phosphine/lsonitrile Complexes of Iron, Ruthenium, and Rhodium. W. D. Jones, F. J. Feher, B. Rappoli. 11:20—198. Pydridine Coordination Chemistry of Nickel Surfaces. R. M. Wexler, E. L. Muetterties. 11:40—199. Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Breaking Processes in Polynuclear Metal Complexes. M. Kulzick, E. L. Muetterties. 12:00—200. Mechanistic Studies of Homogeneous Alkyne Hydrogenation. A. M. Stolzenberg, E. L. Muetterties. 12:20—201. Kinetic Studies of the Reactions of Oxygen Bases with the Trinuclear Clusters M3(CO)12 and the Mononuclear Species M(CO)5 of the Iron Triad, (M = Fe, Ru, Os). D. C. Gross, P. C. Ford. Section C Convention Center, Room 20, South Hall General—Spectroscopy T. P. Fehlner,

Presiding

9:00—202. Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectra of 4-Substituted Pyridine Complexes of BF3. M. A. Weiner, A. Gin. 9:20—203. Gas-Phase Core and Valence Ionization Studies of S0 2 Coordinated to Metals. The Electronic Structure and Metal-Sulfur Dioxide Bonding Interactions of Some d 6 Transition Metal-S0 2 Complexes. C. H. Blevins, II, A. C. Campbell, D. L. Lichtenberger. 9:40—204. Ligand Additivity: Applications to the Electrochemistry and Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Low Spin d 6 Octahedral Complexes. B. E. Bursten. 10:00—205. Aklyne Binding in Polynuclear Cobalt Carbonyl Clusters. A UV Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study. P. Deshmukh, T. K. Dutta, J. L. S. Hwang, C. E. Housecroft, T. P. Fehlner. 10:20—206. Electronic Structure of d 6 Transition Metal-Cyanide Complexes: The Bonding in (r/5-C5H5)Fe(CO)2CN and (i]6C5H5)Cr{NO)2CN. J. L. Hubbard, D. L. Lichtenberger. 10:40—207. Vapor Phase Spectroscopy and Photophysics of W(CO)5L K. Brooks, A. W. Adamson. 11:00—208. Electronic Spectroscopy of Diphosphine and Diarsine Complexes of Rhodium(l) and lridium
Section F

Section D

Convention Center, Room 19, South Hall

9:00—213. Dinuclear Elimination Reactions Between Alkyl Carbonyl Complexes and Transition-Metal Hydrides. K. E. Warner, J. R. Norton. 9:20—214. Syntheses and Properties of Tricarbon'ylphosphineferrate Dianions, Fe{CO)4PR32~. Y.-S. Chen, J. E. Ellis, K. Fjare, J. T. Lin, G. F. Warnock. 9:40—215. Weakly Paramagnetic Zwitterionic Cyclopentadienyl Arene Complexes of Fe(ll). D. W. Slocum, C. C. Hinckley, S. Duraj, M. Thompson, S. Sowa. 10:00—216. Mossbauer Parameters in Five Coordinate Iron Tetracarbonyl Ferrates. B. A. Sosinsky, R. G. Shong, N. Norem. 10:20—217. Mechanistic Study of the Addition of the Transition Metal Hydride Functional Group to Conjugated Dienes. J. W. Connolly. 10:40—218. Reactions of 1,4-Dithia- and Diselena-2,5-Hexadienes with Diiron Nonacarbonyl. A. J. Mayr, K. H. Panned. 11:00—219. Carbon—Carbon Bond Formation Between Adjacent Acylic Ligands. C. M. Lukehart, K. Srinivasan. 11:20—220. Base Reduction of Group 2B Tetracarbonyl Ferrates. Synthesis, Structure, and Bonding in [M'(Fe(CO)4)2]2_(Na-THF2)£. B. A. Sosinsky, B. Fitzgerald, R. G. Shong. 11:40—221. Synthesis, Characterization and Chemical Reactivity of the Bridged Dinuclear Diiodides Me2Si[C5H4Fe(COKL)l]2, L = Ph3P, (PhO)3P. A Route to Mixed Complexes of the Type Me2Si [C5H4Fe(CO)(L)R] [C5H4Fe(CO)(L)R']. G. O. Nelson, M. E. Wright. 12:00—222. A Spectroscopic Study of a Series of Iron Carbido Clusters. B. A. Sosinsky. 12:20—223. New Synthesis of Mixed Metal Clusters from H2Os3(CO)10. W.-L. Hsu, S. G. Shore. Section E Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom D, Lobby Level General and Solid State

L. Eyring, Presiding 9:00—224. An Application of the Localized Orbital Ionization Potential Concept: The Bonding in ONF3 and Related Species. C. J. Eyermann, W. L. Jolly, S. F. Xiang. 9:20—225. Local Density Pseudopotential Calculations for Molecules. J. Bernholc, N. A. Holzwarth. 9:40—226. Electronic Charge Density and Bonding in Two NiAs-Type Solids: TiS and VS. J. Nakahara, H. Franzen, D. K. Misemer. 10:00—227. Hydrogen Bonding in the H 4 0 4 4 " Cluster in Hydrogrossular. K. M. Harmon, J. M.Gabriele, A. S. Nuttall. 10:30—228. Structure Elucidation by HRTEM Imaging and Computer-Graphics-Aided Comparison with Computed Images. L. Eyring, A. R. Smith, R. T. Tuenge. 10:40—229. Solid State Reaction Kinetics by Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction. T. L. Groy, S. K. Porter, S. H. Lin, L. Eyring. 11:00—230. Kinetics of Dissociation of InP in Vacuum. P. K. Gallagher, S. N. G. Chu. 11:20—231. Vaporization Behavior and Stabilities of Metal-Rich Manganese Phosphides. C. E. Myers, G. A. Kisacky, E. L. Patterson, R. A. Mevorach. 11:40—232. Electrochemical Crystal Growth of Organic Metals and Superconductors. V. V. Patel, E. M. Engler. 12:00—233. Optical Spectroscopy as a Probe of Mixed Valence, Cluster Formation, and Derealization Versus Localization in Inorganic Solids. H. H. Patterson. 12:20—234. A New Class of Room Temperature Molten Salts. J. L. Williams, D. A. Floreani, D. J. Stech, J. S. Wilkes, L. A. King.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Symposium on Solid State Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fu<=l Chemistrv, Petroleum Cnemistry, inc. {see page 67) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room 18, South Hall Symposium on Inorganic Reaction Mechansms: Perspectives and Progress

T..J. Meyer, Presiding 2:00—235. Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions: The [EDTA]Ru l, LCo ,ll [NH 3 ] 5+ System With L = 4,4'-bipyridine, Trans 1,2-[4-Pyridyl]Ethylene, and Pyrazine. L. A. A. Oliveira, A. Haim. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—236. Kinetics of Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Binuclear {NC)5Fe{ll)-CNCo(lll)-Chelate Complexes by Picosecond Absorption Spectroscopy. B. T. Reagor, D. S. Kelley, P. M. Rentzepis, D. H. Huchital. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—237. Does Electron Transfer Occur Across Membrane Bilayers? L. Y.-C. Lee, J. K. Hurst. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—238. Towards the Design of Nonadiabatic Electron Transfer. S. S. Isied, A. Vassilian. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—239. Lone-Pair Influence in Properties of N-heterocyclic Complexes of Ru(NH 3 k 2 + / 3 + , Ru(CN) 5 3 - /2 ~ and Fe2_r3 (CN) 5 ~ R. E. Shepherd, C. R. Johnson. 3:45—Discussion. 3:50—240. Photoinduced Metalloprotein Electron Transfer Reactions. H. B. Gray, P. L. DeLaive, A. M. English, V. R. Lum. 4:25—Discussion. Section B Convention Center, Room 19, South Hall General—Organometallic Complexes V. W. Day, Presiding 2:00—241. Lithum Complexes in the Polarization of Bibenzyl from Benzyl HalideAlkyllithium Reactions. A. R. Lepley, D. W. Long. 2:20—242. Metal Complexes of Diphosphine Monoxides. E. H. Wong, F. C. Bradley. 2:40—243. Synthesis of Ring Substituted Manganocenes and Lewis Base Adducts of Manganocene. T. Weed, M. Rettig. 3:00—244. Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopy of r/4-Tetrasubstituted Cyclopenta-2,4diene-1-ones and Their ?75-Cyclopentadienylcobalt Complexes. D. W. Slocum, C. C. Hinckley, S. Duraj, K. Moedritzer, R. E. Miller. 3:20—245. Preparation and Structures of Benzylates of Titanium and Niobium. E. Duesler, Y. Iwata, R. Schaeffer, J. Sims. 3:40—246. Organometallic Chemistry of Niobium and Tantalum: Synthesis and Reactivity of {T/ 5 -C 5 R 5 )MCI 4 and (r?5- C5R5)MCI2(R=H,CH3). R. D. Sanner, S. T. Carter, W. J. Bruton. 4:00—247. Studies of Novel Polyoxoanionic Organometallic Complexes. V. W. Day, M. R. Thompson, W. G. Klemperer, R. S. Liu, W. Shum, C. Besecker. 4:20—248. Metal Carbonyl with Crown Ether Characteristics. The Effect of Preferential Cation Binding on the Reactivity of Coordinated Carbon Monoxide. J. Powell, A. Kuksis, C. J. May, S. J. Smith. 4:40—249. An Investigation of the Reaction Between {OC)MPPh2H (M = Cr, Mo, W) and Tertiary Phosphines (PPh3, PPh2Et, PPhEt2PEt3) in the Presence of Base. R. L. Keiter, M. J. Madigan. 5:00—250. Electrochemical Study of Some Phosphine-Substituted Group VI Metal Carbonyls, M{CO)4L. R. L. Cook, J. G. Morse. 5:20—251. Novel Structural Features of Several Phosphite and Phosphine Complexes of Rhodium. V. W. Day, E. L. Muetterties, R. R. Burch, E. B. Meier. 5:40—252. Structural Studies of Several New Classes of Organoactinide and Organolanthanide Complexes. V. W. Day, S. H. Vollmer, R. D. Ernst, T. H. Cymbaluk, T. J. Marks, M. R. Duttera, P. J. Fagan, E. Mintz, C. S. Day

Feb. 15, 1982C&EN

71

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Section C I FRIDAY MORNING Convention Center, Room 20, South Hall General—Solid State Chemistry R. E. Cramer, Presiding

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-3, East Hall General: Bioinorganic Chemistry

K. W. Jennette, Presiding

2:00—253. Structure of Two Thiamin Com- 9:00—275. Dimethylsulfoxide as Leaving Group—Applications in Transition Metal pounds. R. E. Cramer, R. S. Evangelista. Chemotherapy. N. Farrell. 2:20—254. Analytical and Structural Analysis of the Lanthanum Deficient Lanthanum 9:20—276. Uptake-Reduction Model of Chromate Carcinogenicity. K. W. Jennette, Hexaboride: LaB 6+5 . M. J. McKelvy, E. K. M. J. Tsapakos, T. H. Hampton, J. D. Storms, L. Eyring. Garcia. 2:40—255. Luminescent Centers in Doped Crystals of CsMgl3: Energy Storage and 9:40—277. A Model for the Interaction of Cis-(NH3)2F1CI2 With SV40 DNA. W. M. Thermoluminescence. G. L. McPherson, Scovell, L. Kroos, V. Capponi. K. Talluto. 10:00—278. Formation of Adducts between 3:00—256. X. P. S. Studies on Titanium HaDeoxyguanosine and Cis-Dischlorodiamlides: A Comparison of T1CI3 and TiCI4 in mine Platinum (II). R. O. Rahn. the Solid State. C. Mousty-Desbuquoit, J. 10:20—279. Mo-Fe-S Compounds as Probes Riga, J. Verbist. for the Nitrogenase Active Site. J. W. 3:20—257. A New Route to the SuperconMcDonald, G. D. Friesen, S. Lough, B. K. ducting Spinel, LiTi 2 0 4 . D. W. Murphy, M. | Burgess, W. E. Newton. Greenblatt S. M. Zahurak, J. V. Waszczak, 10:40—280. Reversible Coordination of F. J. DiSalvo, G. W. Hull, Jr. Dioxygen, Carbon Monoxide and Sulphur 3:40—258. Chemical Deposition of Ti0 2 Dioxide by Manganese(ll) Phosphine Layers on GaAs. P. A. Bertrand, P. D. Complexes. C. A. McAuliffe, D. S. Barrett, Fleischauer. C. G. Benson, J. C. Briggs, A. Challita, M. 4:00—259. Cu Chalcogenide Films as PosG. Little, A. G. Mackie, K. L. Minten, J. C. sible Substitutes for Gold in Contacts—1. Pardo, C. Stacey, S. P. Tanner. J. T. Plewes, M. Robbins. 4:20—260. Cu Chalcogenide Films as Possible Substitutes for Gold in Contacts—2. Section B M. Robbins, J. T. Plewes. 4:40—261. Cu Chalcogenide Films as Pos- Convention Center, Room A-4, East Hall sible Substitutes for Gold in Contacts—3. General B. W. Meagher, J. T. Plewes, M. RobB. Hutchinson, Presiding bins. 5:00—262. Oxidation-Reduction and Ion 9:00—281. Intermediate Spin Systems. A Exchange in Ternary Molybdenum Sulfides. Spectroscopic and Variable-Temperature W. R. Robinson, R. J. Behlok, M. L. Magnetic Susceptibility Study of Several Kullberg. Iron(ll) and Iron(lll) Complexes Exhibiting S 5:20—263. Diffusion and Reaction of Po= 1 and S = 3/2 Values, Respectively. B. tassium in Reduced W0 3 . D. Rieck, L. Hutchinson, P. Neill. Eyring. 9:20—282. Physicochemical Studies of Isonitrile and Nitrite Ligands in Group VIB Metal Carbonyl Complexes. A. A. Ismail, I. Section D S. Butler. Convention Center, Room 16, North Hall 9:40—283. Electronic Excitation SpectrosGeneral copy of Tris(Glycinato)Chromium(lll). P. E. Hoggard. B. B. Wayland, Presiding 10:00—284. Synthesis of Polymer-Sup2:00—264. Solution Structure of [Irported Organometallic Complexes Using (bpy) 2 H 2 0(bpy)] 3+ by 1H NMR. P. J. SpelMetal Atom Techniques. N. J. Spare, C. G. lane, R. J. Watts. Francis. 2:20—265. Resolution, Absolute Configu10:20—285. Chemistry of Trivalent Uranium. ration and Reactions of Chiral D. C. Moody, A. J. Zozulin, R. R. Ryan, K. Rhenium Compounds [{77-C5H5)Re(NO)V. Salazar. {P{C6H5)3(L)]X+. J. H. Merrifield, J. A. Gla- 10:40—286. Modeling Heterogeneous Catdysz. alysts with Homogeneous Catalysts. Mod2:40—266. Electrochemistry of Some eling Hydrodenitrogenation Catalysts. R. M. Ruthenium Sulfur and Selenium ComLaine, D. W. Thomas, L. W. Cary. plexes. C. Kuehn. 3:00—267. Ruthenium(ll) Thioether Complexes. M. J. Root, E. Deutsch. 3:20—268. Soluble Polystyrene Pendant Polypyridyl Ruthenium Complexes— Characterization and Electrode Modification. C. D. Ellis, T. J. Meyer 3:40—269. Absorption and Emission Electronic Spectra of the Ruthenium(ll) tris (Bipyrazyl) Cation in Acid Solution. R. J. Crutchley, A. B. P. Lever. 4:00—270. Luminescence and Related Properties of a Series of Ruthenium(ll) Complexes Containing the Ligands, 2,2'Bipyridine, 2,2'-Bipyrazine and 2,2'-BypyDIVISION OF MEDICINAL rimidine. D. P. Rillema, G. Allen, T. J. Meyer. CHEMISTRY 4:20—271. Hydrido(Porphyrinato)Ruthenium Complexes. B. R. James, G. M. Williams. J. Neumeyer, Chairman 4:40—272. Rhodium Octaethylporphyrin M. Gorman, Program Chairman; Activation of CO: Formation of Metallo Secretary Carboxylic Acid and Metallo Ester Species. B. B. Wayland, B. A. Woods. 5:00—273. Metallo Formyl, Formimidoyl, and a-Hydroxyl Alkyls from Reactions of Rhodium Octaethylporphyrin Hydride with SUNDAY EVENING Carbon Monoxide, Isonitriles and Aldehydes. B. B. Wayland, B. A. Woods. 8:00—Divisional Business Meeting, Las 5:20—274. Transition Metal Gold Derivatives Vegas Hilton, Ballroom F. as Structural and Electronic Analogues of 9:00—Divisional Social Hour, following Hydrides. J. W. Lauher. business meeting.

MEDI

Section E Symposium on Solid State Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry, Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 58)

MONDAY MORNING Convention Center, Room 17, Lobby Level Symposium on New Hormones Which Cooccur in the Brain and Gut

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room 17, Lobby Level Symposium on Gastric Acid Secretion Inhibitors

C. R. Ganellin, Presiding

TUESDAY MORNING Convention Center, Room 17, Lobby Level Symposium on Toxicology and Risk Assessment organized by Division of Medicinal Chemistry joint with Division of Pesticide Chemistry R. E. Gammans, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—27. Decision Point Carcinogenicity Testing. J. H. Weisburger, G. M. Williams. 9:45—28. In Vitro Testing and Risk Assessment. D. Clive. 10:30—29. R & D's Role in Managing Environmental Risks. J. T. Funkhouser. 11:15—30. Toxicology in Drug Development. V. C. Glocklin. 11:45—Discussion. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—6. Biochemical Factors Affecting Gastric Acid Secretion. G. Sachs. 2:50—7. Assessment of Current Therapy. J. I. Isenberg. 3:35—8. Newer H2-Receptor Histamine Antagonists. A. A. Algieri. 4:00—9. New Selective Antimuscarinics. R. Hammer. 4:20—10. Omeprazole—An Inhibitor of Gastric Acid Secretion—Studies on Its Mechanism of Action in Isolated Gastric Glands and on H + ,K + -ATPase. B. Wallmark, A. Brandstrom, E. Fellenius. 4:40—11. Antisecretory Prostaglandin Analogs. D. R. Morton.

Section B Convention Center, Room 21, North Hall Poster Session—General J. W. Westley, Presiding 2:00—12. Mechanism for the Transformation of Bile Acids into Iso-Bile Acids by Clostridium Absonum. A. K. Batta, G. Salen. 13. Methylation of Carboxyl Groups in Fibrinogen. A. J. Osbahr. 14. Inhibition of the Decarboxylation of LDOPA by Metal Chelatin and Its Therapeutic Significance. K. S. Rajan, S. Mainer, B. I. Diamond, R. L. Borison, J. M. Davis. 15. Spontaneous Reactivation of Human Serum Cholinesterase Inhibited by Selected Organophosphinates. M. A. Lawson, C. N. Lieske, S. L. Feroli, P. K. Gandhi, H. G. Meyer. 16. C-13 NMR of Some New /3-Adrenergic Blockers. H. Y. Aboul-Enein, M. M. A. Hassan, A. I. Jado. 17. Potential Radiosensitizing Agents. 7. 4(5) IODO-5(4)-Nitroimidazole Derivatives. R. P. Gupta, C. A. Larroquette, K. C. Agrawal, J. Grodkowski, P. Nesta. 20. Retro-Retinols via [1,7]-Sigmatropic Shifts: Acetylenic and Allenic Retinoids, Potential Active Site Inhibitors. Y. S. Chauhan, W. Reischl, B. Scher, W. H. Okamura. 21. Heterocyclic Steroid Hormones: 3-Thia and 3-Sulfinyl Derivatives of 3-Deoxy1a-Hydroxyvitamin D3. A. Haces, H. Okamura. 4:00—22. Streptozotocin Induced Maternal Diabetes as a Model for Examining the Effects of Maternal Hyperglycemia on Fetal Lung Insulin Receptor Binding. R. E. Ulane, R. Steinherz, J. E. Graeber, M. Comblath. 23. Synthesis of Sodium C-11-Benzoate for Physiological and Metabolic Studies: Evaluation in a Tumor-Bearing Animal. B. Schmall, P. S. Conti, R. E. Bigler, P. B. Zanzonico, R. E. Reiman, J. R. Dahl, J. K. Jacobsen, R. Lee. 24. Interactions of Deoxyribonucleic Acids and Alkylating Agents. J. D. Gomes, S. R. Byrn, C-J Chang. 25. Mass Spectrometry of Mesionic Nucleosides. E. M. Schubert, K. H. Schram. 26. Cancer Bioassay Study of Rodents Subjected to Diethylhydroxylamine, Nitroethane, and Diethylamine Hydrogen Sulfite. J. Heicklen, R. Lundgard, K. Partymiller, J. Meagher, J. Weaver, N. Kelly, F. Ferguson, R. Latt, C. Putman, W. Sapanski, J. Tankard, L. Billups.

S. Leeman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Substance P and Neurotensin: Discovery, Isolation from Neural and Intestinal Tissue, Possible Physiological Roles. S. E. Leeman.

72

9:35—2. Design and Synthesis of Antagonists of Substance P. K. Folkers, S. Rosell. 10:05—3. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide: As a Probable Neurotransmitter in Brain, Gut and Other Tissues. S. Said. 10:35—4. Chemical and Biological Characterization of an Ovine Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) W. Vale, J. Spiess, C. Rivier, M. Brown, G. Koob, J. Rivier. 11:05—5. A CRF-Like Hypotensive Peptide from Teleost Fish Urophysis, K. Lederis, K. L. MacCannell, D. McMaster, U. Suess, J. Lawrence. 11:35—Discussion.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Section A

Convention Center, Room 17, Lobby Level Symposium on Information Services and the Medicinal Chemist organized by Division of Medicinal Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Information

B. C. Zahm, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—31. Medicinal Chemist and ISI®—An Information Relationship. B. Lawlor, C. Kulp, J. E. Sarkisian. 2:30—32. CAS Information Services for Medicinal Chemists. J. J. Heyman, E. H. Karasinska. 2:55—33. Substructure Search with DArtC. . E. Chanal, A. Deroulede. 3:20—34. Central Patients Index (CPI) as a Source of Information for the Pharmaceutical Chemist. P. Norton. 3:45—35. Perceived Information Needs of Medicinal Chemists. H. D. Brown. 4:10—Discussion, "Hands-On" Demonstration of Secondary Information Services, and Social Hour.

Section B Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level Poster Session—General

M. P. Mertes, Presiding 2:00—36. Synthesis and Comparison of Some Cardiovascular Properties of the Labetalol Stereoisomers. E. H. Gold, T. Baum, W. Chang, M. Cohen, S. Ehrreich, G. Johnson, N. Prioli, E. J. Sybertz. 37. Epiandrosterone-3/3-Alkylsulfonates: Potential Anticancer and Antiobesity Agents. M. Abou-Gharbia, A. Schwartz, D. Swern. 38. A Synthesis of EHNA from Chiral Precursors. Identification of the Bioreactive Enantiomer, D. C. Baker, L. D. Hawkins. 39. HPLC of Conjugated Bile Acids. Effect of Solvent Polarity. A. K. Batta, G. Salen. 40. 5-p-Benzoquinonyl-2'-Deoxyuridine 5'Phosphate: A Suicide Inhibitor of Thymidylate Synthetase. M. P. Mertes, C. T.-C. Chang, C. F. Bigge, M. E. Hasson. 3:00—41. Serotonin Receptor Affinity of Cathinone and Related Analogues. R. A. Glennon, S. M. Liebowitz. 42. 5-Substituted Derivatives of Uracil. Synthesis and Biological Activity of 5-{a,fiDibromo-/3-Trimethyl Silyl) Vinyl Uracil. N. G. Kundu, S. A. Schmitz. 43. Structure-Activity Relationships of Buspirone Analogues. J. P. Yevich, D. L. Temple Jr., J. S. New, D. P. Taylor, L. A. Riblet. 44. Aminotetralins as Narcotic Antagonists: Synthesis and Opioid-Related Activity of 3-Dialkylamino-2,2-Dimethyl-7-Hydroxy1-Substituted Tetralins. D. S. Fries, H. T. Fikrat, W. G. Riefenrath. 45; A Prototypical Analgetic Derived from Cannabinoids. L. S. Melvin, M. R. Johnson, C. A. Harbert, G. M. Milne. 4:00—46. Homo-13-Azaprostanoic Acids as Inhibitors of Platelet Aggregation. K. S. Anderson, S. S. Navran, H. Akbar, D. R. Feller, D. D. Miller. 47. Irreversible Inhibition of Porcine Pancreatic Elastase by Amino Acid-Derived Imidazole N-Carboxamides, W. C. Groutas, M. C. Theodorakis, R. D. Badger, A. M. Kasper, K. M. Lembezeder, T. D. Ocain.

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48. Imidodisulfamides, A Novel Class of An- I 4:45—68. Potential Anticonvulsant Agents. tagonists of Slow Reacting Substance of Synthesis of 4-Amino-5-Phenoxypentanoic Anaphylaxis (SRS-A). F. E. AM, P. A. DanAcid and Related Compounds. J. T. Uchic, dridge, J. G. Gleason, R. D. Krell, C. H. T. Yamauchi, G. Chettur, I. Lesevicius. Kruse, P. G. Lavanchy, K. M. Snader. 49. Anticoccidial Derivatives of 6-Azauracil. THURSDAY MORNING AND 5. Thousand-Fold Potentiation by BenzoAFTERNOON phenone Sidechains. R. D. Carroll, M. W. Miller, B. L. Mylari, L. R. Chappel, H. L. Convention Center, Room 17, Lobby Level Howes, Jr., M. J. Lynch, J. E. Lynch, S. K. General Gupta, J. J. Rash, R. C, Koch. E. J . Glamkowski, Presiding 50. Trypanocidal Activity of Substituted 2Amino-5-Hydroxynaphtho[ 1,2]Thiazolium 9:00—69. Effects of Quinazoline Analogues Salts. P. Ulrich, A. Cerami. of Folic Acid Upon the Growth of Human 51. Novel Polyether Antibiotics X-1468A and Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinoma Cells in X-1468B: Potent Coccidiostats isolated Vitro. J. B. Hynes, Y. C. S. Yang, G. H. from Nocardia. J. W. Westley, J. F. Blount, McCue, A. C. Arney, W. L. Washtien. R. H. Evans, C-M. Liu, L. H. Sello, N. Troupe, 9:15—70. 2,3-Dimethyl*1,4-NaphthoquiT. Hermann, P. A. Miller. none Derivatives as Potential Bioreductive Alkylating Agents. T-S Lin, I. Antonini, L. A. Cosby, A. C. Sartorelli. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A .9:30—71. Antitumor Activity of Some AnConvention Center, Room 17, Lobby Level thracycline Analogs Modified in the Sugar Moiety. H. S. El Khadem, D. Matsuura. The Alfred Burger Award Symposium— 9:45—72. Mitomycin C and Porfiromycin Selected Topics in Medicinal Chemistry Analogues with Substituted Ethylamines at D. Boger, Presiding Position 7. B. S. Iyengar, S. M. Sami, W. A. 9:00—Introductory Remarks. Remers, W. T. Bradner. 9:05—52. "Orphan Drugs": Accomplish10:00—73. Synthesis and Antitumor Evaluments and Opportunities. T. H. Althuis. ation of 2'-Deoxy-5-Fluorouridine Phos9:35—53. A Practical Total Synthesis of phonates. E. P. Heimer, M. Ahmad, T. Natural and Unnatural Codeine, Morphine, Lambros, M. J. Kramer. Their Opium-Derived Congeners and An10:15—74. 2-Substituted-8-Azaadenosines: tagonists. K. C. Rice. Synthesis and Biologic Activity. J. A. Sec10:05—54. Bivalent Ligands as Probes for rist, III, A. T. Shortnacy, J. A. MontEstimating Inter-Receptor Distance. P. S. gomery. Portoghese, M. Erez, C. B. Yim, L. M. 10:30—75. 8-Haloadenine Nucleosides: Sayre, A. E. Takemori. Synthesis and Biologic Activity. J. A. Sec10:40—55. Formation and Metabolism of rist, III, J. A. Montgomery, B. J. Bowdon, L. 14,15-Leukotriene A. C. J. Sih. L. Bennett, Jr. 11:10—56. Award Address. (Alfred Burger 10:45—76. Synthesis and Antitumor Activity Award in Medicinal Chemistry sponsored of 5'-Phosphates and Certain 4-Substituted by Smith-Kline Corporation). Captopril: A Derivatives of 2-/3-D-RibofuranosylthiaStudy in Ab Initio Drug Design, D. W. zole-4-Carboxamide. P. C. Srivastava, R. Cushman, M. A. Ondetti. K. Robins. 11:00—77. Synthesis and In Vivo Antitumor Activity of Potential 5-Fluorouracil ProWEDNESDAY AFTERNOON drugs. A. Rosowsky, S. H. Kim. 11:15—78. Synthesis and Antitumor Activity Convention Center, Room 17, Lobby Level of the ARA-C Conjugates of Lipophilic AlGeneral cohols. C. I. Hong, A. J. Kirisits, A. NeR. Crenshaw, Presiding chaev, C. R. West. 11:30—79. Synthesis and Antitumor Activity 2:00—57. H2-Antagonists with an Extended of 5-Fluoro~2'-Deoxyuridine Conjugates of Duration of Action. B. J. Price. Corticosteroids. S-H An, C. R. West, C. 2:15—58. Quartenary Ammonium Analogs of I.Hong. an H2 Receptor Antagonist. B. S. Pitzele, 11:45—80. Vitamin A (A) and j3 Carotene (B): P. Kellar, L. Kessler, J. Sanner, E. Woods, Actions in 7,12-Dimethyl-Benz-(a)AnE. Z. Dajani. thracene (DMBA) Tumor Prevention. E. 2:30—59. Structure-Activity and Theoretical Seifter, F. Wong, F. Stratford, S. M. LevStudies of Intramolecular Heterocycle Inenson, G. Rettura. teractions in a Series of Novel H^+Histamine Receptor Antagonists. W. C. Lumma, Jr., J. J. Baldwin, W. A. Bolhofer, J. M. Hoffman, | J. B. Hynes, Presiding B. T. Phillips, M. L. Torchiana, H. B. Schle2:00—81. Receptor Models. Interaction of gel, G. M. Smith, J. Hirshfield. Imidazolium Chloride with Hallucinogenic 2:45—60, Conformational Requirements for Amphetamines. A. P. de Jong, A. MakriHistamine H2-Receptor Inhibitors: A yannis. Structure-Activity Study of Phenylene An2:15—82. Correlations between Anesthetic alogs Related to Cimetidine and Tiotidine. Activity and Ability to Perturb Phospholipid J. M. Hoffman, A. M. Pietruszkiewicz, C. N. Bilayers Using 1H and 2H NMR. A. MakrlHabecker, B. T. Phillips, W. A. Bolhofer, E. yannis, S. Fesik, R. Kriwacki. J. Cragoe, Jr., M. L. Torchiana. 2:30—83. Dynamic NMR Studies of the 3:00—61. Arylpropyl and Arylpropenyl AnaConformational Behavior of Cannabidiol logues of the H2-Antagonist Cimetidine, G. and Its Derivatives. A. R. Martin, V. V. W. Adelstein, N. J. Malek, A. E. Moorman, Kane. D. G. Colton, B. S. Pitzele. 2:45—84. Trace Analysis of Drugs and Me3:15—62. Synthesis and Gastric Antisecretabolites in Physiological Fluids and Tissues tory Properties of 4,5 Unsaturated Derivaby Tandem Mass Spectrometry. H. O. tives of 15-Deoxy-16-Hydroxy-16-Methyl Brotherton, R. J. Perchalski, R, A. Yost. Prostaglandin Ev P. W. Collins, E. Z. Dajani, 3:00—85. Synthesis of Certain CarbamoylR. Pappo, A. Gasiecki, R. G. Bianchi, E. M. Pyrazolopyrimidine and Pyrrolopyrimidine Woods. Nucleosides as Antiviral Agents. R. J. 3:30—63. 4-(Diphenylmethyl)-1-[(lmino)Goebel, R. K. Robins, G. R. Revankar, P. G. Methyl] Piperidines as Gastric AntisecreCanonico. tory Agents, M. K. Scott, H. I. Jacoby, C. R. 3:15—86. Synthesis and Activity of 8-Deaza Rasmussen. Analogs in the Thymidylate Synthetase 3:45—64. Synthesis and Neuroleptic Activity Reaction. A. Srinlvasan, A. D. Broom. of 3-<1-Substituted-4-Piperidinyl)-1,23:30—87. Studies of 7,12-Dimethylbenz(A)Benzisoxazoles. J. T. Strupczewski, R. C. Anthracene Analogue-Induced TransforAllen, B. A. Gardner, B. L. Schmid, U. mation of Human Fibroblasts. D. T. WHIak, Sta^che, E. J. Glamkowski, M. J. Jones, D. G. E. Milo, T. O. Mason, M. Inbasekaran, F. B. Ellis, H. M. Geyer, III. D. Cazer, W. R. Gower, Y. M. Sheikh, N. 4:00—65. Synthesis and Antidepressant Ekwuribe, B. Dhawan. Properties of 2'-(Aminomethyl)Spiro[Benzofuran-2(3H), 1'-CyclohexanesJ. E. J. Glamkowski, M. C. Jones, H. M. Geyer, III, J. C. Wilker, F. P. Huger, M. Comfeldt. 4:15—66. Synthesis and Analgesic Activity of 5-Aryl-3-Methyl-3-Azabicyclo[3.2.0]Heptan-6-One-Dimethylacetals. T. C. McKenzie, W. J. Fanshawe, J. W. Epstein, B. A. Regan, A. C. Osterberg. 4:30—67. Potential Anticonvulsants Derived from Isatin. F. D. Popp, H. Pajouhesh.

3:45—88. Evaluation of 7-Substituted NHydroxy-2-Acetamidofluorenes as Substrates and Inactivators of N-Arylhydroxamic Acid N.O-Acyltransferase. P. IE. Hanna, V. C. Marhevka, A. A. Elfarra, N. A. Ebner, R. D. Sehori. 4:00—89. Molecular Structure and CNDO/2 Molecular Orbital Calculations Regarding The Antineoplastic Antifolate Damp and its Analogues. W. J. Welsh, V. Cody, J. E. Mark, S. F. Zakrewski. 4:15—90. Adrenal Cortical 11/3-Hydroxylase. Structure-Activity Relationship Study of the Inhibition by New Metyrapone Analogues. S. J. Hays, M. C. Tobes, D. L. Gildersleeve, D. M. Wieland, W. H. Beierwaltes. 4:30—91. Immobilized Fluorogenic Substrates for Proteolytic Enzymes. P. J. Brynes, P. Andrade, D. Gordon.

NUCL DIVISION OF NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY R. L. Hahn, Chairman R. W. Hoff, Secretary MONDAY MORNING Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G, Lobby Level Nuclear Chemistry Award Symposium in Honor of Leo Yaffe

G. Friedlander, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Award Address. (ACS Award for Nuclear Chemistry sponsored by EG&G ORTEC.) Nuclear Charge Dispersion Studies in the Fission of Heavy Nuclei by Protons. L. Yaffe. 10:00—Discussion. 10:10—2. Calculations of Charge Dispersion in Fission. J. J. Hogan, C. Chung. 10:50—Discussion. 11:00—Intermission. 11:10—3. Heavy-Mass Yield Distributions in the Fission of Uranium-235 at Various Kinetic Energies of the Fragments. H Braun, H. O. Denschlag, W. Faubel, W. Porsch, R. Sehr, B. Sohnius, H. Faust. 11:50—Discussion. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G, Lobby Level Nuclear Chemistry Award Symposium in Honor of Leo Yaffe

N. Sugarman, Presiding 2:00—4. Anomalous Behavior of Evaporative H/He from 194 Hg* Compound Nuclei. J. M. Alexander, H. DelaGrange, M. Rajagopalan, M. F. Rivet, L. C. Vaz. 2:45—Discussion. 2:55—5. Some Aspects of Applied Nuclear Chemistry at Intermediate Energies. B. D. Pate. 3:40—Discussion. 3:50—Intermission. 4:05—6. Characterization of Art and Archaeological Materials by Nuclear Methods. E. V. Sayre. 4:50—Discussion.

Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 11 & 12, 2nd Floor General

K. W. Thomas, Presiding The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

2:00—7. Pion Single Charge-Exchange Reactions in La and Sr Across the (3,3) Resonance. G. C. Giesler, B. J. Dropeksy, A. A. Caretto, Jr.

2:15—Discussion. 2:20—8. A 4ir (3-y Coincidence System with Minimally Broadened Pulses. R. J. Gehrke, L. O. Johnson. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—9. Production of Microcurie Amounts of 26 AI. K. W. Thomas, and the Los Alamos Medical Radioisotope Group. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—10. Simultaneous Determination of Plutonium and Americium in Process Solutions by Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. T. K. Li. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—11. Electrochemical and Sorption Characteristics of Hydroxo and Carbonato Species of Dioxo Uranium VI. L. Maya. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—Intermission. 3:50—12. Tc-99m Complexes of Bis-Mercaptoethylamino Ligands: Synthesis and Properties. H. Ravert, N. D. Heindel, H. D. Burns. 4:05—Discussion. 4:10—13. Synthesis of Radioiodinated Vinyl and Aryl Iodides via the Reaction of Labeled Sodium Iodide with Organoboranes. G. W. Kabalka, K. A. R. Sastry, K. Muralidhar. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—14. An Alternative Solvent Cleanup Method Using Hydrazine Oxalate Wash Reagent. O. K. Tallent, J. C. Mailen. 4:50—Discussion. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 11 & 12, 2nd Floor Symposium on Nuclei Far From Stability I. The Nuclear Mass Surface; Neutron-Rich Nuclides R. L. Gill, Presiding 9:00—15. Theory Meets Experiment: A Critical Review of Nuclidic Mass Models. P. E. Haustein. 9:30—Discussion. 9:35—16. Calculation of Nuclear Masses and Ground State Shapes with a YukawaPlus-Exponential Macroscopic Model and a Folded Yukawa Single-Particle Potential. P. Moller, J. R. Nix. 10:20—Discussion. 10:25—Intermission. 10:35—17. Q/3 Measurements of Transitional Fission Product Nuclides at TRISTAN. D. S. Brenner. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—18. A Time-of-Flight Spectrometer for Mass Measurements at LAMPF. D. J. Vieira, G. W. Butler, J. L. Clark, J. M. Wouters, A. M. Poskanzer, L. P. Remsberg, H. Wollnik. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—19. Gamow-Teller Strength Functions of Neutron-Rich Nuclides in the Mass Regions A ~ 30, 48, and 90. K.-L. Kratz. 12:00—Discussion.

Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G, Lobby Level Symposium on Geochemistry of Nuclear Waste Disposal organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Division of Geochemistry

D. B. Curtis, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—20. Role of Geochemistry in Siting High-Level Radioactive Waste Repositories: Current Perspective of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. D. J. Brooks, G. F. Birchard. 9:25—Discussion. 9:30—21. Concept of Electron Activity and the Redox Potential of Aqueous Solutions. D. C. Thorstenson. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—22. Critical Geochemistry Variables Affecting Radionuclide Migration Assessments. E. A. Bondietti, R. C. Olsen. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—23. Thermodynamics of Proton and Metal Ion Binding to Organic Polyelectrolytes. J. A. Marinsky, M. M. Reddy. 11:10—Discussion. 11:15—24. Effect of Natural Organic Compounds in Deep Groundwater on Radionuclide Transport. J. L. Means, D. A. Crerar. 11:40—Discussion.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

75

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A I 11:10—39. Aggregate Delayed Neutrons and Spectral Calculations Using Preliminary Precursor Data Evaluated for Inclusion in ENDF/B-VI. T. R. England, R. E. Schenter, F. Mann. 11:50—Discussion.

Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 11 & 12, 2nd Floor Symposium on Nuclei Far From Stability I. The Nuclear Mass Surface; Neutron-Rich Nuclides D. S. Brenner, Organizer, Presiding 2:00—25. IBA-2 Calculations Near the Z-64 Closed Shell. R. L. Gill. 2:30—Discussion. 2:35—26. Development of Radiochemical and Mass Separative Facilities for On-Line Study of Short Lived Fission Products. R. C. Greenwood, R. A. Anderl, J. D. Baker, R. J. Gehrke, D. H. Meikrantz, V. J. Novick 3:20—Discussion. 3:25—Intermission. 3:35—27. Nuclear Structure Studies of Neutron Rich Nuclides Using the On-Line Mass-Separator TRISTAN and a MultiDetector Angular Correlation and Coincidence System. W. B. Walters, C. Chung, A. Wolf, R. E Chrien, G. Peaslee. 4:00—Discussion. 4:05—28. In-Beam A-Ray Spectroscopy of Neutron-Rich Nuclei Through Massive Transfer Reactions. D. R. Haenni, P. Rogucki, U. Garg, G. Mouchaty, R. P. Schmitt. 4:30—Discussion. 4:35—29. Neutron Excess Transfer Reaction. H. C. Britt, W. Faubel, M. M. Fowler, D. C. Hoffman, E. N. Treher, J. Van der Plicht, J. B. Wilhelmy, D. Lee, M. Nurmia, G. T. Seaborg. 4:50—Discussion. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting. 6:15—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). Section B Las Vegas H Iton, Ballroom G, Lobby Level Symposium on Geochemistry of Nuclear Waste Disposal organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Division of Geochemistry M. M. Reddy, Organizer, Presiding 2:00—30. Geochemistry of Tc, Ru, and Nd at the Oklo Natural Reactors. T. M. Benjamin, D. B. Curtis, A. J. Gancarz. 2:25—Discussion. 2:30—31. Modelling Adsorption of Aqueous U, Th, Ra, and Pb onto some Oxides and Silicates. C.-K.D. Hsi, A. C. Riese, J. C. Carts, D. Langmuir. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—32. Applications of 36CI to the Hydrology of Nuclear Waste. H. W. Bentley, S. N. Davis. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—33. Sorption Isotherms and Matrix Diffusion in Yucca Mountain Tuff. R. S. Rundberg, S. J. Knight, J. L. Thompson. 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—34. Solubility Constraints in Basalt Aquifers. E. A. Jenne, W. J. Deutsch, K. M. Krupka. 4:40—Discussion. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location). 6:15—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 11 & 12, 2nd Floor Symposium on Nuclei Far From Stability II. Symposium on Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission R. Tuttle, Presiding 9:00—35. Delayed Neutron Research at Los Alamos. A. E. Evans, Jr. 9:20—Discussion. 9:25—36. Comparison of Measured and Calculated Delayed Neutron Yields. R. W. Waldo, R. A. Karam, R. A. Meyer. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—37. Effective Delayed Neutron Fraction and the Reactivity Coefficient Discrepancy. W, D. Reece, R. A. Karam. 10:10—Discussion. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—38. Effective Delayed-Neutron Energy spectrum in Nuclear Fuel, G. Rudstam. 11:05—Discussion.

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Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G, Lobby Level Symposium on Geochemistry of Nuclear Waste Disposal organized by Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology joint with Division of Geochemistry B. R. Erdal, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—40. Smectite and Zeolite Distributions and Reactions in Tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. D. L. Bish. 9:25—Discussion. 9:30—41. Chemical Speciation of Plutonium in Selected Ground Waters. J. M. Cleveland, T. F. Rees, K. L. Nash. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—42. Origin, Composition, and Migration of Brines in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. R. L. Bassett, D. A. Smith. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—43. Geochemical Studies in the WIPP Site, New Mexico. D. G. Brookins. 11:10—Discussion. 11:15—44. Laboratory Studies of Radionu, elide Transport in Fractured Rock Cores. R. F. Koszykowski, D. Isherwood, E. Raber. 11:40—Discussion. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 11 & 12, 2nd Floor Symposium on Nuclear Far From Stability II. Symposium on Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission C. Reich, Presiding 2:00—45. Beta-Delayed Emission of Two- and Three-Neutrons and Influence of Beta Recoil and Level Width on Delayed Particle Spectra. G. Nyman. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—46. Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Measurement for Na Isotopes and their Descendents with A = 29-35. M. Langevin, C. Detraz, D. Guillemaud, M. C. Kouassigoffri, M. Ephere, G. Audi, M. De SaintSimon, C. Thibault, F. Touchard 3:10—Discussion. 3:15—47. Half-Lives, Average Energies, and Pn Values of Sr, Y, Ba, and La Precursors. P. L. Reeder, R. A. Warner, T. R. Yeh. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—Intermission. 3:50—48. Gamma Spectra Following Delayed Neutron Emission. R. A. Warner, P. L. Reeder, A. E. Evans 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—49. Beta-Delayed Neutron Spectroscopy as a Tool for Studying Nuclear Structure in Far Unstable Nuclei. K.-L. Kratz. 4:55—Discussion.

Section B

4:15—Discussion. 4:20—55. Scaling of Laser Separation of Carbon Isotopes. E. A. Ryabov, V. S. Letokhov. 4:40—Discussion. 4:45—56. Isotope Separation in Supersonic Molecular Beams Using RF Spectroscopy. A. Amirav. 5:05—Discussion. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 11 & 12, 2nd Floor Symposium on Nuclei Far From Stability II. Symposium on Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission G. Woodruff, Presiding 9:00—57. Measurement of Delayed Neutron Spectra with a 3He Spectrometer and Calculation of Corresponding Covariance Error Matrices. D. R. Weaver, J. G. Owen, J. Walker. 9:25—Discussion. 9:30—58. 3He Ion-Chamber Performance from 0.1 to 3.2 MeV. A. E. Evans, Jr. 9:50—Discussion. 9:55—59. Measurement of Delayed Neutron Energy Spectra from 93Rb, 94Rb, and 95Rb. A. J. Caffrey, R. C. Greenwood, L. O. Johnson. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—60. Beta-Delayed Neutron Spectra by Time-of-Flight. D. D. Clark, G. ScharffGoldhaber, T. Yeh, R. L. Gill, M. Shmid. 10:40—Discussion. Symposium on Nuclei Far From Stability III. Proton-Rich Nuclides

K. S. Toth, Presiding 10:45—61. Structure and Spectroscopy of Radioactive Nuclei. G. Leander. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—62. Lasers in Nuclear Science. H. K. Carter, C. E. Bemis, Jr. 12:10—Discussion. Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G, Lobby Level Symposium on Laser Isotope Separation cosponsored with Division of Physica' Chemistry D. M. Cox, Presiding 9:00—63. Report on Progress and Prospects for Future Development of the Laser Isotope Separation Program at Livermore. J. I. Davis 9:40—Discussion. 9:45—64. Two Frequency Isotopically Selective Unimolecular Dissociation of UF6. P. Rabinowitz, A. Kaldor, A. Gnauck. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—65. Uranium Isotope Separation by Lasers—The Research Program of Uranit. H. Jetter. G. Meyer-Kretschmer. 11:20—Discussion. 11:25—66. Molecular Laser Isotope Separation. J. L. Lyman. 12:05—Discussion. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G, Lobby Level Symposium on Laser Isotope Separation cosponsored with Division of Physical Chemistry

Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 11 & 12, 2nd Floor Symposium on Nuclei Far From Stability III. Proton-Rich Nuclides

A. Kaldor, Organizer, Presiding

P. E. Haustein, Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—50. CW Infrared Laser Isotope Separation. T. J. Manuccia. 2:05—Discussion. 2:10—51. Laser Isotope Separation for Isotopes of Hydrogen. R. D. McAlpine, D. K. Evans. 2:50—Discussion. 2:55—52. Tritium Isotope Separation with Extremely Large Separation Factors by C0 2 Laser Multiphoton Dissociation of Trifluoromethane-T. Y. Makide, T. Tominaga, K. Takeuchi, O. Kurihara, R. Nakane. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—53. Laser Isotope Separation for the Industrial Production of Heavy Water. J. Bigeleisen, W. B. Hammond, S. Tuccio. 3:50—Discussion. 3:55—54. Multiphoton Excitation of SF6, Recent Advances in Understanding. D. P. Hodgkinson.

2:00—67. Particle Radioactivities in Neutron-Deficient Nuclei. J. C. Hardy. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—68. Radioactive Decay Experiments on Far From Stability Nuclei at the GSI Mass Separator. E. F. Zganjar. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—69. New Nuclear Structures from Spectroscopy Studies of Nuclei Far Off Stability. J. H. Hamilton.

4:20—Discussion. 4:25—70. Search for Proton-Rich Light Nuclei in 800-MeV Proton Spallation Reactions. J. L. Clark, G. W. Butler, D. J. Viera, D. G. Perry, A. M. Poskanzer, L. P. Remsberg. 4:55—Discussion. Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G, Lobby Level Symposium on Laser Isotope Separation cosponsored with Division of Physical Chemistry C. Cantrel, Presiding 2:00—71. Chemistry, Spectroscopy, and Infrared Photochemistry of Uranium Compounds Tailored for 10/i Absorption: Hexaand Penta alkoxides. E. A. Cuellar, S. S. Miller, T. J. Marks, E. Weitz. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—72. Infrared Laser Fragmentation of Jet-Cooled U02L2-TMP (A Volatile Uranyl Compound). D. M. Cox, A. Kaldor, T. G. Dietz, M. A. Duncan, R. E. Smalley. 3:25—Discussion. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—73. Isotope Effects in the Laser Photochemistry of Volatile Uranyl Complexes. A. Ekstrom, H. J. Hurst, C. H. Randall, H. Loeh, R. N. Whitten. 4:20—Discussion. 4:25—Future Direction and Opportunities for Laser Isotope Separation. Panel Discussion: A. Kaldor, Moderator. 5:10—Adjournment.

FRIDAY MORNING Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G, Lobby Level Symposium on Nuclei Far From Stability IV. Workshop and Panel Discussion on Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission P. L. Reeder, Presiding 9:00—Discussion of Techniques, Details of Calculations, etc., by Symposium Participants. 12:00—Adjournment.

ORGN DIVISION OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY A. I. Meyers, Chairman W. S. Trahanovsky, Secretary/ Treasurer

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room 24, South Hall Symposium on the James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry R. G. Bergman, Presiding 9:00—1. Applications of Carbanion Photochemistry. M. A. Fox. 9:45—2. Adventures in Unsaturated Carbene and Related Chemistry. P. J. Stang. 10:30—3. A Theory of Nuclear Substitution. Applications to Chemical Bonding, Substituent Effects, Potential Energy Surfaces and Catalysis. J. R. Murdoch, D. E. Magnoli, J. Donnella. 11:15—4. Award Address. (Sponsored by the Northeastern Section, ACS). Carbanion Ion-Pairs and -Multiplets. A. Streitwieser, Jr. Section B

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Convention Center, Room 22, South Hall Symposium on Organoselenium Chemistry in Synthesis H. J. Reich, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—5. New Organoselenium Methodology. D. Liotta, M. Saindane, G. Zima, C. Barnum.

9:45—Discussion. 9:50—6. Extrusion Reactions of Selenoketones (Selones) in the Preparation of Stericalty Hindered Molecules. E. R. Cullen, C. J. Murphy, F. S. Guzlec, Jr. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—7. Aspects of the Chemistry of Areneselenosulfonates and Bis(Alkylthio)Selenides. J. L. Kice, R. A. Gancarz, H. Slebocka-Tilk. 10:50—Discussion. 10:55—8. Selenonium Ions and Selenonium Ylides. A. S. Howard, G. K. Surya Prakash, S. C. Frohlich, G. A. Olah. 11:10—Discussion. 11:15—9. Phenyiselenoacetaldehyde in Synthesis. D. L. J. Clive, G. Angoh, C. G. Russell, S. G. Suri. 11:55—Discussion. Section C Convention Center, Room 23, South Hall Total Synthesis

R. W. Franck, Presiding 9:00—10. Total Synthesis of a Seco Erythronolide. B. M. Trost, J. L. Belletire, F. J. Brown, H. Hagiwara, A. Lubineau. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—11. Synthesis of Calonectrin. G. A. Kraus, B. Roth, K. Frazier, M. Shimagaki. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—12. Total Synthesis of Terpenic Acids Via Cyclopentene Annulation of Exocyclic Acrylates. R. P. Short, T. Hudlicky. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—13. Synthesis of HMG CoA Reductase Inhibitors, An Approach to the Synthesis of Compactin. C. H. Heathcock, M. J. Taschner, J. A. Thomas. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—14. A Novel and Efficient Entry to (±)-Quadrone. S. D. Burke, B. Murtiashaw, J. O. Saunders, M. Dike. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—15. Synthetic Studies to Milbemycin. D. R. Williams, B. A. Barner, J. G. Phillips, K. Nishitani. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—16. A Synthetic Approach to Milbemycin /33. A. B. Smith, ill, S. R. Schow, J. D. Bloom, A. S. Thompson, K. N. Winzenberg. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—17. A New and Efficient Cyclization Reaction to Construct the Bicyclomycin Ring System: Synthesis of N.N'-Dimethyl4-Des-Methylene Bicyclomycin. R. M. Williams, O. P. Anderson, R. Armstrong, J. Josey, H. Meyers, C. Eriksson. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—18. Microbial Iron Chelators: The Total Synthesis of Aerobactin and its Constituent Amino Acid N(6)-Acetyl-N(6)-Hydroxylysine. M. J. Miller, P. J. Maurer. 11:55—Discussion. Section D Convention Center, Room 18, South Hall Stereochemistry E. A. Hill, Presiding 9:00—19. Asymmetric Synthesis of Highly Enantiomerically Pure a-Hydroxyacids. E. L. Eliel, J. E. Lynch. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—20. Functionalized Tetrahedral Carbanions in Stereocontrolled Synthesis. G. J. McGarvey, M. Kimura. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—21. t-Butyl Lithium Additions to Enones. Preferential Axial Attack. D. J. Goldsmith, J. K. Thottathil. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—22. Conformational Analysis of Mcnosubstituted Tetrahydropyrans (Oxanes) E. L. Eliel, K. D. Hargrave, K. M. Pietrusiewicz, M. Manoharan. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—23. A Spectroscopic Method for the Determination of Optical Purities of Chiral, Chelating Diphosphines. E. P. Kyba, S. P. Rines. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—24. A New Chiral Trialkylborane Reagent for the Asymmetric Reduction of Ketones. M. M. Midland, A. Kazubski. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—25. Chiral Recognition in the Complexation of Chiral Dimethyl Substituted Macrocyclic Polyether-Diester Ligands with Alkylammonium Salts. B. A. Jones, J. S. Bradshaw, F. G. Morin, D. M. Grant.

11:15—Discussion. 11:20—26. Complex Formation Between Chiral Diketopyridino-18-Crown-6 Substituted Ligands and Amino Acid Ester Cations. Enthalpies and Stability Constants in Methanol at 25°C. R. B. Davidson, R. M. Izatt, J. D. Lamb, J. J. Christensen. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—27. Origins of the Configurational One-Sidedness of Contemporary Life. An Isotactic Bias During Formation of Di-, Tri-, and Tetrapeptides. S. I. Goldberg, J. M. Crosby, N. D. lusem, U. E. Younes. 11:55—Discussion. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room 24, South Hall Symposium on Organoselenium Chemistry in Synthesis D. Liotta, Presiding 2:00—28. New Applications of Organoselenium Reagents in Synthesis. S. V. Ley. 2:45—Discussion. 2:50—29. Total Synthesis of Catalpalactone. J. N. Marx, P. Dobrowolski. 3:05—Discussion. 3:10—30. Functional Group Manipulation Using Organoselenium Reactions. H. J. Reich. 3:50—Discussion. 3:55—31. Diphenylselenium Bis(trifluoroacetate): A New Reagent for Biomimetic Oxidations of Phenolic Compounds and Amines. J. P. Marino, R. D. Larsen, Jr., A. Schwartz. 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—32. Chemistry of Selenosulfonates. T. G. Back. 4:55—Discussion.

Section B Convention Center, Room 22, South Hall Synthesis-Polyenes and Vitamins M. J. Miller, Presiding 2:00—33. [1,5]-Sigmatropic Rearrangement of Vinylallenes: Approaches to A-Homo and A-Nor-1-hydroxy-vitamin D. J. M. Gerdes, S. Lewicka-Piekut, P. Condran, Jr., W. H. Okamura. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—34. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of Steroid Side Chains Via Organoboranes. Stereospecific Synthesis of 20R- or 20S-25-Hydroxycholesterol. M. M. Midland, Y. C. Kwon. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—35. Preparation of 1-alpha Hydroxylated Vitamin D Metabolites by Total Synthesis. E. G. Baggiolini, J. A. lacobelli, B. M. Hennessy, M. R. Uskokovic. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—36. Synthesis of the Calcidiol and Calcitriol Lactone Side Chain. P. M. Wovkuiich, A. Williams, F. Barcelos, B. Hennessy, E. G. Baggiolini, M. R. Uskokovic. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—37. 12-Carboxyretinoic Acids—Synthesis and Structure. A. H. Lewin, M. G. Whaley, S. R. Parker, F. I. Carroll. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—38. Retinoids Via Vinylallenes: 9,11,13,- Tricis- and 11,13-D/c/s-retinal; 12-s-c/s Locked Retinoids. R. Chandraratna, C. G. Knudsen, L. P. Walkeapaa, Y. S. Chauhan, T. Cooper, R. R. Birge, W. H. Okamura. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—39. Vinylallenes: Electrocyclization of Diene-Allenes, A Novel Synthesis of Drimatrienes. W. Reischt, W. H. Okamura. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—40. Synthesis and Reactivity of 6Substituted(Z)-2-ene-4-ynoic Acids. G. Struve, S. Seltzer. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—41. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of Optically Pure C 15 a-Tocopherol Side Chains. M. Koreeda, L. Brown. 4:55—Discussion.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Section C Convention Center, Room 23, South Hall Physical Organic L. T. Scott, Presiding 2:00—42. Transition State Structures of Base-Promoted, Imine-Forming Eliminations In N-Benzyl-O-Arylsulfonylhydroxylamines. R. V. Hoffman, E. L. Belfoure. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—43. Large Kinetic Solvent Isotope Effects for a Hydrolysis Reaction Exhibiting General Acid Catalysis. J. L. Jensen, K. S. Yamaguchi. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—44. Uncatalyzed and General Acid Catalyzed Decomposition of Alkyl Xanthates and Monothiocarbonates in Aqueous Solutions. R. S. Millican, M. Angelopoulos, A. Bose, B. Riegel, D. Robinson, C. K. Sauers. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—45. Hydrolysis of Sodium 2,2-Dichloropropionate. A. C. Howard, K. L. Krumel, B. A. Howell. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—46. Application of a Combined Valence Bond-Hiickel Theoretical Model to Problems in Organic Chemistry. S. W. Staley, M. D. Bjorke, J. R. Collins, G. A. Gallup. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—47. Secondary a-Deuterium Isotope Effects on Reactions of the Grignard Reagent from 1-Bromopentane-1,1-d2. E. A. Hili, D. C. Link. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—48. c/s-Azoalkanes. Mechanisms of Scission and Isomerization. R. C. Neuman, Jr., C. Berge, G. A. Binegar. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—49. Cyclization of o)-Allenyl FreeRadicals. J. K. Crandall, M. Apparu, S. B0rresen. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—50. Ring Currents and Rotational Barriers in (CH=CH) n -H Substituted Cyclooctatetraene Dianions. S. W. Staley, C. K. Dustman. 4:55—Discussion.

Section D Symposium Applications of Main-Group Metal/Transition Metal Reagents in Synthesis organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 69) TUESDAY

MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room 24, South Hall Symposium on ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry M. F. Semmelhack, Presiding 9:00—51. Approaches to the Synthesis of Polycyclic Antibiotics. R. E. Ireland. 9:40—52. Annulation Approaches to Carbocyclic Compounds. R. L. Danheiser. 10:20—53. Natural Products from Carbohydrates. G. E. Keck, E. P. Boden, E. J. Enholm, D. F. Kachensky, R. R. Webb. 11:00—54. Address Award (ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry sponsored by Aldrich Chemical Company, Inc.). Recent Advances in Asymmetric Synthesis. D. A. Evans. Section B Convention Center, Room 22, South Hall Physical Organic—Carbocations B. A. Howell, Presiding 9:00—55. Stabilization Mechanisms for Electron Deficient Carbocations. X. Creary, C. C. Geiger. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—56. Reversible Methide Shifts in the 2-tert-Butyl-2-adamantyl Cation. J. L. Fry, J. A. Saba. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—57. Correlation of the Solvolysis Rates of 2-Adamantyl Perchlorate. D. N. Kevill, M. S. Bahari. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—58. Pentacyclopropylethyl Carbocation. J.JV. Timberlake, Y. M. Jun. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—59. Mechanism of Solvolysis of 2,2-Dimethylcyclopentyl p-Bromobenzene-sulfonate. V. J. Shiner, Jr., M. A. Imhoff. 10:35—Discussion.

10:40—60. Non-lnterconverting Stereoisomeric Bicyclo[4.4.1] Bridgehead Alkenes. P. M. Warner, M. Ah-King, R. F. Palmer. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—61. Protonation of 11-Methylene1,6-methano[10]annulene. K. Lammertsma. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—62. Synthesis of Some [4.3.2]Propellanes and the Conversion into Stable Tricyclic Cations. P. B. J. Driessen, H. Hogeveen, E. M. G. A. van Kruchten. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—63. High Field 1H and 13C NMR Spectroscopic Study of the 2-Norbornyl Cation. G. K. S. Prakash, M. Arvanaghi, F. A. L. Anet, G. A. Olah. 11:55—Discussion. Section C Convention Center, Room 23, South Hall Sulfur and Tellurium Compounds T. J . Maricich,

Presiding

9:00—64. Reaction of Dibenzothiophene Oxides with Alkoxide Ions. C. G. Venier, T. Aida, T. G. Squires. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—65. a-Disulfoxides, Sulfenyl Sulfinates, and Sulfinyl Radicals in the Peroxy Acid Oxidation of Thiosulfinates. F. Freeman, C. N. Angeletakis. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—66. Preparation and Diels-Alder Reactions of Vinyl Sulfoximines. R. S. Glass, K. Reinke, M. Shanklin. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—67. On the [2,3]-Sigmatropic Rearrangements of Sulfenate Esters Derived from Alkenynols: Synthesis of Vinylallene and Vinylacetylene Sulfoxides. E. M. G. A. van Kruchten, W. H. Okamura. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—68. Sulfenamides in Organic Synthesis. B. P. Branchaud. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—69. 2-[1,3-Dithianyl]-diphenylphosphine Oxide: A Wittig-Horner/Corey-Seebach Reagent. E. Juaristi, L. Valle, C. Mora. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—70. Hydrolysis of Ethylenethioketals Under Basic Conditions. J. R. Carson. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—71. Tetratellurotetracene: Synthesis, Molecular, and Supramolecular Properties. D. J. Sandman, J. C. Stark, B. M. Foxman. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—72. A4-4'-4-(Telluropyranol)-4H-telluropyrans. Tellurosulfides and TelluriumSulfur Exchange. M. R. Detty, B. J. Murray. 11:55—Discussion. Section D Convention Center, Room 21, South Hall Spectroscopy R. M. Williams, Presiding 9:00—73. Carbon-13 NMR Studies of 3,6,8,8-Tetramethy l-3ai, 7-Methanoperhydroazulene Derivatives. P. Joseph-Nathan, A. Gutierrez. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—74. Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Dichloropyridoquinolines. D. W. Boykin, F. F. Molock. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—75. Proton NMR Spectra of Organobismuth Hal ides. A. J. Ashe, III, T. R. Diephouse. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—76. Unequivocal Assignment of an ABX Spin-System via Stereoselective Isotope Labelling. J. J. Knittel, A. Makriyannis. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—77. Flow NMR: CIDNP in the Ti(lll)Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation of Ethanol. A. R. Lepley, Y. Zakaria, C. E. Manissero. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—78. Anion Capture Techniques for Negative Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Multifunctional Compounds. A. K. Bose, O. Prakash, B. Pramanik, N. F. Cappuccino, K. Tabei. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—79. Ion-Molecule Complexes in Decompositions of Gaseous Cations. 130 nm Photolysis of 4-Pyridyl Ethers. H. W. Biermann, W. P. Freeman, T. H. Morton. 11:15—Discussion.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

77

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In Person!

FOURTEEN ACS INTEN to improve your on-the-job effectiveness Las Vegas, Nevada • March 1982 Effective Management Techniques This course provides an overview of current management techniques as they apply to industrial research, development and engineering activities. The course is structured around lectures and reading assignments, each of which is supplemented by a class discussion or workshop. Each day of the course focuses on a different aspect of technical management. The first day covers personal and interpersonal relations which contribute to a technologically vital organization. The second day covers topics in organization, planning and evaluation which are the basic ingredients of technological performance. While some of the general principles will be familiar, the specific consequences of their application in research, development and engineering activities are far from obvious and will be of immediate value to those who either have, or expect to have, management responsibility in a technical area. DATES: March 26-27, 1982 FACULTY: Augustus C. Walker

Industrial Organic Chemistry Designed for technical personnel with a knowledge of basic organic chemistry, this new course provides participants with a comprehensive overview of the production and transformation of major organic chemicals. Participants will gain an understanding of the factors that influence the competitiveness of industrial materials and processes. Important topics include a discussion of present and likely future sources of industrial chemicals, the processes that lead from the raw materials to intermediate organic building blocks, the transformation of organic building blocks to marketable materials, economic and other considerations that affect the flow of materials across chemical and allied industry, and the utilization of chemicals in the economy. The course also serves to refresh one's background in modern organic chemistry, since basic principles are reviewed as individual processes are explained. DATES: March 26-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. H. Harry Szmant

Priority Pollutant Analysis — Wastewater This course is an intensive technical discussion of the specific analytical techniques for measuring the "current decree" pollutants in wastewater, including asbestos. Co-sponsored by Battelle's Columbus Laboratories and the American Chemical Society, the course is designed for chemists involved in the methodology of measuring the 129 species identified as "priority pollutants." Important topics include theory of necessary instrumentation, protocol methodology (the "600" methods), sample handling and quality control. Also covered are specific problems associated with implementing the analysis of priority pollutants. The course treats complex screening methods such as GC/MS and ICAP procedures as well as monitoring methods designed to identify narrower classes of species, including GC and LC procedures. DATES: March 27-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. Marcus Cooke (Course Moderator), Dr. Harold M. McNair, Dr. Walter M. Shackelford, Dr. Marvin Miller, and Dr. Ralph Riggin 78

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

New Product Development: From Research to Commercialization

The growth and profitability of every company requires a continuous stream of appropriate new products. This intensive course covers all aspects of new product development, starting with an examination of objectives and the basic strategies to achieve them, and including an analysis of the many types of new products and the strengths required for success in each. The importance of risk management is also treated. The procedure for selecting suitable fields of activity is presented, as well as methods for uncovering candidate projects in those fields. Participants also learn a technique for screening those projects to identify suitable products. Procedures for introducing the new product, pricing it, and controlling progress are covered. Case histories of successful new products are used to illustrate the principles described. DATES: March 27-28, 1982 FACULTY: Carl Pacifico and Robert Polacek

Toxicology; Principles and Practice To understand the nature of the toxic challenges that confront us, and to cope intelligently with the explosion of federal legislation — the Toxic Substances Control Act; the Occupational Safety and Health Act; the Consumer Product Safety Act; the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act; and others — it is essential to be knowledgeable in the field. This course provides an intensive introduction to the general principles of toxicology as well as the practical approaches that guide decision-making in the field. It is designed for chemists and other scientists, managers, and administrators who seek an up-todate broad-based grounding in toxicology and will help those who are preparing to take the accreditation examination of the American Board of Toxicology. The lecturers are leaders in their fields, recognized nationally for their expertise and teaching competence. DATES: March 26-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. Morris M. Joselow and twelve other renowned experts

Polymer Chemistry This introductory course provides a survey of both organic and physical polymer chemistry for chemists without formal training in these areas. Topics in the organic segment of the course include general features of step-growth polymerization, free radical chain polymerization, cationic and anionic polymerization and specific information on the polymerization and properties of some typical polymers prepared by these techniques. The physical chemistry of polymers section includes determination of molecular weights and their distribution, solution thermodynamics, chain configuration, polymer crystallinity, thermal analysis, mechanical properties, structure-property relationships, and polymer processing. DATES: March 26-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. James E. Mark and Dr. George Odian

Medium Effects, Crown Ethers, and Phase Transfer Catalysis in Organic Synthesis This course provides synthetic organic chemists with a sound knowledge of medium effects to enable them to plan and execute more successful syntheses. The course begins with a survey of solvent properties, economics, and toxicity, followed by in-depth discussions of the theory and practice of a variety of organic reactions and solvent effects. Methods for enhancing reactivity are also covered, including use of dipolar aprotic solvents, crown ethers, and phase transfer catalysis. DATES: March 27-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. George W. Gokel and Dr. Bruce B. Jarvis

SIVE SHORT COURSES Writing for Results

Thermal Analysis

This highly-rated course is for scientists, managers and administrators who want to sharpen their writing skills, and for anyone who supervises others who need to write. The program will be in three parts: principles of effective technical and scientific writing; the writing process; and applications to letters, memoranda, technical reports and briefs. Writing instruction will be practical and work-related. These questions will be addressed: What are effective techniques for getting started? How do you analyze the writing situation before you begin? What methods should you use to organize your material most efficiently? How can you develop a clear, direct style? Principles will be applied to the writing of clear, hard-hitting letters, memoranda, and technical reports.

Designed to introduce chemists to the widespread techniques of thermal analysis, this course covers thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), evoloved gas detection (EGD) and analysis (EGA), and other thermal methods. Each technique will be discussed in terms of a brief historical survey; principles; instrumentation; and practical applications to organic compounds, polymers, inorganic compounds, and others. The course will benefit scientists concerned with physical research, and quality and process control.

DATES: March 27-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. Anne Eisenberg

Chemical Engineering for Chemists Co-sponsored by the ACS Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, this course is designed for chemists involved in production, pilot plant operations, development, and design. It is for technical personnel who have not been trained in chemical engineering but who require an understanding of chemical engineering principles. A general presentation of the subject is supplemented by illustrations of how to solve practical problems, with frequent citing of industrial examples. The course focuses on the interaction of chemical engineering with chemical phenomena and processes and covers such examples as non-isothermal batch reactors, flow reactor scale-ups, combined adsorption, and chemical reactions. Comparisons among the chemical engineering treatments of fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer are made. Although the course is not highly mathematical, some knowledge of calculus is required. DATES: March 27-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. Richard G. Griskey

Gas Chromatography Emphasizing practical applications, this introductory course covers the basic principles and procedures of gas chromatography. Although no equipment will be present, participants will learn how to operate a variety of instruments, read the current literature, and comprehend and evaluate new developments as they appear. The limits of application of GC will be discussed as well as logical approaches to separation design. No prior knowledge of GC is presumed. The equivalent of a B.A./B.S. in chemistry is required. DATES: March 27-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. Roy A. Keller and Dr. Michael F. Burke

Environmental Law for Chemists and Chemical Engineers The primary goal of the course is to provide a thorough, fundamental overview of the statutory process for reporting on plant effluents and emissions and interfacing with plant engineering and management to ensure compliance. The course will review the principal environment statutes, the regulatory structure and activity of the EPA, the Council on Environmental Quality and other relevant agencies, and the role of private environmental organizations such as the Sierra Club and the Environmental Defense Fund. In addition to a course manual, each registrant will receive a copy of Environmental Statutes. Participants do not need to have any legal training or any previous environmental law exposure. DATES: March 27-28, 1982 FACULTY: Eugene T. Holmes, Esq. i

DATES: March 27-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. W.W. Wendlandt and Dr. I.M. Sarasohn

Emulsions and Microemulsions Designed for scientists engaged in research and development in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetics fields, this practical course relates the properties of emulsions and microemulsions to the phase equilibrium between different liquid and liquid crystalline association structures which exist in such systems. The approach greatly facilitates preparation of stable microemulsion systems. It also provides systematic rules on how to prepare the thermodynamically unstable oil/water microemulsions, which show kinetic stability. Treating emulsions as multi-phase systems, the course gives a systematic description of stable emulsions of two liquids and one liquid crystalline phase, as well as of the unstable three liquid emulsions close to the HLB-temperature. The latter are useful for emulsification purposes. The stability of macroemulsions is discussed along with the different emulsion breaking mechanisms of Brownian flocculation, sedimentation, and sedimentation-flocculation. DATES: March 27-28, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. Stig Friberg and Dr. Paul Becher

Practice of Modern Liquid Chromatography Taught by internationally acclaimed experts, this comprehensive course provides researchers with the latest developments in the theory and practice of high-performance liquid chromatography. It is organized around the second edition of the authors' new text, Introduction to Modern Liquid Chromatography, which all registrants will receive as part of the course materials. The first day of the course is devoted to a summation of HPLC basics (control of separation, equipment, solvents, columns), the second day deals mainly with the various HPLC methods (reversephase, adsorption, ion-pair, etc.), and the third day covers special techniques (qualitative and quantitative analysis, preparative separation, gradient elution, etc.). During the second and third days, discussion periods have been organized to solve particular problems and deal with areas of interest suggested'by participants. No equipment will be shown. DATES: April 2-4, 1982 FACULTY: Dr. J.J. Kirkland and Dr. Lloyd R. Snyder

Write or Call Collect Today for a detailed brochure on these sessions: 202-872-4508 American Chemical Society Education Division 1155 Sixteenth Street, NW Washington, DC 20036 Class size is limited so act now! Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

79

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11:20—80. Elucidation of Mass Spectral Fragmentation Mechanisms of Alcohol Derivatives of Bile Acids. J. R. Dias, J. G. Davis. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—81. Chemical Ionization and Electron Impact Mass Spectra of Thiosulfinates, Thiosulfonates, and Sulfinyl Sulfones. F. Freeman, C. N. Angeletakis. 11:55—Discussion.

a a.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

5Z

Convention Center, Room 24, South Hall Garvan Medal—Symposium S. W. Staley, Presiding

X

o DC

o

Section A

2:00—82. Approaches to the Synthesis of Botryococcene. E. N. Marvell, A. Strycker, R. Rusay. 2:45—83. Modes of /3-Silyl Involvement in Solvolysis. J. B. Lambert, R. B. Finzel. 3:30—84. Adventures on the Way to Diazoethenes. J. C. Gilbert, U. Weerasooriya, D. Giamalva, B. Wiechman. 4:15—85. Award Address (Garvan Medal sponsored by W. R. Grace & Co.). A Retrospective Look at Sigmatropic Rearrangements in Bisallylic Systems. S. J. Rhoads. Section B Convention Center, Room 22, South Hall Synthesis

J. R. Dias, Presiding 2:00—86. Preparation and Properties of Vinyltropones. O. L. Chapman, D. E. Bugner. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—87. Synthesis of 1,3- and 1,5-Di-tertbutyl Cyclooctatetraene. M. H. Lyttle, A. Streitwieser, Jr. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—88. Synthesis and Properties of [2.2] (11,14)Cyclooctatetraenylparacyclophane. J. E. Garbe, V. Boekelheide, E. Heilbronner, Y. Yhong-zhi. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—89. Synthesis of a Helical Ferrocene. T. J. Katz, J. Pesti. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—90. Facile, Pd(ll)-Mediated Synthesis of Bridged and Spirocyclic Bicycloalkenones. A. S. Kende, B. Roth, P. J. Sanfilippo. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—91. An Efficient Synthesis of 3-Acyl2,4-Pyridinediones. D. R. Williams, S.-Y. Sit, I. B. Horton. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—92. A Convergent Approach to the Synthesis of the Aglycone of the Aureolic Acid Antibiotics. T. V. John, P. D. Noire, C. S. Subramaniam, R. W. Franck. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—93. A Convergent Route for Synthesis of Precursors to 11-Deoxyanthracyclinone. F. M. Hauser, S. Prasanna, D. W. Combs. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—94. Pheromones Via Organoboranes. 3. An Improved, Convenient Synthesis of Unsymmetrical Alkynes Via lodination of Lithium Alkynyl "ATE" Complexes of Thexylalkylborinates. K. K. Wang, J. A. Slkorski, H. C. Brown. 4:55—Discussion. Section C Convention Center, Room 23, South Hall Oxidations C. G. Venier, Presiding 2:00—95. Carbonyl Migration in the BaeyerVilliger and Schmidt Reactions. R. D. Bach, P. F. H. Plank, G. J. Wolber. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—96. Oxidation of Furan Compounds with mCBPA. P. W. Jennings, S. B. Gingerich. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—97. Immobilized Metalloporphyrins as Oxidation Catalysts. H. E. Baumgarten, F.-L. Lu. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—98. A New Method for the Oxidation of Hydrazine Derivatives Using Sulfonyl Peroxides. R. V. Hoffman, A. Kumar. 3:15—Discussion.

3:20—99. Support for an a-Disulfoxide Intermediate in the Peroxy Acid Oxidation of Neopentyl Phenyl Disulfide and its Monoxides. T. J. Maricich, F. Freeman, C. N. Angeletakis. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—100. Selective Oxidation of Sulfides to Sulfoxides to Sulfones. B. G. Balaram Gupta, G. A. Olah. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—101. Redox Reactions of Activated Sulfoxides. The Dihydrobenzothiophene Systems. D. V. Okonek, J. A. Walsh. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—102. 4-Dimethylaminopyridinium Chlorochromate—A Mild Selective Cr(VI) Reagent for the Oxidation of Benzylic and Allylic Alcohols. F. S. Guziec, Jr, F. A. Luzzio. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—103. Fast One-Step Synthesis of C 6 I 6 from C 6 H 6 . L. S. Levitt, R. Iglesias. 4:55—Discussion. Section D Symposium on Applications of Main-Group Metal/Transition Metal Reagents In Synthesis organized by Division of inorganic Chemistry (see page 69) WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Convention Center, Room 24, South Hall Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Essential Oils and Related Products R. M. Coates, Presiding 9:00—104. Endiandric Acid Story. K. C. Nicolaou, N. A. Petasis, R. Zipkin, J.-I. Uenishi. 9:40—105. Alkaloid Synthesis via the Imino Diels-Alder Reaction. S. M. Weinreb, R. A. Gobao, M. Bremmer, T. R. Bailey. 10:20—106. Carbohydrate Derivatives in the Asymmetric Synthesis of Natural Products. B. Fraser-Reld, R. Giuiliano, K. M. Sun. 11:00—107. Award Address. {The Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Essential Oils and Related Products sponsored by Fritzsche Dodge & Olcott Inc.). Recent Progress in the Total Synthesis of Natural Products. P. A. Grieco. Section B Convention Center, Room 22, South Hall Organometallics F. Freeman, Presiding 9:00—108. Chemistry of Higher Order, Mixed Organocuprates. Reactions of Epoxides. B. H. Llpshutz, J. Kozlowski, R. S. Wilhelm. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—109. Regioselective Aromatic Hydroxylation: An Oxidative Procedure Utilizing Arylcopper(l) and Lithium Diarylcopper(l) Ate Complexes. G. J. Lambert, R. P. Duffley, H. C. Dalzell, R. K. Razdan. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—110. Heterocuprates with Greatly Improved Thermal Stability. S. H. Bertz, G. Dabbagh. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00^-111. Iridium(l) Reactions with Small Carbocycles Containing Cyclopropane. P. W. Jennings, W. Campbell. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—112. Induction of Olefin Metathesis by Acetylenes. T. J. Katz, C.-C. Han, S. J. Lee, M. Nair, E. B. Savage. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—113. Use of ESCA in the Study of Reactive Intermediates in Homogeneous Catalysis. P. G. Gassman, S. M. Willging. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—114. Stereochemistry of the Through Space 2p-3d Overlap Effect. W. E. McEwen, K. W. Lau. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—115. Synthesis of Phospha(V)azenes by Redox-Condensation Reactions. M. Pomerantz, S. Bittner, Y. Assaf. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—116. A Mechanistic Study of Chlorination Reactions of Thiophosphates. M. S. Saran, S. A. Sojka. 11:55—Discussion.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details) 80

C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

Section C

WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room 23, South Hall Photochemistry D. A. Dougherty,

Presiding

9:00—117. Substituent Effects in Organic Photochemistry: The Photorearrangements of Bicyclo[3.2.1.]oct-2-en-7-ones. D. J. Choo, R. S. Givens, W. D. Gillaspey, W. K. Chae. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—118. Competing Photoreduction and Paterno-Buchi Reactions of N-Methylphthalimide with 2,3-Dimethyl-2-butene. P. H. Mazzocchi, L. Klingler, F. Khachik, P. Wilson. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—119. Competitive Dimerization and Adduct Formation During Irradiation of 2Cyclohexenone with Tertiary Amines. N. J. Plenta, J. E. McKimmey, Z. R. Stearns, D. W. Smith. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—120. Electron Transfer Initiated Photocyclizations of N-Allylpyrindinium and Quinolinium Salts. U. C. Yoon, S. L. Quillen, P. S. Mariano. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—121. Electron Transfer Photosensitized Cleavage of Benzyl and Bibenzyl Bonds in Cyclic and Acyclic Systems. G. W. Griffin, A. J. Muller, L. W. Reichel, A. P. Tamvakis, J. D. Timpa. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—122. Stereoelectrdnic Requirements in Photosolvolysis of cis- and trans-2(3,5-Dimethoxyphenyl)cyclopentyl Methanesulfonate. D. A. Jaeger, E. A. Bernhardt. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—123. Photochemical Transformation of Dibenzobarrelenes: A Novel Relay Mechanism in Quenching and Sensitization. S. J. Cristol, T. H. Bindel, W. Szalecki. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—124. Chemiluminescence of Organic Peroxides. Thermal Generation of an oXylylene Peroxide. J. P. Smith, A. K. Schrock, G. B. Schuster. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—125. Thermolysis of Dioxetanes: 3,3-Diethyl-1,2-dioxetane and 3,3-Dimethyl-4-ethyl-1,2-dioxetane. A. L. Baumstark, T. Dunams. 11:55—Discussion. Section D Convention Center, Room 21, South Hall Cycloadditiorib P. M. Warner,

Presiding

9:00—126. Cycloaddition Reactions of Substituted Allenes with N-Phenylmaleimide. A Two-Step, Diradical Intermediate Process. D. J. Pasto, P. F. Heid. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—127. Chemoselectivities, Stereoselectivities, Relative Reactivities and Kinetic Isotope Effects in a Model Diradical-lntermediate Cycloaddition Reaction of Allenes. D. J. Pasto, S. E. Warren. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—128. Cycloaddition Reactions of Homoazulene. New Routes to Homoheptalenes. M. A. Kirms, L. T. Scott. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—129. Photochemistry of 1 and 2-{2Methylphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene. R. D. Barrows, J. M. Horn back. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—130. Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reactions of the Furan Diene. D. D. Sternbach, D. M. Rossana. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—131. Synthesis and Chemistry of Bridgehead Enol Lactones. K. J. Shea, E. Wada. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—132. Some (4 + 2) Cycloaddition Reactions of Ketenes: Synthesis of 4-Pyrones. W. T. Brady, M. O. Agho. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—133. Cyanoketenes. Cycloadditions of Chlorocyanoketene to a,p-Unsaturated Imines. G. Hughes, H. W. Moore. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—134. Nitrone Cycloadditions. A New Approach to the Synthesis of Mannich Systems. P. DeShong, C. M. Dicken, J. Leginus. 11:55—Discussion.

Section A Convention Center, Room 24, South Hall Symposium on ACS Award for Creative Invention J. Szmuszkovicz, Presiding 2:00—135. Natural Product Synthesis Utilizing Starting Materials from the "Chiral Pool" N. Cohen. 2:40—136. Synthetic Applications of Thiophosphorus-Stabilized Carbanions. C. R. Johnson, R. C. Elliott. 3:20—137. Chiral Hydrogen Transfer Reagents. J. D. Morrison. 4:00—138. Award Address. (ACS Award for Creative Invention sponsored by Corporation Associates). Asymmetric Hydrogenations. W. S. Knowles. 4:40—Discussion. Section B Convention Center, Room 22, South Hall General J. W. Timber lake,

Presiding

2:00—139. An Unusual Ground-State Di7r-methane Rearrangement in the Thermal Isomerization of Homoazulene. I. Erden, L. T. Scott. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—140. Thermal and Photochemical Decompositions of 2,3-Diazabicyclo[2.1.1]Hex-2-ene. M. H. Chang, D. A. Dougherty. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—141. Thermal Reactions of Some Encumbered Methylenecyclobutanes. P. A. Leber, R. W. Holder. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—142. Isolation and Identification of the Polyenes Formed by the Thermal Elimination of Toluene and m-Xylene from /3,j8-Carotene. J. D. Byers. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—143. Mass Spectra and Pyrolyses of Some Vinylene Carbonates. F. W. Breitbell, III, A. A. Skrobot. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—144. Unusual Solvent Effects in the Wittig Reaction of Some Ketones Indicating Initial One Electron Transfer. V. V. Krishnamurthy, G. A. Olah. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—145. A Periodic Table for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. J. R. Dias. 4:15—Discussion. 1:20—146. Identification of Configurational Isomers of Some 3,3'-Disubstituted-1,1'biindans and Related Compounds. N. E. Heimer, M. Hojjatie, C. A. Panetta. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—147. Fluorescence Quenching of Sterically Hindered Dialkoxybenzenes. F. A. Carroll, K. S. Manning, A. G. Zoutewelle. 4:55—Discussion.

Section C Convention Center, Room 23, South Hall Biological Organic Chemistry A. H. Lewin,

Presiding

2:00—148. Stereospecific Synthesis of 2Deoxyaminoglycerophospholipids. J. Hajdu, N. S. Chandrakumar. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—149. Chemical Synthesis of DNA Using Hindered Dialkylamino Nucleoside Phosphites. S. P. Adams, G. R. Galluppi. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—150. A Model for FAD-Containing Monooxygenase: The Oxidation of Thioanisole Derivatives by an Isoalloxazine Hydroperoxide. A. Miller. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—151. Effect of 3-Alkyl Substituents on Thermal[1,5]- and [1,7J-Sigmatropic Hydrogen Shifts of Vinylallenes and Other Seco-Steroids Related to Vitamin D. A. Johnston, G. A. Leyes, W. H. Okamura. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—152. Effect of Pressure on the Selectivity of Cation Transport by lonophores. K. R. Myers, J. R. Murdoch. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—153. Chemical Reactivity of the New Amino Acid /3-Carboxyaspartic Acid (ASA). M. R. Christy, T. H. Koch. 3:55—Discussion.

4:00—154. Reactions of N-Nitrosamides and L-Cysteine. D. E. G. Shuker, E. Newman, I. Baker, S. R. Tannenbaum. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—155. A 13C,,15N and 1H NMR Study of the Cyclization' of 1-[2-chloroethyl]-3[alkyl]ureas to 2-[alkylamino]-2-oxazoline hydrochlorides. T. G. Burke, J. E. Girard, K. Laki. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—156. Synthesis of N-Alkylated Derivatives of 5-Fluorouracil and Their Reduction with Lithium Tri-sec-butyl Borohydride. N. G. Kundu, S. A. Schmitz. 4:55—Discussion.

Section D Convention Center, Room 21, South Hall Organometallics

P. Boudjouk, Presiding 2:00—157. Improved Synthesis and Characterization of Dllithiomethane (CH2U2) and Other Polylithium Organic Compounds. R. J. Lagow, J. A. Gurak, J. W. Chinn, Jr. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—158. Reaction of Organoboranes with Aluminum Hydride. A Novel Approach to the Synthesis of Alkylaluminum Compounds. J. L. Hubbard, J. A. Ferullo. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—159. Preparation of Highly Reactive Nickel, Cadmium, Magnesium, and Cobalt Metal Powders and Uses of these Metals to Prepare New Organometallic Compounds. R. D. Rieke, H. Matsumoto, E. Burkhardt, T. P. Burns, S. Inaba, G. Rochfort. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—160. Reaction of Secondary and Tertiary Alkyl Lithium Reagents with Vinyl Diand Trisiloxanes. Synthesis of a-Silyl Silanols. H. A. Firgo, W. P. Weber. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—161. Metallacycloalkanones Via Organoboranes. J. A. Soderquist. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—162. Silicon-Directed Selective Gamma Substitution of an a,/3-Unsaturated Ester. P. Albaugh-Robertson, J. A. Katzenellenbogen. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—163. Silicon-Directed Nazarov Cyclizations. S. E. Denmark, T. K. Jones! 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—164. Reaction of Ethyl a-Silylacetates with Grignard Reagents. D. Hernandez, G. L. Larson. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—165. Synthesis and Chemistry of Some a-Chlorosilanes Optically Active at Silicon. S. Sandoval, G. L. Larson. 4:55—Discussion. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room 24, South Hall Heterocyclic Chemistry

A. Miller, Presiding 9:00—166. Bromination of Imidazole. D. O. Salazar, C. L. Hughes, A. M. Schoffstall. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—167. Synthesis of N-Benzyl Protected Imidazocarboxaldehydes. J. M. Kokosa, R. A. Szafasz. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—168. 2-Substituted 2-Oxazolines as Synthons in a Synthesis of 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinolines and 2,3,4,5-1 H-3Benzazepines. L. N. Pridgen, L. B. Killmer, R. L. Webb. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—169. Ring Closure Reactions Involving 1-Hydrazinophthalazine. H. Zimmer, A. Amer. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—170. Synthesis of Certain 5,6-Diamino-as-triazines: Precursors for Novel Fused-Heterocyclic Systems. N. C. Motola, C. C. Tzeng, R. P. Panzica. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—171. Condensation of Polylithiated Intermediates with Electrophilic-Nucleophilic Reagents. C. F. Beam. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—172. Chemistry of Acetylenic-toAllenic Pyrans. J. J. Doney, C. H. Chen. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—173. Diphenyl Cyanocarbonimidate: A Versatile Synthon for the Construction of Heterocyclic Systems. R. L. Webb, C. S. Labaw. 11:35—Discussion.

11:40—174. Reaction of Acetone Oxime with Dicarboxylic Acid Chlorides. R. A. Izydore, R. G. Davis, N. W. Clements. 11:55—Discussion.

11:35—Discussion. 11:40—192. Interaction of Nitrosonium Salts With Crown Ethers. R. A. Bart sen, G. S. Heo, P. E. Hillman. 11:55—Discussion.

9:00—175. /^'-Metalation of a,/3-Unsaturated Amides. D. J. Kempf, P. Beak, K. D. Wilson. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—176. Enamidines. Versatile Vehicles for Homologation of Carbonyl Compounds. A. I. Meyers, G. E. Jagdmann, Jr. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—177. A Carbanion-Accelerated Claisen Rearrangement. S. E. Denmark, M. A. Harmata. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—178. Quinol Synthesis Via the Direct Addition of Carbanions to Quinones. D. Liotta, M. Saindane, L. Waykole, C. Barnum. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—179. Stereochemistry of the Reaction of Lithium Enolates of a-Sily! Esters with Aldehydes. J. R. Ramirez, G. L. Larson. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—180. Stereoselective Reductions of o:-Alkoxy-/3-Keto Esters. Synthesis of (±)-Trachelanthic Acid and (±)-Viridifloric Acid. R. S. Glass, M. Shanklin. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—181. Reaction of Unsymmetrical Enolate Anions with Gold's Reagent. J. T. Gupton, S. A. Andrew, C. Colon. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—182. Regiospecific Formation of Thermodynamic Enolates Under Kinetic Conditions: Development of a New Iron Reagent. M. E. Krafft, R. A. Holton. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—183. Regiospecific Isomerization of Kinetic Dienolates to Thermodynamic Dienolates: Development of a Second Novel Iron Reagent. M. E. Krafft, R. A. Holton. 11:55—Discussion. Section C Convention Center, Room 23, South Hall Micelles, Complexes, and Heterogeneous Reactions N. J. Pienta, Presiding 9:00—184. Reactions in Microemulsion Media. Nucleophilic Displacement Reaction of Benzyl Chloride with Bromide Ion. C. A. Martin, P. M. Crann, G. H. Angelos, D. A. Jaeger. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—185. Photoreactivity of a Surfactant Ketone in Organized Media. J. R. Winkle, D. G. Whitten. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—186. Micellar Photochemistry. Photooxidations with Intramicellar-Generated Singlet Oxygen. M. C. Hovey. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—187. Merocyanine Betaine Dyes as Spectroscopic Probes of Micelle-Solubilizate Interactions. M. J. Minch, E. J. Daggs, M. L. Reshwan. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—188. Cis/trans Isomerism of Merocyanine Betaine Dyes, A Kinetic Probe of Micelle-Solubilizate Interactions. M. J. Minch, M. L. Reshwan, B. Glenn. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—189. Photochemistry of Alizarin Adsorbed on a Glass Surface. J. B. Pawliszyn, J. B. Phillips. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—190. Organic Sonochemistry. New Synthetic Applications of Ultrasonic Waves. P. Boudjouk, B-H. Han. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—191. A Facile Synthesis of 2-Ketodisulfonate Salts for Use as Surfactants. M. Pallmer, D. L. McClaugherty.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

S

< AC

D. J. Nelson, Presiding

Section B Convention Center, Room 22, South Hall Synthesis—Carbanions S. D. Burke, Presiding

Section B Convention Center, Room 22, South Hall Synthesis—Alkaloids and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

Section D Convention Center, Room 21, South Hall Amines, Amino Acids, and Peptides T. Koch, Presiding 9:00—193. Synthesis of Nitrogen-15 Labeled Primary Amines Via Organoborane Reactions. G. W. Kabalka, K. A. R. Sastry, G. W. McCollum, C. A. Lane. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—194. Hindered Amines. General Synthesis of a-(terf-Butylamino)-isobutyramides. J. T. Lai. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—195. Active Heteromethylene Compounds. A New Synthesis of N-(Halomethyl)acylamides. J. P. Chupp, K. L. Leschinsky, D. A. Mischke. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—196. Enantioselective Syntheses of 3-Substituted-4-carboalkoxy-2-Azetidinones from Malic Acid and p-Hydroxy Aspartic Acid. M. J. Miller, J. S. Bajwa, P. G. Mattingly, K. Peterson. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—197. A Novel Synthesis of Peptides. P. N. Confalone, R. B. Woodward. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—198! a-Methyl Amino Acid Derivatives by Catalytic Phase-Transfer Alkyiations: a-Methyl-p-typrosine, -m-typrosine and -DOPA. M. J. O'Donnell, B. LeClef, D. B. Rusterholz. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—199. Palladium Catalyzed Synthesis of Cinnamyl Amines. N. J. Malek, A. E. Moormann. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—200. Palladium Catalyzed 1,4-Addition Reactions of 1° and 2° Amines to Conjugated Dienes. H. A. Dieck, R. W. Armbruster, M. M. Morgan, J. L. Schmidt, C. M. Lau, R. M. Riley, D. L. Zabrowsky. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—201. Effect of Nickel(ll) Ion on Racemization of Amino Acids. G. G. Smith, A. Khatib, G. Sudhaker Reddy. 11:55—Discussion. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room 24, South Hall Heterocyclic Chemistry

A. M. Schoffstall, Presiding 2:00—202. Formylation and Acylation of Lithiated Phenothiazines and 5H-Dibenz[b,f]azepines. T. Dahlgren, A. Hallberg, R. Helitzer, A. R. Martin. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—203. Schmidt Reactions of 1,4-Benzoquinones and 1,4-Benzoquinone-4methoximes. D. S. Wilbur, H. W. Moore. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—204. Selective Reductions of Hydantoins. Preparation of Annelated Imidazolidinones. H. Kohn, S. Cortes, Z.-K. Liao. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—205. Catalyzed Diels-Alder Reaction of Furan With Some Acrylic Monomers. J. A. Moore, E. M. Partain, III. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—206. 5-Hydroxypentanal—A Simple Model for the Study of Solvent Effects on Anomeric Equilibria. H. H. Szmant, B. Nasseri-Noori, L. Menafra. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—207. Thermal Cyclization of N-Nicotinoylalkyl Indoles. R. B. Mujumdar, A. R. Martin. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—208. Spiroannelation: A General Route to Five-and Six-Membered Spirochromens. P. Canonne, G. Foscolos, H. Caron. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—209. Preparation and Thermolysis of c/s-and trans-1 -Hydroxy-2-(2-pyridyl)cyclopentanes and cis- and frans-1-Hydroxyl-2-{2-pyrazyl)cyclopentanes. Y. Houminer. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—210. 1,3-Dinitroso-1,3-diazacycloalkenes: Synthesis, Spectroscopy and Chemistry. R. L. Wilier, D. W. Moore. 4:55—Discussion.

2:00—211. Synthetic Approaches to the Lycorine and Reserpine Skeletons Through N-Vinylisoquinuclidene Amino-Claisen Rearrangements. Y. L. Chen, J. M. Gu, P. S. Mariano. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—212. Semisynthetic Pyrrolidine Alkaloid Antitumor Agents. L. H. Zalkow, L. T. Gelbaum, M. M. Gordon, M. Miles. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—213. Total Synthesis of (±) 3-Deoxy7,8-dihydromorphinone. A. Manmade, J. L. Marshall, R. A. Minns, H. Dalzell, R. K. Razdan. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—214. Variations in the Total Synthesis of (±}-3-Deoxydihydromorphine and (±)4-Methoxy-6-keto-N-methylmorphinan. F.-L. Hsu, K. C. Rice, A. Brossi. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—215. Synthesis of Amine Derivatives of Phencyclidine. P. Y. Johnson, J. Q. Wen. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—216. An Efficient, Convergent Synthesis of Polyhalogenated Benz [a]anthracenes. G. W. Gribble, C. S. LeHoullier, M. P. Sibi. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—217. Efficient Synthesis of Benzacenthrylenes. R. Sangaiah, A. Gold, G. E. Toney. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—218. Synthesis of 6-Substituted Derivatives of 3-Deuterobenzo(A)pyrene. P. P. Fu, M. W. Chou, J. P. Freeman, D. W. Miller, F. E. Evans, S. K. Yang 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—219. Improved Syntheses of 5-, 6-, 9-, and 10-Methylbenz(A)anthracenes. P. P. Fu, L. E. Unruh, M. W. Chou. 4:55—Discussion.

Section C Convention Center, Room 23, South Hall Carbanions

R. C. Neuman, Jr., Presiding 2:00—220. Deprotonation Reactions of Cyclic Vinyl Ethers and the Structures of the Carbanions. R. W. Saylor, F. T. Oakes, J. F. Sebastian. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—221. Naphthalene Suppression of 1Aryl-2-Propanol Formation in Alkali Metal-Provoked Reactions of Aryl Hal ides with Acetone Enolate Ion. J, F. Bunnett, R. R. Bard. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—222. Stabilities of the Anion Radicals of Homo[8]Annulene and Methano[10]Annulene. G. R. Stevenson, Rosario Concepcion, R. C. Reiter, S. S. Zigler. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—223. Bronsted Correlation for Phenalene Hydrocarbons. M. J. Kaufman, A. Streitwieser, Jr. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—224. 1,2-Bismethylenecycloalkanes from 1,2-Bismethylenebutadiene Dianion. R. B. Bates, B. Gordon III, J. J. White. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—225. Preparation and Reactions of 2,5-Dimethylene-1,5-Hexadiene Dianion. R. B. Bates, H. F. Hsu. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—226. Reaction of Ketone Enolates with 2,4-Dichloropyrimidine. A Novel Pyrimidine to Pyridine Interconversion. J. F. Wolfe, D. R. Carver, J. S. Hubbard. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—227. Gas Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Reactions Involving Hydroxide Ion. J. J. Grabowski, C. H. DePuy and V. M. Bierbaum. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—228. Transition States in Hindered Lithium Dialkylamide Deprotonations of Carbonyl Derivatives. J. K. Smith, D. E. Bergbreiter, M. Newcomb. 4:55—Discussion.

Feb. 15, 1982C&EN

81

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FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room D-1, East Hall Heterocyclic Chemistry

J. F. Wolfe, Presiding 9:00—229. Carbene Chemistry of Thiazolium Salts. M. B. Doughty, G. E. Risinger. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—230. Reaction of Thianthrene Cation Radical Perchlorate with Sulfonamides. Formation of N-Sulfonylsulfilimines and p-Arenesulfonamidophenylsulfonium Perchlorate. K. Kim, J. No. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—231. Transesterification of o-Nitrophenyl Carbonates. Novel Catalysis by Dimethylaminopyridine. D. J. Brunelle. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—232. A New Reaction of L-Ascorbic Acid with a,|S-Unsaturated Carbonyl Compounds. G. Fodor, (the late) J. Butterick, H. Mathelier, T. Mohacsi. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—233. Approaches to the Synthesis of Pyranonaphthoquinones. J. Grunwell, S. Heinzman. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—234. Synthesis of Anthracyclinone Intermediates. A. Unuigboje, J. Grunwell. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—235. Formation of Benzofuran Derivatives via Electrophilic Addition to oAnisylacetylenes. S. K. Chaudhary, P. R. West, L. S. Stavdal, R. H. Mitchell. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—236. Synthetic Studies of Cyclic Anhydrides with Grignard Reagents. P. Canonne, M. Akssira, M. Beiley. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—237. Total Synthesis of (±) 5-Dihytiro-3-deoxyapatanol. V. V. Kane, D. L. Doyle, P. C. Ostrowski. 11:55—Discussion.

9:15—Discussion. 9:20—248. New Antileukemic Jatrophone Derivatives from Jatropha Gossypiifolia II. Spectroscopic Analysis and Structure Determination. M. D, Taylor, A. B. Smith, III, G. Furst, S. P. Gunnsekera, G. A. Cordell, M. R. Farnsworth, S. M. Kupchan, I. Uchida, A. R. Branfman, R. G. Dailey, Jr., A. T. Sneden, C. A. Bevelle. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—249. Isolation and characterization of a New Urushiol Component from Poison Sumac. P. D. Adawadkar, M. A. Elsohly. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—250. An Unusual Triacylglycerol from Plant Waxes. A. P. Tulloch. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—251. A Novel Toxic 1,7Dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane from 7a/arorhyces Stipitatus: Application of 1H-NMR Two Dimensional Spin Correlation Maps. D. G. Lynn, N. J. Phillips, W. C. Hutton, J. Schabanowitz, D. I. Fennell, R. J. Cole. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—252. Structure of Host Specific Toxins Produced by Helminthosporium Sacchari. V. Macko, W. Acklin, D. Arigoni. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—253. Tricyclic Diterpenes from the Brown Marine Algae Dictyota Divaricata and Dictyota Linearis. P. Crews, T. E. Klein, E. R. Hogue, B. L. Myers. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—254. A Heterocyclic Diels-Alder Approach to the Synthesis of the C-Ring of Streptonigrin. J. C. Martin. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—255. A Convenient Synthesis of Esters of 6-Amino-penicillanic Acid. K. Gala, S. S. Bari, M. S. Manhas, A. K. Bose. 11:55—Discussion.

Section B Convention Center, Room D-2, East Hall General

P. W. Jennings, Presiding 9:00—238. Aromatization Routes to Cycloproparenes. B. Halton, C. J. Randall. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—239. Alkoxide Variation in Complex Base-Promoted Syn Elimination Reactions. R. A. Bartsch, A. P. Croft. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—240. Reactions of Trivalent Phosphorus with Endoperoxides. E. L. Clennan, P. C. Heah. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—241. Mechanism of the Fe(lll)-Catalyzed Peracetic Acid Oxidation of Catechol to cis, c/s-Muconic Acid. A Biomimetic Reaction for Pyrocatechase. A. J. Pandell. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—242. Mechanism of Sodium Dithionite Reduction of Aldehydes and Ketones. S. K. Chung. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—243. Empirical Force-Field Calculations of Cyclodecanone. T. N. Rawdah. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—244. Stable Substituted a-Ethylenenaphthalenium Ions. B. P. Singh, G. A. Olah. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—245. Synthesis of Fluoroinositols. S. S. Yang, T. R. Beattie, T. Y. Shen. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—246. Alkynylquinones. Synthesis of 2-Alkynyl-5-methoxy-1,4-benzoquinones. K. F. West, H. W. Moore. 11:55—Discussion.

Section C Convention Center, Room E-3, East Hall Natural Products

E. G. Baggiolini, Presiding 9:00—247. New Antileukemic Jatrophone Derivatives from Jatropha Gossypiifolia—I. Isolation and Preliminary Structure Determination. S. M. Kupchan, I. Uchida, A. R. Branfman, R. G. Dailey, Jr., A. T. Sneden, S. P. Gunasekera, C. A. Bevelle, G. A. Cordell, M. R. Farnsworth, M. D. Taylor, G. Furst, A. B. Smith, III.

ORPL DIVISION OF ORGANIC COATINGS AND PLASTICS CHEMISTRY M. Wismer, Chairman R. S. Bauer, Secretary

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-6, East Hall Symposium on Interfacial Interactions and Properties of Composites. Session I

Reactions and Preparation of Block and Graft Copolymers 9:00—13. Modification of Polymers. J. A. Moore, C. E. Carraher, Jr. 9:25—14. Characterization of Radiation Crosslinked Poly{styrene-block-ethyleneco-butylene-block-styrene). D. E. Zurawski, L. H. Sperling. 9:50—15. Grafting on Polyvinylchloride in Suspension Using Phase Transfer Catalyst or Solvent. G. Levin. 10:15—16. Control of Polymer Surface Structure by Tailored Graftcopolymers. Y. Yamashita, Y. Tsukahara. 10:40—17. Ester Interchange Reactions—the Determination of Sequence and Block Size Distributions in Copolyesters. S. Mazur. 11:05—18. Preparation of Block Copolymers by Epoxidation of Trans-1,4-Polybutadiene and Trans- 1,4-Polyisoprene Crystals. A. E. Woodward, K. Anandakumaran, C. C. Kuo, S. Tseng. 11:30—19. Graft Copolymerization of Maleic Anhydride Onto Polyethylene. N. G. Gaylord, M. Mehta, V. Kumar. 11:55—20. Effect of Melt Index and Crosslinking in Masterbatched Polyethylene-Clay Composites Prepared Thru In-Situ Graft Copolymerization of Maleic Anhydride. N. G. Gaylord, A. Takahashi.

Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Transfer Catalysis in Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 89)

J. A. Mason, Presiding

Section E

9:00—Opening Remarks. 9:10—1. Acid-Base Complexes of Polymers with Solvents. F. M. Fowkes, D. O. Tischler, J. A. Wolfe, M. J. Halliwell. 9:40—2. Surface Polarity of High Temperature-and-Silane-Treated Iron Oxides by Water Adsorption. F. J. Micale, C. C. Yu. 10:10—3. Acid-Base Interaction of Polymeric Vehicles with the Corrosion Products of Iron. J. W. Vanderhoff, L. M. Bennetch, M. J. Cantow, K. A. Earhart, M. S. El-Aasser, T. C. Huang, M. H. Kang, F. J. Micale, O. L. Shaffer, D. W. Timmons. 10:40—4. Thermal Analysis of Graphite and Carbon-Phenolic Composites by Pyrolysis-Mass Spectrometry. R. M. Lum, M. Robbins, A. M. Lyons, R. P. Jones, C. W. Wilkins. 11:10—5. Application of Acid-Base Interaction Concepts to Filled Polymer Systems. H. P. Schreiber. Section B Convention Center, Room G-1, East Hall Symposium on Inorganic Coatings. Session I M. Wismer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks.

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

Section C Convention Center, Room G-2, East Hall Symposium on Chemical Modification of Polymers organized by Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. S. Mazur, Presiding

Section D MONDAY MORNING

M. Wismer, J. A. Seiner,

82

9:10—6. Reactive Pigments in Inorganic Silicate Coatings. L. S. Dent Glasser, E. E. Lachowski. 9:35—7. Enhanced Water Insensitivity of Alkali Silicate Coatings by Use of Metal Compounds. W. G. Boberski, J. A. Seiner, J. E. Blasko. 10:00—8. Aqueous Ammoniated Zinc Organosiliconates: Novel Precursors to Metallosiloxanes. C. L. Frye, W. H. Daubt, J. F. Hyde. 10:25—9. Introduction of Newly Developed Inorganic Coating in Japan. N. Kurano. 10:50—10. Reducing the Viscosity of Magnesia Cements with Organosilicon Compounds. W. G. Boberski, J. A. Seiner, V. G. Petracca. 11:15—11. Effects of Selective Phosphate Parameters on the Corrosion Resistance of Painted Steel. R. A. Ottavianf. 11:40—12. Microstructural Characterization of TBTO Antifouling Coatings. M. M. Soroczak, H. C. Eaton, M. L. Good.

Co-chairmen

Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 92) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-6, East Hall Symposium on Interfacial Interactions and Properties of Composites. Session II

J. A. Manson, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—21. Effect of Silica Filler Concentration on the Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Noncrystallizable Silicone Rubber. D. M. Hoffman, I. Chiu. 2:40—22. Interlaminar Shear Properties of Graphite Fiber-Advanced Resin Composites. D. S. Varma, H. L. Needles, D. A. Kourtides, R. H. Fish. 3:10—23. Small and Large Strain Studies on Filled Polyethylene. V. P. Chacko, R. J. Farris, F. E. Karasz. 3:40—24. Composites of Glass Particles in Poly(Styrene-Co-n-Butylemathacrylate) and Modified Copolymers. S. K. Varshney, K, Venkataswamy, C. L. Beatty.

4:10—25. Some Effects of Acid-Base Interactions in Polymer Composites and Coatings. J. A. Manson, J.-S. Lin, A. Tiburcio. Section B Convention Center, Room G-1, East Hall Symposium on Inorganic Coatings. Session II M. Wismer, J. A. Seiner, Co-chairman J. A. Seiner,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—26. Plasma Polymerization of Silanes. S. K. Varshney, C. L. Beatty. 2:30—27. XPS Study of Plasma—Deposited Films Containing Silicon. C. D. Batich, C. L. Beatty, P. E. Bierstedt, S. K. Varshney. 3:00—28. Polycarbosilane Precursors for Silicon Carbide. C. L. Schilling, Jr., J. P. Wesson, T. C. Williams. 3:30—29. Preparation of lll-V Compound Semiconductors by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition. R. M. Biefeld. 4:00—30. Kinetics of Trimethylsiiyl End-Block Polydimethylsiloxane Thermal Depolymerization. M. Zeldin, B. Qian. 4:30—31. Metallic Covalent Polymers: (SN)X and (CH)X and Their Derivatives. A. G. MacDiarmid, A. J. Heeger.

Section C Convention Center, Room G-2, East Hall Symposium on Chemical Modification of Polymers organized by Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc.

D. Tirrell, Presiding Structural Considerations 1:30—32. Organotinpolyimides: StructureProperty Relationships. C. P. Pathak, S. Samant, M. V. R. Murty, G. N. Babu. 1:55—33. Structure-Reactivity Relationships for Substituted Heterochain Polymers. J. F. Brandt, J. S. Shih, M. P. Zussman, D. A. Tirrell. 2:20—34. Preparation of Anion Exchange Resins from Carbonaceous Adsorbents. W. T. Ford, G. H. Beasley, B. P. Chong, J. W. Neely. 2:45—35. Polysulfones Modified Via End Groups. P. M. Hergenrother. 3:10—36. Microstructure of Cyclized Polyisoprene. D.B. Patterson, D. H. Beebe. 3:35—37. Some Recent Studies of Polymer Reactivity. H. Morawetz, S. Sawant, C.-H. Suen. 4:00—38. Three-Arm Star Chlorine-Telechelic Polyisobutylene and Star Poly{lsobutylene-o-o'-Methylstyrene). J. P. Kennedy, L. R. Ross, S. C. Guhaniyogi. 4:25—39. New Polyisobutylene-Based lonomers: Synthesis and Model Experiments. J. P. Kennedy, R. F. Storey. Section D Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Transfer Catalysis in Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 90)

Section E Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 93) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-6, East Hall International Symposium on Polymer Additives. Session I J. E. Kresta, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—40. Additive Loss from Polymers. N. C. Billingham, P. D. Calvert. 9:40-41. Distribution of Additives in Rubber Modified Polymers. I. Antioxidants in Model Systems. M. D. Wolkowicz, D. M. Kulich.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

10:10—42. Self Diffusion of Plasticizers in PVC. P. J. F. Griffiths, K. G. Kirkor, G. S. Park. 10:40—43. Critical Temperature for Solubility, of a Phenolic Antioxidant. V. J. Kuck. 11:10—44. Critical Phenomena in the Inhibited Oxidation of Polymers. Yu. A. Shlyapnlkov. 11:40—45. Effects of Additives on Properties and Coating Processes of Polyphenylquinoxalines. L. Fengcai, W. Baigeng, C. Jinbiao. 12:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). 12:45—Divisional Luncheon (see Social Events, ticket 111). Section B Convention Center, Room G-1, East Hall Symposium on Properties of Polymers Correlation with Chemical Structure V. D. McGinniss, Presiding 9:05—46. Predicting Physical Properties and Structures of Polymers. V. D. McGinniss. 9:30—47. A Correlating Parameter for Liquid Permeability in Polyethylene. M. Salame. 9:55—48. Poly(Perfluoro Ethers): Viscosity, Density and Molecular Weight Relationships. A. C. Ouano, B. Appelt. 10:20—49. A Computer Based Methodology for Matching Polymer Structures with Required Properties. G. C. Derringer, R. L. Markham. 10:45—50. Relations Between Polymer Chemistry and Physical Properties. D. H. Kaeible. 11:10—51. Relations Between Polymer Chemistry and Mechanical Properties. D. H. Kaeible. 12:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for details). 12:45—Divisional Luncheon (see Section A for details). Section C Convention Center, Room G-2, East Hall Symposium on Chemical Modification of Polymers organized by Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc.

A. Usmani, Presiding Modification Through Condensation Reactions 9:00—52. Reactions of Polysodium Acrylate with Aqueous Solutions Containing the Uranyl Ion. C. E. Carraher, Jr., S.Tsuji, W. A. Feld, J. E. DiNunzio. 9:25—53. Chemical Modification of Dextran Through Interfacial Condensation with Organostannane Halides-Reaction Variables. C. E. Carraher, Jr., T. J. Gehrke. 9:50—54. Selected Chemical Modifications, Including Grating, on Cellulosics. J. F. Klnstle, N. M. Irving. 10:15—55. Modification of Polymers VIII. Carbamate Modified Polyvinyl Alcohols). C. G. Gebelein. 10:40—56. Chemical Modification of Sucrose by Polyvinyl Alcohol). A. M. Usmani, I. O. Salyer. 11:05—57. Chemical Modification of Polyv i n y l Chloroformate). G. Meunier, P. Hemery, J. P. Senet, S. Boileau. 11:30—58. Polymer-Supported Optically Active Phase Transfer Catalysts. D. C. Sherrington, J. Kelly. 12:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for details). 12:45—Divisional Luncheon (see Section A for details). Section D Symposium on Polymers in Energy Conservation li. Polymers in Solar Energy I organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 90) Section E Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Transfer Catalysis in Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 90)

Section F Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecuiar Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 93) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

• Section A

Convention Center, Room A-6, East Hall International Symposium on Polymer Additives. Session II

4:05—76. Use of Polyfunctional Monomers as Additives in Accelerating the Radiation Grafting of Styrene to Polyolefins. C. H. Ang, J. L. Garnett, R. Levot. 4:30—77. Synthesis and Reactions of Poly 1,3-Octadienyl Iron Tricarbonyl). T. W. Smith, D. J. Luca. Section D Symposium on Polymers in Energy Conservation II. Polymers in Solar Energy II organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 90)

J. E. Kresta, Presiding

Section E

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—59. An Automated, Multistation, Oxygen Uptake System. J. C. Wozny. 2:35—60. Recent Developments in Phosphorous Stabilizers. E. Lewis. 3:05—61. Effectiveness of Stabilizers in Urethane Systems. G. Mathur, J. E. Kresta, K. C. Fhsch. 3:35—62. Compounding of Additives and Fillers. K. Else. 4:05—63. Effect of Pigments on the Aging Characteristics of Polyolefins. M. G. Chan, H. M. Gilroy. 4:35—64. Thermo-oxidative Degradation of Polyethylene. V. The Effect of Carbon Black Pigments on Low-Density Polyethylene. A. Holmstrom, E. Sbrvik. Section B Convention Center, Room G-1, East Hall Symposium on Properties of Polymers Correlation with Chemical Structure V. D. McGinniss, Presiding 2:00—65. Polymer Structure-Flammability Relationships. E. M. Pearce. 2:25—66. Comparison of Styrene with para-Methylstyrene in ABS Polymers. C. L. Myers. 2:50—67. Physicochemical Characterization of Biologically Active Diviny! Ether-Maleic Anhydride Copolymers. R. Takatsuka, R. M. Ottenbrite. 3:15—68. New Aspects of Core-Shell Emulsion Polymerization-Polybutyl Acrylate and Styrene Pair Systems. T. I. Min, M. S. ElAasser, J. W. Vanderhoff, A. Klein 3:40—69. Acetylene Terminated Resin Mechanical Characterization I. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Fracture Engergies at Different Cure States. C. L. Leung. 4:05—70. Acetylene Terminated Resin Mechanical Characterization Part II: Computer Aided Analysis. D. H. Kaeible, C. Leung.

Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Transfer Catalysis In Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 90) Section F

Section D

Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecuiar Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 93)

Symposium on Polymers in Energy Conservation II. Polymers in Solar Energy III organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 91)

WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Convention Center, Room A-6, East Hall International Symposium on Polymer Additives. Session III 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—78. Dynamic-Mechanical Investigations of Highly Filled Polyethylene. R. Kosfeld, T. H. Uhlenbroich, F. H. J. Maurer. 9:35—79. Effect of Lubricants on the Extrusion Characteristics of Poly Vinyl Chloride. E. A. Collins, T. E. Fahey, A. J. Hopfinger. 10:05—80. Use of Titanate Coupling Agents for Improved Properties and Aging of Filled Plastics and Coatings. S. J. Monte, G. Sugerman. 10:35—81. Iron Naphthenate Adhesion Promoters for Bitumen. R. T. Woodhams, S. Varevorakul. 11:05—82. Precipitated Calcium Carbonates as Ultraviolet Stabilizers and Impact Modifiers in Poly(Vinyi chloride) Siding and Profiles. K. K. Mathur. 11:35—83. Recent Developments in Photodegradation and Phostostabilization of Polydienes. J. F. Rabek.

Section C

Convention Center, Room G-1, East Hall

Convention .Center, Room G-2, East Hall Symposium on Chemical Modification of Polymers organized by Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc.

Symposium on Epoxy Resins. Session I

Reactions and Preparations of Copolymers 2:00—71. Preparation of Highly Substituted Polysulfones by Chemical Modification. J. M. J. Frechet, M. J. Farrall, G. C. Willson. 2:25—72. Synthesis of Photocrosslinkable Fluorinated Polymers and the Surface Chemical Analysis. T. Yamaoka, T. Tsunoda, S. Tamaru. 2:50—73. Polymers Containing Hydrogen Bonding Rings. Poly (Enol-Ketones) Derived from the Oxidation of Poly (Vinyl Alcohol). S. J. Huang, E. Quinga, l.-F. Wang. 3:15—74. Halogenation of Poly [Isobutylene-CO-(2,3-Dimethyl-1,3-Butadiene]. I. Kuntz, B. E. Hudson, Jr. 3:40—75. Preparation and Properties of 2Hydroxypropyl Methacrylate-Alkyl Acrylate Copolymer Net-woks. A. Despande, P. K. Dhal, D. D. Despande, G. N. Babu, A. Despande, P. K. Dhal, D. D. Despande

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Section E Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Transfer Catalysis In Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 91) Section F

J. E. Kresta, Presiding

Section B

S. Huang, Presiding

9:25—91. Variation of the Properties of Aromatic Polyesters by Changes in Isomer Distribution and Ring Substitution. R. W. Stackman, A. G. Williams. 9:50—92. Synthesis and Crosslinking of Acrylic Hydrazides. M. Hartman, R. Dowbenko, T. Hockswender. 10:15—93. Stoichiometry and Chemical Bondings in Aminosilane Treated Polymer and Metallic Surfaces. H. J. Leary, Jr., D. S. Campbell. 10:40—94. Dyed Sulfonated Polystyrene Films as Probes of Molecular Basis of Triboelectric Charging. H. W. Gibson. 11:05—95. Modification of Poly(styreneco-n-Butyl-methacrylate) Copolymers. S. K. Varshney, D. Gustavson, C. L. Beatty. 11:30—96. Calcium Ion-Selective Electrodes with Covalently-Bound Organophosphate Sensor Groups. G. C. Corfield, L. Ebdon, A. T. Ellis.

R. S. Bauer, Presiding 8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—84. Elastomer-modified Epoxy Resins in Coatings Applications. R. S. Drake, D. R. Egan, W. T. Murphy. 9:30—85. Synthesis and Characterization of Mew Elastomeric Polysiloxane Modifiers for Epoxy Networks. J. S. Riffle, I. Yilgor, A. K. Banthia, G. L. Wilkes, J. E. McGrath. 10:00—86. Synthesis and Analysis of Saturated, Reactive n-Butyl Acrylate Polymers for Use in Epoxy Resin Toughening. S. Gazit, J. P. Bell. 10:30—87. Impact Performance of Epoxy Resins with Poly n Butyl Acrylate as the RLP Modifier. S. Gazit, J. P. Bell. 11:00—88. Synthesis of Solid Rubber-Modified epoxy resins. W. A. Romanchick, J. F. Geibel. 11:30—89. Thermal Stability of Uncured Solid Rubber-Modified Epoxy Resins. J. F. Geibel, W. A. Romanchick, J. E. Sohn. Section C Convention Center, Room G-2, East Hall Symposium on Chemical. Modification of Polymers organized by Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. R. W. Stackman, Presiding

Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecuiar Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. (see page 93) Section G Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: I. Some General Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 67) WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room A-6, East Hall international Symposium on Polymer Additives. Session IV J. E. Kresta, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—97. Advances in U.V. Stabilization of Polyethylene. F. Gugumus. 2:35—98. Hindered Amines as Antioxidants in UV Exposed Polymers. D. J. Carlsson, K. H. Chan, J. Durmis, D. M. Wiles. 3:05—99. Photochemistry of Nickel (II) Dithiocarbamates and Thiuram Sulfides in Solution. R. Gooden. 3:35—100. UV Stabilization of Instant Color Photographs. A. M. Usmani, I. O. Salyer. 4:05—101. Photochemical Grafting of Acrylated Azo Dyes onto Polymeric Surfaces VI. Effect of 1,2-Diphenyl, 2,2-Dimethoxy, Ethanone as Photo-initiator on the Grafting of Some Acryloxy-Substituted Aromatic Diazenes onto Poly(propylene) and Poly(caprolactam) Fibres. I. R. Bellobono, E. Selli, S. Calgari. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details). Section B Convention Center, Room G-1, East Hall Symposium on Epoxy Resins. Session II R. S. Bauer, Chairman J. E. McGrath,

Presiding

2:00—102. Morphology of Cured Elastomer-Modified Epoxy Resins. J. E. Sohn. 2:30—103. Styrl-Pyridine Based Epoxy ResApplications ins: Synthesis and Characterization. H-J Yan, E. M. Pearce. 9:00—90. Modified Polysaccharides with 3:00—104. Polyfunctional Chelating Agents Potential Anti-Arrhythmic Activity. E. H. for Improved Durability of Epoxy Adhesion Schacht, L. H. Ruys, J. T. Vermeersch, E. | I to Steel. A. J. DeNicola, Jr., J. P. Bell. J. Goethals.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

83

< GC

a o

fc

m

s

3:30—105. High Performance Tris(Hydroxyphenyl) Methane Based Epoxy Resins. K. L. Hawthorne, F. C. Henson, R. Pinzelli. 4:00—106. Fast Curing Epoxy-Episulfide Resin for Use at Room Temperature. W. Ku, J. P. Bell. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A). Section C Convention Center, Room G-2, East Hall Symposium on General Papers and New Concepts in Applied Polymer Science R. H. Mumma, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—107. Preparation and Structure of Fiedel-Crafts Crosslinked Polystyrene Particles. N. A. Peppas, D. G. Barar. 2:30—108. Isocyanatoethyl Methacrylate: A Hetereofunctional Monomer For Polyurethane and Vinyl Polymer Systems. M. R. Thomas. 2:55—109. Synthesis and Characterization of Thermoplastic Polyesters and Polyamides From Sebacyl Bisketene. D. P. Garner. 3:20—110. Electron Beam Chemistry of Polysulfones in the Solid State. A. Gutierrez, J. Pacansky, R. Kroeker. 3:45—111. Phthalocyanine Polymers. Part IV. Novel Type of Thermally Stable Polyimides Derived From Metal Phthalocyanine Tetramines and Benzophenone Tetracarboxylic Dianhydride. B. N. Achar, G. M. Fohlen, J. A. Parker. 4:10—112. Stress Chemiluminescence: Predictive Applications to Polymer Failure J. H. Richardson, S. B. Monaco, J. D. Breshears, D. S. Johnson, S. M. Lanning, R. J. Morgan. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A). Section D Symposium on Polymers in Energy Conservation II. Polymers in Solar Energy IV organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 91) Section E Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. {see page 93) Section F Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: II. Specific Effects on Domestic Industry organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information {Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates {see page 68) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-6, East Hall International Symposium on Polymer Additives. Session V J. E. Kresta, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—113. Effect of Various Additive on the Photo-degradation of Polyurethane. Z. Osawa, E. Tajima. 9:35—114. Influence of Light Stabilizers on Maintaining Surface Integrity and Preventing Biological Defacement of Polymers. P. D. Gabriele, J. R. Geib, J. S. Puglisi, W. J. Reid. 10:05—115. Effects of Bromine and Antimony-Containing Flame Retardants on the Burning of Polyethylene Films. Y. Hsieh, K. Yeh. 10:35—116. Molybdenum Smoke Suppressants in Polyvinyl Chloride Formulations. F. W. Moore, T. R. Weber, G. A. Tsigdinos, J. G. Bilek. 11:05—117. Mechanism of polyvinyl Chloride) Fire Retardance by Molybdenum (VI) Oxide. Further Evidence in Favor of the Lewis Acid Theory. W. H. Starnes, Jr., L. D. Wescott, Jr., W. D. Reents, R. E. Cais, G. M. Villacorta, I. M. Plitz, L. J. Anthony.

84

C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

11:35—118. Basic Mechanism for Tin Stabilizers in polyvinylchloride. A. Guyot, A. Michel, T. V. Hoang. Section B Convention Center, Room G-1, East Hall Symposium on Epoxy Resins. Session III R. S. Bauer, Chairman C. A. May, Presiding 9:00—119. Physical Aging and Its Effect on the Mechanical and Physical Properties of Graphite/Epoxy Composites. E. S. W. Kong. 9:30—120. Relationships Between Extent of Cure, Free Volume and Water Absorption in Epoxies. J. P. Aherne, J. B. Enns, M. J. Doyle, J. K. Gillham. 10:00—121. Effects of Impurities on the Hydrolytic Stability and Curing Behavior of an Epoxy Resin. G. L. Hagnauer, P. J. Pearce. 10:30—122. Effect of Mixing Conditions on Structure and Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Resins. J. P. Bell. 11:00—123. Molecular Structure/Macroscopic Property Relationships of Epoxy/ Amine Systems Using Time-Temperature-Transformation (TTT) Cure Diagrams. J. B. Enns, J. K. Gillham. 11:30—124. Structure-Property Relations of Polyether Triamine Cured Dgeba Epoxies. F-M Kong, D. M. Hoffman, R. J. Morgan. Section C Convention Center, Room G-2, East Hall Symposium on General Papers and New Concepts in Applied Polymer Science M. R. Thomas, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—125. Influence of Solution Extensional and Shear Flows on Roll Coated Polymer Films. D. A. Soules, J. E. Glass, J. E. Damon. 9:30—126. Investigation of the SolventEvaporation Effect on Spin Coating of Thin Films. B. T. Chen. 9:55—127. Constant Solute Release Rate From Glassy Polymers. N. A. Peppas. 10:20—128. Environmental Effects on Coating Materials for Use In Underwater Opto-Acoustic Detection Devices. R. N. Capps, I. J. Bush. 10:45—129. Antifogging Coating. M. Funaki, M. Yoshida.

2:05—130. Reactions of PVC with Organotin Stabilizers Under Controlled Conditions. G. Ayrey, S. Y. Hsu, R. C. Poller. 2:35—131. Polymeric Additives for Polyvinyl Chloride). J. T. Lutz, Jr. 3:05—132. New Mercapto Esters Stabilizer Intermediate for PVC. G. P. Mack. 3:35—133. Effect of Metal Ions and HCI on the Thermal and Photochemical Degradation of polyvinyl Chloride). E. D. Owen. 4:10—Panel Discussion. Section B Convention Center, Room G-1, East Hall Symposium on Epoxy Resins. Session IV R. S. Bauer, Chairman J. P. Bell, Presiding 2:00—134. Isothermal Cure Kinetics of an Epoxy Resin Prepreg. G. L. Hagnauer, B. R. LaLiberte, D. A. Dunn. 2:30—135. Studies in the Branching of High Molecular Weight Polyhydroxyethers Based on Bisphenol A-Part II. S. A. Zahir, S. Bantle. 3:00—136. Characterization and Moldability Analysis of Epoxy Reaction Injection Molding Resins. J. S. Osinski, L. T. Manzione. 3:30—137. A Study of Some Epoxy Polymers for Underwater Acoustic Use. C. M. Thompson, R. Y. Ting. 4:00—138. Applications for Aqueous Dispersions of Epoxy Resins. F. A. Hudock, R. B. Graver. Section C Symposium on Polymers in Energy Conservation II. Polymers in Solar Energy VI organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. {see page 91) Section D Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: IV. Selected Societal Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information {Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates {see page 68)

Section D

PEST

Symposium on Polymers In Energy Conservation II. Polymers in Solar Energy V organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. {see page 91) Section E Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. {see , page 93)

DIVISION OF PESTICIDE CHEMISTRY G. J. Marco, Chairman G. W. Ivie, Program Chairman P. A. Hedin, Secretary

11:35—6. Protective Chemicals in Plant Epidermal Glands and Appendages. R. D. Stipanovic. 12:05—Discussion.

Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 9, Lobby Level General: Toxicokinetics, Structure Activity, and Mode of Action J. R. Heitz, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—7. Toxicokinetics of Carbofuran Poisoning in House Flies. C. Colins, T. A. Miller. 9:20—8. Fenvalerate Toxicokinetics in Insects Via Two Routes of Entry. J. R. Coates. 9:40—9. Toxicokinetic Studies on Methamidophos. A. J. Gray, C. M. Thompson, T. R. Fukuto. 10:00—10. Mechanism of Action of Methamidophos. C. M. Thompson, T. R. Fukuto. 10:20—11. Relation of Brain Cytoplasmic Microtubule Protease(s) to Organophosphorus Ester-Induced Delayed Neurotoxicity in Hens. J. Seifert, J. E. Casida. 10:35—12. Toxicity of 0,0,S-Trialkyl Phosphorothioate to the Rat. F. A. F. All, T. R. Fukuto. 10:50—13. Delayed Toxic Effect of 0,0,STrimethyl Phosphorothioate on in vivo Protein Synthesis Studied in Various Rat Organs. T. Imamura, N. Umetsu, T. R. Fukuto. 11:05—14. Synthesis and Peculiar Toxicity of Some Simple 0,S-Dialkyl Alkylphos> phonothioates. D. J. Armstrong, T. R. Fukuto. 11:25—15. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships for 2-(Phenylmethylsulfonyl)Pyridine-1-Oxide Herbicides. A. M. Doweyko, J. A. Minatelli, D. I. Relyea, A. R. Bell. 11:45—16. C itrus Li monoid By-Produc ts As Insect Control Agents. I. Kubo, J. A. Klocke. 12:00—Discussion. MONDAY AFTERNOON

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—17. Translational Control of the Synthesis of Anti-nutrient Proteinase Inhibitor Proteins in Leaves of Wounded Tomato Plants. C. E. Nelson, M. Walker-Simmons, C. A. Ryan. 2:40—18. Plant Polyphenols and Their Association With Proteins. E. Haslam. 3:15—19. Natural Photosensitizers and Their Effects on Insects. J. T. Arnason, G. H. N. Towers. 3:50—20. Natural Inducers of Plant Resistance to Insects. M. Kogan. 4:25—21. Metabolism and Interactions of Terpenes in Insect Herbivores. L. B. Brattsten.

4:55—Discussion.

Section B

Section F Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: III. Domestic and International Effects organized by Division of industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information {Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Small Chemical Businesses, Board Committee on Corporation Associates {see page 68) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room A-6, East Hall International Symposium on Polymer Additives. Session VI J. E. Kresta,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 10, Lobby Level Symposium on Mechanisms of Plant Resistance to Insects: Biochemical and Physiological Mechanisms L. B. Brattsten, Presiding

MONDAY

MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 10, Lobby Level Symposium on Mechanisms of Plant Resistance to Insects: Ecological and Histochemical Aspects R. D. Stipanovic, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Insect Population Dynamics and Induced Plant Chemical Defenses. D. F. Rhoades. 9:35—2. Patterns of Defensive Chemistry in Douglas-fir, Stress Physiology, and Western Spruce Budworm Success. R. G. Cates. 10:05—3. Physiology Constraints on Plant Chemical Defenses. H. A. Mooney. 10:35—4. Influence of Plant Chemical Defenses on Insect Susceptibility to Parasites, Predators, and Diseases. J. C. Schultz. 11:05—5. Localization and Differentiation of Secondary Phenolics Within Plants. J. W. McClure.

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 9, Lobby Level Symposium on Analytical & Toxlcological Significance of Pesticide Metabolites: Advances in Identification of Metabolites R. Honey curt, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—22. Advances in Metabolite Identification Using Plant Tissue Cultures. R. O. Mumma, R. H. Hamilton. 2:50—23. Elucidation of Metabolic Pathways for Pesticides in Rotation Crops. B. J. Slmoneaux, I. M. Szolics, J. E. Cassidy, G. J. Marco. 3:30—24. Advances in Methods and Techniques for the Identification of Xenobiotic Conjugates. G. D. Paulson, G. L. Lamoureux, V. J. Feil. 4:10—25. Advances in the Analytical Detection of Metabolites. R. L. Swann, D. A. Laskowski, P. J. McCall.

4:45—Discussion.

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 10, Lobby Level Symposium on Mechanisms of Plant Resistance to Insects: Insect Feeding Mechanisms

M. S. Blum, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—26. Non-Preference Mechanisms. J. A. A. Renwick. 9:40—27. Differential Sensory Perceptions of Plant Compounds by Insects. J. H. Visser. 10:15—28. Nutrient-Allelochemical Interactions in Host Plant Resistance. J. C. Reese. 10:50—29. Towards a Chemical Basis for Hostplant Selection. J. Bordner, D. A. Danehower, J. D. Thacker, G. G. Kennedy, R. E. Stinner, R. T. Yamamoto. 11:25—30. Detoxification, Deactivation, and Utilization of Plant Compounds by Insects. M. S. Blum. 11:55—Discussion. Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 9, Lobby Level Symposium on Analytical & Toxicological Significance of Pesticide Metabolites Toxicological Significance of Metabolites J . Chambers, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—31. Production of Pesticide Metabolites by Oxidative Reactions. E. Hodgson. 9:50—32. Hydrolases: Their F\ple in the Metabolism of Insecticides and the Toxicological Significance of the Metabolites. W. C. Dauterman. 10:30—33. Toxicological Significance of Pesticide Conjugates. H. W. Dorough. 11:10—34. N-Nitrosamines: Environmental Occurrence, in vivo Formation and Metabolism. K. D. Brunnemann, S. S. Hecht, D. Hoffmann. 11:45—Discussion. Section C Symposium on Toxicology and Risk Assessment organized by Division of Medicinal Chemistry (see page 72) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 10, Lobby Level Symposium on Mechanisms of Plant Resistance to Insects: Roles of Plant Constituents G. A. Rosenthal, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—35. Biochemical Studies of Natural Product Detoxification by the Seed Predator, Caryedes brasiliensis [Bruchidae]. G. A. Rosenthal. 2:40—36. Phytochemical Disruption of Hormonal Processes in Insects. W. S. Bowers. 3:15—37. Role of Lipids in Plant Resistance to Insects. D. S. Seigler. 3:50—38. An Insect Ecdysis Inhibitor from Plumbago capensis; A Naturally Occurring Chitin Synthetase Inhibitor. I. Kubo, J. A. Klocke. 4:25—39. Multiple Factors Contributing to Cotton Plant Resistance to the Tobacco Budworm. P. A. Hedin, J. N. Jenkins, D. H. Collum, W. H. White, W. L. Parrott. 4:55—Discussion. Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 9, Lobby Level Symposium on Analytical & Toxicological Significance of Pesticide Metabolites: Toxicological Significance of Metabolites J. Chambers, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—40. Mechanisms of Free-RadicalMediated Toxicity. J. S. Bus, J. E. Gibson. 2:50—41. Bioactivation of Halogenated Hydrocarbons. M. W. Anders. 3:30—42, Significance of Pesticide Photoproducts. G. C. Miller, D. G. Crosby. 4:10—43. Toxicological Significance of the Dihydrodiol Metabolites and a Case Study on Precocene II. M. T. S. Hsia. 4:45—Discussion.

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 10, Lobby Level General: Photochemistry and Environmental Fate E. G. Alley, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—44. Photolysis of Organophosphorus Pesticides. D. E. Doster, J. R. Grunwell. 9:20—45. Photolysis of Methyl N[[[[[(1.1 - DimethylethylX5,5 - Dimethyl2 - Thioxo - 1,3,2 - Dioxaphosphorinan2 yl)Amino]Thio]Methylamino]Carbonyl]Oxy]Ethanimidothioate. K. T. Koshy, M. D. Burdick, D. W. Knuth. 9:35—46. Solid State Photolysis of Herbicides. R. M. Brady, T. J. Stewart, R. E. Leard. 9:50—47. Separation and Identification of Radicals Formed During Fenvalerate Photodegradation. N. Mikaml, N. Takahashi, A. Okumura, H. Yamada, J. Miyamoto. 10:10—48. Photochemical Production of Singlet Oxygen Products on Soil Surfaces. K. Gohre, G. C. Miller. 10:25—49. Transport and Fate of 2,4-D in a Terrestrial Ecosystem. J. D. Glle. 10:40—50. Fate of Pydrin® Insecticide in the Soil Environment. P. W. Lee, H. F. Vanderlinden, M. L. Tallent, H. Y. Fan, W. B. Burton. 10:55—51. Toxaphene Disappearance arid Volatilization from Cotton Plants. G. H. Willis, L. L. McDowell, L. A. Harper, L. M. Southwick, S. Smith. 11:10—52. Conjugates and Oxygenated Metabolites of Ethoxylated Alkylphenol Nonionic Surfactants in Barley Leaf Tissues. G. E. Stolzenberg, P. A. Olson, F. S. Tanaka, C. H. Lamoureux, E. R. Mansager. 11:25—53. A Study of Captan: Its Environmental Fate and Worker Exposure from Applications to Strawberries and Grapes in California. W. L. Winterlin, S. R. Schoen, C. R. Mourer. 11:40—54. Studies on the Sorption of Diazinon Vapor on Surfaces of Mushrooms and Other Agricultural Products in Enclosed Systems. R. J. Argauer, W. W. Cantelo. 12:00—Discussion. Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 9, Lobby Level Symposium on Analytical & Toxicological Significance of Pesticide Metabolites: Regulatory Measures and Metabolites R. Honeycutt, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—55. Covalent Binding of Chemical Metabolites to Tissue Macromolecules as an Indicator of Potential Toxicity. M. R. Moore. 9:50—56. Regulatory Importance of Pesticide Degradation Products from an Environmental Fate Perspective. S. M. Creeger. 10:30—57. Toxicological Testing of Metabolites. W. L. Burnam. 11:10—58. Importance of Metabolite Identification in Quantitative Risk Estimation. J. T. Stevens, D. D. Sumner. 11:45—Discussion.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 10, Lobby Level Plenary Session on Genetic Engineering in Plants—Retrospect and Prospects J . J. Menn, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—59. Genetic Engineering in Plants— Retrospect and Prospects. P. S. Carlson. 3:00—Discussion Group. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

Section A I 9:05—1. Structure Sensitivity of Platinum Catalysts for Reforming Reactions as Revealed by Single Crystal Studies. G. A. Somorjai. 9:40—2. Effect of Structurally Ordered Sulfur Overlayers on the Surface Reactivity of Platinum. R. J. Madix, N. Abbas. 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 10:15—3. Interaction of Saturated Hydro9:05—60. Syntheses and Biological Activicarbons with the Ru{001) and the lr(110) ties of New Xanthene Derivatives. H. TakSurfaces. W. H. Weinberg. eshiba, T. Kinoto, T. Jojima, K. Takahi. 10:50—4. Hydrogen-Oxygen Reaction on the 9:25—61. A Novel Class of Fungicides: 2Pt( 111) Surface: Temperature Programmed (Pyridyl-l-oxo)Thiomethylbenzoates. A. M. Reaction of Coadsorbed Atomic Oxygen Doweyko, D. T. Stanton, R. A. Davis. and Atomic Hydrogen. J. L. Gland, G. B. 9:45—62. Properties and Analytical Methods Fisher. for EL-468 Fire Ant Insecticide. E. W. Day, 11:25—5. Kinetic Oscillations in Carbon Jr., G. K. Dorulla, S. D. West, O. D. Monoxide Oxidation on Platinum. G. Ertl, P. Decker. R. Norton, J. Ruestig. 10:05—63. Vapor Pressures of MCPA Herbicide and of Its Salt and Ester FormulaSection B tions. J. E. Woodrow, J. N. Seiber. 10:25—64. Quantitative Analyses of PestiSymposium on Oil Shale Retorting—Latest cidies by TLC Under Field Conditions. C. W. Developments organized by Division of InR. Wade, W. H. Dennis, Jr., T. M. Trybus. dustrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with 10:45—Discussion. Division of Fuel Chemistry {see page 64)

THURSDAY MORNING

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 10, Lobby Level General: Synthesis, Analysis, and Physical Properties of Pesticides C. J. Soderquist, Presiding

Section B

Section C

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 9, Lobby Level General: Fate Studies in Vertebrates and Insects J . O. Nelson, Presiding

Symposium on Chemical Kinetics of Combustion—I organized by Division of Physical | Chemistry (see page 87)

M O N D A Y AFTERNOON Section A 9:00—Introductory Remarks. Convention Center, Room E-2, East Hall 9:05—65. Pharmacokinetic and Excretion of Symposium on Relation Between Catalyst Permethrin by Male Rhesus Monkeys. S. Selim, R. A. Robinson. Structure and Reactivity organized by Divi9:20—66. Bile Acid Conjugates of a Pyrethsion of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with roid Metabolite. G. B. Ouistad, L. E. Staiger, I Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry D. A. Schooley. 9:35—67. Resmethrin Metabolism in Lac- [ W. K. Hall, Presiding tating Cattle. R. L Ridlen, R. J. Christopher, 2:00—Introductory Remarks. G. W. Ivie, B. J. Camp. 2:05—6. Isotopic Exchange Between 2,29:50—68. Rat Metabolism of Pydrin® InDimethylbutane and Deuterium on Pt/Si0 2 secticide. P. W. Lee, S. M. Stearns, W. R. and Pd/Si0 2 . R. L. Burwell, Jr., V. EskiPowell, E. J. Silveira, W. B. Burton. nazi. 10:05—69. Penetration and Metabolism of 2:35—7. Water Gas Shift Reaction Over Pydrin® Insecticide in Susceptible and ReSupported Rhodium: Evidence for Strucsistant Houseflies. P. W. Lee, S. M. Stearns, tural Effects. J. H. Lunsford, M. Niwa. J. R. Sanborn. 3:05—8. -New Catalysts of Supported and 10:20—70. Absorption, Excretion and MeHighly Dispersed Low Valent Metals. C. tabolism of Amdro* (AC 217,300) Fire Ant Sudhakar, E. P. Yesodharan, A. Cichowlas, Insecticide in the Rat. M. Hussain, I. P. M. Majer, A. Brenner. Kapoor. 3:35—9. Relationships between Surface 10:40—71. Metabolism of 2,4'5-TrichloroChemistry and Catalytic Function of Mobiphenyl in the Rat. A. L. Bergman, J. E. lybdena-Alumina Catalysts. W. K. Hall. Bakke, G. L. Larsen. 4:05—10. Weil-Defined Supported Metal 10:55—72. Effect of Isomalathion and 0,SCatalysts Prepared from Molecular Metal S-Trimethyl Phosphorodithioate on the in Clusters. J. Budge, R. Barth, J. P. Scott, J. vivo Metabolism of Malathion in Rats. D. L. Lieto, M. Wolf, B. C. Gates. Ryan, T. R. Fukuto. 4:35—11. Characterization of Sulfur and 11:15—73. Effect of Dietary Nitrate and NiMetal Catalyst Particles Using XPS and trite on the Metabolism of Sulfadiazine in STEM. T. Wang, A. Kato, A. Vasquez, L. D. the Rat, Guinea Pig and Neonatal Calf. J. L. Schmidt. Woolley, Jr., C. W. Sigel. 11:35—74. Perspiration as an Important Section B Physiological Pathway for the Elimination of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid from Symposium on Oil Shale Retorting—Latest the Human Body. C. R. Sell, J. C. Maitlen, Developments organized by Division of InW. A. Alter. dustrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with 11:55—Discussion. Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 67) Section C Symposium on Chemical Kinetics of Combustion—II organized by Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 87)

PETR

TUESDAY MORNING

DIVISION OF PETROLEUM CHEMISTRY, INC. G. E. Illingworth, Chairman W. V. Bush, Secretary

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room E-2, East Hall Symposium on Advances in Zeolite Chemistry cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry F. G. Dwyer, Presiding

Section A

Convention Center, Room E-2, East Hall Symposium on Relation Between Catalyst Structure and Reactivity organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry J . B. Peri, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—12. Synthesis and Characterization of a New Zeolite of the Offretite Type. M. L. Occelli, A. J. Perrotta. 9:35—13. Investigation of Some Parameters in the Formation of Zeolite ZSM-5 Particulates by Direct Synthesis. L. B. Sand. 10:15—14. Zeolite Modification II—Direct Fluorination. B. M. Lok, F. P. Gortsema, C. A. Messina, H. Rastelli, Jr., T. P. J. Izod. 10:45—15. Random Siting of Aluminum in Faujasite. A. W. Peters. 11:15—16. Factors Influencing the Synthesis of Zeolites A, X and Y. J. A. Kostlnko.

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85

Section B 1 Symposium on Chemical Kinetics of Combustion—Ill organized by Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 87)

Section D Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of The History of Chemistry joint with Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 64)

Section C Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Bonding In Solids organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 69) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room E-2, East Hall Symposium on Advances In Zeolite Chemistry cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry V. McDaniel, Presiding 1:45—Divisional Business Meeting. 2:00—17. Inorganic Cation Exchange Properties of ZSM-5. P. Chu, F. G. Dwyer. 2:30—18. Acidity in ZSM-5. W. H. Flank, G. W. Skeels. 3:00—19. Characteristics of Advanced Dealuminated Zeolites. A. Humphries, J. Scherzer. 3:45—20. Measurement of Faujasite Si/AI Ratios Using 29Si-NMR. M. T. Melchior, D. E. W. Vaughan. 4:15—21. New Approaches to the Structural Characteristics of Faujasitic Zeolites. J. M. Thomas, J. Gonzalez-Calbet, S. Ramdas, J. Klinowski, M. Audier, C. A. Fyfe, G. C. Gobbi. Section B Symposium on Chemical Kinetics of Combustion—IV organized by Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 88) Section C Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Bonding in Solids organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 69) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room E-2, East Hall Symposium on Advances in Zeolite Chemistry cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry F. G. Dwyer, Presiding 9:00—22. Steric Effects in Nitrogen Adsorption by Mordenite. D. T. Hayhurst, M. D. Sefcik. 9:35—23. Modified Zeolite Catalyst for Olefin Synthesis from Methanol. T. Inui, Y. Takegami. 10:25—24. Conversion of C2-C-iq Olefins to Higher Olefins over Synthetic Zeolite ZSM-5. W. E. Garwood. 11:00—25. Evaluation of Some New Zeolite-Supported Metal Catalysts for Synthesis Gas Conversion, G. A. Melson, J. E. Crawford, J. W. Crites, K. J. Mbadcam, J. M. Stencel.

WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Convention Center, E-2, East Hall Lubrizol Award Symposium Honoring Dr. I. Wender H. Beuther, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—30. Ligand Effects on the Homologation of Methanol. W. R. Pretzer, M. M. Habib, T. P. Kobylinskl, J. E. Bozik. 2:40—31. Ligand Effects on the Homologation of Methanol. W. R. Pretzer, M. M. Habib, T. P. Kobylinski, J. E. Bozik. 3:10—32. Rhodium Hydroformylation Mechanism. A. A. Oswald, D. E. Hendriksen, R. V. Kastrup, J. S. Merola, J. C. Reisch. 3:40—33. Effects of Olefin Addition on Synthesis Gas Conversion over FischerTropsch Catalysts. C. L. Kibby, R. B. Pannell, T. P. Kobylinski. 4:10—34. Award Address. (ACS Award in Petroleum Chemistry sponsored by the Lubrizol Corporation). Catalysis in CO Reactions: A Homogeneous Catalyst Chemists view of Heterogeneous Catalysis. I. Wender. 6:30—Divisional Reception and Dinner (see Social Events, ticket 119). Section B Convention Center, Room E-3, East Hall Symposium on Synthetic and Petroleum Based Lubricants organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry B. L. Cupples, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—35. Effects of Structure on the Thermoxidative Stability of Synthetic Ester Lubricants: Theory and Predictive Method Development. L. R. Mahoney, S. Korcek, N. J. Norbeck, R. K. Jensen. 2:45—36. Some Synergistic Antioxidants for Synthetic Lubricants. T. S. Chao, M. Kjonaas. 3:25—37. Influence of Metals on Oxidation Rate and Deposit Formation for Mineral Oil and Ester Base Lubricants. E. E. Klaus, V. Krishnamachar. 4:05—38. Acute Toxicity Assessment of Polyalphaolefin (PAO) Synthetic Fluids. P. D. Guiney. 6:30—Divisional Reception and Dinner (see Section A for details). Section C Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Bonding In Solids organized by Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 70)

Section B Convention Center, Room E-3, East Hall Symposium on Synthetic and Petroleum Based Lubricants organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry B. L. Cupples, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—26. Synthesis and Properties of Silahydrocarbons—A Class of Thermally Stable-Wide Liquid Range Fluids. C. Tamborski, G. J. Chen, D. R. Anderson, C. E. Snyder, Jr. 9:35—27. Synthetic Lubricants: Star Branched Oligomers via Metathesis/Dimerization of 1-Octene and/or 1-Decene. W. T. Nelson, L. F. Heckelsberg. 10:05—28. BF3-Catalyzed Oligomerization of Alkenes—Structures, Mechanisms, and Properties. A. Onopchenko, A. N. Kresge, B. L. Cupples. 10:40—29. Tris-(polyoxyalkylated)isocyanurates—A New Class of Fire Resistant Fluids. D. F. Gavin, R. N. Scott, F. J. Milnes, R. J. Bucko.

Section D Symposium on Combustion Chemistry organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 62) Section E Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of The History of Chemistry joint with Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 64) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room E-2, East Hall Symposium on Advances in Hydrogen Manufacture organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry D. P. Gregory, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—39. Economics of Synthetic Hydrogen Production Via Coal Gasification. R. E. Billings, L. P. Vernon. 9:30—40. Prospects for Economical Large-Scale Production of Hydrogen. F. J. Section C Plenard. Symposium on the Electronic Structure and 9:55—41. Hydrogen Production Via the KBW Bonding In Solids organized by Division of\ Gasification Process. H. J. Michaels, J. F. Inorganic Chemistry (see page 70) ! Cannon, P. B. Probert.

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10:30—42. Hydrogen Recovery with Metal Hydride. J. G. Santangeio, G. T. Chen. 10:55—43. Design and Testing of Prototype 200 SCFH SPE Water Electrolysis Unit. L. J. Nuttali. 11:20—44. Static Feed Water Electrolysis—Hydrogen Production from Impure Water Sources. F. H. Schubert, K. A. Burke, A. J. Kovach.

Section B Convention Center, Room E-3, East Hall Symposium on the Combustion of Synthetic Fuels organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry W. Bartok, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—45. An Overview of Synthetic Fuel Combustion: Issues and Research Activities. A A. Boni, R. B. Edelman, D. Bienstock, J. Fischer. 9:30—46. Shock Tube Combustion of Aromatic Compounds. W. T. Rawlins, S. P. Schertzer, T. Tanzawa. 10:10—47. Soot Formation Characteristics of Liquid Fuels in Spray Flames. J. J. Sangiovanni, D. S. Liscinsky. 10:35—48. Analysis and Modeling of the Combustion and Emissions Characteristics of Typical Synthetic Fuel Components. R. B. Edelman, R. C. Farmer, P. T. Harsha. 11:00—49. An Experimental Study of Synthetic Fuel Atomization Characteristics. R. G. Oeding, W. D. Bachalo. 11:25—50. Shear Layer Combustion with Droplet Injection. A. Vranos, B. A. Knight. Section C Symposium on Lubricant Effects on Fuel Economy organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 68) Section D Symposium on Solid State Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry (see page 57)

4:20—56. Biomass Depolarized Water Electrolysis. M. R. St. John, A. J. Furgala, A. F. Sammells. Section B Convention Center, Room E-3, East Hall Symposium on the Combustion of Synthetic Fuels organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry W. Bartok, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—57. Pyrolysis-Oxidation Studies of Coal Derived Liquids. J. R. Loganbach, L. K. Chan, A. Levy. 2:30—58. Non-Equilibrium Distillation Effects in Vaporizing Droplet Streams. S. Hanson, J. M. Beer, A. F. Sarofim. 3:10—59. Intermediate BTU Global Flame Kinetics. A. Levy, E. L. Merryman, H. A. Arbib. 3:35—60. Synthetic Fuel Effects in Continuous Combustion Systems: An Experimental Study of Fuel Nitrogen Conversion in Jet-Stirred Combustors. R. M. Kowalik, L. A. Ruth. 4:00—61. Reduction of NOx and Particulates Emission by Staged Combustion of Coal Liquid Fuels. J. M. Beer, W. Farmayan, S. Hanson, M. T. Jacques, W. C. Rovesti. 4:25—62. Evaluation of Synthetic Fuel Character Effects on a Rich/Lean Turbine Combustor. L. C. Angello, W. C. Rovesti, R. A. Sederquist, T. J. Rosfjord. Section C Symposium on Lubricant Effects on Fuel Economy organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 68) Section D Symposium on Solid State Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry joint with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry (see page 58) Section E Symposium on Combustion Chemistry organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 63)

Section E Symposium on Combustion Chemistry organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 62) Section F Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of The History of Chemistry joint with Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 64) THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room E-2, East Hall Symposium on Advances in Hydrogen Manufacture organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry J. B. Pangborn, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—51. Current Status of Advanced Electrolytic Hydrogen Production in the United States and Abroad. M. Bonner. T. Botts, J. McBreen, A. Mezzina, F. Salzano, C. Yang. 2:30—52. Technical Developments in Alkaline Water Electrolysis. W. C. Kincaide. 2:55—53. General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water-Splitting Process. G. Basenbruch. 3:20—54. Hydrogen Generation by the Sulfur Cycle—A Progress Update. G. H. Parker, P. W. T. Lu. 3:55—55. Alternate Thermochemical Cycles for Advanced Hydrogen Production. M. G. Bowman, C. M. Hollabaugh, W. M. Jones, C. F. V. Mason.

Section F Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of The History of Chemistry joint with Division of Physical Chemistry (see page 64) FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room E-2, East Hall Symposium on the Combustion of Synthetic Fuels organized by Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry W. Bartok, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—63. Combustion of EDS Fuel Oils. M. W. Pepper, H. Maaser, J. Panzer, D. F. Ryan. 9:30—64. Soot Formation from Synthetic Fuel Droplets. J. C. Kramlich, G. C. England, R. Payne. 9:55—65. Relative Soot Formation Indices. D. B. Olson. 10:35—66. Effects of Coal Liquefaction Processing Conditions on the Combustion of SRC-I Solids. W. C. Rovesti, R. Borio, G. J. Goetz. 11:00—67. Small Scale Combustion Testing of Synthetic Fuels. G. A. Gibbon, J. M. Ekmann, C. M. White, R. J. Navadauskas. Section B Symposium on Processing of OH Shale, Tar Sands, and Heavy Oils organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 63) FRIDAY AFTERNOON

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Symposium on Processing of Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Heavy Oils organized by Division of Fuel Chemistry joint with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 63)

PHYS DIVISION OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY E. F. Hayes, Chairman A. L. Kwiram, Secretary/ Treasurer

9:00—20. Pyrolysis of Benzene behind Reflected Shock Waves. R. D. Kern, H. J. Singh. 9:00—21. A New Look at Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization in Chemical Kinetics. D. Miller, M. Frenklach. 9:00—22. Structures and Reactivities of Hydrocarbon Ions Relevant to Soot Formation. J. R. Eyler, F. W. Brill, J. E. Campana. 9:00—23. A Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer Study of Side-Wall Flame Quenching at Low Pressure by Cooled Noncatalytic and Catalytic Surfaces. T. M. Sloane, J. W. Ratcliffe. 9:00—24. Bimolecular Reactions of the Elusive Ethynyl Radical. F. Shokoohi, A. Renlund, H. Reisler, C. Wittig. 9:00—25. Temperature Dependence of Radical Reactions. R. L. Jaffe. Section C

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom D, Lobby Level Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry Symposium on Electron Correlation in Molecules—I R. L. Jaffe, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Development of the Theory of Electron Correlation in Molecules. H. Shuil. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—2. Green's Functions for the Ionization of Molecules. L. S. Cederbaum, J. Schirmer, W. von Niessen. 10:10—Discussion. 10:15—3. Use of the Polarization Propagator in the Treatment of Excited Molecular States. J. Schirmer, L. S. Cederbaum. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—4. Adventures in Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry. L. Radom, W. J. Bouma, R. H. Nobes. 11:10—Discussion. 11:15—5. Electron Correlation in Reactions of Transition Metal Systems. W. A. Goddard Hi. 11:45—Discussion. 11:50—6. AGP Wavefunction and Electron Correlation. Y. Ohrn. 12:20—Discussion.

Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 11, Lobby Level Poster Session—Chemical Kinetics of Combustion—I joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. A. M. Dean, Presiding 9:00—7. Kinetics of Cyanogen Decomposition and the CN-NO Reaction. M. B. Coiket. 9:00—8. Laser Fluorescence Study of the Chemistry of Sodium in Oxygen-Rich Flames. A. J. Hynes, K. Schofield, M. Steinberg. 9:00—9. Laser Diagnostic for Combustion Kinetics. F. P. Tully. 9:00—10. Kinetic Studies of CH2(1A1) by Laser Resonance Absorption. A. O. Langford, H. Petek, C. B. Moore. 9:00—11. C02-Laser-lnduced Deflagration of Fuel/Oxygen Mixtures. W. M. Trott. 9:00—12. A Direct Kinetic Study of the H0 2 + H0 2 Reaction in the Pressure Range of 3.0-700 Torr at 296°K. R. Simonaitis, J. Heicklen. 9:00—13. The Reaction of Methyl Radicals with Oxygen at Low Pressures. E. A. Schultz, K. D. Bayes, M. Pilling, M. Macpherson, M. Smith. 9:00—14. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrations in Spontaneous Ignition. R. S. Sheinson, C. E. Litz. 9:00—15. Energy Transfer in B 2 2 + CN in an Atmospheric Pressure Flame. W. R. Anderson, J. A. Vanderhoff, A. J. Kotlar. 9:00—16. Radical Production in a D. C. Discharge Rare Gas/Hydrocarbon Diffusion Flame. D. H. Winicur, J. L. Hardwick, S. Murphy. 9:00—17. Competing Unimolecular Reaction Pathways for Flame Radicals. G. F. Adams. 9:00—18. Quantum Chemical Characterization of the Reaction of Acetylene with Hydroxy I Radical. J. S. Brlnkley, C. F. Melius. 9:00—19. A Mechanistic Analysis of the Thermal Denox Reaction. A. M. Dean, A. J. DeGregoria, J. E. Hardy, R. K. Lyon.

Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom F, Lobby Level Nobel Laureate Signature Award Symposium on Coherent Optical Probes of Matter J. Waugh, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—26. Recent Developments in CIDNP Spectroscopy. G. L. Closs. 9:45—27. Billiard Ball Echo Model. S. R. Hartmann. 10:30—Coffee Break. 10:50—28. Molecular Dynamics in Condensed Phases: Picosecond and Nonlinear Spectroscopic Experiments. M. D. Fayer. 11:35—29. Award Address. (Nobel Laurente Signature Award for Graduate Education in Chemistry sponsored by J. T. Baker Chemical Co.) Selective Multiple-Quantum Excitation and Other Applications of Phase Coherent Pulse Sequences in NMR and Optical Spectroscopy. W. S. Warren. Section D Symposium on Thermodynamic Behavior of Electrolytes in Miked Solvents organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 64) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom D, Lobby Level Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry Symposium on Electron Correlation in Molecules—II A. Komornicki,

Presiding

2:00—30. Some Aspects on the Development of Molecular Electronic Structure Theory—Particularly the Correlation Problem. P-0 Lowdin. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—31. Applications of Moller-Plesset Perturbation Theory through Complete Fourth-Order, K. Raghavachari, R. C. Haddon, J. A. Pople. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—32. Recent Studies in MCSCF Theory. B. Lengsfield III. 4:00—Discussion. 4:05—33. CEPA-Calculations on Van Der Waals Interaction Energies Involving Open-Shell Molecules. V. Staemmler, R. Jaquet, U. Stahl. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—34. Applications of the Cray-1 for Quantum Chemistry Calculations, M. F. Guest, V. R. Saunders, J. H. van Lenthe. 5:10—Discussion.

Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom E, Lobby Level Symposium on Chemical Kinetics of Combustion—II joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

Section C

Section C

Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom F, Lobby Level Langmuir Award Symposium on Dense Fluids and Their Transformations

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 11, Lobby Level Poster Session: General—I Condensed Phase L. Kevan, Presiding

D. Chandler, Presiding 2:00—38. Award Address. (The Irving Langmuir Award in Chemical Physics sponsored by The General Electric Foundation.) Critical Point Described in a Plane of Two Densities. B. Widom. 2:30—Discussion. 2:35—39. Critical Phenomena in Chemically Reactive Liquid Mixtures. J. C. Wheeler. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—40. Freezing and Melting in Two and Three Dimensions. J. D. Weeks. 4:00—Discussion and Break. 4:20—41. Criticality in Fluids and the Traditional integral Equations. M. E. Fisher. 5:00—Discussion. 5:05—42. Simple Ideas about the Dynamics of Elementary Reactions in Liquids: The Breakdown of Transition State Theory. D. Chandler. 5:30—Discussion.

Section D Symposium on Thermodynamics Behavior of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry {see page 67) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom D, Lobby Level Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry Symposium on Electron Correlation in Molecules—III S. R. Langhoff, Presiding 9:00—43. Full Optimized Reaction Space Model for Electronic Rearrangements. K. Ruedenberg. 9:30—Discussion. 9:35—44. Many-Body Methods for Potential Energy Surfaces. R. J. Bartlett, G. D. Purvis. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—45. Discussion of some Multiconfiguration Wave Function Optimization Methods. R. Shepard. 10:40—Discussion. 10:45—Intermission. 10:55—46. Electron Pair Operator Studies of Electron Correlation in Weakly Bound Molecules. C. E. Dykstra. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—47. Effects of Electron Correlation on the Structure of Radicals. E. R. Davidson. 12:00—Discussion.

Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom E, Lobby Level Symposium on Chemical Kinetics of Combustion—III joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

S. W. Benson, Presiding 9:00—48. Reactions of Hydrocarbon Free Radicals with Oxygen. K. D. Bayes. ' 9:45—49. 0(3P) Reactions with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons, Mechanism and Dynamics. R. J. Buss, R. J. Baseman, G. He, Y. T. 10:30—Coffee Break. 10:50—50. Laser Stimulation and Observation of Elementary Combustion Reactions. T. Kreier, A. Jacobs, C. Kleinermanns, U. Schindler, J. Wolfrum. 11:35—51. Determination of Kinetic Parameters of Several Elementary Reactions in High Temperature N-H System. T. Asaba.

N. Cohen, Presiding 2:00—35. Some Key Reactions in Oxidation and Combustion. Thermochemistry and Kinetics. S. W. Benson. 2:50—36. Chemical Kinetics Aspects of Hydrocarbon Combustion. W. C. Gardiner, Jr. 3:40—Coffee Break. 4:00—37. Effect of Pressure on Combustion Processes. D. M. Golden.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

9:00—52. Chemical, Electronic and Conduction Studies of Doped and Undoped Polyacetylene. S. I. Yaniger, S. M. Riseman, J. A. Gardella, Jr., T. Frigo, W. P. McKenna, S. Bandyopadhyay, M. Novak, O. G. Symko, L. B. Lloyd, E. M. Eyring. 9:00—53. Nature of the Inhomogeneously Broadened ODMR Spectrum of 1-Bromonaphthalene in Polar and Nonpolar Glasses. R. L. Williamson, A. L. Kwiram. 9:00—54. NMR Relaxation Times of 131Xe in Liquid Solvents and Gaseous Mixtures. N. V. Reo, T. R. Stengle, K. L. Williamson 9:00—55. Flow NMR: T-, Relaxation of Organic Protons in Aqueous Solutions. A. R. Lepley, W. S. Wan-Ali, C. E. Manissero. 9:00—56. Electron Spin Echo Studies of the Solvation Structure of 0 2 ~ in Water. P. A. Narayana, D. Suranarayana, L. Kevan. 9:00—57. Spectroscopic Effects of Gas Phase Aggregation. B. R. Russell, J. Schander. 9:00—58. Studies of Nucleation and Growth in Laser Light Initiated Aerosols Containing S0 2 . S-Q Yu, L. D. Spicer. 9:00—59. Study of Molecular Complex Formation and Solvent Effect by Resonance Raman Scattering. D. Wutz, L. A. Tucker, F. Carney, Jr., R. Hanson, S. H. Lin. 9:00—60. Measurement of Small Frequency and Bandwidth Changes by Raman Difference Spectroscopy. Theory and Applications. J. Laane, M. M. Strube. 9:00—61. Ion-Water Interaction Potentials for Alkalications and Halide Anions. B. T. Gowda, S. W. Benson. 9:00—62. Monte Carlo Computer Simulation Study of the Hydrophobic Effect: Potential of Mean Force For [ { C H ^ L q AT 25°C. G. R. Shanker, D. L. Beveridge. 9:00—63. Thermal Diffusion in Chloroform Mixtures. A. L. Beyerlein, R. N. Y. Ma. 9:00—64. Potential Parameters for Alkali Halides, Alkali Metal Dimers, Halogen and Hydrogen Halide Molecules. B. T. Gowda, S. W. Benson. 9:00—65. Entropy of Hard Sphere Alkali Halide Crystals. A. L. Beyerlein, J. W. Cox. 9:00—66. Absorption Bandshape Calculation of Trapped Electrons in Molten KCI. C. W. Finley, Jr. 9:00—67. Application of Oxide Salt Reactions to the Matrix Isolation Technique. S. J. David, B. S. Ault. 9:00—68. WITHDRAWN. 9:00—69. A Statistical Thermodynamic Model for Water Near Solid Interfaces. F. M. Etzler. 9:00—70. A Semi-Empirical Theory of Adsorption Applied to Hard Spheres^and Lennard-Jones Particles. L. M. Walsh, G. W. Woodbury. Section D Symposium on Thermodynamic Behavior of Electrolytes In Mixed Solvents organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 67) TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom D, Lobby Level Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry Symposium on Electron Correlation in Molecules IV A. D. McLean, Presiding 2:00—71. Multireference Configuration Interaction Calculations by the Graphical Unitary Group Approach. I. Shavitt, F. B. Brown, H. Lischka. 2:30—Discussion. 2:40—72. Structure and Stability of Disilene and Silylsilylene and its Carbon Analogous Compounds. A Gradient SCF and GUGA-CI Study. H. Lischka. 3:10—Discussion. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—73. A Matrix-Formulated Direct ClMethod. R. Ahlrichs. 4:00—Discussion. 4:10—74. Multiconfiguration Self Consistent Field and Configuration Interaction Studies of Group II A Chemistry. R. N. Diffenderfer, D. R. Yarkony.

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87

2:00—132. An Analysis of the Preparation of Section D 4:40—Discussion. I 9:00—88. Rotational Rainbow Structure in I Vibrationally Excited Oxygen by Stimulated Na2-Rare Gas Scattering Cross Sections. 7:30—Divisional Social Hour (See Social Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Resonance Raman Pumping. P. B. Kelly, R. K. Bergmann, U. Hefter. Events for details). Catalysis organized by Division of The History B. Miles, H. Rabitz, J. Gelfand. 9:45—89. New Developments in Fitting Laws of Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum 2:00—133. Experimental Test of V-V Rate for Rotationally Inelastic Collisions. D. E. Section B Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64) Coefficients in CO up to V = 20. J. P. Pritchard. ' Martin, D. M. Boscher, D. D. Goffe. 10:30—Coffee Break. Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom E, Lobby Level 2:00—134. FS and Vibrational Quantum 10:50—90. Uses and Abuses of Surprisal WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Symposium on Chemical Kinetics of ComNumber Dependence of the Charge Theory. J. L. Kinsey. bustion—IV joint with Division of Petroleum Section A Transfer Cross Sections for Ar + ( 2 Pj) + N 2 11:35—91. Physical Analysis of Features and Chemistry, Inc. «=* N 2 + (v) + Ar. I. Koyano, K. Tanaka, T. Trends in Cross Sections. L. Eno. Las Vegas, Ballroom D, Lobby Level Kato. T. M. Sloane, Presiding Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry 2:00—135. Mass Effects in Collision-Induced 2:00—75. Kinetics of Combustion Reactions Section C Dissociation of the Cesium Halides. E. K. Symposium on Electron Correlation in Molfrom.Ignition Delay Times. A. Lifshitz. Parks, S. Wexler. ecules—VI 2:45—76. Combustion Diagnostics Research Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion II, Lobby Level 2:00—136. Role of Vibrational Excitations in H. F. Schaefer, Presiding at Sandia National Laboratories. P. L. Poster Session: General—II Condensed Collision Induced Dissociation. M. I. Haftel, Mattern, D. L. Hartley. Phase T. K. Lim. 2:00—115. Electron Pair Concepts in Multi 3:30—Coffee Break. J. Heicklen, Presiding 2:00—137. A Semiclassical Time-Correlation Reference Configuration Wavefunctions. 3:50—77. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Function Approach to Atom-Polyatomic W. Meyer. Combustion Chemical Kinetics. D. R. 9:00—92. Tunneling in Thermal Unimolecular Collisions: Li + -C0 2 and Li + -N 2 0 in the 1 to 2:30—Discussion. Reactions. W. Forst. Crosley. 10 eV Range. E. F. Vilallonga, D. A. 2:40—116. A Symbolic Matrix Direct CI 4:35—78. Laser Diagnostics for Shock Tube 9:00—93. Highly Localized Oscillations in Micha. Treatment of Molecular Correlation. B. Vibrationally Hot SF6. H. B. Levene, D. S. Kinetics Studies. R. K. Hanson. 2:00—138. Adiabatic Transition Matrix ApLiu. Perry. 7:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section proach for Reactive Scattering: Application 3:10—Discussion. 9:00—94. Semiclassical Calculation of A). to H + Hj, and D + H 2 Systems. J. C. Sun, 3:20—Intermission. Scattering in the Quasiperiodic and StoB. H. Choi, Y. P. Hsia, R. T. Poe, K. T. 3:30—117. Very Large Configuration Interchastic Regime. D. W. Noid, W.-K. Liu, and Tang. Section C action Calculations. D. Fox, N. Handy, P. M. L. Koszykowski. 2:00—139. Energy Transfer Involving Highly Saxe, H. Schaefer. 9:00—95. Vibrational Lineshapes of PolyLas Vegas Hilton, Ballroom F, Lobby Level Vibrationally Excited Polyatomic Molecules. 4:00—Discussion. atomic Molecules. M. L. Koszykowski, W. J. R. Barker, M. J. Rossi, J. Pladziewicz. Debye Award Symposium on Picosecond 4:10—118. Electron Correlation Effects on K. Liu, D. W. Noid. 2:00—140. Collisional Relaxation of (BF7)* the Properties of Molecules Incorporating Chemistry 9:00—96. C0 2 Laser Photolysis of Fluoro By Various Third Bodies. L M. Babcock, G. Second-Row Elements. Comparison with W. S. Struve, Presiding Substituted Alkanes. J. T. Wanna, D. C. E. Streit. Results on First-Row Systems. M. M. Tardy. 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—141. Quasiclassical and Wavepacket Francl, W. J. Hehre. 2:05—79. Award Address. (The Peter Debye 9:00—97. Oxidation of Diethylhydroxylamine Studies of Bimolecular and Unimolecular 4:40—Discussion. by' Nitrogen Dioxide. J. Gleim, J. Award in Physical Chemistry sponsored by Reactions of van der Waals Molecules. R. Heicklen. E. I. duPont de Nemours and Company.) Viswanathan, D. L. Thompson, L. M. Section B Predissociation of Haloaromatics. P. F. 9:00—98. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics Raff. of CH 3 0 2 N0 2 . A. Bahta, R. Simonaitis, J. Barbara, D. Huppert, S. D. Rand, P. M. 2:00—142. A Semiclassical Wavepacket Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom E, Lobby Level Heicklen. Rentzepis. Method for the Investigation of Gas-Surface Pure Chemistry Award Symposium on 2:45—80. Time-Resolved CARS Studies of g : 00—99. Possible Transition States in the Inelastic Scattering. L. M. Raff, P. M. Polymerization of Disulfur Dinitride to (SNk. State-Selected Chemistry Excitonic Transitions in Molecular Solids. Agrawal. A. G. Turner. W. C. Lineberger, Presiding D. A. Wiersma. 2:00—143. An I for an I: Slow Vibrational 9:00—100. Long Range Energy Transfer from 3:20—81. Electron Transfer Reactions BeRelaxation Processes in Iodine Picosecond 2:00—Introductory Remarks. Aromatic Hydrocarbons Donors to Ion tween Bonded Donors and Acceptors. T. L. Recombination Studies. D. J. Nesbttt, J. T. 2:05—119. Award Address. (ACS Award in Radical Acceptors. D. S. Rushforth, L. I. Netzel. Hynes. Pure Chemistry sponsored by Alpha Chi Rangel. 3:55—Coffee Break. 2:00—144. Application of Classical Scaling Sigma Fraternity.) Laser Studies of State4:10—82. Time Resolved Studies of Orien- 9:00—101. Synthesis and Homogeneous Theory to Gas-Surface Energy Transfer. A. Selected chemical Dynamics. S. R. Reductions of Cyclooctatetraenes Monotational Motion and Photochemical IsomE. DePristo, A. M. Richard. Leone. substituted with Polyacenes. A. E. Alegria, erization. G. R. Fleming, S. P. Velsko, D. H. 2:00—145. Toward the Development of a 2:45—120. Dynamics and Photochemistry of N. Diaz, W. Thompson, L. Echegoyen. Waldeck. Classical Scaling Theory. A. E. DePristo. Highly Vibrationally Excited Small Mole4:45—83. Picosecond Coherent Excitation of 9:00—102. Use of the Integrated Absorbance cules. C. B. Moore. to Measure Reaction Rates in Nanosecond Section D Large Molecules in Beams. A. H. Zewail. 3:20—121. Flow Tube Studies of Ion-MolePulse Radiolysis. R. H. Schuler. 7:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section cule Reactions. E. E. Ferguson. 9:00—103. Phosphorescence and Flash Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous A). 3:55—Coffee Break. Photolysis of Diaminopyridines. A. C. Testa, Catalysis organized by Division of The History 4:15—122. Energy Requirements and Energy J. Wolleben. of Chemistry joint with Division of Petroleum Section D 9:00—104. Pressure and Temperature Effects Disposal in Simple Exchange Reactions. H. Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64) R. Mayne, J. C. Polanyi. on the Resonance Raman Spectra of Symposium on Thermodynamic Behavior of 4:55—123. Photofragmentation and Energy 0-Carotene. Z. Z. Ho, R. C. Hanson, T. A. Section E Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents organized by Transfer in Low Pressure Gases and Low Moore, S. H. Lin. Division of Industrial and Engineering Chem- 9:00—105. Chemical Kinetics of Biochemical Symposium on Laser Isotope Separation Temperature Matrices. G. W. Flynn. istry {see page 67) cosponsored with Division of Nuclear ChemInformation Transfer. W. C. Gardiner, Jr. istry and Technology (see page 76) 9:00—106. Ionization Potentials and MolecSection C WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A ular Orbital Energies of Phenylalanine and THURSDAY MORNING Section A its Metabolites. K. L. Pfister, L. F. Heuer, J. Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion II, Lobby Level Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom D, Lobby Level L. Meeks. Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion II, Lobby Level Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry 9:00—107. Flash Photolysis-Pulse Radiolysis Poster Session—Molecular Collisions: Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry Symposium on Electron Correlation in MolSpectroscopy. Reactions of Photo-Excited Theory and Experiment on Quantum Number Poster Session—Electron Correlation in Metalloporphyrins with Short-Lived Radiecules—V Dependence—II cals. H. Levanon, P. Neta. Molecules—VII M. Yoshimine, Presiding I. Koyano, Presiding 9:00—108. Asymmetric Photogeneration of H. F. Schaefer III, Presiding Magnesium Octaethylporphyrin Cation in 9:00—84. CASSCF Studies of Near Degen2:00—124. Enhancement of the FluoresVesicular Bilayers. J. F. Smalley, S. W. 9:00—146. MBPT and MCSCF Results for eracy Effects in Molecules: From Cr2 to cence Quenching Cross Section in the Feldberg, S. H. Wool. Flame Radicals. G. F. Adams, R. J. Bartlett, Paranitroaniline. B. O. Roos, C. Nelin, H. Supersonic Jet: Rotationally Cold S0 2 * (A 9:00—109. Proton Magnetic Resonance AsG. D. Purvis, D. R. Yarkony. 1 Agren. A 2 ) Molecules. B. G. MacDonald, E. K. C. signments and Relaxation Parameters in 9:00—147. Theoretical Investigation of 9:30—Discussion. Lee. Cytochrome C Peroxidase. J. D. Satterlee, Conformational Isomerism in the Alicy9:40—85. Determination of Energy Defects 2:00—125. Orientational Effect of P-Orbitals J. E. Erman. clic-Aromatic Molecule 2-(4-Morpholiand Barrier Heights for Chemical Reactions. in Alkali-Mercury Crossed Beam Collisnothio) Benzothiazole. D. Bhaumik, J. E. T. H. Dunning, Jr, L. B. Harding, R. A. 9:00—110. An ESR Study of a And it Radisions. L. Hiiwel, U. Lackschewitz, J. Maier, Mark, E. Riande. cals Produced in 6-AZA-DNA Bases by One Bair. H. Pauly. 9:00—148. Transition States for the H + X2 Electron Loss. M. D. Sevilla, S. Swartz. 10:10—Discussion. 2:00—126. Avoided Crossing Region of the 9:00—111. Bond Homolysis in High Tem: and H + XY Abstraction Reactions. H + F2, + 10:15—Intermission. CsH(X'2 ) Potential Energy Curve. S. C. perature Fluids. S. E. Stein, A. D. Alfieri, D. H + Cl 2 , H + Br2, H + CIF and H + BrF. R. 10:30—86. Potential Energy Surfaces as Yang. A. Robaugh, R. E. Miller. A. Eades, T. H. Dunning, Jr., D. A. Dixon. Studied by the Energy Gradient Method with 2:00—127. Cross-Sections for Rotational 9:00—149. Ab Initio Studies of the CyclobSCF, GVB and CI Wave Functions. K. Mo- 9:00—112. Unimolecular Reaction of Isolated Relaxation and Reorientation of Molecular CF3CN: The Influence of C0 2 Laser Intenutyne Molecules. G. Fitzgerald, H. F. rokuma. Oxygen by Itself and by Rare Gases. M. H. sity on Energy Disposal into CN Degrees of Schaefer III. 11:00—Discussion. Proffitt, R. E. Utter, W. C. Gardiner, Jr. Freedom. H. Reisler, F. Kong, C. Wittig. 9:00—150. Shape Driven Graphical Unitary 11:10—87. Electronic Structure Aspects of 2:00—128. Rotational Energy Transfer and Group Approach An Open-Ended Direct CI Photodissociation. M. Dupuis, W. A. Lester, 9:00—113. Molecular Dynamics and Spectra: Spectroscopy of the Excited Electronic Transient Raman Spectra for a Chemical Method. P. Saxe, N. C. Handy, D. J. Fox, H. Jr. States of Li 2 . R. A. Bernheim, L. P. Gold, T. Reaction. P. H. Berens, K. R. Wilson. F. Schaefer III. 11:40—Discussion. Tipton. 9:00—114. Infrared Photochemistry (3 and 10 9:00—151. Correlation Anisotropy in ir2:00—129. Velocity Dependence of Rotalim) of Ethane. R. L. Woodin, R. B. Hall, A. Systems of Polyenes. G. A. Gallup, J. R. Section B tionally Inelastic Cross Sections in Kaldor. Collins. L&A'2)-X. N. Smith, T. P. Scott, D. E. Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom E, Lobby Level 9:00—152. Targeted Correlation and CalcuPritchard. lations of the Energy Surfaces of Ethylene Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry 2:00—130. Rotational Relaxation Rates of NO + Methylene. G. A. Gallup, J. R. Collins. Symposium on Molecular Collisions: Theory A 2 2(v = 0) by Step-Wise Ionization. A. W. 9:00—153. Electron Correlation Effects on Johnson, A. V. Smith. and Experiment on Quantum Number Dethe Electronic Structure, Geometry and Slide viewing facilities are available 2:00—131. Selection Rules and Quantum pendence-^! Vibrational Frequencies of the Ground State for authors (see page 96 for details) Number Dependence of Rotationally Inof HCCN. K. S. Kim, H. F. Schaefer III. H. Rabitz, Presiding elastic Collisions of Octahedral Molecules 9:00—154. Theoretical Study of the Spinwith Atoms. R. T. Pack. Orbit Coupling in the X 2 I I State of OH. S. I R. Langhoff.

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9:00—155. Moderate Size CI and MCSCF Approaches to the ir - * TT* States of Ethylene and Substituted Ethylenes. K. D. Jordan, K. K. Sunil, R. Shepard 9:00—156. Ab-initio MODPOT/VRDDO/ MERGE Calculations on Large Energetic Nitrocompounds. J. J. Kaufman, P. C. Hariharan. 9:00—157. Electronic States of Triphenylene. W. M. Norman, B. M. Wilson, R. M. Hedges. 9:00—158. Equilibrium Geometries and Vibrational Frequencies for 0 2 H + . G. P. Ralne, H. F. Schaefer, N. C. Handy. 9:00—159. Closed and Open Shell SCF Second Derivatives. P. Saxe, Y. Yamaguchi, H. F. Schaefer III. 9:00—160. Molecular Orbital Study of CH^iF. H. F. Schaefer III, M. A. Vincent. 9:00—161. Electronic States of Spirobifluorene: A Fluorene Double Molecule. B. M. Wilson, W. Norman, R. M. Hedges. 9:00—162. Studies of Hydrogen Clusters Hn+(n = 3,5,7,9) by the Configuration Interaction Gradient Technique. Y. Yamaguchl, J. F. Gaw, H. F. Schaefer III.

Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom E, Lobby Level Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry Symposium on Molecular Collisions: Theory and Experiment on Quantum Number Dependence—III D. Pritchard, Presiding 9:00—163. Vibrational and Rotational Energy Transfer in Highly Vibrational^ Excited Hydrogen Fluoride. F. F. Crlm, G. M. Jursich, R. A. Copeland, D. J. Pearson. 9:45—164. Experimental Measurement of Rotational and Vibrational Energy Transfer as a Function of Vibrational Excitation. J. Getfand. 10:30—Coffee Break. 10:50—165. Quantum Number Variation of Cross Sections for Inelastic and Charge Transfer Processes. A. M. Richard, S. B. Sears, A. E. DePrlsto. 11:35—166. Recent Advances in Collisional Scaling and Factorization. L. H. Beard, D. J. Kouri, D. K. Hoffman.

Section C Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of The History of Chemistry Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64)

Section D Symposium on Laser Isotope Separation cosponsored with Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 76) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion II, Lobby Level Poster Session—General—III Spectroscopy

R. J. S. Kajly, Presiding 2:00—167. Optogalvanic Spectroscopy in Hollow Cathode Discharges with Infrared and Visible Lasers. M. H. Begemann, J. Pfaff, R. J. Saykally. 2:00—168. Pure Rotational Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions by Far-Infrared Laser Magnetic Resonance. K. G. LuMc, D. Ray, R. J. Saykally. 2:00—169. Laser Induced Fluorescence Studies of Molecular Ions in a Radiofrequency Quadripole Ion Trap. C. C. Mariner, A. O'Keefe, B. H. Mahan, R. J. Saykally. 2:00—170. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of NS~ and CS". S. M. Burnett, C. S. Feigerle, W. C. Lineberger. 2:00—171. High Resolution Photodetachment and Autodetachment Spectroscopy. R. D. Mead, P. A. Schulz, W. C. Lineberger. 2:00—172. Studies of Interstellar Molecules by Millimeter Astronomy and Laser Magnetic Resonance. L. M. Zlurys, R. J. Saykally.

2:00—173. Photoionization of Alkali Molecules. K. I. Peterson, P. D. Dao, A. W. Castleman, Jr. 2:00—174. Molecular Beam Photoionization Studies of the Hg2 and HgAr Van der Waals Molecules. J. M. Brom, Jr., S. H. Linn, C. Y. Ng. 2:00—175. Photoionization of a Higher Temperature Vapor-HgCI2. S. H. Urm, J. M. Brom, Jr., W.-B. Tzeng, C. Y. Ng. 2:00—176. Calculation of the Three-Dimensional Vibrational Potential Energy Surface for the Low-Frequency Modes of 1,3-Disilacyclobutene. P. M. Klllough, R. M. Irwin, J. Laane. 2:00—177. Two-Dimensional Vibrational Potential Energy Surface for the PH Inversion and Ring-Puckering of 3-Phospholene. M. A. Harthcock, L. W. Richardson, P. W. Jagodzinski, J. Laane. 2:00—178. Electrochromism of Low Energy Rydberg States for Divalent Cyclic Sulfides. D. D. Altenloh, B. R. Russell. 2:00—179. Electrochromism Study of Diethyl Ether and Ethylene Oxide. L. R. Ashworth, D. D. Altenloh, B. R. Russell. 2:00—180. Magnetic Vibrational Circular Dichroism. T. A. Keiderling. 2:00—181. Two Photon Excitation Spectra of K2PtCI6. T. A. Keiderling, B. A. Kozikowski. 2:00—182. An Extensive Vibration Analysis of Anionic Derivatives of Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE): Raman, IR, IETS, and Quantum Chemical Results. K. W. Hlpps, U. Mazur. 2:00—183. Temperature of Lattice Dependence of the Luminescence of the 1,1,2,3,3-pentacyanopropene anion: A Progress Report. K. W. Hlpps, U. Mazur. 2:00—184. IR Multiple Photon Dissociation of Molecular Ions Prepared by Laser Multiphoton Ionization. D. Sumida, M. Stuke, C. Wittig. 2:00—185. In-situ IR Reflectance Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Species on Metal Electrodes Using either Potential or Polarization Modulation Techniques. J. W. Russell, A. Bewick, J. Overend.

Section B Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom E, Lobby Level Subdivision of Theoretical Chemistry Symposium on Molecular Collisions: Theory and Experiment on Quantum Number Dependence—IV R. T. Pack, Presiding 2:00—186. Energy and Angular Distributions in Inelastic Atom-Polyatomic Collisions. D. A. Mlcha. 2:45—187. Improvements to an Iterative Close Coupling Method and Applications to Inelastic Collisions. L. D. Thomas, M. L. Koszykowski, J. S. Binkley. 3:30—Coffee Break. 3:50—188. Vibrational and Translation^ Energy Dependence in Reactions of rV*". S. L. Anderson, F. A. Houle, T. Turner, O. Dutuit, D. Gerlich, Y. T. Lee. 4:35—189. Reactions of Doubly Vibrationally Excited Molecules. J. G. Pruett, A. Torres-Filho. Section C Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis organized by Division of The History of Chemistry Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64) Section D Symposium on Laser Isotope Separation cosponsored with Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 76)

POLY DIVISION OF POLYMER CHEMISTRY, INC. J. C. Salamone, Chairman S. W. Shalaby, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room T-1, East Hall Symposium on WHco Award Honoring J. K. Stille

F. E. Arnold, Presiding 8:50—Introductory Remarks. F. W. Harris. 9:00—1. Copolymerization of Allyl and Methallyl Substituted Phenols with Maleic Anhydride and Malleimides. B. M. Culbertson, L. K. Post, A. E. Aulabaugh. 9:30—2. Benzylenebenzimidazoles. P. E. Casskty. 10:00—3. Acetylene Containing Aromatic Benzothiazole Resins. T. T. Tsai, F. E. Arnold. 10:30—4. Synthesis and Intramolecular Cyclization of Aromatic Ethynyl-Substituted Polyurethanes. F. W. Harris, S. H. Hong. 11:00—Intermission. 11:50—5. Award Address. (ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry sponsored by Witco Chemical Corporation Foundation). Architectonic Aromatic Polymers. J. K. Stille.

Section B Convention Center, Room T-2, East Hall Symposium on Microdomalns In Polymer Solutions. I. Internal Micelles in Hydrophobic Polyelectrolytes and Block Copolymers P. Dubin, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—6. Microdomalns in Hydrophobic Polyacids. U. P. Strauss. 9:45—7. Hydrophobic Domains of Maleic Acid Copolymers. S. Sugal, K. Nitta, N. Ohno. 10:10—8. Globular Structures of Partially Quaternized Polyamines. M. Vert. 10:35—Intermission. 10:50—9. Ion Distribution and Poly ion Conformation Displayed by Amphiphilic Polyacids in Aqueous and Organic Media. R. Varoqui, E. Pefferkorn. 11:20—10. Studies of Microdomains in Polymer Solutions by Fluorescence Techniques. H. Morawetz, I. Fernandez-Pierola, J. Jachowicz, H.-L. Chen.

Section C Convention Center, Room T-3, East Hall Polymer Science and Engineering Lecture Series 3: Introduction to Conducting Polymers G. B. Street, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—11. Conducting Polymers: A Review of Fundamental Concepts. A. G. MacDlarmld. 10:05—Discussion. 10:25—Intermission. 10:40—12. Conducting Polymers; A General Surveyi G. B. Street. 11:40—Discussion.

9:55—14. Replacement of Chlorine in PVC by Phase Transfer Catalysis Using Potassium Acetate and 18-Crown-6. J. Lewis, M. K. Naqvi, G. S. Park. 10:15—15. Preparation of a Polymer-Supported Protection Group for Aldehydes and Ketones Using a Phase Transfer Catalysed Reaction. P. Hodge, J. Waterhouse. 10:35—16. Chemical Modification of Chloromethylated Polystyrene with Phosphine Oxides Using Phase Transfer Catalysis. T. G. N'Guyen, J. C. Gautier, S. Boileau. 10:55—17. Applications of Phase Transfer Catalysts in Cellulose Modification. W. H. Daly, J. D. Caldwell, K. V. Phung, R. Tang. 11:15—18. Chemical Modification of Chloromethylated Crosslinked Polystyrenes via Phase Transfer Catalysed Wittig Reactions. P. Hodge, B. J. Hunt, E. Khoshdel, J. Waterhouse.

Section E Symposium on Chemical Modification of Polymers organized by Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page 82) Section F Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat Joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 92) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Room T-1, East Hall Symposium on WHco Award Honoring J. K. Stille W. A. Feld, Presiding 2:00—19. High Temperature Resistant PMR Polyimides. W. B. Alston. 2:30—20. An Efficient One-Pot, CopperCatalyzed Coupling of Aryl Iodides and Phenylacetylene. W. A. Feld, J. Schwartzman, M. Soctt, F. L. Hedberg. 3:00—21. Oligomer Engineering For HighSolids Coatings. G. K. Noren. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—22. Poly(p-phenylenebenzobisthiazole). J. F. Wolfe. 4:10—23. Advances in the Synthesis of Poly(p-phenylenebenzobisthiazole) P. D. Sybert, J. F. Wolfe. Section B Convention Center, Room T-2, East Hall Symposium on Microdomalns in Polymer Solutions. I. Internal Micelles in Hydrophobic Polyelectrolytes and Block Copolymers

D. J. Meier, Presiding 2:00—24. Microenvironment of Soluble and Cross-linked Polymers. F. Mikes, P. Strop, J. Labsky. 2:25—25. Micellization and Emulsifying Properties of Hydrophilic-Hydrophobic Block and Graft Copolymers. Y. Gallot, J. Selb, P. Marie, A. Rameau. 2:50—26. Micellization of Poly(Styrene-bethyleneoxide) Block Copolymers. G. Riess, D. Rogez. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—27. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering studies on Microdomains in Block polymer Solutions. T. Hashimoto, M. Shibayama, H. Kawai. 3:55—28. Size and Shape of Microdomains of Block Copolymers. D. J. Meier, D. R. Smith. 4:20—29. Microdomains of ABA Polypeptide Block Copolymers. A. Nakajlma. Section C

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Section D Convention Center, Room T-4, East Hall Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Transfer Catalysis In Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. Joint with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry

J. M. J. Frechet, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. L. J. Manilas. 9:10—13. Polymer Modification via Phase Transfer Catalysis. J. M. J. Frechet.

Convention Center, Room T-3, East Hall Symposium on Conducting Polymers G. B. Street, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—30. Metallic and Semiconducting Covalent Polymers: Polyacetylene, (CH)x, and Its Derivatives. A. G. MacDiarmid, A. J. 2:50—31. Morphology and Crystal Structure of Polyacetylene. F. E. Karasz, J. C. W. Chien, Y. Yamashita, K. Shimamura, J. A. Hirsch.

Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

89

3:35—32. Molecular Structures of Polyacetylene and Its Thermal Chemistry. J. C. W. Chien, F. E. Karasz, J. Capistran, M. Schen. 4:20—33. 13C NMR Study of Doped Polyacetylene. T. C. Clarke, J. C. Scott, C. S. Yannoni. 4:40—34. Thermal Isomerization and Decomposition of Doped and Undoped Polyacetylene. K. Menke, M. Peo, R. J. Schwelzer, S. Roth.

Section D Convention Center, Room T-4, East Hall Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Transfer Catalysis In Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry

F. L. Cook, Presiding 2:00—35. Polymer Synthesis Employing Phase Transfer Catalysis. F. L Cook. R. W. Brooker. 2:45—36. Phase Transfer Free Radical Reactions. Polymerization of Acrylic Monomers. J. K. Rasmussen, H. K. Smith II. 3:05—37. Synthesis of Polyethers by Phase Transfer Catalyzed Polycondensation. T. G. N'Guyen, S. Boileau. 3:25—38. Phase-Transfer Polymerization. 3. Biphasic Polycondensation Between Bisphenolate Anions and 1,6-Dibromohexane in the Presence of Various Phase-Transfer Catalysts. J.-l. Jin, J.-H. Chang. 3:45—39. Use of Phase Transfer Agents in the Synthesis of Group IV B Polyethers and Polythioethers and Antimony (V) Polyamines. C. E. Carraher, Jr., M. D. Naas. 4:05—40. Synthesis of Polyphosphoanhydrides Using Phase Transfer Agents. C. E. Carraher, Jr., R. Linville, H. Blaxall. 4:25—41. Synthesis of UltraHigh Molecular Weight Nylon 4 with Onium Salt and Crown Ether Containing Catalysts. R. Bacskal. 4:45—42. Syntheses of Carbon-Carbon Chain Polymers and Polysulfides by Phase Transfer Catalyzed Polycondensation. Y. Imai, M. Ueda. Section E Symposium on Chemical Modification of Polymers organized by Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page 82)

Section F Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 93) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Room T-1, East Hall Symposium on Polymers In Energy Conservation II. Polymers in Solar Energy I organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry

D. J. Williams, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—43. Polymers in Solar Energy: Applications and Opportunities. W. F. Carroll, P. Schissel. 9:45—44. Transparent Polymeric Gels for Solar Ponds. M. Levy, D. Vofsi. 10:20—45. Salt-Gradient Solar Ponds and Their Liner Requirements. M. Edesess, R. P. Flynn. 10:50—46. Shallow Solar Pond Collector, Evolution Through Polymer Testing and Selection. R. E. Parsons, R. Woodley, J. E. Whitridge. 11:30—47. Flexible Membrane Linings for Salt Gradient Solar Ponds. R. M. Woodley.

Section B Convention Center, Room T-2, East Hall Symposium on Microdomains In Polymer Solutions. II. Interpolymer Aggregation: Soluble Complexes and Gelation

M. Cotts, Presiding 8:30—48. Intermolecular Association and Aggregation. H.-G. Ellas.

90

C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

9:00—49. Microcrystalline Gelation. L. Mandelkern. 9:30—50. Aggregation and Phase Separation in Helical Polypeptides. S. Chakrabarti, W. G. Miller. 10:00—51. Investigation of Association in Dilute Solutions of a Rodlike Polymer by Integrated and Photon Correlation Light Scattering. Y. Einaga, G. C. Berry. 10:25—Intermission. 10:35—52. Association and Complex Formation in Stereoregular PMMA Solutions. G. Rehage, D. Wagner. 11:00—53. Complex Formation Between Complementary Stereoregular Polymers. G. Challa, E. J. Vorenkamp. 11:25—54. Self-Association of Porcine Submaxillary Mucin (PSM) in Aqueous Solution. R. Shogren, A. M. Jamieson, J. Blackwell. 11:45—55. Aggregation Effects in Dilute Solutions of Poly(vinylbutyral). P. M. Cotts, A. C. Ouano.

Section C Convention Center, Room T-3, East Hall Symposium on Conducting Polymers

A. G. MacDiarmid, Presiding 9:00—56. Conducting Polymers: Theoretical Concepts and Experimental Results. A. J. Heeger, A. G. MacDiarmid. 9:45—57. Charged Defect States in Polyacetylene and Polyparaphenylene. J. L. Bredas, R. R. Chance, R. Silbey. 10:25—58. Solitons and Polarons in Polyacetylene. J. P. Albert, C. Jouanin, P. Bernier. 10:45—59. Electron Spin Echo and ENDOR Studies of Polyacetylenes. L. R. Dalton, H. Thomann, Y. Tomkiewicz, N. S. Shiren, T. C. Clarke. 11:15—60. Frequency Dependence of Conductivity: Applications to Conducting Polymers. A. J. Epstein, H. Rommelmann, M. Abkowitz, H. W. Gibson.

Section D Convention Center, Room T-4, East Hall Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Transfer Catalysis In Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry

G. Menacke, Presiding 9:00—61. Properties of Linear and Network Polymers with Pendant Crown Ether and Glyme Ligands. J. Smid. 9:45—62. Ion-Binding Polyesters and Polyamides Containing THF-Rings. J. A. Moore, E. M. Partain, III. 10:05—63. Anionic Activation Studies with Polymeric Crown Ethers in the KoenigsKnorr Reaction. J. Capillon, A. Ricard, C. Quivoron. 10:25—64. Selective Cation Binding by Polymeric Crown Ether. K. Yagi, J. A. Ruiz, M. C. Sanchez, C. Guerrero. 10:45—65. A High-Conversion Synthesis of Divinyl Ethers of Oligooxyethylenes. L. J. Mathias, J. B. Canterberry. 11:05—66. Use of Crown Ether as a Modifier in the Anionic Polymerization and Copolymer ization of Diene. T. C. Cheng. 11:25—67. Phase Transfer Catalyzed Polymerizations V. Halogenated Polyaryloxkjes, Sulfides, and Sulfones: Synthesis, Characterization and Mechanisms. R. Kellman, D. J. Gerbi, J. C. Williams, R. F. Williams, R. B. Bates. Section E Symposium on Chemical Modification of Polymers organized by Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page 83)

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room T-1, East Hall Symposium on Polymers Energy Conservation II. Polymers In Solar Energy II organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry R. D. Deanin, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—68. Ultra-Violet Microscopy of Morphology and Oxidation in Polymers. P. D. Calvert, N. C. Billingham, J. B. Knight, A. Uzuner. 2:50—69. Effects of Photodegradation on the Sorption and Transport of Water in Polymers. C. E. Rogers. 3:25—70. Effect of Deformation on the Photodegradation of Low Density Polyethylene. D. Benachour, C. E. Rogers. 4:00—71. Effects of Thermal, Oxidative and Hydrolytic Degradation on Physical Properties of Solar Collector Sealants. M. A. Mendelsohn, F. W. Navish, Jr., R. M. Luck, F. A. Yeoman. 4:25—72. Photochemical Degradation of Polymeric Coatings on Mirrors as Studied in Situ Using FT-IR Reflection-Absorbance Spectrophotometry. J. D. Webb, P. Schissel, A. W. Czanderna, D. R. Smith, A. R. Chughtai. Section B Convention Center, Gold Room, Lobby Level Special Topics—Poster Session R. M. Ikeda, Presiding 2:00—73. Morphology-Property Relationships in EPDM-Polybutadiene Blends. G. R. Hamed. 2:00—74. Solutions of Aliphatic Polyamides in Antimony Trichloride. S. M. Aharoni. 2:00—75. Thermal and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis of Polycarbonate/Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Blends. Z. G. Gardlund. 2:00—76. Polymer Networks Cross-linked in Strained States in Different Ways. R. L. Carpenter. 2:00—77. Molecular Weight Distributions of Polymers by Rigorous Analysis of Ultracentrifuge Data. P. Colonomos, R. G. Gordon. 2:00—78. An Investigation of the Mechanism of Adhesive Failure of Polydimethylsiloxane Elastomers. L. A. Gauthier, J. R. Falender, B. A. Howell. 2:00—79. Preparation of Poly(P-Oxybenzoate) Single Crystals. J. Tsay, W. Volksen, J. Economy. 2:00—80. Solution Parameters of 12-Arm Polystyrene in MEK from Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS). B. A. Khorramlan, S. S. Stivala. 2:00—81. 13 C NMR Studies of Polymers from 1,1'-Divinyl-Ferrocene. G. C. CorfteM, J. S. Brooks, S. Plimley, A. V. Cunliffe. 2:00—82. Characterization and Performance of Some Partially Hydrolyzed Polyacrylamides. P. A. Argabrkjht, B. L. Phillips, J. S. Rhudy, W. R. Bauer. 2:00—83. Synthesis, Characterization of Processible Preimidized-Naimide Precursors and Their Hot-Melt Polymerization to High Temperature Resistant Laminating Resins. D. Kumar, G. M. Fohlen, J. A. Parker. 3:15—86. On Entanglements. S. M. Aharoni. 3:15—87. Synthesis and Characterization of Model Comb-Branched Polyurethanes. R.' S. Bezwada, S. S. Stivala. 3:15—88. Synthesis and Properties of Novel Conjugated Polymers Via Nuclear coupling. N.-L. Yang, G. Odian, K. P. W. Pemawansa. 3:15—89. Synthesis of Diels-Alder Polymers Via Benzyne Intermediates. J. M. Dineen, E. E. Howell, Jr., A. A. Volpe.

Section F Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 93)

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

3:15—90. Poly(Arylene Ether Sulfones) and Related Materials via a Potassium Carbonate, N-Methyl Pyrrolidone Process. D. K. Mohanty, J. L. Hedrick, K. Gobetz, B. C. Johnson, I. Yilgor, E. Yilgor, R. Yang, J. E. McGrath. 3:15—91. Poly(Urethane-Siloxane) Copolymers: I. Reaction Kinetics of Model Systems. I. Yilgor, G. L. Wilkes, J. E. McGrath. 3:15—92. Intraresin Reactions of a,oo-A\kanediamines Sulfochlorinated Copoly(styrenedivinylbenzene). Polymer Supported Reagents. D. W. Emerson, D. Gaj, C. Grigorian, J. E. Turek. 3:15—93. Laser Initiated Polymerization of Charge Transfer Monomer Systems: Copolymerization of Maleic Anhydride with Styrene, Vinyltoluene and t-Butylstyrene. R. K. Sadhir, J. D. B. Smith, P. M. Castle. 3:15—94. Copolymerization of Vinyl Acetate with Ethyl a-Cyanocinnamate. G. Kharas, D. H. Kohn. 3:15—95. Stereochemistry of Anionic Oligomerization and Polymerization of 2-<2Pyridyl)- and 2-(4-Pyridyl) Propene. T. E. Hogen-Esch, K. Hashimoto, C. F. Tien, R. A. Smith. 3:15—96. Synthesis and Polymerization of Styrene-Type Monomers Containing Phenyl-Tin-Alkyl Groups. S. S. Al-Dlab, A. M. Barcelon, J. E. Mark, H. Zimmer. 3:15—97. Dipiperidylethane as a Complexing Agent in the Anionic Polymerization of Butadiene and Isoprene. D. J. Wrosfold, S. Bywater, F. Schue. 3:15—98. Synthesis of ABA Triblock Copolymers Containing Electrono-Oonor or Electrono-Acceptor Pendant Groups in A Blocks. V. Percec. Section C Convention Center, Room T-3, East Hall Symposium on Conducting Polymers K. J . Wynne, Presiding 2:00—99. Chemical Modification of (CH)X by Ion Implantation. D. C. Weber, P. Brant, H. A. Resing. 2:20—100. Optical Studies of Pure and Br2 Doped (CD)* Films. M. Tanaka, H. Fujimoto. H. Yasuda, J. Tanaka. 2:40—101. Infrared Study of Doped Polyacetylene. T. C. Clarke, J. F. Rabolt, G. B. Street. 3:00—102. Lithium Doping of Polyacetylene, (CH)x. P. Bernier, F. Rachdi, E. Faulques, S. Lefrant, F. Schue. 3:20—103. EPR and Raman Spectroscopic Studies of FeCI3 and AICI3 Doped (CH)*. A. Pron, D. Billaud, P. Bernier, S. Lefrant. 3:40—104. Electrical Properties of Polyacetylene Doped with Dihydrogenhexachloroiridate. M. Rubner, J. Georger, Jr., E. Sichel. 4:00—105. Reactions of Polyacetylene with Trimethyloxonium Hexachloroantimonate. Covalent Doping of (CH^. P. Brant, D. C. Weber, R. Mowery, R. Nowak. 4:20—106. Electrically Conductive Polymer Composites. Polyerization of Acetylene in Polyethylene. G. E. Wnek, M. E. Galvin.

Section D Convention Center, Room T-4, East Hall Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Transfer Catalysis in Polymer Chemistry organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. joint with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry

W. T. Ford, Presiding 2:00—107. Mechanisms of Phase Transfer Catalysis by Insoluble Polymer-Bound Onium Ions. W. T. Ford. 2:45—108. Polymer-Supported Optically Active Phase Transfer Catalysts. D. C. Sherrington, J. Kelly. 3:05—109. Chiral Polymeric Onium Salts in Heterophase Reactions. E. Chiellini, S. D'Antone, R. Solaro. 3:25—110. Asymmetric Selection by Optically Active Polymers in Phase-Transfer System. Y. Kawakami, Y. Yamashita. 3:45—111. Catalysis of the Reaction of 1Bromooctane with Aqueous Sodium Cyanide by Macroporous Polystyrene-Bound Benzyltri-n-butylphosphonium Ions. W. T. Ford, J. Lee, M. Tomoi. 4:05—112. Gas-Phase Synthesis Promoted by Supported Phase-Transfer Catalysts. P. Tundo, P. Venturello, E. Angeletti.

Section E Symposium on Chemical Modification of Polymers organized by Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page 83) Section F Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Potymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 93) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms S-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Potymers In Energy Conservation H. Polymers In Solar Energy III organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry R. O. Loutfy, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—113. Novel Diagnostic Techniques for Early Detection of Photooxldation in Polymer. R. H. Liang, C. Dao, A. Gupta. 9:35—114. Photodegradation of Poly(n-Butyl Acrylate). H. R. Dickinson, C. E. Rogers, R. Simha. 10:05—115. Photochemical Stability of Ultraviolet Screening Transparent Acrylic Copolymers of [2(2-hydroxy 5-vinylphenyl)2H benzotriazote]. A. Gupta, G. W. Scott, D. Kliger, O. Vogl. 10:45—116. Photophysics of Films of Poly(2-Vinylnaphthalene) Doped with Pyrene and TCNB. N. Kim, S. E. Webber. 11:20—117. A New Approach to the Prediction of Performance of Plastics in Solar Applications. J. E. Gulllet, A. C. Somersall, J. W. Gordon. Section B Convention Center, Room T-2, East Hall Symposium on Microdomalns In Polymer Solutions. III. Ordered Polymer-Llgand

Complexes. G. Kresheck, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—118. Unspecific Cooperative Association of Linear Potymers and Large Ligands. G. Schwarz, F. Watanabe. 9:50—119. Fluorescence Probe Studies of the Aggregation State of Sodium Dodecylsulfate in Aqueous Solutions of Polyoxyethyleneglycol and Poly-N-Vinylpyrrolidone. R. Zana, J. Lang, P. Lianos. 10:25—120. Viscometric Investigation of Complexes Between Polyethyleneoxide and Surfactant Micelles. R. Nagarajan, B. Kalpakci. 10:50—Intermission. 11:05—121. Complexation of Poly(vinyl-2 pyridine) with Cationic Surfactant and with Weak Poly(carboxylic acids). G. Muller, C. LeBuchoux. 11:30—122. Tubklimetric Investigation of Mixed Micelle-Polyelectrolyte Interactions. R. Oteri, P. L. Dubin.

Section C Convention Center, Rooms S-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Conducting Potymers T. J . Marks, Presiding 9:00—123. 13 C NMR Shift Tensors for Polyacetylene and Graphite. H. A. Resing, D. C. Weber, M. Anderson, G. R. Miller, M. Moran, C. F. Poranski, Jr., L. Mattix. 9:20—124. Electron Spin Resonance Studies of Doped and Undoped Polyphenylacetylene. E. T. Kang, A. Langnec, P. Ehrllch. 9:40—125. Calculations of Electronic Band Structures for Some Rigid Benzobisoxazole and Benzobisthiazole Polymers. D. Bhaumik, J. E. Mark. 10:00—126. AsF3-Enhanced Doping Rates for Poly(p-Phenylene Sulfide). J. E. Frommer, R. L. Elsenbaumer, H. Eckhardt, L. W. Schacklette, R. R. Chance. 10:20—127. Is Planarity Important for High Conductivity Upon Doping in Polymeric Systems? S. K. Tripathy, D. Kitchen, M. A. Druy.

10:40—128. Effects of Disorder on Transpolyacetylene. C. T. White, M. L. Elert. 11:00—129. Structural Disorder in Polyacetylene Upon Doping: Dynamical and Spectroscopic Calculations. G. Zerbi, G. Zannoni. 11:20—130. Tight-Binding Studies on Polyacetylene. M. L. Elbert, C. T. White. 11:40—131. Effect of Orientation on Conductivity in Crystalline and Amorphous Organic Conductors. D. B. Cotts.

2:00—144. Complexes of Cationic Polymers and Anionic Surfactants. E. D. Goddard, P. S. Leung. 2:25—145. Cooperative Interactions of Anionic Dyes with Imidazole-Containing Section D Polymers, J. S. Tan, T. M. Handel. 2:50—146. "Thermometry and Potentiometric Convention Center, Room T-4, East Hall Characterization of Polymer-Surfactant Symposium on Crown Ethers and Phase Interactions. G. C. Kresheck. Transfer Catalysis in Polymer Chemistry 3:15—Intermission. organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, 3:30—147. Induced Ordered Conformation of Inc. joint with Division of Organic Coatings and Poly(L-Lysine) and its Homologs in Anionic Plastics Chemistry Surfactant Solutions. J. T. Yang. 3:55—148. Structural Complexes of Cationic Y. Kawakami, Presiding Polysoaps and Phospholipids. L. Ter-Min9:00—132. Polymers with Backbone Crown asslan-Sarga. Ethers and Polyoxyethylene as a Phase 4:20—149. High-Sensitivity Differential Transfer Catalyst. L. J. Mathias. Scanning Calorimetry of Polymer-Phos9:45—133. Photo-induced Nucleophilic pholipid Mixtures. A. B. Turek, D. A. TirSubstitution of Anisole in the Presence of rell. Polyethylene Glycol (PEG): Usefulness of 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (See Section PEG on Photochemical Reactions. N. SuA). zuki, Y. Ayaguchi, K. Shimazu, T. Ito, Y. Izawa. Section C 10:10—134. Anionic Polymerization with Complex Bases and Derivatives. P. CauConvention Center, Rooms S-2 & 4, East bere, S. Raynal, G. Ndebeka, S. Lecolier. Hall 10:30—135. Polyethylene Glycols as Oligomeric Host Solvents: Applications to Symposium on Conducting Polymers Oxidation and Reduction Reactions. E. R. H. Baughman, Presiding Santaniello, A. Manzocchi, P. Ferra2:00—150. Preparation and Characterization boschi. of Neutral and Oxidized Polypyrrole Film. 10:50—136. Substituted Polyethylene Glycols G. B. Street, T. C. Clarke, M. Krounbi, P. as Soluble, Recoverable Phase-Transfer Pfluger, J. F. Rabolt, R. H. Geiss. Catalysts. J. M. Harris, N. H. Hundley. T. G. 2:45—151. Electron Spin Resonance and Shannon, E. C. Struck. Carbon-13 NMR Studies of Polypyrrole. J. C. Scott, P. Pfluger, T. C. Clarke, G. B. Section E Street. 3:05—152. Some Chemical and Electronic Symposium on Chemical Modification of Structure of Polypyrrole. W. R. Salaneck, Polymers organized by Division of Organic R. Erlandsson, J. Prejza, I. Lundstrom, C. B. Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page Duke, W. K. Ford. 83) 3:25—153. Characterization of Polypyrrole Films by X-Ray Photoemission SpectrosSection F copy (XPS). P. Pfluger, G. B. Street. 3:45—154. Cofacially Linked MetallomaSymposium on Initiation of Polymerization crocyclic Conductive Polymers. Halogen and Catalytic Aspects of Potymers organized Dopant Level and Macromolecule Archiby the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with tecture, Electronic Structure, and Charge Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, DiviTransport. B. N. Diel, T. Inabe, J. W. Lyding, sions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, OrK. F. Schoch, Jr., C. R. Kannewurf, T. J. ganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rub* Marks. .ber. Inc. (see page 93) 4:30—155. Synthesis and Properties of Conducting Bridged Macrocyclic Metal WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Complexes. M. Hanack, A. Datz, K. Fischer, W. Kobel, J. Koch, J. Metz, M. Section A Mezger, O. Schneider. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Section Convention Center, Rooms S-1 & 3, East A). Hall Symposium on Potymers in Energy Conservation II. Potymers In Solar Energy IV organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry

R. D. Deanin, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—137. Economics of Solar Heating Systems. J. W. Andrews. 2:30—138. Vacuum Lamination of Photovoltaic Modules. D. R. Burger, E. F. Cuddihy. 3:00—139. Review of Polymer Usage in Development of Prototype Troughs. N. H. Clark, R. Champion, S. B. Martin. 3:15—140. Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for Low-Cost, Terrestrial Photovoltaic Modules. E. F. Cuddlhy, C. Coulbert, P. Willis, B. Baum, A. Garcia, C. Minning. 3:45—141. Reactivity of Polymers with Mirror Materials. S. K. Brauman, D. B. MacBlane, F. R. Mayo. 4:10—142. Adhesives Used in Reflector Modules of Troughs—Effects of Environmental Stress. N. H. Clark, D. Clements, V. Grasso. 4:30—143. Degradation and Outgassing of Polymeric Sealants and Plastics and Their Effects on Solar Collector Efficiency. R. M. Luck, M. A. Mendelsohn. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details).

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

Section B

Section B I Convention Center, Room T-2, East Hall Symposium on Microdomalns in Polymer Solutions. III. Ordered Polymer-Ligand Complexes D. A. Tirrell, Presiding

Section D Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 93)

Convention Center, Room T-2, East Hall Symposium on Microdomalns in Polymer Solutions. IV. Ionic Polymer Systems J . Tan, A. Eisenberg, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—160. Relaxation Behavior of Metal Sulfonate EPDMs in a High Viscosity Petroleum Hydrocarbon Solvent. P. K. Agarwal, R. D. Lundberg. 9:00—161. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Concentrated Solutions of Carboxylated Styrene lonomers in a Nonpoiar Solvent. C. G. Bazuln, A. Eisenberg. 9:20—162. Solution Behavior of Sulfo EPDM in Hydrocarbon Solvents. R. D. Lundberg, P. K. Agarwal. 9:45—Intermission. 10:00—163. Intermacroion Ordering in Dilute Solutions of Polyelectrolytes. N. Ise. 10:30—164. Electron Transfer Process in the Domain Formed by Intermacromolecular Complexes. E. Tsuchida, H. Ohno. 10:50—165. Effect of Polyelectrolytes on the Rate of Some Ligand-Metal Ion Reactions. C. Tondre, N. Sbiti. 11:10—166. Viscosity of Concentrated Solutions of Xanthan in Water: Absence of a Liquid Crystal Transition. A. M. Jamieson. 11:30—167. Interpretation of the Chain Length Dependence of the Unperturbed Dimensions of The Cellulose and Amylose Tricarbinilates in Terms of a One-dimensional Order-Disorder Transition. B. Hsu, C. A. McWherter, D. A. Brant. 11:55—Concluding Remarks. P. Dubin. Section C Convention Center, Rooms S-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Conducting Polymers M. Hanack, Presiding 9:00—168. Resistiyity of Doped Phthalocyanines to 6.5 GPA. A. W. Webb, R. S. Nohr, D. C. Weber, P. Brant. 9:20—169. Stable, Conducting BF 4 _ and PF6~ Doped Fluorometalphthalocyanines. R. S. Nohr, P. Brant, D. Weber, K. J. Wynne. 9:40—170. Conducting Polymers-Synthesis, Properties, and Device Potential. R. H. Baughman, R. R. Chance, E. Eckhardt. R. L. Elsenbaumer, J. E. Frommer, D. M. Ivory, G. G. Miller, A. Preziosi, L. W. Shacklette. 10:20—171. Organic Batteries Based on Poly(p-Phenylene). R. L. Elsenbaumer, L. W. Schacklette, J. M. Sowa, R. R. Chance, D. M. Ivory, G. G. Miller, R. H. Baughman. 10:40—172. Intrinsicially Conductive Polymers: Potential Commercial Applications. J. R. Ellis, R. S. Schotland. 11:00—173. Photoelectrochemical Studies of Polypyrrole-Coated Small-Bandgap nType Semiconductors. K. Honda, A. J. Frank. 11:20—174. Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on Polypyrrole Coated n-Si Electrodes. T. Skotheim. 11:40—175. Photovoltaic Devices Involving Organic Polymers. J. Kanicki. Section D

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms S-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Polymers in Energy Conservation II. Polymers in Solar Energy V organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry P. Schissel, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—156. Photovoltaic Properties of Polymeric Metallophthalocyanine Coatings. R. O. Loutfy, C. K. Hsiao. 9:50—157. Novel Method for Concentrating Solar Energy by Using Polymer-Dye Systems. A. H. Zewail. 10:35—158. Development of a Polyacrylonitrile-Based Photovoltaic Device. P. D. Metz, H. Teoh, W. G. Wilhelm. 11:00—159. Electrochemistry of Polyacetylene, (CH)X: Lightweight Rechargeable Batteries Using (CH)X as the Cathodeand/or Anode-Active Material. A. G. MacDiarmld, A. J. Heeger.

Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Rubber, Inc. (see page 93) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Convention Center, Rooms S-1 & 3, East Hall Symposium on Polymers in Energy Conservation II. Polymers in Solar Energy VI organized by Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry C. G. Gebelein, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—176. Plastic Pipe Requirements for Ground Coupled Heat Pumps. P. D. Metz.

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2:30—177. Use of Polymer Film and Laminate Technology for Low Cost Solar Energy Collectors. W. G. Wllhelm. 2:55—178. Protective Coatings and Sealants for Solar Applications. K. B. Wischmann. 3:20—179. Encapsulate Masterial Requirements for Photovoltaic Modules. K. J. Lewis. 3:45—180. Encapsulant Degradation in Photovoltaic Modules. C. A. Megerle, K. J. Lewis. 4:10—181. Optical, Mechanical and Environmental Testing of Solar Collector Plastic Films. M. J. Berry, H. W. Drusch.

10:35—Intermission. 10:50—4. Research and Development Problems (and Opportunities) in Small Companies. L. V. Gallacher. 11:20—5. Marketing Research for Profitable Small Business Operations. R. C. Kidder. 11:50—Panel Discussion.

RUBB

Section B

RUBBER DIVISION, INC. H. J. Herzlich, Chairman E. R. Sourwine, Secretary

Section B Convention Center, Room T-2, East Hall Special Topics R. M. Ikeda,

Presiding

2:00—182. Effects of Protonation on the Conformational Characteristics and Geometry of the Rod-Like Polybenzobisoxazole (PBO) Polymers: A CNDO/2 Study. W. J. Welsh, J. E. Mark. 2:20—183. CNDO/2 Studies on Nonplanar Conformations within Some cis and trans Polybenzobisoxazoles and Polybenzobishthiazoles. W. J. Welsh, J. E. Mark. 2:40—184. Molecular Structure of Fatty Acids in Ordered and Disordered Phases: A Spectroscopic Study. G. Zerbi, Q. Minor i. 3:00—185. Nematic and Cholesteric Thermotropic Polyesters with Azoxybenzene Mesogenic Units and Flexible Spacers in the Main Chain. A. Bkimstein, S. Vilasagar, S. Ponrathnam, S. Clough, G. Maret, R. Blumstein. 3:20—186. Radiation Chemistry of Block Copolymers of Butadiene and Styrene II. Crosslink Formation as a Function of Styrene Content. R. Basheer, M. Dole. 3:40—187. Entanglement Networks of 1,2Polybutadiene Cross-linked in States of Strain Using CKF Parameters. Does the 2nd State of Ease Phenomenon Really Exist? R. L. Carpenter. 4:00—188. Light Scattering Studies of Semidilute Polymer Solutions. D. B. Cotts. 4:20—189. Thermodynamic Influences on the Rheological Behavior of Moderately Concentrated Solutions of Polystyrene. M. Ballauff, H. Kramer, B. A. Wolf.

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 92)

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 93)

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 93)

THURSDAY MORNING Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 93)

PRFR DIVISION OF PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS D. Chamot, Chairman M. W. Wadley, Secretary

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Convention Center, Room P-2, East Hall Symposium on Education for a Professional Life joint with Council Committee on Professional Relations E. N. Garcia, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—1. A Career Development Course for the Chemist. D. J. Runser. 2:40—2. Some Aspects of Professional Employment Agreements H. M. Peters, H. Levy. 3:10—Intermission. 3:15—3. Education For a Safe Professional Life. J. A. Young, H. H. Fawcett. 3:45—4. Learning To Live With Our Chemicals. J. Y. Tong. 4:15—Concluding Remarks. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting. 6:15—Divisional Wine and Cheese Reception (see Social Events, ticket 112).

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MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Convention Center, Room L-3, East Hall Symposium on Opportunities for Chemical Entrepreneurs K. W. Greenlee, Presiding 2:00—6. SBA Programs and Resources Can Enhance Opportunities. M. Papile, D. Huston 2:30—7. CALSEC Consultants: Opportunities for Retired Chemists and Engineers. A. C. Nixon. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—8. Financial Implications of Management Decisions—The Old Rules Don't Apply Anymore. R. Schechter, B. Petersen. Section B Symposium on the Marketing/R&D Interface organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 65)

TUESDAY MORNING Convention Center, Room L-3, East Hall Symposium on the New Tax Law and Its Impact on Small Chemical Businesses J. H. Obermayer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—9. Changes in the Depreciation Rules and Credits Related to Tangible Assets. D. Offer. 9:35—10. Changes in the Rules Related to Real Property. T. L. Lloyd. 10:05—Intermission. 10:20—11. New Tax Credit for Research & Experimentation, Some Guidelines for Its Effective Use. J. H. Obermayer. 10:50—12. Incentive Stock Options and Other Business Related Provisions of the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981. R. Chullck. 11:20—Panel Discussion. 12:00—Divisional Luncheon (see Social Events, ticket 108). TUESDAY

AFTERNOON

Convention Center, Room L-3, East Hall Symposium on True Stories of Small Chemical Businesses—Some Gambles Which Paid Off organized by Division of Small Chemical Businesses joint with Division of The History of Chemistry

DIVISION OF SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESSES P. K. Garetson, Chairman J. E. McClurg, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Symposium on the Marketing/R&D Interface organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 64)

M. E. Strem,

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Typical Strategic Errors of Smaller Companies. R. J. Polacek. 9:35—2. Accounting and Profits. E. A. Fike. 10:05—3. Typical Errors in the Recruitment of Senior to Middle Management Talent. C. J. Ballos.

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: I. Some General Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Board Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 67) Section B Symposium on Marketing Chemicals through Distributors organized by Division of Chemical Marketing and Economics (see page 55) WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: II. Specific Effects on Domestic Industry organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Division of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Board Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 67) THURSDAY

MORNING

Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: III. Domestic and International Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Board Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 68) THURSDAY

AFTERNOON

Symposium on TSCA Impacts on Society and Chemical Industry: IV. Selected Societal Effects organized by Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry joint with Divisions of Chemical Information (Chemistry and the Law Subdivision), Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Board Committee on Corporation Associates (see page 68)

MACROMOLECULAR SECRETARIAT E. J. Soltes, General Secretary R. S. Graff, Secretary Elect F. E. Bailey, Jr., O. Vogl, Symposium General Chairmen

Presiding

2:00—13. Story of Strem Chemicals Including the Gamble of 7 7 . M. E. Strem. 2:30—14. Platina Laboratories—A Case History of a Small Chemical Company. J. R. Grasso.

Section A

Convention Center, Room L-3, East Hall Symposium on Typical Errors of Smaller Companies R. J . Polacek, Presiding

3:00—15. Story of Synthatron Corp. M. Prince. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—16. Story of Arapahoe Chemicals Inc. R. C. Waugh. 4:15—17. Parish Chemical 1972-1982. A Decade of Metamorphosis. W. Parish. 4:45—Panel Discussion. 5:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Social Events for details).

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or c o m m i t t e e meetings

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Convention Center, Rooms S-2 & 4, East Hall Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divisions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc.

Plenary Session: F. E. Bailey, Jr., O. Vogl, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. New Syntheses of Functional and Sequential Polymers by Exploiting Knowledge of the Mechanism of Initiation. J. P. Kennedy.

10:00—2. Polymeric Catalysis. C. G. Overberger, R. J. Schiavone, R. Tomko. 10:55—3. Initiation Reactions with Activated Monomer and/or Nucleophile in Ionic Polymerization. T. Tsuruta.

Divisional Sessions: F. E. Bailey, Jr., O. Vogl, Presiding 11:50—4. Muonium as a Hydrogen-like Probe to Study Monomer Initiation Kinetics. J. M. Stadlbauer, B. W. Ng, Y. Ito. Y. C. Jean, D. C. Walker.

E. J. Vandenberg, Presiding 2:00—5. Electron Transfer Processes in Polymer Chemistry. M. Szwarc. 2:45—6. Initiation of Polymerization with High Energy Radiation. V. Stannett, J. Silverman. 3:15—7. Mechanisms of Photochemically Initiated Polymerization of Epoxides. A. Ledwith. 3:50—8. Homogeneous Lanthanide Complexes as Polymerization and Oligomerization Catalysts: A Mechanistic Study. P. L. Watson. 4:25—9. Temperature and Dilution Effects in the Radical Polymerization of Maleic Anhydride and Norbornene Derivatives. N. G. Gaylord.

8:35—10. Catalysis by Macroions and Polymer Latex Particles. N. Ise. 9:15—11. Catalytic Behavior of the Metal Complex Attached to Poly(styrene) Beads with Spacer Group. E. Tsuchlda, H. Nishkte. 9:45—12. Study of the Esterolytic Reactions of Active Esters Using Heterogeneous Polymeric Catalysts Containing Imidazole Groups. C. G. Overberger, B-D. Kwon. 10:15—13. Catalytic Effects of Micellar Poly(3-alkyl 1-vinyl-imidazolam) Salts on the Hydrolysis of Phenyl Esters. S. C. Israel, K. I. Papathomas, J. C. Salamone. 10:45—14. Epitaxial Polymerization as a Tool for Molecular Engineering. J. B. Lando, E. Baer, S. Rickert, H. Nae, S. Ching. 11:15—15. Polymerization and Surface Reactions of Mixed Monolayers and Liposomes. R. Biischl, Th. FokJa, B. Hupfer, H. Ringsdorf. 11:45—16. Chiral Surfaces and Surface Recognition of Polymeric Mono and Double Layers. H. Bader, H. Ringsdorf.

M. J. Bowden, Presiding

1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—17. Friedel-Crafts Type Initiators: Cationic Polymerization of para-substituted a-Methyl Styrenes. R. W. Lenz, J. M. Jonte. 2:25—18. Ring Opening Polymerization: Make the Initiator Work for You. P. DreyTUESDAY MORNING AND fuss. AFTERNOON 2:50—19. Initiation Considerations in Formation of Poly(2-Methyl-1-Pentene SulConvention Center, Rooms S-2 & 4, East fone). M. J. Bowden, A. E. Novembre. Hall 3:15—20. Rational Design of Catalysts with Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization Interacting Supports. G. L. Baker, S. J. and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized Fritschel, J. K. Stille. by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with 3:40—21. Initiation of Organosiloxane RingCellulose, Paper and Textile Division, DiviOpening Polymerization. J. E. McGrath, J. sions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, OrS. Riffle, A. K. Banthia, I. Yilgdr. ganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly- 4:05—22. Studies of Cationic Photoinitiation Efficiency. L. Gatechair, S. P. Pappas. mer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. 4:30—23. Activation of the Phillips PolyA. Blumstein, Presiding merization Catalyst, I. Influence of Silanoi 8:30—Introductory Remarks. Population M. McDaniel, M. B. Welch.

2:05—30. Factors Affecting the Isomeric Chain Unit Structure in Organolithium Polymerization of Butadiene and Isoprene. Convention Center, Room T-1, East Hall M. Morton, J. R. Rupert. 2:40—31. Viscosity and Aggregation of AlkSymposium on Initiation of Polymerization yllithium-lnitiated Polymers. H. L. Hsieh, A. and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized G. Kitchen. by the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divi- 3:15—32. Nature of Stereochemical Control in Metal Catalyzed Butadiene Polymerizasions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly- tion. L. M. Stephenson, C. A. Kovac. 3:50—33. Catalytic Control of Architecture mer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. and Properties of Butadiene Block CoJ . C. Arthur, Jr., Presiding polymers. Ph. Teyssie, R. Fayt, J. Heuschen, R. Jerome, D. Petit. 9:00—24. Novel Additives for Enhancing UV 4:25—34. Synthesis of Block Sequences by and Radiation Grafting of Monomers to Radical Polymerization. W. Heitz, M. LatPolymers and the Use of These Copolymers tekamp, Chr. Oppenheimer. as Ion Exchange Resins. C. H. Ang, J. L. Garnett, R. Levot, M. A. Long. 9:30—25. Initiation of Polymerization InTHURSDAY MORNING volving Polysaccharides and Radio Frequency Cold Plasmas. O. Hlnojosa, T. L. Convention Center, Room T-1, East Hall Ward, R. R. Benerito. Symposium on Initiation of Polymerization 10:00—26. Flame-Resistant Cotton Fiber by and Catalytic Aspects of Polymers organized Grafting with Acrylamide and bis(betaby the Macromolecular Secretariat joint with chloroethyl) Vinylphosphonate. Y. NakaCellulose, Paper and Textile Division, Divimura, M. Shimada. sions of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Or10:30—27. Photo-induced Grafting of Monoganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Polymers on Pre-Wetted Fiber Substrates. H. L mer Chemistry, Inc., Rubber, Inc. R. M. Ottenbrite, Presiding 11:00—28. Mechanochemically Initiated WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

Copolymerization Reactions in Cotton Cellulose. D. N-S. Hon. 11:30—29. Radiation Initiation of In-Situ Polymerization in Leather. P. R. Buechler, H. A. Gruber, E. Harris, Jr., S. H. Feairheller.

J. Lai, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 96 for details)

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—35. Initiator-Accelerator Systems for Dental Applications. G. M. Brauer. 9:40—36. Synthesis of Biodegradable Polymers for Biomedical Utilization. J. Heller. 10:15—37. Biodegradability of Poly(£-Caprolactone) and Its Copolymers. A.Schlndler, C. G. Pitt. 10:50—38. 7-lrradiatton Graft Polymerization of N-Vinylpyrrolidone on Polymethylmethacrylate: Modification of Intraocular Lens Surface Properties. E. P. Goldberg, J. E. Sheets, M. Yalon, S. Reich. 11:25-39. Radiation Induced Polymerization Reactions for Biomedical Application. G. R. Hattery, V. D. McGlnniss. 12:00—Concluding Remarks. F. E. Bailey, Jr., O. Vogl.

-POLYMER DIVISION SHORT COURSE - ! A Free Short Course will be offered to registrants at the Las Vegas ACS National Meeting as part of the Polymer Division technical program. • • •

MARCH 29, 1982 Introduction to Conducting Polymers by Bryan Street IBM, San Jose Research Laboratories and Alan MacDiarmid University of Philadelphia (Followed by a full symposium on Electroconducting Polymers See final program for details.) This Course Is Supported by the Industrial Sponsors of The Polymer Division Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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General Program

LAS VEGAS* *

REGISTRATION

Persons planning to attend the Las Vegas meeting are encouraged to register in advance, using the form on page 116. A separate form must be provided for each registrant, including guests. Photocopies are acceptable. As an incentive to advance registration, appreciable discounted fees are in effect. The current scale of fees for registration is shown at right. Either payment in full or authorization to charge to a credit card (MasterCard, VISA, Access, or Barclaycard only) must accompany your order. Purchase orders cannot be honored. The deadline for advance registration is March 8. Registrations received after that date will be returned. Mail completed material 94

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

with payment to: Department of Meetings & Divisional Activities, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Please allow at least three weeks to process your request. The meeting badge will be mailed to the address shown on the registration form. If a registrant's affiliation and address are not available, please provide a home address. Note: The number on your badge is for your use as you tour the chemical exposition. Advance registrants' cards will be posted in the visible file in the ACS registration area, Las Vegas Convention Center, Rotunda lobby. No check-in prior to attendance at technical sessions will be required. However, copies of the booklet program will be available in the registration area. Please note on your registration form where you will be staying, so that in the event of an emergency, the proper information can be relayed. If the information is not known prior to departure for the meeting, please come to the Las Vegas Convention Center, locate your card in the al-

Classification of registrants

MEMBERS ACS member or national affiliate Emeritus member Student member or affiliate, undergraduate or graduate VISITORS Non-U.S. resident or nonchemical scientist or chemical technician Family of registrant

NONMEMBERS U.S. resident chemist or chemical engineer Student, undergraduate or graduate ONE-DAY SESSION Regular Student

Fees Advance On site

$75

$85

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1 The Las Vegas ACS meeting offers attendees a variety of special programs, tours and plant trips, short courses, and workshops in addition to the technical program. A reception and dinner honoring recipients of 1982 ACS awards will be held Monday, March 29. A general meeting will follow at which Bryce Crawford Jr. will give his Priestly Medal address. Other events Include the ACS mixer

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Tuesday, March 30; the presidential lecture on science policy and funding for scientific research Tuesday, March 30; and showings of "The Stellar Thread," the ACS planetarium show about DNA, on Tuesday and Wednesday, March 30 and 3 1 . A chemical exposition will be held from Monday, March 29, through Thursday, April 1 . An employment clearinghouse will be available to ACS members and student affiliates.

istrants ordering abstracts, to be ex- Activities, ACS, 1155—16th St., changed for books in the registration N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Use area. Orders for abstracts only should the official housing form shown on On-Site Registration. Registration fa- be sent to Special Issues Sales, ACS, age 98. Deadline for receipt of cilities at the meeting will be located 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, ousing requests is March 5. in the Las Vegas Convention Center, D.C. 20036, or call toll free 1-800Reservations received after the deadline cannot be processed and will Rotunda lobby. Hours for registration 424-6747. be returned. Reservations will be are: Sunday, March 28, 3 PM to 8 PM; and from 8 AM to 4 PM, Mon- Refunds. Requests for refunds for confirmed directly to the individuals, day, March 29, through Thursday, registration will be honored if re- by ACS, indicating the hotel assigned ceived, together with the return of the and a guaranteed rate. Please allow at April 1. badge and a copy of the receipt, by least three weeks for processing your One-Day-Session Tickets. $45 in ad- March 12. No refunds will be hon- request. If registrants are sharing a twin or double-bedded room, use only vance; $50 on site. Fill in the appro- ored after that date. one form listing both names. Incompriate information on the advance plete information on the housing registration form on page 116, folform will result in a delay in processlowing the same procedure used for ing your request. If the type of acregular registration. One-day-session, commodation requested has been tickets will be sold in the registration sold out, the next closest type will be area during the hours announced for assigned according to your preference registration. listed on the housing form. These tickets can be converted at * a later time to full registration, if so One night's deposit is required HOUSING desired. on all rooms. Send your check directly to your assigned hotel after receiving your confirmation from Abstracts. Abstracts will be mailed upon completion, about March 3, to Room Reservations. All housing re- ACS. Do not send your check to U.S. residents who pay the extra quests for the official hotels at the ACS. postage for mailing. Yellow receipt meeting must be submitted to the Las Vegas hotels require estabcards will be mailed to all other reg- Department of Meetings & Divisional lishment of credit at check-in. A phabetical file, and mark the appropriate space on the form.

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major credit card is acceptable. If you do not have a credit card, cash for your entire stay will be required. Changes in arrival/departure times or dates should be sent directly to the hotel; cancellation before March 5 to ACS. All unassigned rooms will be released to the hotels on March 5. After that date, all correspondence concerning housing matters, including reservations, cancellations, and changes, should be made directly to the hotels. A map showing hotel locations appears on the opposite page. Do not be disappointed; submit your requests as early as possible.

The cooperation of the ACS Boulder Dam Section in handling local arrangements is acknowledged gratefully. Through the efforts of its committees, many interesting activities have been planned for registrants. Patricia Laska, general chairman Anita Mullen, hospitality chairman Ralph Smiecinski, hospitality cochairman Gary Atkinson, tour chairman Kim Devore, plant trip chairman Maria Fassett, publications chairman

the delivery of mail, telegrams, or Hotel List. For the convenience of reg- telephone messages, but is glad to be istrants, area hotels not participating of as much service as possible. as official hotels for the meeting are shown on page 99. The ACS Housing ACS Offices. Following is a list of ACS Bureau recommends that you contact offices at the meeting. • Accounting. Las Vegas Conthem directly. Rates shown for these hotels are estimated, not guaranteed vention Center, Rotunda Conference Room. by ACS. • Books & Journals. Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 3. • Chemical Abstracts Service. Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 1. • Chemical & Engineering News. Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 3. • Emergency after hours. A. T. LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS Winstead, Las Vegas Hilton. • Executive Offices. Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 1. Hospitality Center. The ACS Boulder • Hospitality Center. Las Vegas Dam Section will operate the Hospi- Hilton, Conference Room 4. tality Center where registrants can • Information Center. Las Vegas get information about what to see and Convention Center, Rotunda lobby. do in Las Vegas, where to dine, and • News Service and Press the complete tour program available. Room. Las Vegas Convention Center, The hours for the center on Sunday, Meeting Rooms 5, 6, 7. March 28, will be from 3 PM to 8 PM. • Operations. Las Vegas ConMonday, March 29, through Thurs- vention Center, Rotunda Cloakday, April 1, the center will be open room. from 8 AM to 4 PM. The center will • Public Affairs. Las Vegas Hilbe located in the Las Vegas Hilton, ton, Conference Room 5. Conference Room 4. • Ticket Sales. Las Vegas Convention Center, Rotunda CloakInformation Center. The center will room. operate in the Rotunda lobby, Las Vegas Convention Center, 3 PM to 8 Conferences with ACS Staff. Discussions PM, Sunday, March 28; and 8 AM to with society staff members may be 5 PM, Monday, March 29, through arranged through the executive ofThursday, April 1. The hours on Fri- fices in the Las Vegas Hilton, Conday, April 2, will be from 8 AM until ference Room 1, Monday, March 29, noon. Personal messages may be ex- through Thursday, April 1,8 AM to 5 changed and a lost-and-found service PM. Telephone for an appointment will be provided. Mail and telegrams if you would like to discuss ACS acshould be addressed to the hotel in tivities in any of the following areas: which you are staying. Communica- awards, constitution and bylaws, ditions addressed in care of ACS cannot visional activities, educational acbe delivered, but will be held at the tivities, local section activities, Information Center. No one will be meetings and expositions activities, paged in divisional meetings. The membership in ACS, nominations society accepts no responsibility for and elections, Petroleum Research

IAS VEGAS*

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C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

Fund, professional training, public affairs, public relations, regional meetings and conferences, and special projects. Audiovisual Offices and Viewing Rooms.

Audiovisual offices will be located in the Las Vegas Convention Center, Room 19A, South Hall; and Room F-l, East Hall, first floor. To assist presenters, these rooms will be open for slide viewing and tray preparation Monday through Thursday, 8 AM to 3 PM, and on Friday, 8 AM to 10 AM. Facilities for the Handicapped. I t is the

intention of ACS to make national meetings accessible to registrants with physical handicaps. Upon receipt of advance information, ACS staff members will try to arrange for oral or sign language interpreters for registrants who are deaf or hearing impaired and escort services for registrants who are blind or visually impaired. For assistance in maneuvering the public areas of the meeting hotels, contact the assistant manager on duty in each property. Specially equipped sleeping rooms can be provided if so indicated on the housing request form. For assistance in maneuvering the Las Vegas Convention Center, contact the ACS Operations Office, Rotunda Cloakroom, during the hours for registration. At least one month's notice is required for advance arrangements for special assistance. Please address request to the Department of Meetings & Divisional Activities, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Shuttle Service. A limited shuttle service will operate between the Las Vegas Convention Center (adjacent to the Las Vegas Hilton) and the MGM Grand. The nature of the service will be determined by the number of persons housed on "the strip"—the exact schedule will be published in the booklet program. Transportation. Arrangements have been made by Zoe Newman Travel Inc. with American Airlines for you to obtain the lowest possible fares (discounts of 25 to 40%). To take advantage of this service, call toll free (800) 433-1790 (in Texas—(800) 792-1160) and identify your connection with ACS by giving CODE #S-5678. The American Airlines Convention Desk will make all of your flight reservations, at the cheapest fare, on any airline. The discounts offered by American Airlines do not require travel as part of a group. Tickets may

be paid for by credit card or check and will be mailed to you. Reserva­ tions may be made for travel from any city in the U.S., Canada, or Mexico. Zoe Newman Travel would be happy to work directly with anyone to obtain the cheapest possible individual or group fares: call (203) 327-1781. McCarran International Airport is 2 to 5 miles from the hotels on "the strip," 3.5 miles from the Las Vegas Convention Center, and 11 miles from downtown. Estimated ground fares are as follows: Taxis: $1.95 for the first mile. $1.00 for each additional mile. 20 cents for each additional person over three passengers (five persons to a cab). 20 cents tax per cab for each trip originating at the airport.

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ACS Membership. Membership in the society offers numerous tangible and intangible benefits. Among these are special member prices on ACS pub­ lications, eligibility to use the soci­ ety's extensive employment aids, and, of course, a lower registration fee at all ACS meetings. These are only a few of the advantages. For your con­ venience, a membership application appears on pages 65 and 66. It can either be turned in at the ACS mem­ bership booth in the Las Vegas Con­ vention Center, North Exhibit Hall, or mailed to the Membership Devel­ opment Office, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W, Washington, D.C. 20036. (202) 872-4569. Divisional Membership. Divisional membership is evidence of your in­ terest in that particular field of chemistry or chemical engineering and in the work of the division. Divi­ sion members are granted at least one special privilege—a reduced rate on the purchase of national meeting ab­ stracts. Most divisions offer addi­ tional services. Members of the soci­ ety may become members of one or more divisions by filling out a divi­ sional membership form and paying the required dues. This can be done in the registration area, or upon request to the divisional secretary. Poster Sessions. Posters will be dis­ played for the entire morning, after­ noon, or evening of their assigned days. Authors will be with their posters during the times indicated in the program.

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1. Caesars Palace 3570 Las Vegas Blvd. South 89109 (702)731-7110 2. Landmark 364 Convention Center Dr. 89109 (702)733-1110 3. Las Vegas Hilton 3000 Paradise Rd. 89109 (702)732-5111 4. MGM Grand 3645 Las Vegas Blvd. South 89109 (702)739-4111 5. Riviera 2901 Las Vegas Blvd. South 89109 (702)734-5110 6. Sands 3355 Las Vegas Blvd. South 89109 (702) 733-5000

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Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

97

Use this form only for ACS participating housing/session hotels. Please read information on room reservations before completing this form. DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT AT ACS: MARCH 5. REQUESTS RECEIVED AFTER THIS DATE CANNOT BE PROCESSED. HOTELS:

INDICATE BELOW ORDER OF PREFERENCE (Choice 1st, 2nd, 3rd) INDICATE RATE PREFERENCE 1st

SOLD OUT

2nd

3rd

CAESARS PALACE

LAS VEGAS HILTON

RIVIERA

LANDMARK

MGM GRAND

SANDS

CHECK ONE: If my preferred rate is not available, I am more concerned with location .

, rate.

ROOM(S) WILL BE OCCUPIED BY: NAME(S). ADDRESS_ CITY & STATE. _OFFICE_

TELEPHONE: HOME_

-DEPARTURE DATE-

ARRIVAL DATE Single (1 person) Double (2 persons, 1 bed)

Suite, 1 bedroom (1 or 2 persons) Suite, 2 bedroom (3 or more persons)

Twin (2 persons, 2 beds) Double/Double (3 or 4 persons, 2 dbl. beds)

ONE NIGHT'S DEPOSIT MUST BE SENT TO YOUR ASSIGNED HOTEL IMPORTANT: Changes in arrival/departure time or dates should be made directly to the hotel. Cancellations only to ACS. After March 5 all housing matters should be directed to the hotel. MAIL CONFIRMATION TO: NAME ADDRESSCITY & STATE.

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The name of each hotel guest must be listed for doubles/twins. Reservations cannot be made unless two names are given. Room assignments will be made in the order received. Incomplete information will result in a delay in processing your request.

LAS VEGAS* SOCIAL EVENTS

price of meal; P—partially subsidized; COD—cash bar; or M—by divisional membership. SATURDAY, MARCH 27

Reception, 6:30 P M

Divisional Officers Group, Las Vegas Hilton, Crown Room D The following schedule of social events has been arranged for the Las Vegas meeting. Where purchase of tickets is necessary, the event has been numbered to assist in ticket ordering. Tickets should be purchased as early as possible, either in advance using the registration form on page 116, or on-site in the registration area. The final deadline for the sale of tickets will be 48 hours before the event, after which time only a few tickets will be available at the door of the event. Ticket prices are shown, or events coded as follows: NT—sponsored, no ticket required; L or D—included in 98

C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

Dinner, 7:30 PM 101 Divisional Officers Group, Las Vegas Hilton, Crown Room $22 SUNDAY, MARCH 28

Social Hour, 6 P M

Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry Subdivision, Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom E COD Reception, 6:30 PM American Institute of Chemists Inc., Gold Medal Award, Sands Hotel, Grand Ballroom D

Dinner, 7:30 PM 102 American Institute of Chemists Inc., Gold Medal Award, Sands Hotel, Grand Ballroom. Address: A New Gold Age of Science and Technology? by Dr. Milton Harris $25

Social Hour, 8 PM Division of Chemical Education Inc., MGM Grand, Metro 5 Room COD Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Chemical Industry Hospitality, Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom G M Social Hour, 9 PM Division of Medicinal Chemistry, Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom F (preceded by Divisional Business Meeting at 8 PM) NT

MONDAY, MARCH 29 Social Hour, 11:45 AM Women Chemists, Las Vegas Hilton, Crown Room COD

Meeting Event, 6:30 PM Reception honoring 1982 ACS Award recipients, Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom B COD

Reception, Noon James T. Grady Award, Las Vegas Hilton, Leonardo's Restaurant L

Dinner, 7:15 PM 105 Division of Chemical Health & Safety, Alpine Village Inn, 3003 Paradise Road (across from Convention Center) $14

Luncheon, 12:15 PM 103 Women Chemists, Las Vegas Hilton, Crown Room $14 Luncheon, 12:30 PM 104 James T. Grady Award, Las Vegas Hilton, Leonardo's Restaurant $20 Receptions, 5 PM Division of Chemical Health & Safety, joint with Division of Environmental Chemistry, Wine & Cheese, Las Vegas Convention Center, Convention Conference Board Room 15 members: N T nonmembers: $5.00 Division of Environmental Chemistry, joint with Division of Chemical Health & Safety, Wine & Cheese, Las Vegas Convention Center, Convention Conference Board Room 15 members: N T nonmembers: $5.00 Student Affiliates, Las Vegas Hilton, Royal/Grand Salons NT Social Hour, 5:30 PM University of Massachusetts, Department of Chemistry & Polymer Science, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 14 COD University of Wisconsin-Madison, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 7-8 COD

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Meeting Event, 7:30 PM 106 Dinner honoring 1982 ACS award recipients, Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom A $30 Reception, 8:30 PM Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Mobay Award, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 14 M TUESDAY MARCH 30 Reception, Noon

Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, E. V. Murphree Award, Las Vegas Hilton, Barronshire Restaurant L Social Hours, Noon Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Las Vegas Hilton, Crown COD Division of Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry, Las Vegas Hilton, Royal/Grand Salons COD Luncheons, Noon 107 Division of Chemical Information, joint with Division of Small Chemical Businesses, Las Vegas Hilton,, Leonardo's Restaurant $14 107 Division of Small Chemical Businesses, joint with Division of Chemical Information, Las Vegas Hilton, Leonardo's Restaurant $14 Luncheons, 12:30 PM 108 Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Las Vegas Hilton, Crown Room $14 109 Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, E. V. Murphree Award, Las Vegas Hilton, Barronshire Restaurant $14 Luncheon, 12:45 PM 110 Division of Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry, Las Vegas Hilton, Royal/Grand Salons $14 Reception, 4 PM Local Section Officers Group and Tour Speakers, Las Vegas Con-

vention Center, C6cktail Lounge, Rotunda lobby NT Reception, 5 PM Symposium on Government/Industry Sponsorship of University Research, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room R-2&4, East Hall NT

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Social Hours, 5 PM Colorado State University, Las Vegas Hilton, J. K. Stille Suite COD Division of Chemical Information, joint with Division of Small Chemical Businesses Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 13 COD Division of Small Chemical Businesses, joint with Division of Chemical Information, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 13 COD Reception, 5:15 P M University of Illinois, UrbanaChampaign, MGM Grand, Metro 2 Room NT Social Hour, 5:30 PM Alumni Hour, Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion (see independent listings for participants): Alpha Chi Sigma Association of Indiana University Chemists Cornell University Illinois Institute of Technology Iowa State University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Michigan State University Northeastern University Northwestern University Ohio State University Pacific Northwest Universities (University of Idaho, Oregon State University, University of Oregon, University of Washington, Washington State University) Princeton University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Johns Hopkins University University of California, Los Angeles/Berkeley University of Kansas University of Notre Dame University of Southern California University of Texas, Austin University of Virginia Chemists Society of Columbia Chemists, Las Vegas Hilton, Grand Salon: COD Reception, 5:45 PM Yale Chemists Association, MGM Grand, Metro 1 Room NT Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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Social Hour, 6 PM Symposium on Chemistry & Biochemistry of Platinum, Gold, and other Chemotherapeutic Agents, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room 18-A COD Reception, 6 PM University of Maryland, Las Vegas Hilton, W. J. Bailey Suite NT

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Reception 6:15 PM 111 Division of Professional Relations, Wine & Cheese, Las Vegas Hilton, Embassy Salon $3.00 Social Hour, 6:15 PM Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 6 P Social Hours, 6:30 PM Division of Analytical Chemistry, Alpine Village Inn, 3003 Paradise Road COD Division of Chemical Education Inc., Library Restaurant, 200 W. Sahara Ave. COD Division of Environmental Chemistry, Library Restaurant, Blue Room, 200 W. Sahara Ave. COD Division of Inorganic Chemistry, poster session, Las Vegas Convention Center, Gold Room COD Dinner, 7 PM 112 Division of Analytical Chemistry, Alpine Village Inn, 3003 Paradise Road $17 Dinners, 7:30 PM 113 Division of Chemical Education Inc., Library Restaurant, 200 W. Sahara Ave. $15 114 Division of Environmental Chemistry, Library Restaurant, Blue Room, 200 W. Sahara Ave. $25 Social Hour, 7:30 PM Division of Physical Chemistry, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 7 &8 M or COD Meeting Event, 9 PM 115 ACS Mixer, Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion badge or $3.00 ticket WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31 Reception, 11:45 AM Corporation Associates, ACS Award for Creative Invention, MGM Grand, Palace 4 Room L Luncheon, Noon 116 Division of Fuel Chemistry, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 7 & 8 $14 100

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

Luncheon, 12:15 PM 117 Corporation Associates, ACS Award for Creative Invention, MGM Grand, Palace 4 Room $19 Social Hours, 5:30 PM Association of Harvard Chemists, Las Vegas Hilton, Club Salon COD Chinese American Chemical Association, Silver Dragon Restaurant, 1510 E. Flamingo Road COD Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 6 COD Division of Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry, joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc., Las Vegas Convention Center, Cocktail lounge, Rotunda lobby COD Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc., joint with Division of Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry, Las Vegas Convention Center, Cocktail Lounge, Rotunda lobby COD Social Hours, 6 PM Association for Women in Science, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 11 & 12 COD Brigham Young University Chemistry Alumni Association, see dinner for details Division of Chemical Education Inc., poster session, Las Vegas Convention Center, Gold Room P Division of Fluorine Chemistry, Award, MGM Grand, Metro 1 Room COD Division of History of Chemistry, Symposium on the History of Heterogeneous Catalysis, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 14 COD Reception, 6:30 PM Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc., The Dunes, Top o' the Dunes D Dinner, 6:30 PM 118 Chinese American Chemical Association, Silver Dragon Restaurant, 1510 E. Flamingo Road $20 Dinner, 7:00 PM Brigham Young University Chemistry Alumni, Hotel Continental, 4100 Paradise Road. Contact J. B. Ott for reservations (801-378-3669) $12 119 Division of Fluorine Chemistry, MGM Grand, Metro 1 Room $20 Dinner, 7:30 PM 120 Division of Petroleum Chem-

istry, Inc., The Dunes, Top o' the Dunes $25 THURSDAY, APRIL 1 Social Hour, 6 PM Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry, Symposium on Maillard Reactions in Food and Nutrition, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 7 & 8 P

LASVEC^S* ^ AWARDS The awards reception, dinner, and general meeting will be held the evening of Monday, March 29, in the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel—reception, 6:30 PM, dinner, 7:30 PM, general meeting, 8:30 PM. There will be additional seating for those wishing to attend only the general meeting. At the general meeting, Bryce Crawford Jr., 1982 Priestley Medalist, will speak on "The Ripening of Time" (see Social Events listing, ticket 106). ACS Award Addresses Alfred Burger Award in Medicinal Chemistry sponsored by SmithKline Corp. received by David W. Cushman and Miguel A. Ondetti. Address to be presented before Medicinal Chemistry, Wednesday, March 31, at 11:10 AM (see page 75). ACS Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology sponsored by Air Products & Chemicals Inc. received by Jack G. Calvert. Address to be presented before Environmental Chemistry, Tuesday, March 30, at 11:30 AM (see page 59). ACS Award for Creative Invention sponsored by the Corporation Associates received by William S. Knowles. Address to be presented before Organic Chemistry, Wednesday, March 31, at 4 PM (see page 80). ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry sponsored by Aldrich Chemical Co., received by David A. Evans. Address to be presented before Organic Chemistry, Tuesday, March 30, at 11 AM (see page 77).

ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Mallinckrodt received by Arthur W. Adamson. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, March 29, at 10:05 AM (see page 68). ACS Award for Nuclear Chemistry sponsored by EG&G ORTEC received by Leo Yaffe. Address to be presented before Nuclear Chemistry and Technology on Monday, March 29, at 9:10 AM (see page 75). ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry sponsored by Fisher Scientific Co. received by Ralph N. Adams. Address to be presented before Analytical Chemistry, Tuesday, March 30, at 9:10 AM (see page 48).

Surface Chemistry, Tuesday, March 30, at 11 AM (see page 56). ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Monsanto Co. received by Roald Hoffmann. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, March 29, at 9:05 AM (see page 68). ACS Award in Petroleum Chemistry sponsored by Lubrizol Corp. received by Irving Wender. Address to be presented before Petroleum Chemistry, Wednesday, March 31, at 4:10 P M (see page 86). ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry sponsored by Witco Chemical Corp. Foundation received by John K. Stille. Address to be presented before Polymer Chemistry, Monday, March 29, at 11:10 AM (see page 89).

ACS Award in Chemical Education sponsored by Union Carbide Corp. received by Anna J. Harrison. Address to be presented at the dinner meeting of Chemical Education, Tuesday, March 30, at 8:45 P M (see Social Events, ticket 113).

ACS Award in Pure Chemistry sponsored by Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity received by Stephen R. Leone. Address to be presented before Physical Chemistry, Wednesday, March 31, at 2:05 PM (see page 88).

ACS Award in Chromatography sponsored by SUPELCO received by Barry L. Karger. Address to be presented before Analytical Chemistry, Wednesday, March 31, at 3:45 P M (see page 49).

ACS Award in the Chemistry of Contemporary Technological Problems sponsored by Mobay Chemical Corp. received by Joseph T. Kummer. Address to be presented before Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Tuesday, March 30, at 4:25 PM (see page 67).

ACS Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry sponsored by Kendall Co. received by Gert Ehrlich. Address to be presented before Colloid and

Arthur C. Cope Award will be presented to Frank H. Westheimer at the ACS fall meeting in Kansas City.

James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching sponsored by Ethyl Corp. received by Robert Roe Jr. Address to be presented before Chemical Education at the ACS fall meeting in Kansas City. The Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry sponsored by E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. received by Peter M. Rentzepis. Address to be presented before Physical Chemistry, Tuesday, March 30, at 2:05 PM (see page 88). Garvan Medal sponsored by W. R. Grace & Co. received by Sara Jane Rhoads. Address to be presented before Organic Chemistry, Tuesday, March 30, at 4:15 PM (see page 80). James T. Grady Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public received by Albert Rosenfeld. Address to be presented at the Grady Luncheon, Monday, March 29 (see Social Events, ticket 104). The Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Essential Oils and Related Products sponsored by Fritzsche Dodge & Olcott Inc. received by Paul A. Grieco. Address to be presented before Organic Chemistry, Wednesday, March 31, at 11 AM (see page 80). Frederic Stanley Kipping Award in Organosilicon Chemistry sponsored by Dow Corning Corp. will be

Las Vegas Convention Center will be site of many of the national meeting activities Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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presented to Thomas J. Barton at the 14th Central Regional Meeting, June 14-16, in Midland. The Irving Langmuir Award in Chemical Physics sponsored by The General Electric Foundation received by Benjamin Widom. Address to be presented before Physical Chemistry, Monday, March 29, at 2 PM (see page 87).

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E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry sponsored by Exxon Research & Engineering Co. received by Sol W. Weller. Address to be presented before Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Tuesday, March 30, at 10:50 AM (see page 67). Nobel Laureate Signature Award for Graduate Education in Chemistry sponsored by J. T. Baker Chemical Co. received by Warren S. Warren and Alexander Pines. Addresses to be presented before Physical Chemistry, Monday, March 29, at 11:35 AM (see page 87). The James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry sponsored by the Northeastern Section, ACS received by Andrew Streitwieser Jr. Address to be presented before Organic Chemistry, Monday, March 29, at 1U15 AM (see page 76). Priestley Medal received by Bryce Crawford Jr. Address to be presented at the general meeting, Monday, March 30, 8:30 PM (see page 113).

LASVECyH # COMMITTEE AGENDA

The open committee sessions listed below give ACS members a chance to express their views on various issues of importance to the society before these issues are acted on by the board or council. Members are urged to examine the agenda and make known any opinions or ideas they may have. If you cannot attend the particular sessions involved, write to the officers listed or ask someone attending the session to speak in your behalf. Most executive sessions are open to councilors. For further information, contact the officers listed. 102

C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

Las Vegas Hilton will house ACS hospitality center, many meeting goers BUDGET & FINANCE

Joseph A. Dixon, chairman; Pennsylvania State University, Department of Chemistry, University Park, Pa. 16802 Open Meeting Saturday, March 27, 8:30 AM-5 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Embassy Salon 1. Reports of the chief financial officer: a. Treasurer's report. b. Report of Committee on Investments. c. Report of director of financial operations; financial status report; review of 1981 performance against budget. 2. Application of dues escalator for 1983. 3. Review results of final survey on priority ranking of ACS programs, prior to presentation to council and board of directors. 4. Report on financial policy. 5. Report on budgets and programs. 6. Cost implication of petitions for council action and considerations. CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE

Paul V. Smith Jr., chairman; Exxon Research and Engineering Co., P.O. Box 101, Florham Park, N.J. 07932 Open Meeting Monday, March 29, 3-4 PM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room N-4, East Hall 1. Patent coverage improvements. 2. CAS Online update. 3. Other matters resulting from executive session.

Executive Session 1. Financial and business reports. 2. International cooperative agreements. 3. Computer configuration and acquisitions. CHEMICAL EDUCATION

Stanley Kirschner, chairman; Chemistry Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich. 48202 Open Meeting Monday, March 29, 4-5 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 11 Same as below plus topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. High school chemistry: a. Enrichment materials for precollege chemistry courses. b. Chemistry curriculum for the general student. c. ACS membership criteria as interpreted for high school teachers. d. White paper on the status of precollege science education. 2. College/university chemical education: a. Approval criteria of the Committee on Professional Training. b. Review of ACS activities in cooperative education. c. Nonpermanent exchange positions in industry for academic faculty and in academe for industrial chemists. d. The cross-fertilization of chemistry and chemical engineering curricula. e. Impact of contemporary

mechanisms for the support of academic institutions on their educational programs; relationships between education and research in academic institutions. 3. Continuing education: a. Initial activities in ACS computer courses. b. Teleconferencing of ACS continuing education courses. 4. Other educational topics: a. Joseph Priestley 250th anniversary celebration. b. Forensic laboratories. c. Federal support for science education. CHEMICAL SAFETY

George J. O'Neill, chairman; Research Laboratories, Tennessee Eastman Co., Kingsport, Tenn. 37660 Open Meeting Monday, March. 29, 2-4 PM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room 0 , East Hall Same as below plus topics from the floor. Executive Session

2. Reports: R&D funding; legislative update; hazardous laboratory wastes; OSHA/laboratory policy. 3. Reports from Congressional fellows. 4. Local section public affairs—open discussion. 5. Members are invited to give short presentations (limited to five minutes) on issues of concern to the Society. Please send copy of proposed presentation to the Department of Public Affairs before March 17 to ensure inclusion on the agenda. COMMITTEES

George E. Heinze, chairman; Janssen Pharmaceutica, 501 George St., New Brunswick, N.J. 08903 Open Meeting Monday, March 29,1:30-2:30 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Club Salon 1. Review of council petitions. 2. Subcommittee reports: on Committee on Chemical Education; on Economic Status; on joint boardcouncil committees; and on Revision of CCPA Charter. 3. Comments from visitors. Executive Session

1. Chairman's report: a. Liability insurance. b. Status of "Prudent Practices . . . " review. c. OSHA task force. d. CCS schedule at national meetings. 2. Authors' guidelines for safety. 3. Proposed review of NIOSH/OSHA occupational health guidelines for chemical hazards. 4. ACS safety manual (4th edition, fall 1982, editorial comments from committee). 5. RCRA task force. 6. Local section safety activities related to high school chemistry laboratories. 7. Consumer Product Safety Commission. 8'. College safety survey and proposals. 9. Chemical health & safety referral service (embryofetotoxins). CHEMISTRY & PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Norman Hackerman, chairman; Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Tex. 77001 Open Meeting Monday, March 29,10 AM-noon, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room S-3, East Hall 1. Committee recommendations.

1. Report of Subcommittee on Committee Associates (open to councilors). 2. Subcommittee reports (closed). 3. Review of committee chairman vacancies and recommendations (closed).

Council, board meetings The ACS Council meeting will begin at 8 AM, Wednesday, March 31, in the Las Vegas Hilton, Ballrooms B&C. It will be preceded by a continental breakfast for councilors beginning at 7:15 AM in the back of the room. Councilors are asked to check in beginning at 7 AM and proceed to the breakfast area, keeping in mind that the meeting starts promptly at 8 AM. Space will be available for ACS members and nonmembers to observe the council in action. It is hoped that many will take advantage of this opportunity to learn firsthand of the society's operations. Alternate councilors and division and local section officers are particularly urged to attend. The ACS Board of Directors meeting, open to members who wish to observe, will be in the Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom D, from 10:30 AM to noon, and from 1:30 PM to 4 PM, on Sunday, March 28.

CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS

William A. Nevill, chairman; Director, Graduate Studies, IUPUI, 1100 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, Ind. 46223 Open Meeting A Sunday, March 28, 9 AM-12:30 PM and 1:30-5 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 6 See executive session agenda. ACS members, particularly petitioners, are invited to consult with the committee on matters likely to come up in the council meeting. Open Meeting B Wednesday, March 31, starting two hours after council meeting ends, Las Vegas Hilton, Continental Salon See comments under A above. Executive Session 1. Review petitions to amend the ACS constitution and/or bylaws that will be acted upon by council in Las Vegas: a. ACS association or affiliation with other organizations. b. Manner of election. c. Surcharge for C&EN foreign postage ("urgent action" requested). d. Procedures for dropping a member from membership for conduct injurious to the society. 2. Review of petitions to amend the ACS constitution and/or bylaws that are on the agenda for consideration only by council in Las Vegas: a. Lifetime of joint board-council committees. b. Yearly allotments to local sections. c. Charge to emeritus members for C&EN. 3. Reports of C&B Subcommittees: a. To Study Proposed Amendment to Bylaw III, Sec. 3(a)(8) (joint with N&E). b . On society Committee on Chemical Education (joint with ConC and SOCED). 4. Other business. 5. Proposed amendments to local section and division bylaws. COPYRIGHTS

Frederick H. Owens, chairman; Rohm & Haas Co., Research Laboratories, 727 Norristown Rd., Spring House, Pa. 19477 Open Meeting Monday, March 29,10-11 AM, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Rooms 11-12 Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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Open Meeting Monday, March 29,10-11:30 AM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room 0, East Hall Report on executive session plus topics from the floor. Executive Session

1. Improving the economic status of Newman M. Bortnick, vice-chairman; chemists. 509 Oreland Mill Rd., Oreland, Pa. 2. Proposed joint task force with Corporation Associates. 19075 3. Tying pensions to cost of living. Open Meeting 4. Plans for survey of personnel Tuesday, March 30, 9:30 AM-4:30 practices affecting professional emPM, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference ployees. Rooms 7-8 5. Plans to obtain salary data from companies. 1. Report of interim actions. 6. Proposed conference of academic 2. Reports of officers. administrators. 3. Report of CPC vice-chairman 7. Surveys in the Office of Manpower a. Goals and objectives for 1982. Studies: 4. Reports of subcommittees. a. Plans for reporting survey a. Review of petition to amend data. ACS constitution and bylaws: ACS b. Research reports from the Ofassociation or affiliation with other fice of Manpower Studies. organizations. c. 1982 salary surveys. 5. Review of preliminary schedule of 8. Reports of subcommittees. business sessions, fall 1982. 9. Report of task force on employer6. Reports of committees. employee relations. 7. Review of council agenda. 8. Old and new business. COUNCIL POLICY

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT

DIVISIONAL ACTIVITIES

Carlos M. Bowman, chairman; Dow Chemical Co., 1803 Dow Center, Midland, Mich. 48640 Open Meeting Sunday, March 28, 3-4 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 9 Same as below, plus topics from the floor. Executive Session (Entire meeting open to councilors.)

Nina I. McClelland, chairman; National Sanitation Foundation, P.O. Box 1468, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 30, 2-3 PM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room O, East Hall Same as below plus any related topics. ACS members are invited to give short presentations on environmental issues of concern to ACS.

1. Petition for formation of probaExecutive Session tionary division of applied polymer science. 2. Petition on yearly allotments to 1. Chairman's report: environmental issues of concern. local sections. 2. Subcommittee and task force re3. 1982 joint divisional officers/proports: gram coordination conference. a. Symposium on risk assessment 4. Suggestions for making ACS of hazardous waste sites. membership more attractive to inb. On high school environmental dustrial chemists. education. 5. Subcommittee reports. c. Symposium on acid rain. 6. Governance experiment at Kansas d. On executive order 12291. City meeting. e. On modification of the Delaney 7. Long-range planning. Amendment. ECONOMIC STATUS f. On feasibility study on hazardous waste issues. Gerhard G. Meisels, chairman; Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Nebraska, g. On study of committee Lincoln, Neb. 68588 charter. 104

C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES

Cyril Ponnamperuma, chairman; Lab of Chemical Evolution, Chemistry Dept., University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 30, 9 AM-noon, Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom F 1. Science and technology exchange projects with developing countries. 2. Committee-sponsored symposia at ACS meetings and meetings in China, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico. 3. ACS role in CHEMRAWN II. 4. Foreign chemistry-student interviewing project. 5. Proposed lecture tour program for Eastern Europe. 6. Formation of an international society for chemists. 7. Scientific freedom/human rights cases. LOCAL SECTION ACTIVITIES

Attila E. Pavlath, chairman; 2140 Shattuck Avenue, No. 1101, Berkeley, Calif. 94704 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 30, 3-4 PM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room T-2, East Hall 1. Report from the executive session. 2. Yearly allotments to local sections. 3. Assessment of the efficiency of LSAC. 4. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. a. Staff liaison's report. 2. Reports from subcommittees: program development fund, local section development, finances, annual report review, divisional cooperation, Speakers' Service and emeritus members. 3. Petitions for consideration: yearly allotment to local sections, and charge to emeritus members for C&EN. 4. Assessment of the efficiency of LSAC. 5. Reports from committee liaisons. 6. Old and new business. MEETINGS AND EXPOSITIONS

Paul H. L. Walter, chairman; R.D. 3, 9 Walter Drive, Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866 Open Meeting Sunday, March 28, 3-5 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 13

3. New projects. 4. Patent legislation. 5. Professional employment guidelines. 6. Symposia at national meetings. 7. Other committee activities and interests.

Same as below, plus topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Finance subcommittee report: income & expense projections: a. Recommendation for registration fees for 1983. b. Registration fees for nonmembers. 2. ACS chemical exposition. 3. Report on the New York meeting. 4. Future national meetings: a. Reports on previously scheduled sites. b. Pacific Basin Chemical Congress, 1984. c. 3rd Chemical Congress of the North American Continent, 1988 4. Site bids for 1988 and 1990. 5. Workshop for division officers and regional meeting representatives. 6. Governance experiment for Kansas City meeting: a. Results of Council survey at New York. 7. Other subcommittee reports.

PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS PLANNING & COORDINATING (PROPPACC)

Robert K. Neuman, secretary; American Chemical Society, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036 Open Meeting Wednesday, March 31,1:30-4:30 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Embassy Salon

Lake Mead provides excellent fishing

MEMBERSHIP AFFAIRS

W. M. Tuddenham, chairman; 1828 Lincoln St., Salt Lake City, Utah 84015 Open Meeting Monday, March 29, 4-5 PM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room S-3, East Hall 1. Report on executive session. 2. Items from the floor.

dent-Elect, Regional Director and Director-at-Large. 2. Proposed amendment to Bylaw III, Sec. 3 (a)(8) on filling vacancies of less than one year on the Council Policy Committee. 3. Use of outside organizations for ballot handling and counting in national elections. 4. Improved mechanisms for voting and counting at council meetings.

Executive Session

Executive Session

1. Review of amendments for council action or consideration. 2. Progress on study of alternate dues structure. 3. Funding for the emeritus program, possible bylaw amendments. 4. Progress on study of membership grades, possible bylaw amendments. 5. Review of membership promotion.

1. Preparation of slates (1983-85 term) for Council Policy Committee and Committee on Committees.

NOMINATIONS & ELECTIONS

J. Trygve Jensen, chairman; Department of Chemistry, Wagner College, Staten Island, N.Y. 10301 Open Meeting Monday, March 29, 3-5 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Continental Salon 1. Addition to Bylaw V on death or withdrawal of candidates for Presi-

PATENTS & RELATED MATTERS

Walter E. Buting, chairman; Patent Counsel, Eli Lilly & Co., Pharmaceutical Products, 307 East McCarty St., Indianapolis, Ind. 46206 Open Meeting Monday, March 29,10-11 AM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room K-2, East Hall Same as below plus any related topics.

1. Reports of units represented on PROPPACC: a. Committee on Chemistry & Public Affairs. b. Committee on Economic Status. c. Committee on Professional & Member Relations. d. Committee on Professional Relations. e. Committee on Professional Training. f. Committee on Public Affairs & Public Relations. g. Committee on Corporation Associates. h. Division of Professional Relations. i. Committee on Membership Affairs. j . Women Chemists Committee. k. Younger Chemists Committee. 2. Other reports: a. 1981 Presidential Conference on Professionalism. b. Engineers and Scientists Joint Committee on Pensions. c. Other. 3. Proposal for a professionalism projects discretionary fund. 4. Topics from the floor. PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS

Phillip S. Landis, chairman; Mobil R&D Corporation, Paulsboro, N.J. 08066 Open Meeting Monday, March 29, 4:30-5:30 PM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room P-2, East Hall

Executive Session 1. Compensation for employed inventors. 2. Federal government patent policy.

1. Summary report on executive session. 2. Topics from the floor. Executive Session Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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1. Reports of Subcommittees on Member Assistance, on Professional Standards, on Employment Aids, on Licensure & Related Regulations, on Local Section Liaison, and on Civil Service Liaison. 2. ACS-sponsored insurance plans. 3. Liaison reports: AIC, DPR, Economic Status and other ACS committees. PROFESSIONAL TRAINING

J. Arthur Campbell, chairman; Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, Calif. 91711 Open Meeting Sunday, March 28, 2-3 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom F The committee invites responses and suggestions to the draft of the revision of the criteria for ACS-approved schools which was circulated to all approved departments and ACS divisions earlier in 1982. PROJECT SEED

W. Lincoln Hawkins, chairman; 26 High St., Montclair, N.J. 07042 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 30,10-11 AM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room O, East Hall Same as below plus topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Review of subcommittee activity. 2. Review of 1981 programs. 3. Long-range planning. PUBLICATIONS

John G. Verkade, chairman; Dept. of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 Open Meeting Monday, March 29, 4:30-5:30 PM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room N-4, East Hall 1. Reports of subcommittees and C&EN editorial board. 2. B&J & C&EN 1981 financial review. 3. 1983 recommended subscription prices. 4. Status of computer readable journal experiment. 5. Reports from liaisons to other committees. 6. Status of Organometallics. 7. Review of petitions to amend ACS bylaws to provide for a surcharge for C&EN foreign postage, and for a charge to emeritus members for C&EN. 106 C&EN Feb. 15, 1982

Executive Session Same as open meeting. SCIENCE

Herbert Kaesz, chairman; Dept. of Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 30, 2-4 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Club Salon Reports from executive session plus topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Reports and recommendations from the committee's subcommittees and groups: Research Support, Industrial/Academic Cooperation, Scientific Publications, Scientific Activities, and Science Policies. 2. Progress report from the Conference on Scientific Aspects of Measurements. 3. New topics from the November 1981 meeting: authority and responsibility in administration of ACS regional meetings, coordination of activities with "sister" scientific societies, scope of ACS awards program. TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES

Milton H. Campbell, chairman; Exxon Nuclear Co., 2101 Horn Rapid Rd., Richland, Wash. 99352 Open Meeting Monday, March 29,11 AM-noon, Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 13 1. Report on executive session. 2. Leadership program. 3. Comments from visitors. Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. NCCTA report. 3. Reports of Subcommittees on: a. Leadership. b. Technician Symposia. c. CTA/NCCTA Interaction. d. Educational Activities. e. Long-Range Planning. 4. Reports by liaisons to other committees. 5. New business. WOMEN CHEMISTS

Maureen Gillen Chan, chairman; Room 7F 226, Bell Telephone Labs, Murray Hill, N.J. 07974

Open Meeting Monday, March 29,10:15-11:30 AM, Las Vegas Hilton, Embassy Salon Report from executive session plus topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. Subcommittee reports: a. Status of Women/Academic Surveys. b. Symposia. c. Newletter. d. Project Identification. 3. Garvan Medal and award canvassing. 4. Membership promotion. 5. Academic information service. 6. New business. YOUNGER CHEMISTS

Mark Frishberg, chairman; Research Laboratories, Tennessee Eastman, Kingsport, Tenn. 37662 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 30, 4-5 PM, Las Vegas Convention Center, Room D-l, East Hall 1. Report from executive session. 2. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Introduction of new members. 2. Report on symposia at national meetings—preview of Las Vegas symposium and plans for Kansas City symposia. 3 Report on YCC booth at national meetings—new physical layout, staffing assignments, and publicity handouts. 4. Report of slide-tape career counseling project subcommittee— review of introductory program and production strategy. 5. Report on chemical career insights 1981 (evaluation) and 1982 (sites, dates, planning). 6. Report on revision of "How to Run a Roadshow" booklet. 7. Newsletter report—spring 1982 issue evaluation and plans for summer 1982 issue. 8. Report on "Passages" video tape project. 9. YCC budget recommendations for 1983. 10. Discussions by YCC liaisons to other committees, divisions, and ACS departments. 11. Brainstorming session on new projects and directions.

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ment, products, and services will be available for your inspection and V discussion. Each company will have technical personnel on hand to discuss its products and services and many will be illustrating the latest CHEMICAL EXPOSITION applications of their instrumentation. A series of Exposition Workshops A National ACS Chemical Exposition has been organized in conjunction of chemical and instrumental prod- with the chemical exposition and will ucts, services, and technical litera- be directed to a variety of instruture—from both domestic and in- mental, data services, and other ternational companies—will be held chemical areas of interest to meeting in conjunction with the spring Las and exposition attendees. Attendance Vegas meeting. This exposition, the will be limited to workshop reglargest in over a decade at a spring istrants. This ACS chemical exposimeeting, will have more than 125 ex- tion and workshops will be sponsored hibiting organizations. These exhibits jointly by the society and the Boulder will be located in the North Hall of Dam section of ACS. the Las Vegas Convention Center For the workshop program and adjacent to the Rotunda and regis- registration form see page 109. tration areas. The exposition will be open Monday through Thursday, Exhibitors March 29 to April 1, and the hours Bold numbers at end of lines are booth numbers will be 9 AM to 5 PM except for Thursday when the exhibits will close Academic Press, 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. at 3 PM. 10003. Featuring outstanding chemistry books inSheldon/Kochi, "Metal-Catalyzed Oxidations A wide variety of exhibits display- cluding: Organic Compounds"; Gajewski, "Hydrocarbon ing the latest in chemical and ana- ofThermalIsomerizations";Bailey, Vol.2, "Ozonation lytical instrumentation, chemical and in Organic Chemistry"; Hammes, "Enzyme Catalysis and Regulations"; Trahanovsky, "Oxidation in Organic related publications, computer search {Part D); Clarke, "Calculator Programming and data services, research and spe- Chemistry" for Chemistry and the Life Sciences"; and Mulliken/ 429 cialty chemicals, and other equip- Ermler, "PolyatomicMolecules."

ILAS ¥E^AI' '

Academic Press, College Dept., 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003. Information available on textbooks and their new molecular models—the latest development in effective, low-cost model building for research and instruction. 427, 428 Ace Glass, 1430 Northwest Blvd., Vineland, N.J. 08360. Ace proportional temperature controllers with instatherm oil baths, Michel-Miller HPLPLC, Firestone valve, and Trubore stirring equipment with flexible shaft. 157, 158 Advanced Electronic Design, 440 Potrero Ave., Sunnyvale, Calif. 94086. Exhibiting the AED512 color graphics imaging terminal. Images are stored on the AEDWINC08 (8-inch Winchester system) and processed through an LSI-11/23 CPU. 167 Aldrich Chemical, P.O. Box 355, Milwaukee, Wis. 53201. Organic chemicals, inorganic chemicals, and biochemicals for research and industry. Borane reagents, deuterated solvents, stains and dyes, and bulk intermediates. 322 Allyn & Bacon Inc., 470 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 02210. New and recently published texts and references. 431 American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1515 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Science, Science 82, Compendia, and other publications produced by AAAS. 311 Analabs—a unit of Foxboro Analytical/Foxboro Co., 38 Neponset Ave., Foxboro, Mass. 02035. Exhibiting a selection of on-stream and off-line gas, liquid and thin-layer chromatographic supplies, and infrared accessories for many makes and models of chromatographs and spectrophotometers. 135 Analect Instruments, 1731 Reynolds Ave., Irvine, Calif. 92714. Displaying models of the fX-6200 series FTIR spectrometers, the new fXG-100 GC-FTIR system interface, and the new low-cost fX-6221 GC-FTIR spectrometer system configured for absorption and on-the-fly FC fraction analysis. Sampling accessories will also be displayed. 233 Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN 107

Ann Arbor Science Publishers, P.O. Box 1425, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106. Publishers of scientific and technical books for the professional in areas of air and water pollution, water and waste technology, chemistry and engineering. 425, 426 J. T. Baker Chemical, 222 Red School Lane, Phillipsburg, N.J. 08865. Chromatography products, including automated TLC spotter; sample preparation product advancements such as the Baker-10 extraction system; high purity solvents for HPLC and GC, and reduced volume LSC fluids. 143, 144 Battelle/Columbus Laboratories, 505 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43201. 230, 231 Benjamin/Cummings Publishing, 2727 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, Calif. 94025. Displaying the new physical chemistry text by Laidler and Meiser; Matta and Wilbraham's "Atoms, Molecules, Life"; "Electronics and Instrumentation for Scientists" by Malmstadt; and "Chemical Principles," 3rd Ed. by Dickerson, Gray, and Haight, in addition to many other outstanding chemistry texts. 422

residue analysis, industrial hygiene, methods development, priority pollutant analysis, and hazardous waste identification. Staff is experienced with many matrices including air, water, soil, sludge, feeds, and food. In-house instrumentation includes GCIMSIDS, GC, IC, AA-ICP, HPLC, and microscopy. 320 Chapman & Hall/Methuen, 733 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. Publishers of books for academic, professional, and reference use in science and technology. On display will be the sample volume of the fifth edition of the "Dictionary of Organic Compounds" to be published in September 1982. 309 Chemical Abstracts Service, P.O. Box 3012, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Live demonstrations of CAS Online, the chemical substance search and display system. 223, 224, 225, 226

heating equipment, student, industrial and research model melting point apparatus. 248 Elsevier North-Holland, 52 Vanderbilt Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. Scientific publisher exhibiting the latest additions to its chemistry list. Also available is the chemistry catalog containing descriptions and lists of contents of recent and forthcoming titles. 411 Encyclopaedia Brttannlca, 425 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60611. Exhibiting the 30-volume Encyclopaedia Britannica 3 and other related educational publications. 333 Engelhard Industries Division, 2655 U.S. Route 22 West, Union, N J . 07083. Engelhard noble metal catalysts are used to synthesize fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals and purify chemical process effluent streams. The catalysts have high specific activity and high selectivity towards desired products. Expert consultation on how stock and custom catalysts are produced, supplied, and reclaimed will be available. 145

Chemical Dynamics, 3001 Hadley Rd., South Plainfield, N.J. 07080. Featuring a complete line of research and development chemicals, including organics, biochemicals, deuterated solvents, and pharmaceutical intermediates. Also featured will be restriction nucleases, chemicals for recombinant DNA work, and Extranuclear Laboratories, P.O. Box 11512, Pittschromatographic adsorbents. The new "Chemalog" burgh, Pa. 15238. Illustrating its broad range of quaBerghof/America, Raymond Professional Building, 81182 catalog! handbook will be on display. 232 drapole mass spectrometers for analytical and reMain St., Raymond, N.H. 03077. The most complete search uses. Both components and complete systems line of Teflon products for research and industry, inincluding GC/MSIDS and MSI MSI DS are described Cole Scientific, 23966 Craftsman Rd., Calabasas (Los cluding vessels, beakers, Teflon-lined high-pressure and technological innovations in mass spectrometry Angeles) Calif. 91320. Exhibiting the new Axxiom autoclaves and digestion bombs, fluid flow systems, are detailed. 259 and fittings. Custom fabrication a specialty. Introducing model 711 microcomputer HPLC programer-system controller, model 301 Data Saver for analog chronew electrodialysis separation equipment. 206 matographic storage and retrieval, plus a complete Fairfield Chemical, P.O. Box 20, Blythewood, S.C. Axxiom gradient HPLC system. Also shown—Zinger-ll 29016. More than 15 years' experience in the manuBoard of Trustees—ACS Group Insurance Plans, microliter dispenser and complete line of Altex HPLC facture of fine organic chemicals—from grams to 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Incolumns. 325 hundreds of kilos—for chemical, pharmaceutical, and formation about the ACS Group Insurance Plans for agricultural research and development. More than ACS members sponsored by the Board of Trustees. 3000 items, many of which are unavailable elsewhere. Coulometrics, 4965 Independence, Wheat Ridge, These plans include term life, hospital indemnity, Custom synthesis service also. 253 high-limit AD&D coverage, long-term disability income Colo. 80033. Instruments for the determination of protection, professional liability (malpractice), and the carbon and organic oxygen. Total carbon (TC), organic carbon (TOC), and carbonate carbon (IC) concentraW. H. Freeman & Co., 660 Market St., San Francisco, ACS tax deferred retirement annuity program. tions can be determined in waters, oils, gases, and Calif. 94104. Publishers of text and reference books. 302, 303 solids including metals. Applications also include 415 determination of carbon on metal and filter surfaces. B. Braun Instruments, 805 Grandview Dr., S. San Gas Research Institute, 8600 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., 136 Francisco, Calif. 94080. Exhibiting their complete line Chicago, III. 60631. Responsible for managing a naof Thermomix constant temperature water bath cirtionally balanced applied and basic research program Crystalytics, P.O. Box 82286, Lincoln, Neb. 68501. culators, homogenization equipment for trace element in gas-energy R&D. GRI plans an R&D program that High-quality and confidential x-ray crystallographic analysis and an overview of the broad line of our indevelops technologies for new gas supplies, efficient structural services at affordable rates. Services range struments. 250 use, and reliable service. Photographs of GRI-sponfrom crystal mounting, diffraction data collection, and molecular model building to complete crystal structure sored research projects will be displayed and broBrinkmann Instruments, Cantiague Rd., West bury, 168 determination and refinement. Results can be provided chures will be available. N.Y. 11590. Electrochemical instrumentation, elecin as little as three weeks. 301 tronic analytical and top-loading balances, rotary Haake, 244 Saddle River Rd., Saddle Brook, N.J. evaporators, bottle-top dispensers, and digital micro 07662. Rotovisco viscometers for product developDesmo Chemical, 8 Westchester Plaza, Elmsford, pipettes. 323,324 ment and quality control. Constant temperature therN.Y. 10523. Exclusive representatives of Farmitalia Carlo Erba, Montedison Group of inorganic and organic mal liquid laboratory baths and circulators including Brookhaven Instruments, 8 Harbor Ct., Mt. Sinai, N.Y. heating and refrigerated baths, all purpose water and reagent grade chemicals. U.S. edition of Farmitalia 11766. Laser light scattering systems for characteroil baths, digital set display refrigerated and heating Carlo Erba catalog will be available describing items izing macromolecules, polymers, emulsions, colloids, in stock. Distributor inquiries welcome. baths, and shaker and open immersion circulators. 137,138 and submicron particles. Systems for particle and 317 droplet size distribution analysis. 239 DIALOG Information Services, 3460 Hillview Ave., Harper & Row Publishers, 10 East 53rd St., New York, Palo Alto, Calif. 94304. A well established leader in Brooks/Cole Publishing, 555 Abrego, Monterey, Calif. N.Y. 10022. Full line of college texts including the on-line chemical information, offering low-cost, rapid 93940. College textbooks in the subject area of access to millions of references to journal articles, following newly published titles: AllenlKeefer, chemistry. 416 "Chemistry: Experiment and Theory," 2nd Ed.; Strohl, patents, reports, and papers in all areas of chemistry, "Prep Chem"; BoikesslEdelson, "Chemical Princiengineering, and technology, as well as to identifying Burgess Publishing, 7108 Ohms Lane, Minneapolis, data on millions of chemical substances. The DIALOG ples, " 2nd Ed. (1981); LowrylRichardson, "MechaMinn. 55435. Publishers of educational and resource nism and Theory in Organic Chemistry" (1981); Winexhibit will offer free demonstrations of on-line books and materials in chemistry and related fields. grovel Caret, "Organic Chemistry" with accompanying searching for both subject and substance information. 400A ' 'Study Guide/ Solutions Manual.'' 407 304, 305 Cahn Instruments, 16207 S. Carmenita Rd., Cerritos, Calif. 90701. Cahn 29—the new microprocessor control C-29 has dynamic weighing ranges of 25 mg to 0.1 fig and 250 mgto 1.0 fig. Pushbutton calibration simplifies operation. TA-450—a top-loading microprocessor controlled electronic analytical balance. Weighs samples from 50 g. down to 0.1 mg. The balance incorporates Cahn's unique "stay-put" airhood and 2-year warranty. Cahn 2000, a recording microbalance with a 3.5 g capacity and 0.1 fig sensitivity. 247

Digilab, division of Bio-Rad Laboratories, 237 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02139. Exhibiting our new, low-cost FTIR table top instrument for quality control. 321 Dynatech Laboratories, 900 Slaters Lane, Alexandria, Va. 22314. Dispensers, diluters, shakers, and spectrometers for chemical tests performed on microliter plates. 104

Hauville D. F. S., 235 Yorkland Blvd., Suite 505, Willowdale, Toronto, Ont., Canada M2J 4W9. Portable fume hoods without ducting, toxic gases eliminated by filtration. Intended for the handling and filtration of toxic substances used in all types of laboratories. 133, 134 Hanson Lab Furniture, 814 Mitchell Rd., Newbury Park, Calif. 91320. California manufacturer of metal laboratory furniture. Hanson specializes in free engineering and design and will gladly assist you with your lab planning. A unique manufacturing process provides unusually prompt delivery of this product to the scientific community. 141

Cathodeon, Nuffield Road, Cambridge, England CB4 1TF. Full range of hollow cathode and deuterium lamps. New products include a range of low voltage mercury lamps and xenon flash lamps. 204

Eldex Laboratories, 3551 Haven Ave., Menlo Park, Calif. 94025. Low-cost modular HPLC components: The new Chromat-A-Trol gradient and systems programing, a complete line of high-pressure metering pumps, column heaters, fraction collectors, and solvent delivery systems. 159

CBL Analytics, subsidiary of Rohm & Haas, P.O. Box 25249, Richmond, Va. 23260. A multidisciplinary analytical testing laboratory providing services in

Electrothermal, Crystal Run Rd., Middletown, N.Y. 10940. Heating mantles, heating tapes, Kjeldahl exD. C. Heath & Co., 125 Spring St., Lexington, Mass. traction apparatus, high-temperature industrial surface 01973. Featuring current chemistry texts and new titles

108

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1250 Sixth Ave., San Diego, Calif. 92101. 423

Exposition Workshops In conjunction with the Chemical Exposition, a number of participating exhibitors will be conducting Exposition Workshops covering their areas of instrumentation, data search techniques, and other specializations. Because of space limitations, attendance will be limited and early registration for the workshops is encouraged. Deadline for advance registration is March 8. The advanced registration fee has been set at the minimum level of $15 to allow maximum participation. All on-site registration fees will be $20. All Exposition Workshops will be held in the Rotunda area of the Las Vegas Convention Center adjacent to the Chemical Exposition. Tuesday, March 30 1. FT-IR in the analytical laboratory Sponsor: Nicolet Instrument Corp. This workshop will focus on the practical advantages of FT-IR over dispersive IR, and how FT-IR is useful in the solving of everyday analytical problems. Presentations will cover the surface analysis, multi-component and quantitative analysis, and the use of FT-IR as an intelligent detector for various chromatographic techniques. Instructors: Robert L. Julian, Janet L. Carter; 10 AM to 5 PM, meeting room 9. 2. Powder surface area and porosity Sponsor: Quantachrome Corp. Discussion of the theory and practice of surface area, porosimetry, density, and representative sampling of powders. Instrumentation will be on hand for practical demonstrations. Instructor: Joan Shields; 9 AM to 5 PM, meeting room 10. Wednesday, March 31 3. Chemical patent searching on Orbit Sponsor: System Development Corp. What is Orbit? What files are to include: James/Schreck, "General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: A Brief Introduction"; Grebe, "Theory and Practice in the Organic Laboratory," 3rd Ed.; Miller/Neuzil, "Modern Experimental Inorganic Chemistry." 406 Hlac/Royco Instruments division of Pacific Scientific, 141 Jefferson Dr., Menlo Park, Calif. 94025. Automatic particle sizing and counting systems for liquids, powders, and air. 139 NSA Hitachi, 460 E. Middlefield Rd., Mountain View, Calif. 94043. Model 110 UV-Visible spectrophotometer, Model 180-80 Zeeman effect atomic absorption.

315 IBM Instruments, Orchard Park, P.O. Box 322, Danbury, Conn. 06810. NR/80 Series of FT-NMR spectrometers, Minispec PC20 NMR process analyzer.

in it? What do these files contain? How are they searched? In what ways are they important to the variety of people interested in chemical patents? This workshop will answer the above questions with discussion, demonstration, and on-line practice by the participants themselves. Instructor: Sandy Burchan; 10 AM to 5 PM, meeting room 9. 4. Absolute viscosity measurements Sponsor: Haake Inc. Discussions of rheological behavior patterns, including plastic, pseudoplastic, dilatant, and thixotropic, with ways of describing these flow behaviors both graphically and numerically. The concepts of shear rate and shear stress are introduced. Experimental methods and techniques using the Haake Rotovisco rotational viscometer will be used. Attendees are encouraged to bring samples. A useful workshop for anyone to whom flow properties and their measurements and control are important. Instructor: Wolfgang Marquardt; 10 AM to 5 PM, meeting room 10.

Thursday, April 1 5. Structure searching—the easy way to chemical information retrieval Sponsor: Questel Inc. General description of structure data base, basic commands, and structure search and substructure search using DARC system. General description of Eurcas data base in Questel system, basic commands, and text searching and link between structure and subject searching. Instructor: Michael P. O'Hara; 10 AM to 5 PM, meeting room 9. 6. Recent advances in rapid HPLC analysis Sponsor: IBM Instruments. Discussion of the theory of bonded phase separations using aqueous and near-aqueous mobile phases. Guidelines for transfer of separation conditions from traditional columns to rapid analysis will be given. Demonstrations using the IBM LC/ 9533 ternary liquid chromatograph. Instructors: R. Gilpin, R. Lewis, J. Chazaud; 10 AM to noon, meeting room 10.

REGISTRATION

EXPOSITION WORKSHOPS March 30-April 1, 1982 Course(s) Desired No. Description

Name. Address.

ADVANCE registration fee for each course is $15 (On-site—$20) and must be submitted with this registration form. Make all checks payable to: American Chemical Society. Mail form to: Department of Chemical Expositions, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C 20036.

Deadline for advance registration is March 8. IR/80 and IRI 90 Series of FTIR spectrometers, ER 200 Sciences (current awareness services based on Series of electron paramagnetic resonance, EC 200 standard interest profiles). 162 Series of electrochemical analyzers, related supplies. Instrumentation Graphics, 60 Church St., Yalesville, 254-258 Conn. 06492. The Videochart recorder is a user interactive and RS232C computer interfaced instrument Imported Publications, 320 W. Ohio St., Chicago, III. much more versatile than chart recorders. It zooms 60610. Scientific and technical books from the in, scans to locate and analyze data while providing U.S.S.R. and other socialist countries, in English real time integration of areas under peaks, side-by-side translation. Titles in chemistry, chemical engineering, and superimposed comparisons, and other operations mathematics, physics, science policy, and more. on-the-fly. 209 424 Institute for Scientific Information, 3501 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. The Science Citation Index, Current Abstracts of Chemistry and Index Chemicus, Current Chemical Reactions, Current Contents/ Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences, the Index to Scientific Reviews, ASCA profiles (personalized current awareness services), and ASCATOPICS in the

Instruments For Research & Industry, 108 Franklin Ave., Cheltenham, Pa. 19012. Therm-O-Watch versatile controller; Lead Donuts—weights for lab apparatus; glove bag—inflatable, disposable dry chamber; waterflow units for monitoring the flow of cooling water; Lab-guard curved lead-based safety shield; Handy-cab fume hood. 164 Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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Instruments SA, 173 Essex Ave., Metuchen, N.J. 08840. Direct reading; sequential and combination inductively coupled plasma; spectrometers, large and small; monochromators; macro and micro Raman spectrometers. 245 teotec, 7542 McEwen Rd., Dayton, Ohio 45459-3995. Manufacturers and suppliers of a wide range of enriched stable isotopes for analytical, research, and commercial applications. Among the isotopes available are helium-3, neon-20, 21, 22 plus the isotopes of xenon, krypton, and argon. Also the life science isotopes of carbon-13, oxygen-17, 18 and nitrogen-15, are supplied in elemental gaseous forms such as CO2, 0 2 , and N2 as well as single- and multiple-labeled inorganic acids and salts, aliphatic alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, and acids. 148 Kratos Analytical Instruments, 24 Booker St., Westwood, N J . 07675. Variable wavelength absorbance and fluorescence detectors, post-column reaction systems, and a TLC scanner. 318 R. E. Krieger Publishing, P.O. Box 9542, Melbourne, Fla. 32901. The leading technical and scientific reprinter, Krieger will feature the latest reprints as well as new works. Krieger reprints ACS, John Wiley, Van Nostrand, Reinhold, McGraw Hill, etc. Out-of-print books. 362

on your in-house minicomputer which allow researchers throughout your laboratories interactive access to important chemical information. All input is via conventional molecular diagrams. Other programs allow molecular modeling, rotation, and presentation in three dimensions. 307, 308 Molecular Structure, 3304 Longmire Dr., College Station, Tex. 77840. Offers complete single-crystal x-ray diffraction service, including crystal mounting, data collection structure solution and refinement, construction of 3-D scale model, and production of materials for publication. Also available are experimental electron density studies and structure determination from powder. Results are available in as little as three weeks. 165 National Bureau of Standards, Office of Standard Reference Materials, Chemistry Building, Room B 311, Washington, D.C. 20234. Featuring new standard reference materials that are well characterized homogeneous materials or simple artifacts with specific chemical or physical properties certified by NBS. 207,208

lications. "Comprehensive Organometallic Chemistry" is featured as the major 1982 reference work. 310 Perkin-Elmer, 702 Main Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 06856.

211,212,213 Pharmacia Fine Chemicals, 800 Centennial Ave., Piscataway, N.J. 08854. Brand new, high-performance, separation system for proteins and peptides. A wide range of chromatography packings and instruments such as pumps, monitors, and microprocessor-controlled fraction collectors. 237, 238 Plenum Publishing, 233 Spring St., New York, N.Y. 10013. Johnson, "Introduction to Atomic & Molecular Collisions"; Miller, "Extended Linear Chain Compounds, " vols. 1 & 2; Abramovitch, "Reactive Intermediates," vol. 2; Bockris, "Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry," vol. 14; Leja, "Surface Chemistry of Froth Flotation"; Matijevic, "Surface and Colloid Science," vol. 12; Goldstein, "Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Microanalysis";, and Soferl Zaborsky, "Biomass Conversion Processes for Energy and Fuels." 306

Nermag, DBA RDS, 3064 Scott Blvd., Santa Clara, Praxis, 8327 Potranco Rd., San Antonio, Tex. 78251. Calif. 95050. Manufacturers and marketers oftheRiThe Praxis PNMRLAB offers automated analysis by bermag gas chromatographl mass spectrometer and combining pulsed NMR instrumentation with the Apple data system for use with magnetic sector, quadrupole, II microcomputer. Measurements (liquids in solids and and time flight mass spectrometers. 205 solids in solution) are rapid, precise, and nondestructive. Flexibility adapts to research, industrial QC, Lab Safety Supply, 3430 Palmer Dr., P.O. Box 1368, Nicolet Instrument, 5525 Verona Rd., Madison, Wis. and education. 217 Janesville, Wis. 53547. Dispos-lt with Multisorb the 53711. Newly extended FTIR spectrometer product revolutionary disposal method for laboratory waste. line, consisting of 11 spectrometers including the Prentice-Hall, College Division, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. 236 5MX, a compact, economical, easy-to-use spec07632. Up-to-date college textbooks in introductory trometer; the 5DX system, which unites a compact LDC/MiKon Roy, P.O. Box 10235, Riviera Beach, Fla. and advanced chemistry. 363, 364 optics package with a powerful interactive color33404. Displaying its full line of HPLC pumps, detecgraphics data terminal; and the all new 60SX, a truly Prism Instruments, P.O. Box 13308, New Orleans, La. tors, integrators, and gradient formers. Modular and state-of-the-art system optimally designed for industrial 70185. A revolutionary new instrument, the totally integrated HPLC systems ranging from simple isoresearch applications. New 1270IDACS, a versatile automatic refractamater will be demonstrated. This chratic to totally automated gradient liquid chromasignal acquisition and data processing system. FT-MS microprocessor-based instrument can be programed tography will also be featured. 149 1000 Fourier transform mass spectrometer with newly to directly read any function empirically related to developed high-resolution capillary-column GC-MS refractive index and it can automatically compensate Lea & Febiger, 600 S. Washington Square, Philadelcapabilities and new fast atom bombardment source. fbr temperature variations. This refractamater will phia, Pa. 19106. Latest publications in the field of Nicolet Magnetics 360 wide-bore NMR spectrometer totally eliminate operator eye strain and will make the chemistry and chemical engineering. 409 system. Nicolet XRD R3M single-crystal x-ray crysfive-place refractive index reading available to any tallographic structure determination system. laboratory. A complete line of automatic polarimeters Longman, 19 W. 44th St., New York, N.Y. 10036. 240, 241 and accessories, including a new inexpensive model, Publishers of undergraduate and graduate textbooks the AA-5 which will make manual polarimeter readings and reference books in chemistry. Recent publications Orion Research, 840 Memorial Dr., Cambridge, Mass. obsolete. 242 include books in organic, inorganic, chemical ecology, 02139. Ross electrodes, model 611 pH meter with log and mathematics for chemists. 410 R compensation, model 811 microprocessor pH Quantachrome, 6 Aerial Way, Syosset, N.Y. 11791. meter, model 901 microprocessor ion analyzer, pH and Macmillan Publishing, 866 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 243 specific ion meters and electrodes, dissolved oxygen 10022. Featuring books of educational and profeselectrode, reagents, and accessories. 155,156 sional interest including Petrucci, "General Questel, 1625 I St., N.W., Suite 818, Washington, D.C. Chemistry," 3rd Ed., 1982; and Steitwieser and Heath20006. DARC, an interactive and on-line system for Oxford University Press, 200 Madison Ave., New cock, "Introduction to Organic Chemistry," 2nd Ed., searching by substructure and structure, uses the York, N.Y. 10016. Publishers of reference works, 1981. 430 EURECAS file containing nearly 5 million chemical monographs, and advanced texts in all areas of compounds. The result of a search is the CAS registry chemistry and related fields. Series include: Internanumber which, used with a single command, leads you Manville Products, Ken-Caryl Ranch 1-07, Denver, to the specific CAS abstract and bibliographic inforColo. 80217. Chromosorb chromatographic supports, tional Series of Monographs on Chemistry, Oxford Chemistry Series, Monographs on the Physics and mation for that chemical. 160, 161 packings, and adsorbents for both gas and liquid Chemistry at Materials, Monographs on Physical chromatography. 327 Biochemistry, and Atlas of Molecular Structures in Random House, 201 E. 50 St., New York, N.Y. 10022. Biology. 331 McGraw Hill Book, 1221 Ave of the Americas, New 414 York, N.Y. 10020. Important new books in the field of Parr Instrument, 211 53rd St., Moline, III. 61265. chemistry, including Siebert, "Foundations of Rainin Instrument, Mack Rd., Woburn, Mass. 01801. Pressure reaction equipment and general purpose Chemistry"; Braun, "Introduction to Chemical AnalLiquid chromatography systems, components and ysis"; Russell, "General Chemistry"; Waser, True- pressure vessels for laboratory use. Oxygen bomb supplies including: pumps, detectors, injectors, recombustion, sodium peroxide fusion, and acid digesblood and Knobler, "Chem One," 2nd Ed.; and Pine, corders, column heaters, filtration systems, packed tion sample preparation bombs. Oxygen bomb caloHendrickson, Cram, and Hammond, "Organic columns, column hardware, bulk packings, syringes, rimetry and master control. New accessories for calChemistry," 4th Ed. 313, 314 valves, and fitting systems for both low- and highorimeter and improved stirrers for stirred autoclave pressure applications. Liquid handling systems insystems. 146 cluding pipettes, dilutors, and dispensers, featuring Micron, P.O. Box 3536, Wilmington, Del. 19807. AnGilson Pipetman. 140 alytical services, SEM, EPA, TEM, XRF, XRD, OES. Pathfinder Laboratories, 11542 Fort Mimms Dr., St. GC/MS—photo exhibit and TV video presentation. Louis, Mo. 63141. Labeled compounds. New catalog Space Invaders video contest. 246 Reade Manufacturing, Ridgeway Blvd., Lakehurst, N.J. listing approximately 350 carbon-14-labeled com08733. Established in 1881 Reade is the largest pounds. Custom synthesis of carbon-14- and 13-laMilne Press, P.O. Box 1246, Carmel Valley, Calif. manufacturer in the western world of magnesium beled materials. These organic materials are used 93924. Publishers of study guides and computer pro- primarily in metabolism testing and studies. turning-chips utilized in the Grignard reaction, etc. Our 166 grams for college and high school chemistry courses. production facility in Lakehurst, N.J., consists of more Computer-based supplements for the lecture and than 40 separate buildings on 60 acres of land. Our PCR Research Chemicals, P.O. Box 1778, Gaineslaboratory components of physical chemistry, general ville, Fla. 32601. Organofluorine, organosilicon, production capacity exceeds 10,000 metric tons per chemistry, and introductory chemistry. Software for 316 compounds, derivatizing agents, mass spec standards, year. mainframe and Apple, PET, and TRS-80 micro sys- crown ethers, synthetic reagents, terpenes, and many tems. 332 Recra Research, 4248 Ridge Lea Rd., Amherst, N.Y. other fine organic intermediates. 163 14226. A hazardous waste materials consulting firm, specializing in waste volume reduction, detoxification, Molecular Design, 1122 B St., Hay ward, Calif. 94541. Pergamon Press, Maxwell House, Fairview Park, solidification, waste water treatment and design, Offering an Integrated system for graphical input, Elmsford, N.Y. 10523. Publisher of scientific and landfill design, hydrogeologic, and geologic investistorage, searching, and retrieval of molecular infortechnical books and journals including publications in gation of controlled and uncontrolled waste sites, mation. Our major programs, MACCS and REACCS, the chemical sciences. Distributor of microforms and permitting, and waste materials R&D functions. 329 provide immediate access to the private data bases back issues of Pergamon and other publishers' pub110

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

Sadtler Research Laboratories, 3316 Spring Garden St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. Search system forFT/IR and P-E data station; Sadtler standard and commercial spectra (IR, proton NMR, 13 C NMR, IR vapor phase, UV, fluorescence, Raman, and DTA); CIRA 101 chromatographic IR analyzer, an inexpensive GC/IR system; technical books and analytical services. 101 Sanda, 4343 E. River Dr., Philadelphia, Pa. 19129. 234 Saunders College Publishing, 383 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. Text and reference books in chemistry and the sciences. 412,413 SDC Search Service, 2500 Colorado Ave., Santa Monica, Calif. 90406. The largest and best-designed data bases of chemical information available on line. Chemical Abstract files cover 1967 to date. Chemical dictionary files offer substructure searching for more than 3.4 million compounds. 218, 219 Shandon Southern Instruments, 515 Broad St., Sewickley, Pa. 15143. Exhibiting the Hypersil range of HPLC packing materials, packed columns, the unique Shandon column system and packing pumps. In addition, a selection of electrophoresis tanks and power supplies will be displayed. 147 Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, 9147-H Red Branch Rd., Columbia, Md. 21045. Exhibiting new microprocessor GC, new multichannel chromatography data station microprocessor control UV-VIS scanning spectrophotometer, mini-ll GC, top-loading electronic balances, high performance TLC scanner, new fluorescent spectrophotometer. 326 Shrader Laboratories, 3450 Lovett Ave., Detroit, Mich. 48210. Specializing in mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, GC/MS, high-resolution MS, highresolution GC/MS, electron capture GC, purge and trap GC/MS, single ion monitoring GC/MS, pyrolysis GC/MS and capillary GC/MS. 328

Tracor Instruments, 6500 Tracor Lane, Austin, Tex. 78721. New, model 570 gas chromatograph integrated, microprocessor based, with CRT keyboard controller, 10 method storage, permanent memory, method linking, printer plotter output. Also exhibiting a complete line of liquid chromatography modules and systems. 151 Tracor Northern, 2551 W. Beltline Hwy., Middleton, Wis. 53562. Diode array rapid scan spectrometer with TN-6050 multipurpose spectrophotometer suitable for UV-VIS-NIR, stopped flow analysis, single wavelength fluorescence, broadband wavelength excitation and HPLC. 150 Tracor X-Ray, 345 E. Middlefield Road, Mountain View, Calif. 94043. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometers for the automatic elemental analysis of materials. 152 University of Utah, Dept of Chemistry, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112. Slide-tape presentation and printed material describing research at the University of Utah. 103 Vacumetrics, 2261 Palma Dr., Ventura, Calif. 93003-5789. GC/MS accessories, inlet systems, electron multipliers, antivibration mounts, electropolishers, water chillers, custom vacuum systems, fused silica columns. 330 Varian Instruments, 375C Distel Circle, Los Altos, Calif. 94022. Instruments for chemical, life science, and environmental laboratories. Featuring the new 2200/2300 series UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometers; model 975A A and GTA-95 graphite atomizer and the popular Vista series GC/LC with 401 data systems. 153,154 Verlag Chemie International, 1020 NW 6th St., Deerfield, Fla. 33441. New titles including: "Biotechnology," vol. 1; "Chemical Shift Ranges— Correlation Tables for Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopy"; "Atlas of Polymer and Plastics Analysis," vol. 3; "Additives and Processing Aids"; "Stereospecificity in Organic Chemistry and Enzymology"; "Fertilizers and Fertilization"; "Explosives," 2nd Ed.; "Chem-Art Templates." 401, 402

SLM Aminco, 810 W. Anthony Dr., Urbana, III. 61801. Displaying their analytical instrumentation line, including the SLM 8000 spectrofluorometer, and other fluorescence instruments, such as the Aminco SPF-500, fluoro-monitor, andSPF-125. Also displayed Wadsworth Publishing, 10 Davis Dr., Belmont, Calif. 94002. College textbooks in the subject area of will be the Aminco Hem-O-Scan blood oxygen equichemistry. 417 librium curve analyzer. 220, 221

Waters Associates, 34 Maple St., Milford, Mass. Spectrex, 3594 Haven Ave., Redwood City, Calif. 94063. Vreeland-Direct reading spectrascope. Particle 01757. Displaying the latest in HPLC instruments, components and accessories. Continental Waters counting system. Personal air sampler. 102 Systems will be featuring RO and Dl water. 200, 201, 202, 203 Spectrum Chemical Manufacturing, 14422 S. San Pedro St., Gardena, Calif. 90248. A leading supplier of reagent, biochemicals, USP and FCC chemicals, distributors for Kodak and MCB laboratory chemicals and Mallinckrodt electronic grade and fine chemicals. Exclusive western states distributors for Ajinomoto amino acids, specialists in bench scale custom organic synthesis of difficult intermediates. 319 Springborn Group, One Springborn Center, Enfield, Conn. 06082. An internationally recognized research, development, and testing firm since 1944 presenting a graphic summary of facilities and services available to technical and business managers throughout the chemical industry. Both physical sciences and life sciences will be highlighted as well as integrated management services. 210

John Wiley & Sons, 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158. College textbooks and professional reference books of interest to those in the field of chemistry. 403, 404, 405, 405A Willard Grant Press, Statler Office Bldg., 20 Providence St., Boston, Mass. 02116. Texts in general, organic, and biological chemistry. Modular lab program in chemistry. "Organic Chemistry," 2nd Ed., Fessenden and Fessenden; "Intro Organic Chem," 3rd Ed., Brown; "General Applied Chemistry," 2nd Ed., Manahan. 400 Wilmad Glass, Route 40 & Oak Rd., Buena, N.J. 08310. Materials and supplies for NMR spectroscopy and IR and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Samples of precision bore glass and quartz tubing and subassemblies manufactured from it. 252

Springer-Verlag, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10010. Featuring H. Dugas and C. Penney, "Bioorganic Chemistry"; Prince, "Mathematical Techniques for World Book-Childcraft, P.O. Box 12212, Lake Park, Crystallography and Materials Science"; W. BartFla. 33403. The 1982 edition of World Book and knecht, "Explosions"; Spector, "Covalent Catalysis Childcraft. Together they represent the best source By Enzymes"; Hutzinger, "Handbook of Environmental of information for use in the home today. 249 Chemistry." 312 Worth Publishers, 444 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. Teknivent, 10774 Trenton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63132. 10016. Callewaert and Genyea, "Fundamentals of 228, 229 College Chemistry"; "Fundamentals of Organic and Biological Chemistry"; "Basic Chemistry: General, Thiokol/Ventron Division, 150 Andover St., Danvers, Organic, Biological"; Kemp and Vellaccio, "Organic Mass. 01923. Manufacturer of specialty chemicals for Chemistry" and workbook and solutions manual; Althe chemical process industries specializing in sodium inger et al, "Organic Chemistry," 2nd Ed and supborohydride for chemical purification, pollution control, plements; Lehninger, "Biochemistry," 2nd Ed; and metal recovery. 244 ' 'Principals of Biochemistry." 408

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Tickets for the tours and plant trips may be purchased either in advance, using the registration form on page 116, or on-site in the Hospitality Center located in the Las Vegas Hilton, Conference Room 4 during the hours announced for registration. Please note that the following tours can be sold only in advance: GP-12, GP-13, and GP-18. For the first two of these, advance guarantees must be given. See the description of GP-18 for details concerning its arrangements. Advance purchase of tickets for other tours is recommended as participation is limited. Buses for all tours will depart from the Las Vegas Hilton, pavilion entrance. Tours GP-3, GP-4, and GP-8 will take place in the Hilton.

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GP-1.6 PM to 9:30 PM. After-dark tour of Las Vegas area. Las Vegas is a night-time city, and everything looks better then. This is your chance to see Hoover Dam, stop at a historic old casino for a roast beef buffet (optional at $3.45 per person), then see "Glitter Gulch"—the downtown casino center and strip at their best. Cost: $8.00; limit: 41. MONDAY, MARCH 29

GP-2. 9 AM to 3 PM. Hoover Dam tour and Lake Mead cruise. This "land and lake" tour includes a buffet luncheon, a grand tour to the top of the $175 million dam, plus an excursion on Lake Mead aboard a tour cruiser. Cost includes government dam fee. Cost: $26; limit: 45. GP-3. 9 AM to 10 AM. How to be a winner. An expert teaches you how to be a winner, how to act in a casino, and how to feel confident in any game. He teaches baccarat, roulette, 21, and craps, using casino layouts to demonstrate, and has a question and answer period. Location is Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom C. Cost: $5.00; limit: 100. Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

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GP-4. 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM. Las Vegas showgirl. This program takes you behind the scenes with a Las Vegas showgirl. She reveals her unique stories of being on stage at the Lido de Paris while changing from street attire to her full makeup and show ensemble. She will put stage makeup on an audience volunteer. Location is Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom C. Cost: $6.00; limit: 100.

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GP-5. 1 PM to 5 PM. Las Vegas home tour and Liberace Museum. This tour takes you through Las Vegas' exclusive residential areas and permits you to enter one home. Then on to the new Liberace Museum to see the world's rarest piano collection, classic and customized automobiles, and a million-dollar wardrobe. Plus a visit to Omnimax, the ultimate motion picture theater. A 30-minute movie is presented at Caesars Palace in the world's newest theater dome—a duplicate of the six-storyhigh screen in the National Air &

Space Museum at the Smithsonian. Cost: $18; limit: 45. GP-6.6 PM to 9:30 PM. After-dark tour of the Las Vegas area. See GP-1 for details. Cost: $8.00; limit: 41.

back in time via gowns and accessories worn by our forebears. A wedding gown collection will be the finale. The show is performed to oldtime piano playing. Location is Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom C. Cost: $12; limit: 100.

GP-9. 6 PM to 11 PM. Night club tour. An introduction to Vegas night TUESDAY, MARCH 30 life, including a dinner show, a visit to "Glitter Gulch," and a cruise up the GP-7.9 AM to 2 PM. Valley of Fire. strip. No lines, no waiting, no hassles. Geology guides will take you to an We take care of the tipping. Cost: $49; area of red sandstone rock formations limit: 56. with a history dating back to 500 BC. A box lunch is included. Return trip is along the Northshore Road of Lake WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31 Mead. Cost: $20; limit: 45. GP-10.9 AM to 3 PM. Hoover Dam, GP-8. 1 PM to 3:30 PM. Antiques Old Vegas Fort, Ethyl M candy and newtiques. Antique expert has factory, and cactus gardens. An displays of costly items that are or will opportunity to visit a famous frontier be valuable someday. This class fort and have lunch in the Hondo shows how to decipher value today Cantina, a replica of that in a John and also for tomorrow. It teaches how Wayne movie, and see western shops, to become more aware of what we buy stores, a park, and entertainment. and collect for possible sale. An an- Tour will descend by elevator into the tique gown fashion show will take you depths of Hoover Dam to see details

APPLICATION TO TOUR NEVADA TEST SITE RETURN TO: Boulder Dam Section ACS, 1989 N. Valley Dr., Las Vegas, Nev. 89108. DEADLINE: U.S. citizens—March 10; Citizens of other countries—Feb. 26. U.S. citizens: Full Name

Name and Address of Employer or Sponsoring Organization.

Social Security No Name and Address of Place of WorkDate of Birth

Place of Birth_

Residence or Business AddressKind of BusinessField of ResearchCitizens of other countries: Work TelephoneFull Name U.S. Social Security No. (if applicable). Date of Birth

Place of Birth:

Citizenship

Fluent — — —

Not Fluent — — —

None — — —

Writing — — — Brief Description of Technical Qualifications and Experience (in relation to visit).

Aliases and Dates usedDate of Entry into U.S..

Knowledge of English (check one) Speaking Comprehension Reading

-Place of Entry-

Alien Registration No. (if immigrantPassport No. (if nonimmigrant)

Notify me of my acceptance or rejection at the following address:

Date Passport Expires

Name-

Residence Address

Street AddressCity

Title (field of specialization).

112

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

State/Country.

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of construction and the power plants that provide energy for the southwestern U.S. We will visit the "Ethyl M " chocolate factory and view one of the world's finest cactus gardens. Cost: $20 (includes government fee); limit: 45.

electrochemicals used in the battery industry. They also manufacture chlorates and perchlorates used as weed killers, in the bleaching of paper, and as the oxidizers in matches and solid propellant rocket fuels. Cost: $6.00; limit: 48.

GP-11. 1 PM to 4 PM. Red Rock Canyon and Spring Mountain Ranch. We take you to beautiful Red Rock Canyon area with a geologist to interpret the impressive red and white rock formations. We will tour Spring Mountain Ranch, a working western ranch that is part of the Nevada State Park System. Cost: $15; limit: 45.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31

GP-12.7 PM to 10:30 PM. Western rodeo with barbeque feast and square dance. A real western rodeo with bronco riding, roping, bull-riding, and audience participation events; also a western deep-pit barbeque and a music program with optional square dancing. (If you don't know how, we'll teach you.) Cost: $35. Preregistration a must. Minimum: 500. THURSDAY, APRIL 1

GP-13. 10 AM to 3 PM. Scenic flight over Lake Mead and through the Grand Canyon. An exciting lV2-hour flight through the Grand Canyon also will take you the entire length of Lake Mead and into the rugged remote wilderness of western Grand Canyon. We also will visit a famous frontier fort, Old Vegas, for lunch and a western experience. Cost: $80. Preregistration required. Limit: 37. GP-14. 10 AM to 3 PM. Tennis tournament. The tournament will be held at the Desert Inn. Bring your own racquet, play at your own risk, and try for a trophy. Cost: $10.

PLANT TRIPS TUESDAY, MARCH 30

GP-15.8:30 AM to 1 PM. Southern Nevada Chemical Industries. A bus will take visitors to the BMI industrial complex in Henderson, Nev. Three major chemical manufacturers are located in the complex. Stauffer Chemical manufactures chlorine, caustic, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Titanium Metals Corp. is the largest completely integrated producer of titanium in the world. Operations at this plant include the production of sponge titanium ingots. Kerr-McGee produces a variety of

GP-16. 9 AM to noon. Genstar Lime and Cement Company. Tour the company's quarry, calcining and hydration operations, and quality control laboratory for dolomitic lime products. Cost: $6.00 limit: 42. GP-17. 1:30 PM to 4:30 PM GTE Sylvania and the Environmental Protection Agency. Tour will begin with a visit to the GTE Sylvania Lithium Battery Co. GTE is the high technology manufacturer of the high energy density, prismatic, lithium thionyl chloride primary battery. Following this is a visit to the U.S. EPA environmental monitoring systems laboratory. This facility includes several divisions concerned with applying a variety of methods to measure and assess the extent of pollutants, both radiological and chemical. Cost: $6.00; limit: 30. THURSDAY, APRIL 1

GP-18. 7 AM to 5:30 PM. Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site. Tour group will travel by bus to Mercury, Nev., about 110 km (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas and enter the 1350 square mile test site where nuclear weapons testing and radioactive waste storage research are done. Visitors will tour E-MAD, where high-level radioactive waste is remotely handled before it is used in storage research. They will tour the Climax spent fuel test tunnel 1400 feet underground in granite, and Sedan Crater, a massive crater created by a peaceful nuclear explosives test in 1962. Special badging is required for access to the site; those who have not provided complete information will be excluded. For this tour, all ticket holders must carry proper identification: U.S. citizens: driver's license or other personal identification; naturalized citizens: passport or naturalization papers. Casual dress and comfortable walking shoes are recommended. No cameras or binoculars will be allowed. Lunch can be purchased at an on-site cafeteria. Please complete application form on page 112. Tickets will be sold on-site only to those approved for participation. Cost: about $15. limit: 90.

LAS VECiAS* ^ SPECIAL EVENTS

SATURDAY, MARCH 27 Divisional Officers Caucus. 1 P M to 4

PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 11. Divisional Councilors Caucus. 4 P M to 6

PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 11. SUNDAY, MARCH 28 Glenn T. Seaborg Address. 2 P M to 4

PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion 10. The talk, "The New Elements," is open to everyone. Western Regional Councilors Caucus. 8

P M to 10 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Royal Salon. MONDAY, MARCH 29

ACS Award Reception and Dinner. 6:30 P M to 8:30 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Ballrooms A & B (see Social Events, ticket 107). The general meeting following the banquet is open to all those wishing to hear 1982 Priestley Medallist Bryce Crawford Jr. speak on "The Ripening of Time." Southeastern Councilors Caucus. 7:30 P M to 9 P M , Las Vegas Hilton, Continental Salon. TUESDAY, MARCH 30 Congressional Science Counselors Caucus. 3:30 P M to 5 P M , Las Vegas Convention Center, Room O, East Hall.

Region I Councilors Caucus. 4:30 PM to 5:45 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Continental Salon. Middle Atlantic Regional Councilors Caucus. 5 P M to 7 P M , Las Vegas Hilton, Directors Suite 473.

"The Stellar Thread." the society's new planetarium show on DNA, 6 PM and again at 8 PM, Clark County Community College planetarium. Presidential Lecture: Science Policy and Funding for Scientific Research. 7 P M to 9 P M , Las Vegas Hilton, Ballroom C.

Mixer. 9 P M to 11 PM, Las Vegas Hilton, Pavilion. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31 "The Stellar Thread." 12:15 P M . See details above. Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN 113

One-day-session tickets are not honored. The meeting registration fee V may be waived for an unemployed member who wishes to use NECH. The waiver may be requested in advance or at the meeting. In advance, ^ PREPRINTS forward the preregistration form from this issue with your request to the Petroleum Chemistry Inc. Vol. 27 Employment Aids Office. At the No. 1 & 2, James W. Bunger meeting, come to the NECH staff of$8.00 Treasurer fice in the Rotunda. Browning Bldg. Outside U.S. Preprints of the following divisions' 320 Employer representatives may University of Utah $9.00 technical sessions may be purchased Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 register beginning Monday, March at the entrance to their meeting (801)581-8627 29, at 8 AM to review candidates' rooms or ordered by mail. records and schedule interviews. Polymer Chemistry Inc. Vol. 23 Employer representatives must agree Frederick Dammont Environmental Chemistry Vol. 22 No. 1,$12.50a that no placement charges will be a Circulation Manager Gordon Bellen No. 1,$7.00 made and that candidates will be Division of Polymer National Sanitation Chemistry advised at the time of first contact the Foundation P.O. Box 20453 name of the employer, geographic P.O. Box 1468 Newark, N.J. 07101 Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106 location, and nature of the position. (201)482-5744 (313)769-8010 Position available postings received a Payment with order, b 1. For members of the division and from companies will be ready for reFuel Chemistry Vol. 27 ACS, no charge except $12 dues for divisional membership. view after 1 PM, Monday, March 29, 2. For affiliate members of the division, not members of ACS, Shirley B. Radding No. 1,$8.00 by any person registered at the no charge except $14 dues for affiliate membership of the Director of Publications No. 2, $8.00 division. 3. For libraries and individuals who are not affiliates meeting. Copies will be available for Fuel Chemistry Division or members, $10 per book or $30 per year shipped surface 2994 Cottonwood Ct. sale at 50 cents per position. mail. (Airmail shipment will incur additional costs.) Payment Santa Clara, Calif. 95051 with order. Back orders $8.00 per volume through Vol. 43, if Employers who wish to post a noavailable; $10 for Vol. 44 and 45. Payment with order. (415)859-2875 tice of an opening may obtain standard forms in advance from the Employment Aids Office. A separate vance. If this is not possible, register at the meeting just as early as possi- form should be submitted for each ble—no later than Monday, March opening. These may be returned to 29. Interviews are scheduled one-half the national office (by March 9) or day in advance, and the majority of delivered to NECH during the employer representatives do not re- meeting. All completed forms must ^ EMPLOYMENT main for the entire meeting. Early comply with all federal regulations on registration for candidates only will job discrimination in employment. begin Sunday, March 28, from 3 PM Fee to employers in addition to National Employment Clearing to 7 PM. Candidates' records will not meeting registration: .$50 ($20 to acHouse (NECH) will be available to be placed on file to be reviewed by ademic, $125 to agencies and manACS members and student affiliates employers until the candidate reports agement consulting firms), which inat the meeting. It will be located in in Las Vegas and completes all regis- cludes unlimited postings during the the Rotunda of the Las Vegas Con- tration requirements. When re- meeting or $25 per listing (maximum vention Center and will be open from questing forms for the meeting, please charge $100) to employers who submit opening(s) but are unable to at8 AM to 5 PM Monday through specify Las Vegas. Thursday, March 29 through April Both candidates for employment tend. You will be invoiced following 1. and employer representatives must the meeting. If you do not plan to atCandidates are urged to submit be registered and in attendance at the tend, note this on your form and that forms to the national office in ad- meeting to use the NECH facilities. all interested candidates should write to you directly. Single copies of candidates' records (the summary form) will be provided during the meeting at 50 cents per copy. Personal resumes of candidates, if submitted, will be on file for review. Copies of the resumes may be obtained at 50 cents per resume. Orders for complete sets of candidates' summary forms ($50 per set) will be taken during the meeting from registered employers. Orders for complete sets of the summary forms from companies not registered with NECH will be accepted at $100 per set for 30 days following the meeting. Request all forms from the ACS Employment Aids Office, 1155—16th Some hotels along the famous Las Vegas strip St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036.

LAS ¥IE€IAS- '

LASVIC^S*

114

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

Vol. 46 Organic Coatings & $15b Plastics Chemistry John H. Lupinski Preprint and Sales Manager General Electric Co. P.O. Box 8, Bldg. K-1 Schenectady, N.Y. 12301 (518)385-8638

LA$¥E€iAS'"' ^ ACS OFFICERS

Robert W. Parry, president Fred Basolo, president-elect Albert C. Zettlemoyer, immediate past-president Clayton F. Callis, chairman, board of directors Raymond P. Mariella, executive director Rodney N. Hader, secretary John K Crum, deputy executive director/treasurer Divisional Officers Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. A. Pour-El, chairman; C. J. Mussinan, secretary-treasurer, c/o International Flavors & Fragrances, Research & Development, Union Beach, N.J. 07735. Division of Analytical Chemistry. H. L. Pardue, chairman; R. F. Hirsch, secretary, Department of Chemistry, Seton Hall University, South Orange, N.J. 07079. Division of Biological Chemistry. E. R. Stadtman, chairman; V. A. Bloomfield, secretary, Biochemistry Department, University of Minnesota, 1479 Gortner Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 55108. Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry. G. D. McGinnis, chairman; D. C. Baker, secretary, Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, University, Ala. 35486. Cellulose, Paper & Textile Division. I. S. Goldstein, chairman; R. D. Gilbert, secretary-treasurer, 218 David Clark Laboratory, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C.27650. Division of Chemical Education Inc. G. A. Crosby, chairman; J. A. Bell, secretary, Department of Chemistry, Simmons College, 300 The Fenway, Boston, Mass. 02115. Division of Chemical Health & Safety. M. M. Renfrew, chairman; D. B. Walters, secretary, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27709. Division of Chemical Information. J. G. Marcali, chairman; P. B.

Moses, secretary, 5619 Evergreen, Midland, Mich. 48640. Division of Chemical Marketing & Economics. F. Y. Chan, chairman; J. L. Bivert, secretary, 1211 Kingsbury Court, Midland, Mich. 48640. Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry. G. L. Haller, chairman; E. Kugler, secretary, Exxon Research & Engineering Co., P.O. Box 45, Linden, N.J. 07035. Division of Computers in Chemistry. D. A. Pensak, chairman; D. Edelson, secretary, Bell Laboratories, 600 Mountain Ave., Murray Hill, N.J. 07974. Division of Environmental Chemistry. R. L. Jolley, chairman; J. D. Johnson, secretary, 720 Bradley Rd., Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514. Division of Fertilizer & Soil Chemistry. D. P. Day, chairman; L. W. Bierman, secretary, 121 Foothill Blvd., Pocatello, Idaho 83201. Division of Fluorine Chemistry. A. W. Jache, chairman; P. R. Resnick, secretary-treasurer, Polymer Products Department, Building 269, Room 411, Experimental Station, E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Del. 19898. Division of Fuel Chemistry. K. S. Vorres, chairman; M. F. Farcasiu, secretary, 73 Gulick Rd., Princeton, N.J. 08540. Division of Geochemistry. T. Wildeman, chairman; P. G. Hatcher, secretary-treasurer, U.S. Geological Survey, 923 National Center, Reston, Va. 32092. Division of The History of Chemistry. T. A. Koeppel, chairman; N. M. Foster, secretary-treasurer, Department of Chemistry, Cedar Crest College, Allentown, Pa. 18104.

Division of Medicinal Chemistry. J. Neumeyer, chairman; M. Gorman, secretary, Lilly Research Laboratories, MC930, 307 East McCarty St., Indianapolis, Ind. 46285. Division of Microbial & Biochemical Technology. R. W. Eltz, chairman; R. W. Swartz, secretary-treasurer, Genetics Institute, 225 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 02115. Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology. R. L. Hahn, chairman; R. W. Hoff, secretary, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, POB 808, Livermore, Calif. 94550. Division of Organic Chemistry. A. I. Meyer, chairman; W. S. Trahanovsky, secretary-treasurer, Roger Adams Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 61801. Division of Organic Coatings & Plastics. M. Wismer, chairman; M. J. S. Bowden, secretary, Bell Telephone Laboratories, 600 Mountain Ave., Murray Hill, N.J. 07974. Division of Pesticide Chemistry. G. J. Marco, chairman; P. A. Hedin, secretary, Boll Weevil Research Laboratory, Box 5367, Mississippi State, Mississippi State, Miss. 39762. Division of Petroleum Chemistry. G. E. Illingworth, Jr., chairman; W. V. Bush, secretary, Shell Development Co., P.O. Box 1380, Houston, Tex. 77001. Division of Physical Chemistry. E. F. Hayes, chairman; A. L. Kwiram, secretary-treasurer, Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 98195. Division of Polymer Chemistry. J. C. Salamone, chairman; S. W. Shalaby, secretary, R.D. 2, Box 238-A, Long View Rd., Lebanon, N.J. 08833. Division of Professional Relations. D. Chamot, chairman; M. W. Wadley, secretary, 520 East Riverdale Ave., Orange, Calif. 92665.

Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry. R. A. Stowe, chairman; G. K. Smith, secretary, Rohm & Haas Co., Computer Application Group, P.O. Box 584, Bristol, Pa. 19007.

Rubber Division Inc. H. J. Herzlich, chairman; E. R. Sourwine, secretary, Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., 1200 Firestone Parkway, Akron, Ohio 44317.

Division of Inorganic Chemistry. L. V. Interrante, chairman; R. N. Grimes, secretary, Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. 22901.

Division of Small Chemical Businesses. P. K. Garetson, chairman; J. E. McClurg, secretary, Harris Laboratories, P.O. Box 80837, Lincoln, Neb. 60068. Feb. 15, 1982 C&EN

115

Advance registration—183rd National ACS Meeting Las Vegas, Nev.

March 28-Apr. 2, 1982 Mali this form with payment to:

Deadline for receipt off registration: March 8 Deadline for requests for refunds: March 12

Department of Meetings & Divisional Activities American Chemical Society 1155— 16th St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036

Make check payable to: ACS or American Chemical Society D Dr.

D Mr.

D Miss

D Ms.

D Mrs.

Name (Last, first, M.I.) Affiliation Affiliation address City, State, ZIP Country Telephone (office, home) Days at meeting: 1 QSu 2 DMo 3 DTu 4 DWe 5 DTh 6 DFr

Type of affiliation:

D Academia

D Government

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Address during meeting Which division's program influenced you to attend: most.

- less _

.next-

. Division(s).

I am a member of the

.Division(s).

I am interested in joining the. FEES: Registration—check one only 1 D Member or national affiliate (
No. tickets

@$

Total

Ticket total $_

Paid by:

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FEES: Abstracts Sets at $22 ($20 for division members) $_ D Will pick up at meeting D Please mail (U.S. only). Enclosed is $3.00 for each book mailed. $_ D California delivery sales tax—add 6% abstracts price $_ Total remitted $_ D VISA or D MasterCard D Access D Barclaycard

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116

C&ENFeb. 15, 1982

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WORKSHOPS ON ^4f FT-IR in the Analytical Laboratory ^ ^ Powder surface area and porosity ^ f Chemical patent searching on orbit ^ V Absolute viscosity measurements ^q^ Structure searching—the easy way to chemical information retrieval

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orkshops will be held Tuesday, March 30 thru Thursday, April 1 in the Rotunda area of the Las Vegas Convention Center adjacent to the chemical exposition. See Page 109 for further details.

"5^Recent advances in rapid HPLC analysis

COURSE(S) DESIRED No.

EXPOSITION WORKSHOPS MARCH 30-APR 1, 1982. AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY CHEMICAL EXPOSITION 1155 Sixteenth St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036

•• •

DESCRIPTION

NAME.

ADDRESS. CITY • STATE • Z I P .

Advance registration fee for each course is $15.00 (onsite—$20) and must be submitted with this registration form. All checks should be made payable to: American Chemical Society