192nd ACS National Meeting - C&EN Global Enterprise (ACS


Nine divisions will participate in the Biotechnology Secretariat's inaugural program. The Computer Secretariat will address chemists' workstations: ap...
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PRELIMINARY PROGRAM At the American Chemical Society's national meeting in Anaheim, six of its committees, 27 of its divisions, and three secretariats will sponsor technical sessions covering a myriad of noteworthy topics, A sampling: chemicals in labs —from purchase to disposal (ACS Task Force on Resource Conservation & Recovery Act); development and applications of immunoligand techniques (Agricultural & Food Chemistry); low-level radiation and biological monitoring for health effects (Chemical Health & Safety); generic structure searching (Chemical Information); proteins at interfaces (Colloid & Surface Chemistry); atmospheric persistence of toxic organic compounds (Environmental Chemistry); geochemical posai (Geochemistry); case histories in drug disposal (History of Chemistry); recombinant ON A process technology (Microbial & Biochemical Technology); chemical phenomena associated with radioactivity releases during severe nuclear plant disasters (Nuclear Chemistry & Technology); and polymers for electronics applications (Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering). Nine divisions will participate in the Biotechnology Secretariat's inaugural program. The Computer Secretariat will address chemists' workstations: applications of computers in chemical research, and the Macromolecular Secretariat will sponsor several symposia on composites. A presidential plenary session-"How To Survive When Everyone's Scared"—Monday, Sept. 8, explores responsibilities of both scientists and journalists to public understanding of science and technology. Among the many tour sites are Disneyland, San Diego Sea World, Knott's Berry Farm, Unocal's (Union Oil) Fred Hartley Research Center, and Universal Studios. The final program, with more details on the technical sessions and other events in Anaheim, will appear in the July 14 C&EN.

192nd ACS

National Meeting Sept. 7-12

Anaheim

June 23, 1986 C&EN

43

Preliminary Program Divisions and other groups offer diversified program in Anaheim ACS Task Force on Resource Conservation & Recovery Act Symposium on chemicals m labs—from purchase to disposal—addresses unique problems facing labs that in September become part of the federal regulatory system for hazardous waste management and must comply with its regulations, and provides insights on how to establish practical chemical management scheme, Board Committee on the Handicapped Presentation describes new technological methods that assist physically handicapped scientists and students in obtaining and analyzing lab data; methods suitable for high school and college labs. Younger Chemists Committee Forum on employment of chemists—the place for the chemical entrepreneur— features four chemists with independent chemical businesses who share their early experiences with failure and address skills required to be one's own boss. Other presentation explores opportunities for chemists in space. Agricuitural & Food Chemistry One symposium covers developments and applications of immunoligand techniques, a second treats chemometrics and stateof-the-art techniques being applied to help close the gap between sensory and analytical data, and a third addresses bioavailability and metabolic aspects of manganese. Agrochemicals Symposia addressing range of topics dealing with pesticides, insect hormones, and insect pheromones include award symposium on advances in pesticide metabolism and environmental safety, and sym-

Aiisiliciin Although some changes may become necessary, sessions are assigned to the following locations from 8:30 AM to noon and 1:30 PM to 6 PM, Monday through Friday. Please check the final program in the July 14 issue.

SUNDAY INORGANIC— Anaheim Hilton Tutorial on Metals in Medicine ORGANIC—Convention Center Poster 44

June 23, 1986 C&EN

posia on synthesis, biotechnology of agrochemicals (for Biotechnology Secretariat's inaugural program), and light activation in pesticide chemistry. Cellulose, Paper & Textile Anselme Payen Award symposium considers cellulose microfibril formation in biological systems. Another symposium deals with muJtidisciplinary aspects of cellulose and related fibrous materials. Chemical Education State-of-the-art symposium on issues in air quality treats atmospheric aerosols, detection of airborne mutagens, acid fog, and nuclear winter. Other symposia topics include consumer chemistry, computeraided instruction, periodic table, and high school teachers program. Plenary lectures address marine natural products and the inorganic chemistry-molecular biology interface. Chemical Health & Safety Symposia cover low level radiation and biological monitoring for health effects, occupational health aspects of toxicology—incorporating both chemical and medical approaches, and right-to-know—with review and evaluation of audiovisual materials for company and educational institution training programs. Chemical information International program includes symposia on generic structure searching; special topics in chemical searching—inorganics, topology, stereochemistry, and threedimensional representation; reaction data bases and computerized synthesis planning; and graphics for chemical information. Program also features symposium on biotechnology information (organized

for Biotechnology Secretariat) and one on the chemist's workstation (organized for Computer Secretariat). Chemical Marketing & Economics Full-day symposium on bringing biotechnology to market, presented for Biotechnology Secretariat, covers biotechnology products in specialty chemical manufacture, agriculture, therapeutics, diagnostics, instrumentation, and protein engineering that have market significance. Colloid & Surface Chemistry Four-and-a-half-day symposium on proteins at interfaces and symposia on polymer films on electrodes, interfacial chemistry in electronic materials technologies, kinetics and intermediates in surface reactions, and applications of solid-state NMR to heterogeneous catalysis are among eight symposia in program. Computers in Chemistry Program features two joint symposia: one, with History of Chemistry, celebrates computer division's 10th anniversary; another, with Small Chemical Businesses, deals with prominent role of computers in small businesses. Environmental Chemistry Nine symposia and four general sessions cover all aspects of the environment. Areas emphasized include atmospheric chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons* atmospheric persistence of toxic organic compounds, indoor air pollutants, and measurement of atmospheric nitrogen species such as nitric acid. Specific symposia address emissions from waste dumps, landfills, and waste incinerators; artifacts and trace concentrations; and health effects related to complex organic mixtures.

2YC3—Past, Present & Future: 25th AnniMONDAY versary YOUNGER CHEMISTS COMMITTEE—Quality General Inn CHEMICAL HEALTH & SAFETY— Anaheim Forum on Employment of Chemists: The Hilton Place for the Chemical Entrepreneur (So Biological Monitoring for Health Effects You Want To Be Your Own Boss!) Occupational Health Aspects of Toxicology AGRICULTURAL & FOOD— Anaheim Marriott CHEMICAL INFORMATION— Anaheim Hilton Bioavailability of Manganese Open Meetings of Society Committees on General Publications & CAS AGROCHEMICALS— Anaheim Marriott General Burdick & Jackson Award Symposium: AdCHEMISTRY & THE LAW—Convention Cenvances in Pesticide Metabolism & Enviter ronmental Safety Innovation To Regain the U.S. Competitive General—Analytical & Environmental, in Edge memory of F. Gunther COLLOID & SURFACE—Convention Center ANALYTICAL— Anaheim Marriott Surface Chemistry in Biology, Medicine & Fourier-Transform Mass Spectrometry: I & II Dentistry: Proteins at Interfaces Separations: Clinical Analyses Photochemical & Electrochemical Surface Supercritical Fluid Chromatography: I & II Science: Polymer Films on Electrodes Conformation & Structure of Proteins General: Catalysis & Related Subjects CELLULOSE, PAPER & TEXTILE— ConvenGeneral: Colloid Science & Related Topics tion Center ENVIRONMENTAL—Anaheim Hilton Cellulose & Related Fibrous Materials Atmospheric Chemistry of Aromatic HydroCHEMICAL EDUCATION— Quality Inn carbons: I & II State of the Art Symposium: Issues in Air Health & Environmental Effects of Complex Quality Organic Mixtures: I & II Perspectives Lecture

Fertilizer & Soil Chemistry Program emphasizing environmental aspects of fertilizers and related agronomic practices explores effects of impurities on fertilizer production and effects of nitrification inhibitor use. A general symposium is devoted to analytical methods. Geochemistry Topics of major symposia include geochemistry in petroleum exploration and geochemical aspects Qf radioactive waste disposal. Geochemical techniques in earthquake prediction are subject of special address. History of Chemistry Three major symposia cover history of computing m chemistry; case histories in drug discovery—highlighting anti-inflammatory drugs, benzodiazepines, and antihypertensives; and history of polymer composites. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Symposia address electronic device manufacture, modeling of complex reaction systems, diffusion in polymers and composites, biological separations technology, coal ash chemistry, and transport in soil. Inorganic Chemistry Symposia, general papers, and tutorials for novices cover metals in medicine and related bioinorganic topics. Program also includes symposia on multiple bonding involving the heavier main-group elements, high-energy processes in organometallic chemistry, and a cosponsored symposium on conducting polymers. Medicinal Chemistry Among symposia topics are mechanismbased approaches to cancer chemotherPollutants in a Multimedia Environment: I & II Atmospheric Persistence of Toxic Organics: I FERTILIZER & SOIL—Anaheim Marriott Environmental & Agronomic Aspects of Fertilizers General FUEL—Inn at the Park Syngas Conversion Catalysis Reactions of Coal in Novel Systems GEOCHEMISTRY—Inn at the Park Geochemistry in Petroleum Exploration Origin & Evolution of Brines in the Subsurface HISTORY—Anaheim Hilton 10th Anniversary of the Computer Division: Symposium on the History of Computing in Chemistry: I. Key Organizations; II. Nonnumerical Methods in Chemistry INDUSTRIAL & ENGINEERING—Convention Center Process Technology for Electronic Device Manufacture Chemical & Mathematical Modeling of Complex Reaction Systems INORGANIC— Anaheim Hilton Metals in Medicine

apy, recent ^advances in treatment of seizure disorders, and discovery and development of potential drugs from natural sources. Microbial & Biochemical Technology Program defines cutting edge of applied biotechnology with symposia on recombinant DNA process technology, mammalian cell culture, and biosensor technology. Other symposia highlight fermentation kinetics and modeling, secondary metabolism, and computer applications. Nuclear Chemistry & Technology Presentation includes symposium on chemical phenomena associated with radioactivity releases during severe nuclear plant accidents. Organic Chemistry Cope Award Symposium includes presentations by 10 Cope Scholar awardees. Symposium on azide photochemistry and one on controlled carbometallation and related reactions also featured. Physical Chemistry One theoretical symposium addresses electronic structure of the transition state; another emphasizes advances at the interface of chemistry and biology. Symposium on state-to-state chemistry treats newest theoretical and experimental results in chemical reactivity. Polymer Chemistry Symposia on phQtophysics of polymers, solution characterization of polymers, and polymer chemistry of membranes are prefaced by a free, half-day tutorial on each topic. Among other highlights are a symposium on chemical reactions on polymers and a memorial symposium in honor of Paul Flory. Multiple Bonding Involving the Heavier MainGroup Elements General: Organometallics General MEDICINAL— Anaheim Hilton Recent Advances in the Treatment of Seizure Disorders General MICROBIAL & BIOCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY—Convention Center Fermentation Kinetics: Growth, Product Formation & Stability Biosensor & Bioinstrumentation for Screening, Monitoring & Controlling NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY & TECHNOLOGY— Inn at the Park Nuclear Spectroscopic Quantities, Their Determination & Use: I & II General ORGANIC—Anaheim Hilton Poster Synthesis Controlled Carbometallation & Related Reactions General

Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering Symposia on polymers for electronics applications; high solids, powder and radiation curable coatings; and an award symposium are outstanding features. Workshops on lithographic materials and processing, on modern methods of particle size distribution analyses, and on coatings technology are scheduled for weekend preceding the meeting. Professional Relations Symposium on key to professionaf success follows Women Chemists luncheon discussion on networking within ACS. Other sessions deal with networking for success, women and minority scientific networks, the old-boy network, and networking to help create future scientists. Small Chemical Businesses In addition to session on application of personal computers in solving chemical and/or business problems, program addresses use of PCs in marketing, data analysis, and management applications. Macromolecuiar Secretariat Four-day symposium on composite materials, which maximizes exposure to divergent activities in this area, comprises sequential sessions on structure-property relationships and processing, elastomeric composites, matrix resin In composites, fibers in composites, advances in wood composites, and role of interface in composites.

Note: These highlights are based on information pror vided by chairmen about thejr programs to the ACS Meetings, Expositions & Divisional Activities Department.

PETROLEUM— Inn at the Park Chemistry of Polynuclear Aromatics PHYSICAL— Anaheim Marriott Theory at the Interface Between Chemistry & Biology State-to-State Chemistry Procter & Gamble Award Symposium Honoring K. M. Ervin, L. H. Spangler, M. W. Crofton, G. A. Voth & A. M. Wodtke POLYMER—Convention Center Chemical Reactions on Polymers: PhaseTransfer Catalysis Polymer Science: a Tribute to P. J. Flory Chemical Reactions on Polymers: New Synthetic Routes Polymer Science & Engineering Lecture Series No. 16: Solution Characterization of Polymers General POLYMERIC MATERIALS: SCIENCE & ENGINEERING—Convention Center Polymers for Electronic Applications High Solids, Powder & Radiation-Curable Coatings Specialty Monomers & Polymers. R. W. Tess Award Symposium June 23, 1986 C&EN

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Preliminary Program Teleconferences planned for six sessions from Anaheim Teleconferencing can make this meeting as close as your own conference room. Plans are under way to teleconference (audiographs, not video) six sessions from the meeting in Anaheim to subscribers across the country. The Symposium on High Solids, Powder and Radiation Curable Coatings will be teleconferenced Monday through Thursday. This program is sponsored by the Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering. Teleconferences from the ACS national meetings expand the audiences for selected symposia. For those companies and institutions interested in these topics and located hundreds of miles from Anaheim, teleconferencing gives scientists who would not normally attend an opportunity to participate in a very meaningful way. Speakers' slides will be provided for simultaneous projection in each location and each remote site will be linked by telephone with the meeting room in Anaheim. All listeners may ask questions and comment during the discussion periods. If your company is interested in subscribing to one or all six sessions ($600 per session), please contact the Department of Meetings & Divisional Activities at (202) 872-4401 for more information. New Concepts in Polymeric Materials & General PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS—Anaheim Hilton General SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESSES— Anaheim Hilton Personal Computers in Small Chemical Business BIOTECHNOLOGY SECRETARIAT—Anaheim Marriott Opening Overview: Impact of Chemistry on Biotechnology , Conformation & Structure of Proteins Technology of Biopolymers: Bioactive & Biocompatible Polymers: I MACROMOLECULAR SECRETARIAT—Convention Center Composites: Structure-Property Relationships & Processing

TUESDAY PACIFIC CONFERENCE ON CHEMISTRY & SPECTROSCOPY, WESTERN REGIONAL MEETING—Convention Center Toxic Compounds in Groundwater Assessing & Mitigating Risk Spectroscopic Techniques for the Analysis of Trace Elements in Environmental Water Samples ACS TASK FORCE ON RCRA—Anaheim Marriott Chemicals in Laboratories . . . from Purchase to Disposal WOMEN CHEMISTS COMMITTEE—Anaheim Hilton Networking: II—The Key to Professional YOUNGER CHEMISTS COMMITTEE—Quality Inn Emerging Technologies in the Chemical Industry: Opportunities for Chemists in Space AGRICULTURAL & FOOD—Anaheim Marriott Chemometrics: Bridging the Gap Between Analytical & Sensory Data General AGROCHEMICALS—Anaheim Marriott Burdick & Jackson Award: Advances in Pesticide Metabolism and Environmental Safety Synthesis & Chemistry of New Pesticides General: Metabolism General: Poster ANALYTICAL—Anaheim Marriott Division of Analytical Chemistry Award for Excellence in Teaching: I & II Mass Spectrometry in Biotechnology: I & II CELLULOSE, PAPER & TEXTILE—Convention Center 46 June 23, 1986 C&EN

Cellulose & Related Fibrous Materials Anselme Payen Award CHEMICAL EDUCATION—Quality Inn Critical Thinking in Consumer Chemistry Creative Computer-Assisted Instruction in Chemistry Breakthrough Lecture Poster: Placement Procedures for General Chemistry General CHEMICAL HEALTH & SAFETY—Anaheim Hilton Low-Level Radiation CHEMICAL INFORMATION—Anaheim Hilton Special Topics in Chemical Searching: Inorganics, Topology, Stereochemistry & Three-Dimensional Representations Generic Structure Searching CHEMISTRY & THE LAW—Con vention Center The Forensic Scientist as an Expert Witness Clandestine Drug Laboratories: a New Cottage Industry? COLLOID & SURFACE—Con vention Center Surface Chemistry in Biology, Medicine & Dentistry: Proteins at Interfaces Photochemical & Electrochemical Surface Science: Polymer Films on Electrodes General: Catalysis & Related Subjects COMPUTERS—Quality Inn 10th Anniversary of the Computer Division: History of Computing in Chemistry: III. Numerical Methods in Chemistry ENVIRONMENTAL—Anaheim Hilton Atmospheric Persistence of Toxic Organics: II & III Health & Environmental Effects of Complex Organic Mixtures: III Role of Drinking Water Chemistry & Essential Nutrients in Cardiovascular Disease General FERTILIZER & SOIL—Anaheim Marriott Environmental & Agronomic Aspects of Fertilizers FUEL—Inn at the Park Syngas Conversion Catalysis Reactions of Coal in Novel Systems Advances in Gasification: Catalytic or Other Aspects GEOCHEMISTRY—//?/? at the Park Geochemistry in Petroleum Exploration Origin & Evolution of Brines in the Subsurface Geochemical Aspects of Radioactive Waste Disposal HISTORY—Anaheim Hilton Case Histories in Drug Discovery: I & II INDUSTRIAL & ENGINEERING—Convention Center

Process Technology for Electronic Device Manufacture Diffusion in Polymer Composites INORGANIC—Anaheim Hilton Metals in Medicine Multiple Bonding Involving the Heavier MainGroup Elements High-Energy Processes in Organometallic Chemistry General: Organometallic General: Poster General MEDICINAL—Anaheim Hilton Discovery & Development of Potential Drugs from Natural Sources Mechanism-Based Approaches to Cancer Chemotherapy MICROBIAL & BIOCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY—Convention Center International Symposium on Biosensors New Approaches to Modeling Biological Processes Recovery of r-DNA Products Awards Symposium Poster General NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY & TECHNOLOGY— Inn at the Park Nuclear Spectroscopic Quantities, Their Determination & Use: III & IV Chemical Phenomena Associated with Radioactivity Releases During Severe Nuclear Plant Accidents: I & II ORGANIC—Anaheim Hilton Arthur C. Cope Award Honoring D. Arigoni PETROLEUM— Inn at the Park Chemistry of Polynuclear Aromatics General: Poster PHYSICAL—Anaheim Marriott Theory at the Interface Between Chemistry & Biology State-to-State Chemistry General: Poster POLYMER—Convention Center Chemical Reactions on Polymers: Graft Polymers Instrumental Methods for Polymer Characterization No. 4: Solution Characterization of Polymers Polymer Science: Tribute to P. J. Flory Photophysics of Polymer Systems Chemical Reactions on Polymers: Surface Modification POLYMERIC MATERIALS: SCIENCE & ENGINEERING—Convention Center Polymers for Electronics Applications High Solids, Powder & Radiation-Curable Coatings Polymers in the Recovery of Petroleum & Other Natural Resources New Concepts in Polymeric Materials & General: Sherwin Williams Award PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS—Anaheim Hilton Education for a Professional Life SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESSES—Anaheim Hilton Expanding Your Product Line Profitably True Stories of Small Chemical Businesses BIOTECHNOLOGY SECRETARIAT—Anaheim Marriott Biotechnology Information Mass Spectrometry in Biotechnology: I & II Technology of Biopolymers: Bioactive & Biocompatible Polymers II MACROMOLECULAR SECRETARIAT—Convention Center Elastomers Composites Matrix Resin in Composites

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WEDNESDAY BOARD COMMITTEE ON THE HANDICAPPED—Anaheim Marriott Advancing Chemistry Through Specialized Technology AGRICULTURAL & FOOD— Anaheim Hilton Chemometrics: Bridging the Gap Between Analytical & Sensory Data General AGROCHEMICALS— Anaheim Marriott Light-Activated Pesticides Biosynthesis & Metabolism of Insect Pheromones and Hormones ANALYTICAL— Anaheim Marriott Mass Spectrometry Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy New Frontiers in Analytical Science: Memorial Symposium Honoring T. B. Hirshfeld Gas Chromatography Analytical Challenges in Protein Analysis CHEMICAL EDUCATION—Quality Inn Integrating Chemistry into Interdisciplinary Courses Pedagogy & the Periodic Table Chemistry of Wine General CHEMICAL HEALTH & SAFETY— Anaheim Hilton Presentation/Review of Selected AV Materials General CHEMICAL INFORMATION— Anaheim Hilton Reaction Databases & Synthesis Planning Graphics for Chemical Information CHEMISTRY & THE LAW—Convention Center Selected Topics in Patent Law, Trademark Law, Copyright Law, Trade Secrets, Licensing & Litigation COLLOID & SURFACE— Convention Center Surface Chemistry in Biology, Medicine & Dentistry: Proteins at Interfaces Photochemical & Electrochemical Surface Science: Polymer Films on Electrodes Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Kinetics & Intermediates in Surface Reactions

Surface Science of Catalysis: Surface Chemistry in Electronic Materials Technology COMPUTERS—Quality Inn Computer Data Manipulation & Optimization General ENVIRONMENTAL—Anaheim Hilton Indoor Air Quality: I & II Environmental Chemistry Education at the Graduate & Undergraduate Levels: I & II General FERTILIZER & SOIL— Anaheim Marriott Effect of Impurities on Fertilizer Production FUEL—Inn at the Park Coprocessing & Two-Stage Liquefaction Advances in Gasification: Catalytic or Other Aspects GEOCHEMISTRY— Inn at the Park Geochemistry in Petroleum Exploration Origin & Evolution of Brines in the Subsurface Geochemical Aspects of Radioactive Waste Disposal HISTORY— Anaheim Hilton History of Polymer Composites: I General INDUSTRIAL & ENGINEERING—Convention Center Advances in Biological Separation Technology INORGANIC— Anaheim Hilton High-Energy Processes in Organometallic Chemistry Conducting Polymers General: Bioinorganic and Medicinal General: Organometallic General: Bioinorganic General MEDICINAL— Anaheim Hilton Atypical Antidiabetic Agents General MICROBIAL & BIOCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY—Convention Center New Approaches to Modeling Biological Processes Recovery of r-DNA Products

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY & TECHNOLOGY— Inn at the Park Solid-State Chemistry & Physics of Actinides: I & II Chemical Phenomena Associated with Radioactivity Releases During Severe Nuclear Plant Accidents: III & IV ORGANIC—Anaheim Hilton Azide Photochemistry Controlled Carbometallation & Related Reactions Synthesis Biosynthesis Amino Acids & Peptides Asymmetric Synthesis Nucleosides & Nucleotides Ionic Mechanisms PETROLEUM— Inn at the Park Advances in Free Radical Chemistry PHYSICAL— Anaheim Marriott Theory at the Interface Between Chemistry & Biology State-to-State Chemistry Electronic Structure of the Transition State POLYMER— Convention Center Chemical Reactions on Polymers: Specialty Polymers with Polar/Ionic Groups Polymer Science & Engineering Lecture Series No. 17: Membrane Separations Polymer Division Award in Polymer Education: Honoring P. J. Flory Photophysics of Polymer Systems Chemical Reactions in Polymers: Specialty Polymers for Electronic Applications POLYMERIC MATERIALS: SCIENCE & ENGINEERING—Convention Center Polymers for Electronics Applications High Solids, Powder & Radiation-Curable Coatings New Concepts in Polymeric Materials & General Polymers in the Recovery of Petroleum & Other Natural Resources SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESSES— Anaheim Hilton A Startup Is Born BIOTECHNOLOGY SECRETARIAT—Anaheim Marriott Treatment of Waste with Biotechnology Analytical Challenge in Protein Analysis Biochemical Processing: State-of-the-Art Review Biotechnology of Agrochemicals MACROMOLECULAR SECRETARIAT—Convention Center Fiber in Composites Advances in Wood Composites

THURSDAY

Disneyland

is one of Anaheim's main

attractions

AGRICULTURAL & FOOD— Anaheim Marriott New Developments & Applications in Immunoligand Techniques General AGROCHEMICALS— Anaheim Marriott Light-Activated Pesticides Biosynthesis & Metabolism of Insect Pheromones & Hormones General: Environmental & Metabolism ANALYTICAL— Anaheim Marriott Environmental Analysis Electrochemistry: I & II Liquid Chromatography CHEMICAL EDUCATION—Quality Inn High School Teachers Program: New Ways To Teach the Old Issues Workshop: Bringing Chemistry to Students in Grades K-9 Effective Chemistry Programs for K-12 Teachers & Students June 23, 1986 C&EN

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Preliminary Program CHEMICAL HEALTH & SAFETY— Anaheim Hilton Riaht-To-Know CHEMISTRY & THE LAW—Convention Center Alternative Career Paths for the Chemist: Combining Chemistry & the Law Synergism Between Chemistry & Metallurgy for Invention COLLOID & SURFACE— Convention Center Surface Chemistry in Biology, Medicine & Dentistry: Proteins at Interfaces Surface Science of Catalysis: Applications of Solid-State NMR to Heterogeneous Catalysis Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Kinetics & Intermediates in Surface Reactions ENVIRONMENTAL— Anaheim Hilton Indoor Air Quality: III Airborne Nitrogen Species Methods Comparison Study: I & II Artifact Problems in Environmental Chemistry: I & II Monitoring Emissions from Landfills, Waste Dumps & Incinerators: I FUEL—Inn at the Park Coprocessing & Two-Stage Liquefaction GEOCHEMISTRY— Inn at the Park Geochemistry in Petroleum Exploration Biogeochemistry of Silicon & Related Group IV Organometallics in Freshwater Ecosystems Geochemical Aspects of Radioactive Waste Disposal Field Trip: Outcrops of the Miocene Monterey Formation HISTORY— Anaheim Hilton History of Polymer Composites: II & III INDUSTRIAL & ENGINEERING—Convention Center Advances in Biological Separation Technology Coal Ash Chemistry INORGANIC— Anaheim Hilton High-Energy Processes in Organometallic Chemistry Conducting Polymers General: Organometallic General MEDICINAL— Anaheim Hilton Antiglaucoma General

MICROBIAL & BIOCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY—Convention Center Applications of Mammalian Cell Culture Applications of Artificial Intelligence & Expert Systems to Biochemical Process Development General NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY & TECHNOLOGY— Inn at the Park Solid-State Chemistry & Physics of Actinides: III & IV Chemical Phenomena Associated with Radioactivity Releases During Severe Nuclear Plant Accidents: V & VI ORGANIC—Anaheim Hilton Synthesis Molecular Recognition Organometallic Reactions Synthetic Methods Pericyclic Reactions & Biradicals Photochemistry & Polynuclear Aromatics Nitrogen Compounds Synthetic Methods General: Mechanisms PETROLEUM—Inn at the Park Advances in Free Radical Chemistry PHYSICAL— Anaheim Marriott Theory at the Interface Between Chemistry & Biology Electronic Structure of the Transition State POLYMER—Convention Center Photophysics of Polymer Systems Chemical Reactions on Polymers: Modification for Analytical Characterization Polymers in Membrane Separations Chemical Reactions on Polymers: Specialty Papers POLYMERIC MATERIALS: SCIENCE & ENGINEERING—Convention Center Polymers for Electronics Applications High Solids, Powder & Radiation-Curable Coatings Polymers in the Recovery of Petroleum & Other Natural Resources New Concepts in Polymeric Materials & General BIOTECHNOLOGY SECRETARIAT—Anaheim Marriott Biotechnology in Food & Agriculture: I & II Bringing Biotechnology to Market: Current & Potential Opportunities in the Chemical Industry: I & II

San Diego Wild Animal Park is within easy reach of 52

June 23, 1986 C&EN

Anaheim

COMPUTER SECRETARIAT—Quality Inn Chemists' Workstations: Applications of Personal Computers in Chemical Research MACROMOLECULAR SECRETARIAT—Convention Center Role of Interface in Composites

FRIDAY AGRICULTURAL & FOOD— Anaheim Marriott General AGROCHEMICALS— Anaheim Marriott General: Environmental ANALYTICAL— Anaheim Marriott Atomic Spectroscopy General: Spectroscopy CHEMICAL EDUCATION—Quality Inn Chemistry in the Community: a Progress Report CHEMICAL INFORMATION— Anaheim Hilton CINF Vendor Symposium: System Development Corporation COLLOID & SURFACE— Convention Center Surface Chemistry in Biology, Medicine & Dentistry: Proteins at Interfaces Surface Science of Catalysis: Applications of Solid-State NMR to Heterogeneous Catalysis ENVIRONMENTAL— Anaheim Hilton Monitoring Emissions from Landfills, Waste Dumps & Incinerators: II Airborne Nitrogen Species Methods Comparison Study: III GEOCHEMISTRY— Inn at the Park Biogeochemistry of Silicon & Related Group IV Organometallics in Freshwater Ecosystems Field Trip: Outcrops of the Miocene Monterey Formation INDUSTRIAL & ENGINEERING—Convention Center Transport in Soils INORGANIC— Anaheim Hilton Conducting Polymers General: Organometallic General MICROBIAL & BIOCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY—Anaheim Marriott Expression of Products from r-DNA Containing Microorganisms Topics in Secondary Metabolism NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY & TECHNOLOGY— Inn at the Park Chemical Phenomena Associated with Radioactivity Releases During Severe Nuclear Plant Accidents: VII ORGANIC— Anaheim Hilton Synthesis Nitrogen Macrocycles Physical Organic Synthetic Methods General POLYMER—Convention Center Photophysics of Polymer Systems Polymers in Membrane Separations General POLYMERIC MATERIALS: SCIENCE & ENGINEERING—Convention Center Polymers for Electronics Applications New Concepts in Polymeric Materials & General Polymers in the Recovery of Petroleum & Other Natural Resources BIOTECHNOLOGY SECRETARIAT —Anaheim Marriott Bioconversion of Lignocellulosic Materials to Fuels & Chemicals COMPUTER SECRETARIAT—Quality Inn Chemists' Workstations

19&id National Meeting

One-Day-Session Tickets. $60 in advance, $70 on-site. Fill in the appropriate information on the advance registration form on page 62, following the same procedure used for regular registration. A special one-day fee of $35 will apply for the symposium sponsored by the Pacific Conference on Chemistry & Spectroscopy, for which registration will be handled at the door. Standard one-day-session tickets will be sold in the registration area during the hours announced above and may be converted to full registration. Abstracts. Abstracts will be mailed upon completion, about Aug. 1, to U.S. residents paying the additional postage fee. Receipt cards will be mailed to all other registrants ordering the abstracts, to be exchanged for books in the registration area. Orders for abstracts only should be sent to Distribution, Room 210, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036, or call toll free 1800-424-6747.

Anaheim Advance registration information Persons planning to attend the Anaheim meeting are encouraged to register in advance, using the form on page 62. A separate form must be provided for each registrant, including guests. Photocopies are acceptable. As an incentive to advance registration, appreciably discounted fees are in effect. The current scale of fees is shown at right. Either payment in full or authorization to charge to a credit card (American Express, MasterCard, Visa, or Diners Club/Carte Blanche only) must accompany your order. The deadline for advance registration is Aug. 15. Registrations received after that date will be returned. Mail completed form with payment to: American Chemical Society, Meetings, P.O. Box 18598, 20th St. Station, Washington, D.C. 20036-9998. Please allow at least three weeks to process your request. A meeting badge and receipt will be mailed to the address shown on your registration form. (If a registrant's affiliation and business address are not available, please provide a home address.) Also included will be an exposition inquiry card that can be used at all national meeting expositions. Either your business card or exposition inquiry card will be welcomed by exhibitors. Badge cases and booklet programs will be available in the registration area. On-site registration facilities will be

located in the Anaheim Convention Center. The hours for registration will be Sunday, Sept. 7, 2 PM to 7 PM; Monday, Sept. 8, through Wednesday, Sept. 10, 7:30 AM to 3:30 PM; Thursday, Sept. 11, 7:30 AM to noon; and Friday, Sept. 12, 7:30 AM to 10 AM.

Classification of registrants

MEMBERS ACS member or national affiliate Member emeritus Student member or affiliate, less than postdoctoral status VISITORS Non-U.S. resident, nonchemical scientist or chemical technician Family of registrant NONMEMBERS U.S. resident chemical scientist Student, less than postdoctoral status ONE-DAY SESSION Regular Student Pacific Conference (Tuesday only) EXPOSITION ONLY

Fee Advance On-site

$ 90

$110

35 15

40 15

90

110

15

15

165

185

15

15

60 5 —

70 5 35

No fee

Refunds. Requests for refunds for registration and event tickets will be honored if received, together with badge, a copy of your receipt, and any tickets ordered, by Aug. 29. After that date, .until Sept. 30, a refund of 80% of the registration fee may be obtained.

Housing Room Reservations. All housing requests for the official hotels at the meeting should be submitted to American Chemical Society, Meetings, P.O. Box 18598, 20th St. Station, Washington, D.C. 20036-9998. Use the official housing form shown on page 59. Deadline for receipt of housing requests is Aug. 11. Reservations received after the deadline cannot be processed and will be returned. Reservations will be confirmed directly to the individual by ACS, indicating the hotel assigned and a guaranteed rate. Please allow at least two weeks for processing your request. If registrants are sharing a twin or double-bedded room, use only one form listing both names. If the type of accommodation requested has been sold out, the next closest type will be assigned according to your preference listed on the housing form. Please note at least four choices when making your selection. Every attempt will be made to honor your first choice. One night's deposit is required on all rooms. Send your check directly to your assigned hotel after receiving your confirmation from ACS. Do not send your check to ACS. Most hotels require establishment of credit at check-in. A major credit card is acceptable. If you do not have a credit card, cash for your entire stay may be required. June 23, 1986 C&EN

53

Preliminary Program Changes in arrival/departure times or dates should be sent directly to the hotel; cancellation before Aug. 11 to ACS. All unassigned rooms will be released to the hotels on Aug. 11. After that date, all correspondence concerning housing matters, including reservations, cancellations, and changes, should be made directly to the hotels. A map showing hotel locations appears on page 57. Do not be disappointed; submit your housing requests as early as possible. Hotel List. For the convenience of registrants, area hotels not participating as official hotels for the meeting are shown on page 58. The ACS Housing Bureau recommends that you contact them directly. Rates shown for these hotels are estimated, not guaranteed by ACS.

Local arrangements ACS Hospitality Center. The ACS Orange County Section will host a Hospitality Center located in the Anaheim Hilton, Green Room. Details of tours that have been arranged are given elsewhere in this program. Attendee Locator. A file of registrants will be on display in the registration area, Convention Center, where registrants can find the local addresses of colleagues attending the meeting. You are urged to visit the center and fill in the information on your card, if you have not done so in advance or if the information has changed. This information is also helpful in event of an emergency. Day Care Services. Arrangements for child care can be made directly through your hotel. Sitters also can be hired through a local Anaheim agency, Sitters Unlimited, 1440 North Harbor Blvd., No. 800, Fullerton, Calif. 92635, (714) 680-4434. The company strongly urges that arrangements be made in advance. ACS offers this information for the convenience of registrants, but can in no way accept responsibility or liability for care provided by these services. In an attempt to assist those of you planning to attend the spring 1987 national meeting in Denver, a message board will be located in the Hospitality Center at this meeting, to enable registrants interested in cooperative child care to exchange names. Facilities for the Handicapped. Most facilities used for meeting functions are readily accessible. Hotels having appropriately designed sleeping rooms are identified on the list. There is a box on the registration form to be checked if you would like to be contacted in advance of the meeting concerning other special needs. TTY phone request only can be made by calling (202) 872-8733. 54

June 23, 1986 C&EN

Tips for a safe stay in a large city • When walking, stick to main thoroughfares and well-lit areas. • If walking, don't wear fancy jewelry in plain sight. • Don't wear your meeting badge outside the hotels and convention center. • Be cognizant and alert to surroundings. Look alert. • When walking after dark, don't hug the buildings or cars; walk in the open or near the curb. • Carry your purse close to your body. • Don't leave valuables in your room. Get a hotel safe deposit box. • Go in numbers. Don't be a loner, particularly in the evening. • Abide by common sense: If something looks suspicious, report it and/or avoid it.

Share-a-Room in Denver Program. A bulletin board will be located in the Hospitality Center for those interested in making arrangements to share a room with another member at the spring meeting in Denver. Shuttle Service. All of the hotels used for technical sessions are located within one large city block of the Convention Center; thus shuttle service will not be necessary. The Grand Hotel will provide van service to the Convention Center for its guests attending sessions Monday through Friday. Speakers Information. Each meeting room will be equipped as follows: 2 inch X 2 inch (35 mm) slide projector, overhead projector, screen, and lighted reading desk with remote slide control and lapel microphone. Requests in writing for other special equipment must be received by the ACS meetings department by July 21. Rental Car Discounts. Special rates will be available for one week before, during, and one week after the meeting. Details will appear in the final program and will be included with the material sent to those who preregister. Air Transportation. Arrangements have been made with Delta Airlines, Republic Airlines, and United Airlines for attendees to obtain discounted air fares to and from the several airports serving the Anaheim area. These discounts are particularly advantageous for those not planning to be in Anaheim over a Saturday night and therefore do not qualify for published discounted fares. Tickets, which must be issued at least seven days before departure, may be obtained by

providing credit card information when making reservations or subsequently through the ticket offices of the respective airlines, or through travel agents. Since the number of seats available on any given flight is limited, it is very important that reservations be made as early as possible. United Airlines: a 5% savings off any fares for which attendees qualify (based on normal restrictions), including First Class and Ultra Saver, or a 30% discount off normal coach fares with no restrictions (including round trips from Honolulu and Canada). These discounts will apply from Sept. 3 through Sept. 17. Call United's toll-free number 1-800-5214041 and identify the ACS meeting by the number 6045D. All reservations must be made through the 800 number, which is open from 8:30 AM to 8 PM, Eastern time, seven days a week. Delta Airlines: a 5% savings off any Delta published round-trip fare within the continental U.S. and San Juan, including all promotional and deeply discounted supersaver fares, providing all rules and conditions of the airfares are met. For passengers not qualifying for any published discounts, a 30% discount on Delta's domestic system for travel to the Anaheim area (including round trips from Honolulu and Montreal). The 30% discount will be based on the full nondiscounted round-trip day-coach rates. Seven days advance ticketing is required and a maximum stay of 21 days is permitted. Call Delta's toll-free number 1-800-241-6760, and identify the ACS meeting by the number D0269. All reservations must be made through the 800 number, which is open from 8 AM to 8 PM, Eastern time, seven days a week. Republic Airlines: a 5% savings off the lowest applicable round trip available at the time of booking, booked in the appropriate class of service, or a 30% discount from the full adult coach class fare, booked in M-class, from point of origin to Los Angeles and return. The discounted fares will be permitted three days prior to the meeting, through three days following its conclusion (Sept. 415), except for Republic Express flights; travel from or to Canada, Mexico, or Grand Cayman; and fares under $100 round trip. Call Republic's toll-free number 1-800-328-1111 (in Minnesota, 1-800-272-1408), and identify the ACS meeting by the number ACE222. All reservations must be made through the 800 number, which is open from 8 AM to 8 PM, Central time, Monday through Friday. Ground Transportation. John Wayne/ Orange County Airport is 20 minutes from Anaheim, Los Angeles International (LAX) is 45 minutes away, and, Long Beach Airport is 20 minutes away. All three airports have scheduled bus

service to Anaheim area hotels. From LAX, cab fares can be as high as $50; bus service costs about $10. The Orange County Transit District (OCTD) operates buses throughout Or­ ange County. Buses run daily, with lim­ ited runs on Saturday and Sunday. Fares are 75 cents and transfers are free. Diala-Lift service for the mobility impaired is available. Call (714) 636-RIDE for more information. Contact the front desk of your hotel for information on tour buses to area attractions. Tourist Information. The Anaheim Convention Bureau operates a recorded information service on special events and the hours of area attractions. Please call (714) 635-8900. For other general in­ formation, contact the bureau at (714) 999-8999.

Ν

3u

Τ Disneyland

CO

5

Χ

Katella Ave.

Ο Ο Convention Center

•σ CQ

A

CO

"5 ϋ

Ο Convention Way

Ο

!

ω en _ω

g

All hotels are within walking distance of each other, with the exception of the Disneyland and the Grand, which are about Vz mile from the Convention Center

Hotels and rates in Anaheim Single

Double

Double/ Double

1 bedroom

2 bedroom

$ 84

$ 96

$ 96 up

$275 up

$325 up

94 104

106 116

106 up 116

2. Anaheim Marriott b c d e 700 West Convention Way 92802(714)750-8000

85

95

95 up

200 up

300 up

bde 3. Convention Center l n n 2017 South Harbor Blvd. 92802(714)740-2500

38

48

48 up

58 up

68 up

4. Disneyland H o t e l a b d f 1150 West Cerritos Ave. 92802(714)778-6600

89

89

89 up

Upon request

5. Grandb'd-e'9 1 Hotel Way 92802(714)772-7777

50

50

50 up

Upon request

6. Holiday l n n b d e 1850 South Harbor Blvd. 92802(714)750-2801

55

60

60 up

130 up

185 up

7. Inn at the P a r k a M 1855 South Harbor Blvd. 92802(714)750-1811

72

82

155 up

230 up

8. Jolly Roger l n n b d e 640 West Katella Ave. 92802(714)772-7621

48

51

53 up

75 up

9. Quality lnn b d e 616 Convention Way 92802(714)750-3131

48

54

59 up

175 up

abcd

Anaheim Hilton 777 Convention Way 92802(714)750-4321 Lanai Towers

82 92 102

a Parking at cost (check with hotel for accessibility for other than standard autos), b Handicapped, c Health club. d Pool, e Parking free (check with hotel for accessibility for other than standard autos), f Limited space available; no shuttle service, g Shuttle service provided by hotel to Convention Center. Note: All rooms are subject to 8% tax

Special events Please plan to attend the following spe­ cial events. Further details will be avail­ able in the final program. • Presidential Plenary Session: "How To Survive When Everyone's Scared/ 7 Monday, Sept. 8, 5 PM to 7 PM. Chemi­ cal spills! Hazardous waste dumps! Polution! Pollution! Pollution! Are stories about problems with some chemicals sensationalized by the media? Are chemists meeting their responsibility in communicating these matters to the public? Is there a middle ground where responsibilities of journalists and scien­ tists meet? Public understanding of sci­ ence and technology is a critical issue today. The session will explore all sides of this issue . . . and you should too. • ACS Alumni Hour, Tuesday, Sept. 9, after the technical sessions. • ACS Mixer, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 9 PMto 11PM. • Field Trip to the Outcrops of the Miocene Formation, sponsored by the Division of Geochemistry, Thursday and Friday, Sept. 11 and 12. Ancillary to the division's symposium on Geochem­ istry in Petroleum Exploration, the field trip will leave Anaheim at about 2 PM on Thursday for a scenic trip to Santa Barbara, during which a geological com­ mentary will be provided. On Friday morning, Carol Isaacs of the U.S. Geo­ logical Survey, a leading expert on Mon­ terey field geology, will lead the tour, which will give the nonexpert a chance to look at oil source rocks and the expert an opportunity to sample material for further study. The group will return to the hotel for an optional extended stay in the area or a return trip to Anaheim, with a stop at Los Angeles International Airport around 9 PM. The trip price will include one night's accommodation in Santa Barbara and bus transportation to and from Anaheim. Full details will be available in the final program. Interest­ ed registrants may also send their names to the ACS meetings department, re­ questing further details when available. June 23, 1986 C&EN 57

Preliminary Program

Board and council meetings The meeting of the board of directors will be held on Sunday, Sept. 7, and the council meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 10. Both meetings will take place in the Anaheim Hilton.

ACS exposition In these competitive times, there is no better or more convenient way to keep abreast of the latest technology than to attend the ACS national exposition. Not only has the exposition grown tremendously, it has become much more diversified, offering a range of equipment and services to appeal to a wide audience. Be sure to come by the Anaheim Convention Center (North Hall) and take a look—get some new ideas and find out what you may be missing. Each exhibiting company and organization will have expert personnel on hand to give demonstrations and/or discuss your needs and interests. Admission to the exposition is complimentary. In addition to the comprehensive display of products and services of interest to the scientific community, there will be free refreshments, giveaways, and drawings for prizes. All attendees will receive a free ACS souvenir. The exposition will be open Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, Sept. 8, 9, and 10, from 9 AM to 5 PM each day. There will be a full restaurant and lounge on the exhibit floor where you can have a quick, reasonably priced meal or drink and visit with your colleagues. Exposition Workshops. Workshops are sponsored by exhibiting companies and are complimentary to registrants. Details will be in the final program. Commemorative Postal Cachet/Postal Substation. The fifth in a series of philatelic covers featuring ACS presidents will be available for sale at the booth of the Center for History of Chemistry. Sponsored by the ACS Division of The History of Chemistry, this fifth cachet will feature Frederick A. Genth, ACS president in 1880. A temporary postal substation will be set up in the exposition area and will be open Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday from 10 AM to 4 PM. A special ACS postal cancellation will be available for those interested in the philatelic dating of this commemorative envelope. For those unable to attend the meeting, mail orders will be accepted. Price and ordering information can be obtained by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to John Sharkey, Chemistry Department, Pace Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10038. Deadline for receipt of mail orders is Sept. 1. 58

June 23, 1986 C&EN

Nonparticipating hotels Hotel

Emerald of Anaheim 1306 South Anaheim Blvd.

Single Double

$70

$76

41

45

52

56

92805(800)821-8976 Paul Bunyon International 2060 South Harbor Blvd.

92802(800)251-2345 Raffles Inn 2040 South Harbor Blvd.

92802(714)750-6100 Note: Prices shown are not guaranteed by ACS.

Social events A schedule of social events planned for the Anaheim meeting will appear in the final program. Those already registered can use the registration form provided in that issue to order tickets. The Department of Meetings & Divisional Activities will be glad to assist in arranging social events. Hotels in Anaheim will arrange social hours only if sponsors guarantee payment of a $75 bar service charge. Average menu prices for meal service in a private room, inclusive of taxes and gratuities, are: breakfast, $12; luncheon, $17; and dinner, $28.

Tours and plant trips On Your Own. What is happening in the southern California area at the time of the meeting? Information regarding entertainment and sports events will be available at the Hospitality Center, Green Room, Anaheim Hilton. Just because you are at the meeting for the week, you will not have to miss one day of exercise or training. California Angels Baseball Game, Sunday, Sept. 7. See Reggie Jackson hit one over the right field wall at Anaheim Stadium. The Angels play the Yankees at 1:30 PM. For ticket information call (714) 634-2000. May use Orange County Transit Authority Bus Shuttle. South Coast Shopping Plaza. South Coast Plaza includes some of the most famous and world-renowned names in retailing. Restaurants and sidewalk cafes throughout the center make shopping a delightful experience. Shuttle service departs from valet parking at your hotel every two hours. Adults $2.00 round trip. Validation at participating stores. Contact your hotel's front desk for schedule information. Movieland Wax Museum. Vouchers for discounted prices of $4.95 for adults and $2.95 for children ages 4 to 11 will be available in the Hospitality Center. The museum, one block north of Knott's Berry Farm and 10 minutes from Disneyland, features an elaborate collection of movie and TV memorabilia including

lifelike replicas of more than 200 renowned stars, costumes and props. Shuttle to Knott's Berry Farm/Movieland Wax Museum. Daily scheduled bus service from most Disneyland area hotels and motels to Knott's Berry Farm, Movieland Wax Museum, and the Buena Park Shopping Mall every day. Oneway fare to/from Knott's and Anaheim/ Disneyland area: Adults $2.00, children four to 11 $1.50, under four free. Round trip: Adults $4.00, children four to 11 $3.00. All-day pass (unlimited rides): Adults $4.75, children four to 11 $3.75. Hot Line for Free Fun. FREE Fun Hotline gives information about free entertainment, events, and services available throughout the Southland. The number to call is (213) 976-2437. Toll charges where applicable 75 cents per call. Special tours. The special national meeting committee of the Orange County Section has scheduled the following events for your enjoyment. Tours are limited to meeting registrants only. To order tickets, please use the registration form on page 62. Tickets ordered as part of preregistration will be included with badges. Tours will be canceled if there is insufficient preregistration to meet the required minimums, so please make your tour reservation(s) before coming to Anaheim. Advance registration is required for tours scheduled Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday. Based on availability, tour tickets may be purchased on-site for Wednesday and Thursday at the Hospitality Center only. Except for tours requiring transportation "on your own," all tours depart from the lobby entrance of the Anaheim Hilton and do not include lunch except where indicated. Handicapped persons who need assistance with tours should indicate so on the registration form. During the day the temperature is very warm, yet drops 20 to 30 degrees in the evening. Therefore, casual and comfortable attire with good walking shoes are recommended. SUNDAY, SEPT. 7 GP-1/adult; GP-lC/child. 9 AM to 9 PM Disneyland. Fantasies, adventures all await the visitor to the multitheme park—Adventureland, Frontierland, Fantasyland, Tomorrowland. Enjoy a film in the Circle Vision Theatre and countless new shows and attractions. Dress comfortably and wear walking shoes. Transportation is "on your own," but buses run every hour from most hotels and motels to the Main Street entrance. One-way fare is 50 cents for adults; children under five ride free. Check with hotel front desk for schedule information. Lunch not included in price but may be purchased at park. Advance registration is required for discount admission tickets. Cost: $12.95/adult, $8.95/child three to 12.

GP-2/adult; GP~2C/child. 10 AM to 6 PM. San Diego Sea World. Tour Mission Bay and the ' O l d Town" historic park (San Diego's earliest settlement), an area filled with points of historic interest. At Sea World, experience an afternoon of splashing entertainment with Shamu, the killer whale, performing his breathtaking leap, acrobatic dolphins jumping through hoops, and much more. Lunch not included in price but may be purchased at park. Advance registration required. Cost: $30/adult; $26/child. MONDAY, SEPT. 8 GP-3. 10 AM to 6 PM. Knott's Berry Farm. This marvelous theme park, which started over 60 years ago as a fruit and jelly stand, offers roller-coaster rides, specialty shops, live shows, ghost town, and Camp Snoopy—a place to visit Snoopy, Charlie Brown, and all their animal friends. Casual dress and walking shoes recommended. Tickets can be used on any day, Monday through

Thursday. Lunch not included in price but can be purchased at the park. For transportation, see "On Your Own." Cost: $8.75. GP-4/adult; GP-4C/child. 9 AM to 5 PM. San Diego Wild Animal Park. San Diego Wild Animal Park is an 1800-acre sanctuary where animals from Africa and Asia roam freely in surroundings similar to their native lands. Enjoy the monorail tour, Nairobi Village tour with exotic animal exhibits and picturesque gardens, and free shows featuring the animals' natural behaviors and intelligence. Lunch not included in price but can be purchased at the park. Advance registration required. Cost: $26/adult, $23/child. GP-5. 9:30 AM to 1:30 PM. Unocal (Union Oil) Plant Tour. The Fred Hartley Research Center, with more than 1000 research personnel, features stateof-the-art chemical instrumentation. The facility provides Unocal's petroleum research, rare-earth applications,

separation technologies, environmental, seismic, geothermal and other earth technologies research, as well as a shale earth pilot plant. Lunch not included in price but may be purchased in the cafeteria. Advance registration required. Cost: $10. GP-6. 2 PM to 5 PM. Swedlow Plant Tour. This 400,000-sq-ft Garden Grove facility is the world's foremost producer of abrasive-resistant plastics used in military and commercial aviation, mass transit, and exotic automobiles including the Chevrolet Corvette. Process of design, casting, quality control, and analytical laboratories required to manufacture giant polymer windows can be seen. Advance registration required. Cost: $10. GP-7. 7 PM to 10:30 PM. Crystal Cathedral Organ Concert. Crystal Cathedral is a spectacular $16 million cathedral sheathed in more than 10,000 panes of glass. Enjoy an organ concert by Fredrick Swann, director of music of the

Use this form only for ACS participating housing/session hotels. Please read the information regarding room reservations before completing this form. DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT AT ACS: Aug. 11. REQUESTS RECEIVED AFTER THIS DATE CANNOT BE PROCESSED. Mail to: AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, MEETINGS, P.O. Box 18598, 20th St. Station, Washington, D.C. 20036-9998 Hotels: Indicate below order of hotel preference (choice 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th)

-Anaheim Hilton

-Disneyland Hotel

-Inn at the Park

-Anaheim Marriott

.Grand Hotel

-Jolly Roger Inn

-Convention Center Inn

-Holiday Inn Anaheim

-Quality Inn

Room(s) will be occupied by: (PLEASE PRINT) Name(s) Mail confirmation to: Name_ Address. City

. State-

Telephone: Home(_

.ZIP-

. Country.

-Office(-

-Telex_

-Number of nights.

Arrival date Single (1 person)

Twin (2 persons, 2 beds)

Suite, 1 bedroom (1 or 2 persons)

Double (2 persons, 1 bed)

Double/double (2 double beds)

Suite, 2 bedroom (2 or more persons)

One night's deposit must be sent to your assigned hotel, or your reservations will not be held.

IMPORTANT:

Changes in arrival and departure time or date should be made directly to the hotel. After Aug. 11 all housing matters should be directed to the hotel. The name of each hotel guest must be listed for doubles/twins. Reservations cannot be made unless two names are given. Room assignments will be made in the order received. Incomplete information will result in a delay in processing your request.

June 23, 1986 C&EN

59

Preliminary Program cathedral. The program will include secular music and a verbal "walk-through" of the organ, one of the largest in the world, containing more than 13,000 pipes. Advance registration. Cost: $10. TUESDAY, SEPT. 9 GP-8. 9 AM to 3 PM. Universal Studios. The world's largest motion picture and TV studio reveals behind-the-scenes secrets of film. Narrated two-hour tour via motorized trams of the back lot and sound stages includes simulated special effects such as the 24-foot shark from the movie "Jaws." Then a visit to the Entertainment Center, a fascinating complex, with five shows, designed to show how special effects and illusions are created. Lunch not included in price but available at many small restaurants and food stands. Walking shoes recommended. Advance registration required. Cost: $26. GP-9. 9:30 AM to 2:30 PM. Balboa Harbor Cruise. Narrated boat tour begins in Newport Beach. Cruise throughout the harbor. Have lunch at the Irvine Ranch Market on the atrium level of one of California's most beautiful shopping centers. Spend the afternoon browsing through stores. Lunch not included in price. Casual dress and appropriate boating shoes recommended. Advance registration required. Cost: $19. GP-10. 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM. American Scientific Products. A major source of scientific equipment not only fills instrument and supply needs but services most things in their inventory. The Irvine facility uses the most sophisticated telephone hub line to handle 1200 orders a day. Cost: $10. GP-11. Noon to 4 PM. Huntington Gardens, Library, and Museum. Within the estate of the famous railroad tycoon H. E. Huntington are three particular areas of interest—acres of rural and formal gardens, including the Shakespeare Garden; the library, which contains over half a million volumes of rare books and 5 million manuscripts, one of which is a Gutenberg Bible; and the art gallery, which contains 18th century British art such as Gainsborough's "Blue Boy" and "Pinkie." Dress for hot weather, but bring a sweater for museum tour. Lunch on your own in museum's cafeteria. Advance registration required. Cost: $16. WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 10 GP-12. 9 AM to 3 PM. Museum of Science & Industry Exposition Park Area. At California Museum of Science & Industry visitors can finger-paint on a computer, take a spin on a General Motors test track, or walk through a space shuttle. The museum maintains 22 separate permanent exhibits covering everything from space to the inner workings 60

June 23, 1986 C&EN

of the human body, from air traffic control to water resources, and presents approximately 60 exhibits each year, embracing all aspects of the arts, sciences, and humanities. Lunch not included in price but visitors can have a picnic lunch on the grounds or enjoy a meal at a nearby restaurant. Bus leaves at 2 PM to return to Anaheim. Cost: $16. GP-13, adult; GP 13C, child. 9 AM to 5 PM. San Diego Zoo. The San Diego Zoo has one of the world's largest collections of wild animals living in surroundings as natural as man can provide. Above the zoo canyons, the Skyfari aerial tramway gives visitors an exciting ride over the grottos and mesas that are home for the animals in this cageless zoo, as well as a spectacular overview of Balboa Park. There is also the Children's Zoo, which puts the small child nose to nose with the animal kingdom's younger members. Lunch not included in price but may be purchased at zoo. Comfortable walking shoes recommended. Cost: $26/adult, $22/child. GP-14. 9:30 AM. to noon Allergan Plant Tour. Cost $10 Allergan Pharmaceuticals Inc. was founded in 1948 as a small drugstore operation. It has grown into a major pharmaceutical company with strong marketing positions in its specialty markets—ophthalmology and dermatology—both home and abroad. Allergan is the leading eye care company in the U.S., with the major share of the combined ophthalmic drugs and contact lens accessory markets. It engages in development and marketing of both prescription and nonprescription ophthalmic preparations. At the same time, it is one of the world's leading developers of products recommended by professionals for use with contact lenses. GP-15.9 AM to 3 PM. Hollywood Stars' Homes. A closeup view of the lavish homes of Hollywood's legendary movie stars. See Beverly Hills, Sunset Strip, Hollywood Bowl, and Grauman's Chinese Theatre where you can match your footprints with those of the stars. Lunch not included. Cost: $21. GP-16. 9:30 AM to 2:30 PM. Mission San Juan Capistrano/Laguna Beach. Mission San Juan Capistrano is one of the most colorful and impressive of the 21 Franciscan missions in California. The "Mission of the Swallows" generates a mood of yesteryear powerful enough to recreate the serenity of a bygone era. Next enjoy the scenic coastline to Laguna Beach, an artist colony that has an aura all its own. Time will be allowed for lunch on your own in Laguna Beach. Cost: $17. THURSDAY, SEPT. 11 GP-17. 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM. Chevron Oil Field Research. This center is re-

sponsible for all Chevron oil field research in the U.S., concentrating on exploration and production of oil and gas. Seven hundred research personnel in chemistry, geochemistry, and geophysics are engaged in enhanced oil recovery, steam for recovery, environmental work, and minerals research. Cost $10. GP-18. 9 AM to 9 PM. Solvang/Firestone Winery. By bus to the Santo Ynez Valley and Firestone Winery to enjoy a catered lunch in the picnic area. Then a firsthand look at the beginning steps of wine production from harvest to fermenting tanks. The tour also includes the chemistry labs and modern instruments involved in wine production. Then on to the wine tasting room for tasting and purchasing. The tour concludes with a visit to the windmilled town of Solvang. Walking shoes recommended. Lunch and snacks on bus included. Dinner can be purchased in Solvang. Cost: $30.

Employment aids A National Employment Clearing House (NECH) will be available to ACS members and student affiliates at the Anaheim meeting. It will be located in Marriott Hall of the Anaheim Marriott Hotel and will be in operation Monday through Thursday, Sept. 8-11, from 7:30 AM to 5 PM. Candidates' deadline to register will be 5 PM Tuesday, Sept. 9. Thus, candidates are urged to submit completed NECH forms to the national office in advance of the meeting, no later than Aug. 15. To assist in early registration, NECH will be open Sunday, Sept. 7, from 2 PM to 7 PM. Records of candidates who register on Sunday and records received in advance from candidates who complete registration requirements on Sunday will be on file for employers to review when NECH opens officially Monday, Sept. 8, at 7:30 AM. Records received in advance will not be placed on file to be reviewed until the candidate reports in Anaheim and completes all registration requirements. When requesting forms for NECH, please specify the Anaheim forms, as these differ from the year-round clearinghouse forms. The national meeting registration fee may be waived for an unemployed member to use the NECH facilities. Requests for waivers should be sent to the ACS Employment Aids Office. For an advance waiver, forward the preregistration form from this issue with your request to the ACS Employment Aids Office. At the meeting, come to the NECH Staff Office in Marriott Hall. Employer representatives also are encouraged to submit forms to the national office in advance. You may register or check in beginning Sunday, Sept. 7,

from 2 to 7 PM. Early registration will allow you to post openings and to have your registration on file so that you can begin reviewing candidates 7 records and scheduling interviews promptly Monday morning, Sept. 8. Representatives who wish to post a notice may obtain standard forms in advance. A separate form should be submitted for each posting and must be in triplicate. To assure early posting, forms should be returned to the national office no later than Aug. 15. They also may be delivered to NECH during the meeting. These openings will be posted just as soon as possible, but because of the volume received on-site there will be certain delays. Completed forms must comply with all federal regulations on job discrimination in employment or they will not be accepted. Recent users will receive a mailing containing NECH forms. If you have not made use of the service recently, request forms from the national office. The "positions available" area will be opened just as early as possible Monday, Sept. 8, so that candidates may review the openings posted. Any member registered for the meeting may review the openings; however, if you are not registered with NECH, it is your responsibility to make note of the employer's name and address and contact directly by mail. Employers are encouraged to submit a descriptive brochure or an annual report on their company. This will be retained in a file for interested candidates to review. There are two types of user fees in addition to the meeting registration fee: a $10 minimum fee to any representative registered; and, for full utilization of the service, $50 industrial, $20 academia, $125 agencies/management consulting firms. The full utilization fee includes unlimited posting of openings, reviewing records of candidates, and use of the interview area. For employers who wish to post but are unable to attend the meeting, the fee is $25 per listing (maximum charge $100). If you do not plan to attend the meeting, be certain this is noted on your returned form(s) so that interested candidates may write you directly. If you would like to be assured a definite table assignment for interviewing, this can be arranged. The fee is $50 per representative. If you are interested, advise the Employment Aids Office in advance or make arrangements on-site. Because of the rising expenses incurred in operating the clearinghouse at national meetings, we anticipate an increase in the user fee and the cost for the packet of candidates' "summary forms" beginning in 1987. This is an advance notice so it will not come as a surprise when you receive a notice for the spring 1987 NECH.

Personal résumés of candidates, if submitted, will be on file for review. Copies will not be available for sale. Single copies of the candidates' summary form (the ACS standard form) will be provided during the meeting at 50 cents each. Orders for complete sets of the summary forms ($50 per set) will be taken during the meeting from registered employer representatives. Orders for complete sets of summary forms from companies not registered with NECH will be accepted for 30 days following the meeting at $100 per set. Both candidates and employer representatives must be registered and in attendance at the meeting to use the NECH facilities. One-day-session tickets do not entitle registrants to use NECH. Request all forms from the ACS Employment Aids Office, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036.

ACS Short Courses To obtain complete information on ACS Short Courses, write or call: Department of Educational Materials, ACS, 1155— 16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036, (202) 872-4508. Detailed brochures will be mailed as soon as they are available. Chemical Engineering and Process Fundamentals for Chemists, Sept. 5-7 Fundamentals of Experimental Design, Sept. 5-7 Practice of Modern Liquid Chromatography, Sept. 5-7 Mechanical Properties of Polymers, Sept. 6-7 Project Management for Chemists and Chemical Engineers, Sept. 6-7 Supercritical Fluid Chromatography, Sept. 6-7 Organic Coatings, Sept. 6-7 Quality Assurance of Chemical Measurements, Sept. 6-7 Effective Management of Chemical Analysis Laboratories, Sept. 6-7 Emulsions and Microemulsions, Sept. 6-7 Managing People: Getting Things Done Through Others, Sept. 6-7 Analytical Chemistry of Contaminants in Surface and Ground Water, Sept. 6-7 Environmental Analysis —Priority Pollutants, Sept. 6-7 Creative Problem Solving, Sept. 6-7 Fermentation/Purification Technology, Sept. 6-7 Dispersion of Fine Particles in Liquids, Sept. 6-7 Practical Medicinal Chemistry, Sept. 6-7 Molecular Biology and Recombinant DNA Technology, Sept. 6-7 New Product Development, Sept. 6-7

Panning for gold is one of many activities at Knott's Berry Farm Maintaining and Troubleshooting Chromatographic Systems, Sept. 6-7 Adhesion, Theory and Practice, Sept. 8-9 Organometallic Reagents in Organic Synthesis, Sept. 8-9 Toxicology for Chemists, Sept. 9-11

Division Short Courses Coatings Technology, sponsored by the Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Sept. 6-7. Contact: J. E. Glass, North Dakota State University, Polymers and Coatings Department, Fargo, N.D. 58105, (701) 237-7128. Modern Methods of Particle Size Distribution Analyses, sponsored by the Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Sept. 6-7. Contact: T. Provder, Glidden Coatings & Resins Division of SCM Corp., 16651 Sprague Rd., Strongsville, Ohio 44136,(216)826-5289. Lithographic Materials and Processing, sponsored by the Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Sept. 6-7. Contact: L. F. Thompson, AT&T Bell Labs, 600 Mountain Ave., Murray Hill, N.J. 07974,(201)582-2252. June 23, 1986 C&EN

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