193rd ACS National Meeting - C&EN Global Enterprise (ACS


lab standard (Chemical Health & Safety), effects of the 1986 tax reform act (Chemistry & the Law), new DNA associated targets for drug ... C&EN On...
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FINAL PROGRAM

More than 3300 technical papers will be presented at the 193rd ACS National Meeting in Denver, in which 23 divisions and four committees will participate. Sym­ posia of special interest include principles of environ­ mental sampling (Committee on Environmental Im­ provement), modification and applications of indus­ trial polysaccharides (Carbohydrate Chemistry), newly proposed OSHA lab standard (Chemical Health & Safety), effects of the 1986 tax reform act (Chemistry & the Law), new DNA associated targets for drug design (Medicinal Chemistry), and a forum on the employment of chemists including problems of young academic professionals (Younger Chemists Committee). The Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & En­ gineering's symposium on chemis­ try, properties, and applications of crosslinking systems will be teleconferenced from the meeting and all nine of the division's sessions will be audioconferenced. A complete listing of all technical papers is on the following pages.

193rd ACS

National Meeting

April 5-10

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Technical Section

35

Registration

82

Housing

83

Local Arrangements

83

Special Events

87

Social Events

87

Exposition & Workshops

89

Awards

96

Tours

98

Employment Aids

99

Committee Agenda

100

Short Courses

103

Preprints

103

ACS Officers

104

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31

TECHNICAL MEETING SESSIONS Μ Τ WT F

M TW Τ F

Presidential Plenary Session

Carbohydrate Chemistry (CARB)

High-tech threat from abroad (35)

General—macromolecular aspects (41)

COMMITTEES

General—synthetic & medicinal aspects (41)

Environmental Improvement Principles of environmental sampling* * (35) Science Chemical problems in electronic materials* (35) Technician Activities

Hudson award (41) General—chemical & analytical aspects (41) General—biochemical & analytical aspects (41) Roundtable discussion—carbohydrate research (42)

39th national technicians' symposium (35) Cellulose, Paper & Textile (CELL) Cellulose & related materials (42) Emerging technologies in chemical industry (36) Funding opportunities for junior faculty (36)

Output, upgrading: pyrolysis oils from biomass* * (42) Delignification, cellulose enzyme hydrolysis (42)

DIVISIONS Chemical Education (CHED)t Agricultural & Food Chemistry (AGFD) Chemistry for kidst (43) Supercritical fluid extraction—chromatography (36) Teaching chemistry to special students (43) General (36) Student affiliates poster session (43) Chemistry & processing of sugar beet (36) Phosphorus: modern facets of existing chemistry (43) Chemistry & applications of polyphenolics in plants (36) Chemical interactions: foods & food packaging (37) Agrochemicals (AGRO) General—analytical & environmental (37) Synthesis & chemistry of new pesticides (37) Surface runoff of chemicals from ag watersheds (37) Pesticide regulations, scientific method, risk & law (38) General—biochem mechanisms, natural products (38) General—metabolism (38) Analytical Chemistry (ANYL) Analytical chemistry award (38) Analytical chemistry & surfaces (38) Characterization of ion-containing polymers (38) Mass spectrometry award (38) Chemical instrumentation award (39) Atomic spectroscopy: optimization (39) Near infrared analysis (39) Garvan Medal symposium (39) Chromatography award (39) General (39)

Lecture & posters—student affiliate chapters (43) Chemical education awards (44) Fourier transform methods in instrumentation (44) Passer symposium* (44) Chemical health & safety education in universities (44) Symmetry in undergraduate curriculum (44) General (44) General—posters (44) Demonstration session (44) Educational ideas from other disciplines (45) High school teachers program (45) Chemical Health & Safety (CHAS) Right-to-know (45) Fume hoods & lab ventilation* * (45) Liability issues & chemical safety** (45) Safety concerns of small chemical businesses (45) Microcomputer resources & right-to-know (45) Why chemicals are toxic (45) Effect of occupational chemicals on hormones (45)

Novel detection methods in liquid chromatography (40)

General (46)

Mass spectrometry (40)

Chemical Information (CINF)

Field-flow fractionation (40)

End users' reflections on end user searching (46)

Photothermal spectroscopy (40)

Data/information resource management (46)

Liquid chromatography (40)

General (46)

Spectroscopy (40)

Microcomputer information handling (46)

Spectroscopy/flow injection analysis/biosensors (40)

Small computer systems—software for chemists (46)

*Cosponsored symposium—listed only under primary organizer. * * Includes cosponsored session(s). fSee program for Sunday session.. 32

February 9, 1987 C&EN

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TECHNICAL MEETING SESSIONS MTWTF

MTWTF Chemical Marketing & Economics (CMEC)

Geochemistry (GEOC)

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Atmospheric methane (53)

I1 Inorganic marine chemistry (54)

Managing for change in chemical industry (46)

Geochemical standards (55)

Chemistry & the Law (CHAL)

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General (55)

Impact of new tax legislation* (46)

History of Chemistry (HIST) Colloid & Surface Chemistry (COLL) History of physical chemistry (55)

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Recent advances in photoelectrochemistry (47)

Dexter award (55)

Molecular processes at solid surfaces (47)

General (55)

Surfactants & colloids: biosurfactant systems (47)

Archaeological chemistry (55)

Photoelectrochemistry of small structures (47)

Industrial & Engineering Chemistry (l&EC)

Kendall award (47)

Improved adsorbents & adsorption processes (56)

Energetics of semiconductor/electrolyte interface (47)

Murphree award (56) Separations science & technology (56)

Catalysis at semiconductor/electrolyte interface (48)

Managing R&D in today's world (56)

Photoelectrochemistry: thin semiconducting layers (48)

Robotics in industrial laboratory* (56)

Surface chemistry in biology, medicine & dentistry (48)

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General—catalysis & related topics (48)

Conductive polymers—their emergence & future (56) Membrane-based separations processes (57)

Surface science of catalysis (48)

Solvent extraction processes in minerals industry (57)

Colloid science & related topics (49)

Inorganic Chemistry (INOR)f

Computers in Chemistry (COMP)

Inorganic & organometallic polymers—tutorial! (57)

General (49)

Awards presentations (57)

Computers in chemistry award (49)

Inorganic & organometallic polymers* (58) Biological electron transfer (58)

Computer analysis of motion in larger molecules (49)

Organometallic chemistry award* (58)

Environmental Chemistry (ENVR)

Inorganic chemistry award (58) Aquatic humic substances, treatment of pollutants (49)

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Structure-activity in environmental toxicology (49)

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General—unsaturated ligands (58)

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General—main group chemistry (58)

Luminescence spectroscopy (50)

Advancement of inorganic chemistry award (58)

Waste management trends (50) Special topics: poster sessions (50) Creative advances in environmental science award (50

General—homobimetallic complexes (58)

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General—photochemistry & electron transfer (59) General—ligand chemistry (59)

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Contemporary technological problems award*(51)

General—C-H bond breaking & formation (59)

Soil component effects on organic contaminants (51)

General—homopolyatomic complexes (59)

Colloid controlled migration of pollutants (51)

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General—poster session (59)

Photochemical oxidants (52)

Metals in olefin polymerization (60)

Fuel Chemistry (FUEL) Structure & property of low rank coals (52) General (52) Storch award (53)

General—main group, coordination chemistry (59)

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Hydrazine centennial conference** (60) General—heteropolyatomic complexes (60) General—N-, P- & S- containing ligands (60) Phosphorus-containing polymers (61)

Surface chemistry of coals (53)

General—electron transfer, bioinorganic chemistry (61)

Structure & reactions of coals (53)

General—zeolites & layered material (61)

Advances in coal liquefaction (53)

General—d, lanthanide & actinide chemistry (61)

*Cosponsored symposium — listed only under primary organizer. * * Includes cosponsored session(s). tSee program for Sunday session. February 9, 1987 C&EN

33

TECHNICAL MEETING SESSIONS MTWTF

MTWTF

Poster session: inorganic, organometallic polymers(61)

Hydrazine** (68)

General—bioinorganic & medicinal (61)

Synthetic methods (68)

General—catalysis (62)

Molecular recognition (69)

General—solid state from organometallics (62)

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Aromatic synthesis (69)

General—polynuclear & organometallic chemistry (62)

Photochemistry (69)

General—bioinorganic & mechanism studies (62) Mechanisms (69) General—oxygen-bound ligands (62)

Biochemistry mechanisms (69)

General—solid state (62)

Petroleum Chemistry (PETR)

General—theoretical & thermodynamic studies (63)

Structure of future jet fuels (69)

General—electrochemistry (63)

Advances in hydrotreating (70)

General—hydride, alkyl & silyl complexes (63)

Advances in oil shale chemistry** (70)

General—spectroscopy (63)

Advances in hydrocracking (70)

Medicinal Chemistry (MEDI)

Petroleum chemistry award (70)

Protease inhibitors (63)

Advances in resid upgrading (70)

Enzyme inhibitors in hormone dependent cancer (63)

Advances in petrochemical technology (71)

Bioisosterism in drug design (63)

Physical Chemistry (PHYS)

Poster session (63)

Hildebrand award (71)

DNA-associated targets for drug action (64)

Debye award (71)

General (64)

Electroactive polymers* (71)

Therapeutic uses of plosphodiesterase inhibitors (64)

Molecular line shapes & laser spectroscopy (71)

Nuclear Chemistry & Technology (NUCL)

General—poster session (71)

Fission & nuclear reaction mechanisms (64)

Chemistry on minicomputers & supercomputers** (72)

General (64)

Polymer Chemistry (POLY)

Nuclear detectors for nuclear & radiochemistry (65)

Characterization of polymers by FTIR techniques (74)

Central collisions & fragmentation processes (65)

High-performance polymers for harsh environments(74)

Archaeological chemistry: nuclear techniques* (65)

Special topics (74)

Waste disposal & treatment for fusion reactors (65)

Polymer chemistry award (74)

Organic Chemistry (ORGN)f

Special topics—poster session (75)

Posterst (66)

Polymer self-diffusion & related problems (76)

Norris award (67)

Creative polymer chemistry award (76)

Synthesis (67)

Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering (PMSE)

General (67)

Chemistry & applications of crosslinking systems (76)

Creative work award (67)

Applied polymer science award (76)

Stereoselection (67)

New technologies & materials for food packaging* (77)

Ionic mechanisms (67)

New concepts in polymeric materials (77)

Structure—theory & experiment; radicals (67)

Plasma polymerization & treatment of polymers (77)

Metal catalysis in synthesis (67)

Adhesives, sealants & coatings for space (77)

Cycloadditions (68)

*

Professional Relations (PROF)

Radical-cations and anions (68)

Drug testing in the workplace (79)

Guenther award (68) New trends in chemical employment* (79)

Multidentate complexation, coordination of anions (68)

Small Chemical Businesses (SCHB)

Natural products (68) General & physical organic (68)

Opportunities in aerospace industry (79)

Graduate education award (68)

Concerns of the independent laboratory (79)

Research at undergraduate institutions award* (68)

I

True stories (79)

*Cosponsored symposium—listed only under primary organizer. * * Includes cosponsored session(s). fSee program for Sunday session. 34

February 9, 1987 C&EN

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Session 2: Quality Assurance and Quality Control

M. Barcelona, Presiding 1:45—6. Defining the Accuracy, Precision and Confidence Limits of Sample Data. J. K. Taylor. 2:25—7. Defining Control Sites and Blank Sample Needs. S. C. Black. 3:05—8. Assessing and Controlling Sample Contamination. D. L. Lewis. 3:45—Intermission. 3:55—9. Storage and Preservation of Environmental Samples. M. P. Maskarinec, R. L. Moody. 4:35—10. Evaluating and Presenting QA/QC Sampling Data. F. Smith, S. V. Kulkarni, L. E. Myers.

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TUESDAY MORNING AFTERNOON

Fairmont, Imperial Ballroom (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Principles of Environmental Sampling

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A. M a s o n ,

PRESIDENTIAL PLENARY SESSION

COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION

M. L. Good,

R. D. A r c h e r ,

President

TUESDAY EVENING Fairmont, Imperial Ballroom (Ballroom Level) 5:30-7:00 High-Tech Threat from Abroad: Can Ameri­ ca Meet the Challenge?

COMMITTEE ON CHEMICAL SAFETY

Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: Symposium In Honor Of Moses Passer (see Division of ChemicalEducation* Tu, page 44)

Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: Fume Hoods &ηά Laboratory Ventila­ tion (see Division of Çbemiœt Heatm
COMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC STATUS Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: New Trends in Chemical Employment {see Division of Professional Relations, page 79)

2:00—14. Preservation Techniques for Organics and Inorganics. J. Parr, M. Bollinger, O. Callaway, K. Carlberg. 2:35—15. Special Quality Assurance? Quality Control Considerations for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells. R. T. Kent, Κ. Ε. Payne. 3:10—Intermission. 3:20—16. Techniques for Sampling Surface and Industrial Waters; Special Consider­ ations and Choices. J. E. Norris. 3:55—17. Groundwater Sampling. J. S. Smith, D. P. Steele, M. J. Malley, M. A. Bryant. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

L. H. Keith, Program

MONDAY MORNING AFTERNOON

AND

Session 5: Sampling Air and Stacks M. M. W a d l e y ,

Chairman

AND

Fairmont, Moulin Rouge (Lobby Level) Symposium on Principles of Environmental Sampling, organized by the Subcommittee on Environmental Monitoring & Analysis, cosponsored with Divisions of Agrochemicals, Analytical Chemistry, and Environmental Chemistry

W . H. G l a z e ,

MORNING

Fairmont, Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Principles of Environmental Sampling

COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT

L. H. K e t h , Organizer Session 1: Planning and Sample Design

V. K u c k ,

Session 7: Sampling Solids, Sludges and Liquid Wastes R. B. P o j a s e k ,

Presiding

9:00—29. Impact of Sample Variability on Planning and Confidence Levels. Ε. Κ. Triegel. 9:30—30. Relations of Sampling Design to Analytical Precision Requirements. L. J. Holcombe. 10:00—31. Preservation Techniques for Organics and Inorganics. L. I. Bone. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—32. Special QA/QC Considerations for Sampling and Analysis of Hazardous and Industrial Wastes. L. P. Jackson. 11:10—33. Special Documentation, Pack­ aging and Transportation Requirements for Hazardous Waste Samples. T. M. McKee.

Presiding

9:00—Introduction: Objectives of the Symposium. L. H. Keith. 9 : 1 0 — 1 . An Overview of the Sampling Process. M. J. Barcelona. 9:45—2. Sampling for Nonparametric Tests of Hypothesis When Data are Correlated in Space and Time. L. E. Borgman, W. F. Quimby. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—3. Non-Parametric Geostatistics for Risk and Additional Sampling Assessment. A. G. Journel. 11:05—4. Geostatistical Approaches to the Design of Sampling Regimes. G. T. Flatman, E. J. Englund, E. A. Yfantis. 11:40—5. Expert Systems as Aids in Defining QA/QC Sampling Requirements. L. H. Keith, M. T. Johnston, D. L. Lewis.

Presiding

8:45—18. Effects of Environmental Mea­ surement Variability on Air Quality Deci­ sions. J. G. Watson. 9:20—19. Airborne Sampling & In Situ Mea­ surement of Atmospheric Chemical Spe­ cies. R. L. Tanner. 9:55—20. Sampling for Organic Com­ pounds. J. B. Clements, R. G. Lewis. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—21. Sampling for Dry Deposition. T. P. Meyers, B. B. Hicks, D. D. Baldocchi. 11:15—22. Quality Control Infusion into Sta­ tionary Source Sampling. J. A. Peters.

COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE L. R. Faulkner, Program

Chairman

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Executive Tower Inn, Symphony Ballroom (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemical Problems in Elec­ tronic Materials cosponsored with Divisions of Analytical Chemistry, Colloid & Surface Chemisty, Industrial & Engineering Chemis­ try, Inorganic Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, Organic Chemistry, and Phys­ ical Chemistry L. R. F a u l k n e r , Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9 : 0 5 — 1 . Chemistry and Physics of Microstructures for Electronics. T. C. McGill. 9:55—2. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Semiconductor Materials. T. F. Kuech. 10:45—Intermission. 11:00—3. Organic Resist Materials for Mi­ croelectronic Device Fabrication. C. G. Willson. 1:30—4. Design and Synthesis of Optical Materials. A. M. Glass. 2:20—5. Photocarrier—Induced Surface Chemistry: Fundamentals and Applica­ tions. R. M. Osgood, Jr. 3:10—Intermission. 3:20—6. Role of Chemistry on the Electron­ ic Properties of GaAs Interfaces. J. M. Woodall. 4:10—7. Toward 3-Dimensional Structures: Chemical Aspects of Silicon IC Reliability, Processing and Interconnection. A. Hell­ er.

Session 6: Sampling Biota

COMMITTEE ON TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES

J . P. M i n y a r d ,

P. Morabito, Program

Presiding

2:00—28. Special Quality Assurance-Quali­ ty Control Needs for Sampling Biota. R. C. Honeycutt, D. F. Keefe. 2:30—24. Relation of Sample Size to Ana­ lytical and QA/QC Requirements. J. B. Bourke, T. D. Spittler, S. J. Young. 3:00—25. Modern Sampling Equipment, Methods and Containers. D. F. Keefe, T. L. Hamaker. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—26. Composite Sampling for Environ­ mental Monitoring. F. C. Garner, M. A. Stapanian, L. R. Williams. 4:10—27. Preservation Techniques for Organics and Inorganics. T. D. Spittler, J. B. Bourke 4:40—23. Impact of Sample Variability on Sampling and Confidence Levels. R. H. Albert, W. Horwitz.

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Presiding

9 : 1 5 — 1 1 . Sampling Waters: The Impact of Sample Variability on Planning and Confidence Levels. U. M. Cowgill. 9:55—12. Assessment of Measurement Uncertainty: Designs for Two Heteroscedastic Error Components. W. S. Liggett. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—13. Modern Sampling Equipment: Design and Application. L. H. Newburn. Session 4: Sampling Waters—continued

Presiding

Federal Science Policy Perspectives on In­ ternational Competition. William Graham, Science Adviser to President Reagan; Di­ rector, Office of Science & Technology Policy Industrial Collaboration to Advance Basic Research. Wiliam C. Norris, Chairman Emeritus, Control Data Corp. Hybrid Corporations of Tomorrow. Corporate executive, to be announced. Speakers will entertain questions.

S. H. Pine,

MORNING

Fairmont, Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Principles of Environmental Sampling

Session 3: Sampling Waters

Technical Section

M. L. G o o d ,

AND

THURSDAY

TUESDAY MORNING AFTERNOON

Chairman

AND

Executive Tower Inn, Assembly Room (2nd Floor) 39th National Technicians Symposium

P. Morabito, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. D. Lee. 9:15—Keynote Address. M. L. Good. 10:00—1. A Simple Procedure to Convert PPM to Molarity. R. J. Sunberg. 10:20—2. Chemical Destruction of Polychlorinated Biphenyls. E. C. Ward, N. S. Chu. 11:00—3. PCB Screening with Kits: How Accurate Are They? D. M. Seita, C. M. Sutcliffe.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

35

MONDAY MORNING

Teleconference planned for nine sessions from Denver The Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Orosslinking Systems wilt be teleconferenced from the Derwvr meeting. This symposium will feature internationally recognized speakers in this area of polymer science. Audioconferencing of ail nine sessions of this Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering Division program is planned If your organization has several scientists who are interested in this timely symposium, but who cannot travel to Denver, a tele­ conference subscription will allow them to participate in the meeting in your conference room* Subscribing sites will be linked to the D&nv& symposium by telephone lines that will allow scien­ tists hundreds of miles from Denver to hear presentations ana to ask questions and comment during discussion periods, Each loca­ tion will receive a set of the speakers' slides for viewing during the presentations and abstracts of these papers. Teleconferencing is now a regular feature of ACS national meetings and the number of enthusiastic subscribers is growing, if your company would like to learn more about the program, the symposium speakers, and/or subscription fees, please contact the Department of Meetings & Divisional Activities at (202) 8724401, * ^

Section A

Brown Palace, Onyx Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Supercritical Fluid Extraction-Chromatography

D. A. Charpentier, Organizer M. R. Se venants, Presiding 8:00—Introductory Remarks. 8:05—1. Processing with Supercritical Flu­ ids. V. J. Krukonis. 8:45—2. Analytical Supercritical Fluid Ex­ traction Methodologies. B. W. Wright, J. L. Fulton, A. J. Kopriva, H. T. Kalinoski, R. D. Smith. 9:15—3. Characterization and Utilization of Supercritical Fluid/Adsorbate/Adsorbent Systems in Vegetable Oil Extraction Stud­ ies. J. W. King, R. L. Eissler, J. P. Friedrich. 9:45—4. Concentration of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. S. S. H. Rizvi, J. A. Daniels. 10:15—Intermission. 10:40—5. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Ex­ traction of Terpenes from Orange Essen­ tial Oil. F. Temelli, R. J. Braddock, C. S. Chen, S. Nagy. 11:10—6. Steps to Developing a Supercriti­ cal C0 2 Processed Spice Product. R. T. Marentis. 11:40—7. Supercritical Fluid Extraction/ Chromatography of Natural Products. M. L. Kumar, A. Rosselli, R. K. Houck, F. Pacholec. 12:10—Food and Nutritional Biochemistry Subdivision Business Meeting.

Section Β 11:20—4. Determination of Minor Elements in Argillaceous Limestone and Dolomitic Limestone Standards by ICP-AES. L. E. Medina. 1:35—Introductory Remarks. 1:40—5. Determination of Non-Derivatized Ethylene Glycols Using Capillary Gas Chromatography. J. D. Wines. 2:00—6. Effects of Sample Preparation and IFD Test Procedures on High-Comfort, High-Resilience Foam Support Factors. G. A. Halstead. 2:40—7. Synthesis of Plutonium Trichloride and Utilization in Pyrochemical Process­ es. M. D. Ferran, M. H. West, K. W. Fife, H. D. Ramsey, G. D. Bird. 3:00—8. Down-Hole Sampling of Geothermal Fluids. G. K. Bayhurst, D. R. Janecky.

WOMEN CHEMISTS COMMITTEE

3:50—Intermission. 4:00—4. Chemical Challenges for Ad­ vanced Ceramics. J. D. McKenzie. 4:35—5. Market Outlook for Advanced Ma­ terials. R. Fasth. TUESDAY

AFTERNOON

Arts Auditorium, Room 2-G (2nd Floor) Forum on Employment of Chemists: Fund­ ing Opportunities for Junior Faculty

A. Butler, Organizer, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—6. Funding Opportunities from the Pe­ troleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society. J. M. Malin. 2:30—7. Funding Opportunities from the Na­ tional Science Foundation. K. G. Han­ cock. 2:55—8. Funding Opportunities from the Of­ fice of Naval Research. F. E. Saalfeld. 3:20—9. Funding Opportunities from the Re­ search Corporation. B. Andreen. 3:40—Panel Discussion.

M. A. Cavanaugh, Chairman

Brown Palace, Central City Room (2nd Floor) General

C. J. Brine, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—8. Selecting for Modified High-Lysine Maize by Reversed-Phase HPLC. J. W. Paulis, J. A. Bietz. 9:25—9. Analysis of Ethylenethiourea Using Liquid Chromatography/Electrochemistry in Human Urine. M. Hopkins, P. G. Koski. 9:45—10. Separation of B6 Vitamers by Isocratic Cation Exchange HPLC. C. J. Argoudelis. 10:05—11. Determination of Virginiamycin by Reversed-Phase HPLC. W. A. Moats. 10:25—12. Antifungal Peptides: The Basis for Biological Control of Peach Brown Rot with Bacillus Subtilus. R. C. Gueldner, C. C. Reilly, P. L. Pusey, C. Costello, R. F. Arrendale, R. H. Cox, D. E. Himmelsbach, F. G. Crumley, H. G. Cutler. 10:45—13. Application of HPLC to Measure­ ment of ATP Levels in Corn Embryos Ger­ minated at Optimum and Suboptimum Temperatures. L. P. Schnell, D. A. Danehower, J. R. Anderson, Jr. MONDAY AFTERNOON

CQSPOmomO SYMPOSIUM: New Trends in Chemical Employment {soe Division of Protesmon&i Relations, page 70) '

YOUNGER CHEMISTS COMMITTEE

DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY

A. Wilson, Chairman

J. P. Zikakis, Program Chairman

36

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—21. High-Fiber, Non-Caloric Flour Substitute for Use in Baked Foods. Β. Κ. Jasberg, J. M. Gould, K. Warner. 2:25—22. Changes in Free and Total Sulfite in Processed Foods During Storage Mea­ sured by Ion Exclusion Chromotographic Technique. H.-J. Kim, Y.-K. Kim, I. A. Taub. 2:45—23. Stability of Soybean Protease In­ hibitors During Heat Treatment. C. M. DiPietro, I. E. Liener. 3:05—24. Isomerization of Retinyl Palmitate in Milk Under Retail Lighting. P. A. Mur­ phy, R. Engelhardt, S. E. Smith. 3:25—25. In Vitro Microbicidal Action of Hu­ man Neutrophils (PMN): Enhancement by Beta Carotene (BC). E. Seifter, R. Horo­ witz, J. D. Kanofsky, S. N. Goldberg, E. R. Burns. 3:45—26. Beta Carotene (BC) in Neutrophils (PMN): Effector of Selective Toxicity? E. Seifter, J. Padawer, J. Kanofsky, S. N. Goldberg. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Brown Palace, Onyx Room (2nd Floor) Chemistry and Processing of the Sugar Beet M. A. Clarke, M. A. Godshall, Organizers M. A. Clarke,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—27. Sugarbeet Processing—the Overall Picture. S. E. Bichsel. 9:35—28. Effects of Plant Breeding on Sugarbeet Composition. G. A. Smith. 10:05—29. Carbonation Process in Beet Sugar Manufacture. M. Cleary. 10:35—Intermission. 10:55—30. Integrated Juice Purification System. V. Andersson. 11:25—31. Ion Exchange Processes in Beet Sugar Manufacture. M. Shore, N. W. Broughton, D. Sargent, G. C. Jones, B. W. Brown. 12:00—Flavor Subdivision Business Meet­ ing. Section Β

B. A. Charpentier,

E. J. Conkerton, D. J. Daigle, Organizers

Presiding

1:00—Introductory Remarks. 1:05—14. Capillary SFC with Applications in the Food Industry. T. L. Chester, L. J. Burkes, T. E. Delaney, D. P. Innis, G. D. Owens, J. D. Pinkston. 1:35—15. Fundamental Studies of the Re­ tention Process in SFC. C. R. Yonker, R. D. Smith. 2:05—16. SFC Analysis of Food Products Using Liquid C0 2 Soxhlet Sample Extrac­ tion. E. J. Guthrie. 2:35—17. Capillary SFC—Its Use for the Analysis of Food Components and Con­ taminants. B. E. Richter, M. R. Andersen, D. E. Knowles, E. R. Campbell, N. L. Por­ ter, D. W. Later.

BUSINESS MEETINGS; M, Tu, W

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—1. Opportunities in Advanced Com­ posites. F. J. McGarry. 2:40—2. Transport Through Polymers: Mo­ lecular Specific Selection Principles. W. J. Koros. 3:15—3. Developments in Polyimides. T. L. St. Clair.

D. H. Mueller,

Brown Palace, Central City Room (2nd Floor) Chemistry and Applications of Polyphenolics in Plants

J. Cianci, C. Zukoski, Organizers Presiding

General

Section A

OTHER DIVISION'S SYMPOSIUM Or INTEREST; Modifications and Applications of In­ dustrial Polysaccharides {$ee Division of Carbc>h$rat0 Chomt$try< Tu, p$m. 41)

C. Zukoski,

Section Β Brown Palace, Central City Room (2nd Floor)

Brown Palace, Onyx Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Supercritical Fluid Extraction-Chromatography

Arts Auditorium, Room 2-G (2nd Floor) Symposium on Emerging Technologies in the Chemical Industry: Opportunities in Ad­ vanced Materials

MONDAY AFTERNOON

3:05—Intermission. 3:30—18. Capillary SFC-MS—A Promising New Tool for the Food Industry. J. D. Pink­ ston, G. D. Owens, L. J. Burkes, T. L. Chester, D. P. Innis, T. E. Delaney. 4:00—19. SFC-Mass Spectrometry of Carotenoids and Other Polar Lipids. Ν. Μ. Frew, C. G. Johnson. 4:30—20. FTIR Detection with SFC. R. C. Wieboldt, J. A. Smith.

OfVi$0*l SOCIAL EVENT; Reception, U The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

D. J. Daigle,

Presiding

8:00—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—32. Hydroxycinnamoyl Conjugates in Plant Cells: Organization of Metabolism and Storage. W. De-Eknamkul, C. C. S. Chappie, R. D. Williams, Β. Ε. Ellis. 9:05—33. Polyphenol Oxidase—Its Func­ tion in Higher Plants. S. O. Duke, K. C. Vaughn. 9:35—34. Enzymatic Synthesis and Local­ ization of Polymethylated Flavonol Glucosides. R. K. Ibrahim. 10:05—Intermission. 10:30—35. Effects of Agricultural Chemi­ cals on Phenolic Compound Biosynthesis. J. Lydon, S. O. Duke. 11:00—36. Role of Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase in Plants. L. F. Ross. 11:30—37. Tissue-Specific Flavonoid Me­ tabolism in Developing Leaves. G. Weissenbock, W. Knogge, A. Peters, M. Schultz.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Brown Palace, Onyx Room (2nd Floor) Chemistry and Processing of the Suqar Beet M. A. Godshall,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—38. Treatment and Disposal of Ef­ fluents of the Sugarbeet Factory. J. A. Richmond, R. W. Strickland. 2:35—39. Ion Exchange for Desugaring of Molasses and Byproduct Isolation. L. H. Ramm-Schmidt. 3:05—40. Utilization of Fibre and Other NonSugar Products from Sugar Beet. J. Tjebbes. 3:35—Intermission. 4:00—41. Analytical Methods of Sugar Fac­ tories—New Developments. H. Schiweck, G. Steinle. 4:30—42. Ultrafiltration Used in a Novel Flexible Process to Produce High Fruc­ tose Syrup from Different Raw Materials. T. R. Hanssens, K. Koerts. 5:00—Agricultural Chemistry Subdivision Business Meeting. 7:00—Divisional Future Program Meeting.

Section Β Brown Palace, Central City Room (2nd Floor) Chemistry and Applications of Polyphenolics in Plants

E. J. Conkerton, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—43. Occurrence and Reactions of Hydroxycinnamoyl Tartrates, the Major Phe­ nols of White Grape Juices and Wines. V. L. Singleton. 2:05—44. Development and Significance of Polyphenols in Tobacco Leaf and Flowers and their Relationship to Cigarette Smok­ ing. M. E. Snook, W. S. Schlotzhauer, O. T. Chortyk, G. R. Gwynn, V. A. Sisson. 2:35—45. Hazards or Benefits from Poly­ phenols in Foods: An Update. B. Stavric, R. Klassen, T. Matula. 3:05—Intermission. 3:30—46. Use of Immunoassays for the Quantification of Flavonoids in Citrus. R. L. Mansell, C. A. Mcintosh. 4:00—47. Use of Proanthocyanidin-Free Barley in Brewing and as a Research Tool in Polyphenol Chemistry. B. Jende-Strid. 4:30—47A. Phytoalexin Analogues from Condensed Tannins. P. E. Laks. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Brown Palace, Onyx Room (2nd Floor) Chemical Interactions Between Foods and Food Packaging J. H. Hotchkiss, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—48. Modeling of Oxygen and Water Vapor Transport Through Polymeric Films. S. S. H. Rizvi, R. R. Chao. 9:35—49. Flavor-Polymer Interactions. A. L. Hriciga, D. J. Stadelman. 10:05—50. Retarding Food Deterioration by Packaging. S. G. Gilbert. 10:35—Intermission. 11:00—51. Chemical Changes in Food Packaging Resulting from Ionizing Radia­ tion. D. W. Thayer. 11:30—52. Levels of Metals in Foods Pack­ aged in Metal Cans: Recent Trends. K. W. Boyer. 12:00—Divisional Business Meeting and Luncheon. Section Β Brown Palace, Central City Room (2nd Floor) Chemistry and Applications of Polyphenols in Plants D. J. Daigle,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—53. 3-Deoxyanthocyanidins of Sor­ ghum: Chemical Characteristics and Met­ abolic Significance. D. H. Netzly, B. M Daly, L. G. Butler. 9:35—54. Chemistry and Nutritional Adver­ sities of Condensed Tannins in Sorghum Bicolor. J. N. Neucere. 10:05—55. Chemistry and Technology of Water Soluble Plant Pigments. T. Philip.

I 10:35—Intermission. 11:00—56. Use of Preparative HPLC for the Isolation of Anthocyanins and other Plant Pigments. Κ. Β. Hicks. 11:30—57. Biosynthesis and Storage of Anthocyanins in Plants. G. Hrazdina. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Brown Palace, Onyx Room (2nd Floor) Chemical Interactions Between Foods and Food Packaging J. H. Hotchkiss,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—58. Recent Advances in Metal Can Interior Coatings. R. H. Good. 2:35—59. Relationship Between Polymer Structure and Performance in Food Pack­ aging Applications. G. W. Halek. 3:05—60. Loss of Antioxidants from HDPE Films and Its Effect on Food Oxidation. J. Miltz, P. Hoojjat, J. K. Han, J. R. Giacin, B. R. Harte, J. I. Gray. 3:35—Intermission. 4:00—61. Interaction Between Aseptically Filled Citrus Products and Laminated Structures. C. H. Mannheim, J. Miltz. 4:30—62. Diffusion and Sorption of Flavor Molecules in Polymer Films. P. T. DeLassus.

Section Β Brown Palace, Central City Room (2nd Floor) Chemistry and Applications of Polyphenolics in Plants E. J. Conkerton,

Presiding

| 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—63. Application of Diode Array Detec­ tion in the Analysis of Plant Phenolics by HPLC. W. D. Clark. 2:35—64. Early Gene Activation in Peas May Be More Closely Associated with Dis­ ease Resistance than is Phenolic Accu­ mulation. L A. Hadwiger, C. H. Daniels, B. Kendra, B. Fristensky. 3:05—65. Effects of Bioregulators on Fla­ vonoids, Insect Resistance, and Yield of Cotton. P. A. Hedin, J. N. Jenkins, A. C. Thompson, J. C. McCarty, D. H. Smith, W. L. Parrot, R. L. Shepherd. 3:35—Intermission. 4:00—66. Histological and Cytological Lo­ calization of Phenolic Compounds in High­ er Plants. A. Zobel. 4:30—67. Elicitation and Variation of Phyto­ alexin Accumulation in Peanuts. C. E. Ed­ wards, S. E. Richards, R. N. Strange.

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Brown Palace, Central City Room (2nd Floor) Chemical Interactions Between Foods and Food Packaging J. H. Hotchkiss,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—68. Affects of Aroma Compound Ab­ sorption on Mechanical and Barrier Prop­ erties of Polymer Films. B. R. Harte, K. Hiroze, J. Miltz, J. R. Giacin. 9:35—69. Preparation of Flexible Plasticized PVC Packagings for Liquid Foods with Low Matter Transfers. J. L. Taverdet, J. M. Vergnaud. 10:05—70. Matter Transfers Between Liquid Foods and Plasticized PVC Packaging. J. L. Taverdet, J. M. Vergnaud. 10:35—Intermission. 11:00—71. Permeation of High Barrier Food Packaging Films by Ethyl Esters: Effect of Permeant Molecular Weight. J. LandoisGarza, J. H. Hotchkiss. 11:30—72. Theoretical and Computational Aspects of Migration of Package Compo­ nents to Food. S-S. Chang, L. E. Smith. 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—73. Overview of Analytical Methods for Phthalate Esters in Foods. B. D. Page. 2:05—74. Recent Advances in Analytical Methods for the Determination of Mi- , grants. H. Hollifield, T. Fazio. 2:35—75, Migration and Formation of Λ/-ΝΪtrosamines from Food Contact Materials. N. P. Sen. 3:05—Intermission.

3:30—76. Development of a Standard Test for Volatile Migrants from Polyester Trays. S. J. Risch, G. A. Reineccius. 4:00—77. Migration of Packaging Compo­ nents to Foods: Regulatory Consider­ ations. C. V. Breder. FRIDAY

MORNING

Brown Palace, Central City Room (2nd Floor) General

L. W. Doner, Presiding

10:05—4. Environmental Fate Studies of Fenoxaprop-ethyl. A. P. Toole, D. G. Cros­ by. 10:25—Intermission. 10:35—5. Comparative Penetration of Amines into Bulb Mites and House Flies. C. O. Knowles, M. S. Hamed. 10:55—6. ADME Studies of the Anthelmintic 4-Pyridinyl Butyrylhydrazone in the Sheep. R. E. Hornish, R. E. Gosline, J. M. Nappier, T. S. Arnold, D. R. Reeves, C. J. Subacz, B. K. J. Leong. 11:15—7. Areawide Time and Space Varia­ tions in Air Concentrations of Two Pesti­ cides Used on Rice in California. J. N. Seiber, M. M. McChesney, J. E. Woodrow.

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—78. Correlation of Growth Location of Sugar Beets and Ratios of 180/160 and Carbon-bound D/H in Derived Sucrose. L. MONDAY AFTERNOON W. Doner, J. P. Phillips. 8:55—79. Novel Methods for the Determina­ Brown Palace, Ballroom A (2nd Floor) tion of Polymeric Polyphenolics. A. E. HaSymposium on the Synthesis and Chemis­ german, R. Miller. try of New Pesticides 9:15—80. Cocoa Polyphenols and Their Fate During Fermentation. A. G. H. Lea, G. | D. R. Baker, J. G. Fenyes, Organizers, D. Ford. Presiding 9:35—81. Inhibition of Soybean Lipoxygen­ ases Activity by Plant Polyphenolics and 2:00—Introductory Remarks. Extracts of Plants. D. L. King, B. P. Klein. 2:05—8. Synthesis of Commercial Herbi­ 9:55—82. Oligomerization of Methyl Linolecides, Fungicides, and Insecticides Relat­ nate Monohydroperoxides, Hydroperoxy ed to Carbamate. J. J. D'Amico, F. G. Epidioxides and Dihydroperoxides. W. E. Bollinger. Neff, E. N. Frankel, K. Fujimoto. 3:15—9. Synthesis and Insecticidal Activity 10:15—83. Acylated Nomicotines and Their of Some iv-Aminoxy Esters of c*-Cyano-3Formation During Air-Curing of Burley To­ Phenoxy Benzyl Alcohol. J. R. Sanborn, bacco. H. R. Burton, R. A. Andersen, P. D. R. L. Sageser, C. H. Tieman. Fleming. 3:40—10. Synthesis of Optical Isomers and Epoxide Analogs of Tridiphane. J. M. Renga, L. D. Markley. 4:10—11. Chemical Agents as Regulators of Biological Responses in Plants. H. Yokoyama, J. H. Keithly, W. J. Hsu, E. Hayman. 4:30—12. Milbemycin H Analog Synthesis. S. R. Schow, M. E. Schnee, J. J. Rauh.

AGRO

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

DIVISION OF AGROCHEMICALS P. Hedin, Program

Chairman

COSPONSÛRiD SYMPOSIA: Principles of Environmental Sampling

{$ee Committee on EftvkQnment&t improvementM, Tu, W> Thu, see page 35) Chemistry mû Applications of Polyphenols in Plants (see Oivt&fon ofAg* ricuitwat α food Chemistry, Tu, W\ p&ge 36) BUSINESS MEETING; W DIVISION SOCIAL EVENT: Social Hoar, Tu

MONDAY

MORNING

Brown Palace, Ballroom A (2nd Floor) General—Analytical and Environmental

J. N. Seiber, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Surface Sampling of Insecticides and Its Application to Food-Handling Es­ tablishments. R. B. Leidy. 9:25—2. Airborne Residues of a Termiticide Formulation of Chloropyrifos in Homes— A Two Year Study. R. B. Leidy, C. G. Wright. 9:45—3. Foliar Dislodgeable Residues of Avermectin Bla and Its Delta 8,9 Isomer Following Application of AVID 0.15 EC to Greenhouse-Grown Chrysanthemums. J. J. Jenkins, H. S. Rosenthal, J. Mollet, R. D. Brown, J. Norton, R. A. Dybas.

Brown Palace, Ballroom A (2nd Floor) Symposium on the Surface Runoff of Chem­ icals from Agricultural Watersheds P. J. McCall, G. R. Oliver, P. J. McCall, Presiding

Organizers

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—13. Prediction of Pesticide Transport from Forested Watersheds: A Compari­ son of Two Models. W. L. Nutter, J. F. Dowd, P. B. Bush, D. G. Neary. 9:40—14. Representative Climatic Record for Pesticide Runoff and Leaching Simultation. W. G. Knisel, R. A. Leonard. 10:05—15. Modeling the Runoff of Chlorpyrifos in a Terrestrial-Aquatic Watershed. P. J. McCall, G. R. Oliver. 10:40—Intermission. 11:00—16. Modeling the Runoff Potential of Chlorpyrifos in a Citrus Grove Environ­ ment. G. R. Oliver, J. E. Eager. 11:30—17. Management Practices for Re­ ducing Pesticide Runoff. A. Felsot, J. K. Mitchell. G. R. Oliver, Presiding 2:00—18. Determination of Herbicides in Surface Water from Agricultural Water­ sheds. A. J. Klein, S. R. Baszis, L. M. Horner, R. Lauer, F. Rupel, R. G. Smith, F. M. Triebe. 2:25—19. Field Calibration of Surface: A Model of Agricultural Chemicals in Sur­ face Waters. D. I. Gustafson. 2:50—20. Simulating Interrelations of Chemical, Soil, and Hydrologie Factors in Pesticide Runoff. R. E. Smith, V. A. Ferreira. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—21. Can Pesticide Transport Models be Validated using Field Data: Now and in the Future? R. A. Leonard, W. G. Knisel. 3:55—22. Expert Systems and Chemical Transport Modeling. E. H. Seely. 4:25.—23. Model for Assessing Agricultural Management Impact on Ground Water Quality. C. S. Hebson, D. G. DeCoursey. 4:50—Discussion.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

37

I i ô

5 .3

Section A

Section Β

Brown Palace, Ballroom A (2nd Floor) Symposium on the Relationship Between the Regulation of Pesticides, the Scientific Method, Public Perception of Risk and the Law

Brown Palace, Stratton—Tabor Room (2nd Floor) General—Metabolism

R. C. Honeycutt, Organizer,

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—43. Thiiranium Ion Intermediates in the Toxicity of w'c-1,2-Dihaloalkanes. D. R. Dohn, J. E. Casida. 2:25—44. Accelerated Biodégradation of Several Organophosphate Insecticides. L. C. Horng, D. D. Kaufman. 2:45—45. Degradation of Alachlor in Water by Ultraviolet Light and Ozone. C. J. Somich, P. C. Kearney, M. T. Muldoon. 3:05—46. Metabolism of 14C-Desaminosulfamethazine [N-(4,6-Dimethyl-2-Pyrimidinyl) Benzene[U-14C] Sulfonamide] in the Rat. G. D. Paulson, V. J. Feil. 3:25—Intermission. 3:35—47. Glutathione Medicated Methylthio Removal and Thiol Formation in the Metabolism of 2-Methylthiobenzothiazole. G. L. Larsen, J. E. Bakke, V. J. Feil. 3:55—48. Spontaneous Reactivation of Phosphinylated Acetyl-Cholinesterase: Effect of the pH of Inhibition on the pH Profile. C. N. Lieske, C. E. Gessner, H. G. Meyer, R. T. Gepp, J. H. Clark, L. W. Harris. 4:15—49. Chloromethyl Group Activation of Eel Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition. C. N. Lieske, J. H. Clark, H. G. Meyer, J. R. Lowe, P. Blumbergs, M. A. Priest.

WEDNESDAY MORNING

1 υ

ι

8:30—Introduction. 8:45—24. Historical Perspective on the Sci­ entific Method—a Search for Truth Through Scientific Methods. E. G. Jordan. 9:10.—25. Educational System as a Factor in Risk Perception and Scientific Aware­ ness of the General Public. E. Hodgson., 9:35—26. Role of the Scientist in the Public Perception of Risk. J. E. Chambers. 10:00—27. Advocacy Groups as a Factor in the Public Perception of Pesticide Risk. P. Jones. 10:25—28. Risk Perception and the Mass Media. F. Rowan. 10:50—29. Communications as a Tool to Integrate Elements of the Regulation of Pesticide Safety. S. Ragland. 11:15—Panel Discussion.

Ο <

Presiding

Section Β Brown Palace, Stratton—Tabor Room (2nd Floor) General—Biochemical Mechanisms and Natural Products H. Chambers,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—30. Preparation and Properties of some 5-Alkoxy-3-Methyl-2(5H) Furanones. A. B. Pepperman. 9:25—31. Cuticular Alkanes of the Screwworm. Relationship to Sex, Age, Geo­ graphical Origin and Irradiation. J. G. Pomonis, H. Hakk. 9:45—32. Phytotoxins from a Host Specific Pathogen of Spotted Knapweed, Centaurea maculosa. A. C. Stierle, J. H. Cardellinall. 10:05—33. Enhanced Release of Norepi­ nephrine from Presynaptic Nerve Termi­ nals by Alpha Cyano Pyrethroids. J. M. Clark, M. W. Brooks. 10:25—Intermission. 10:35—34. Monooxygenase Activity and Cytochrome P-450 in Permethrin-Resistant Heliothis virescens from Cotton. T. M. Brown, G. T. Payne. 10:55—35. Phenoxyalkylpyridinium-4-AIdoximes as Reactivators of Phosphorylated Acetylcholinesterase. H. Chambers. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Brown Palace, Ballroom A (2nd Floor) Symposium on the Relationship Between the Regulation of Pesticides, the Scientific Method, Public Perception of Risk and Law D. Severn,

Presiding

1:30—36. Pesticide Regulation and the Law—How does the Scientific Method Fit in? W. S. Ferguson. 1:55—37. Scientific Evaluation Procedures. How EPA Views the Weight of Scientific Evidence and Law While Making Regula­ tory Decisions? J. C. Lamb. 2:20—38. Quality of Science and the Office of Pesticide Programs' Data Reporting Guidelines, Standard Evaluation Proce­ dures and Standard Format for Prepara­ tion of Scientific Reviews. S. L. Johnson. 2:45—39. Good Science and GLPs: Is There a Difference? P. Swiderskey, R. Novak. 3:10—40. Dynamics of Politics and Science in Regulatory Decisions Concerning Pesti­ cides. J. M. Witt. 3:35—41. Academic Viewpoint of Regula­ tion of Pesticides Through Scientific Anal­ ysis. N. P. Thompson. 4:00—42. Industrial Viewpoint of Regulation of Pesticides Through Scientific Analysis. R. C. Honeycutt. 4:25—Panel Discussion. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings 38

February 9, 1987 C&EN

W. Garner,

Presiding

ANYL

10:00—2. Recent Advances in Optical Spectroscopy Using High Performance Array Detectors. M. Bonner Denton, R. B. Bilhorn, P. M. Epperson, J. V. Sweedler. 10:20—3. Modeling for Expert Systems. J. W. Frazer. 10:40—Intermission. 11:00—4. Stochastic Photolysis: A New Technique for Observing Rapid Chemical Reactions. G. R. Haugen, G. M. Hieftje. 11:20—5. Voltammetric Chemical Sensors for Neurotransmitters. R. M. Wightman. 11:40—6. Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems for Inductively Coupled Plasma—Atomic Emission Spectrometry. G. Horlick, B. Todd, G. King.

Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Zephyr Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Analytical Chemistry and Surfaces—I: Frontier Methods

R. L. Garrell, Organizer, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—7. Raman Spectroscopy of Molecules Adsorbed on Solid Surfaces. A. Campion. 9:20—8. Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of Monolayers Adsorbed on Low-Area Metal Surfaces by Polarization Modulation Techniques. W. G. Golden, C. G. Zimba. 10:00—9. Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry of Surface Species. C. Korzeniewski, S. Pons, M. Severson, P. Schmidt. 10:40—10. Scanning Tunneling Microsco­ py. S. Chiang, R. J. Wilson. 11:20—11. Use of Conventional Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy for Surface Analytical Chemistry. C. R. Brundle, J. E. Baglin.

Section C Executive Tower Inn, Curtis-Caucus Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Chemical Characterization of Ion-Containing Polymers—I C. R. Martin, Organizer,

DIVISION OF ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY M. A. Kaiser, Program

Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIA: Principles of environmental Sampling (see Committee on Environmental improvement, M, Tu, W, Thu$ page 35} Chemical Problems in Electronic Malerials (see Committee on Science, Thu, page 35)

OTHER DIVISIONS' SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Drug Testing in the Work Pïace, Technical* Legal and Ethical Issues (see Division of Professional Relations, fvt, page 79) Archaeological Chemistry {see Division of the History of Chemistry, W, Thuf page 55) Robotics in the industrial Laboratory (see Division of industrial 8. Engineering Chemistry, Tu, W, page 56) DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Social Hour> Tu Dinner, Tu

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry: Award Symposium Honoring G. M. Hieftje—I J. M. Ramsey,

Organizer

G. Horlick, Presiding 9:05—Introduction of Awardee. 9:10—1. Award Address. (ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry sponsored by Fisher Scientific Co.) From Droplets to Tomography—In Diversity There is Strength. G. M. Hieftje.

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—12. Two-Dimensional NMR Tech­ niques in lonomer Analysis. A. Natansohn, A. Eisenberg. 9:30—13. Characterization of Polyurethane lonomers. Y. S. Ding, R. A. Register, S. L. Cooper. 10:00—14. ESR Evidence for Specific Sol­ vation Effects in lonomers. R. A. Weiss, J. J. Fitzgerald, H. A. Frank, B. W. Chadwick. 10:30—15. Characterization of Sulfonate lonomers in a Non-Ionizing Solvent, C. W. Lantman, W. J. MacKnight, J. S. Higgens, D. G. Peiffer, S. K. Sinha, R. D. Lundberg. 11:00—16. Characterizations of Polyelectrolyte Modifying Layers on Electrodes Via Luminescent Probes. L. R. Faulkner, R. G. Bartolo. 11:30—17. Microdomain and Interaction of Styrene—Imidazole Copolymers. J. S. Tan, R. C. Sutton, L. Thai, J. M. Hewitt. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry: Award Symposium Honoring G. M. Hieftje—II J. M. Ramsey,

Presiding

2:00—18. Applications of Photothermal De­ flection Spectroscopy (PDS) in Analytical Chemistry. R. E. Russo. 2:20—19. Ultra-Fast Frequency-Domain Flourescence Measurements. F. V. Bright. 2:40—20. Development of a Piezoelectric Biosensor. G. J. Bastiaans, C. M. Good. 3:00—Intermission. 3:20—21. Characterization and Control of Reactive Plasma Chemistries via Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Its Applica­ tion in Semiconductor Device Fabrication. R. N. Savage. 3:40—22. Laser Spectroscopy in Pharma­ ceutical Control. J. E. Freeman, H. A. Havel, R. J. Haskell, T. J. Thamann. 4:00—23. Process Analytical Chemistry. D. E. Honigs.

Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Gold Room (2nd Floor) Frank H. Field and Joe L. Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry: Award Symposium on Phys­ ical Chemistry in Mass Spectrometry Hon­ oring J. H. Beynon R. K. Boyd, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30—24. Neutralization-Reionization Mass Spectrometry. F. W. McLafferty. 2:00—25. Collisions of Polyatomic Ions with Surfaces. R. G. Cooks. 2:30—26. Isomerization Studies on EnergySelected Ions. T. Baer. 3:00—27. Photodissociation of Ions in an ICR Spectrometer Cell. R. C. Dunbar. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—28. Diatomic Dications. R. K. Boyd. 4:15—29. Photodissociation Dynamics of Small Cluster Ions. M. T. Bowers. 4:45—30. Award Address. (Frank H. Field and Joe L. Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry spon­ sored by Extrel Corp.) Applications of En­ ergy Resolution Capabilities of Mass Spectrometers. J. H. Beynon.

Section C Executive Tower Inn, Curtis-Caucus Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Analytical Chemistry and Surfaces II. Frontier Methods C. R. Brundle,

Presiding

2:00—31. Surface Photochemistry on Met­ als. M. Moskovits. 2:45—32. ATR Enhanced and Conventional Raman Spectroscopy as a Probe of Sur­ face Chemistry on Metals and Semicon­ ductors in UHV. J. C. Hemminger. 3:30—33. Atomic Processes on Solid Sur­ faces, a Pulsed-Laser Atomic-Probe Field Ion Microscope Investigation. T. T. Tsong. 4:15—34. Analysis of Electrode Surfaces by Auger Spectroscopy and LEED: Ag(111) in Aqueous Halide Solutions. G. N. Salaita, F. Lu, A. T. Hubbard.

Section D Executive Tower Inn, Zephyr Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Chemical Characterizations of Ion-Containing Polymers—II

S. L. Cooper, Presiding 2:00—35. Chemical Characterizations of Solution-Cast Perfluorosulfonate lonomer Films and Membranes. R. B. Moore III, C. R. Martin. 2:30—36. Effect of Internal Plasticization on Ion Clustering in lonomers. M. Gauthier, A. Eisenberg. 3:00—37. Characterization of Plasticized Polystyrene lonomers. C. G. Bazuin, S. Villeneuve. 3:30—38. Characterization of Rare Earth Polystyrenesulfonate lonomers. W. M. Risen, Jr., K. Sun. 4:00—39. Effect of Solvents on the Microstructure of Sulfonated Polystyrene lon­ omers. R. A. Weiss, J. J. Fitzgerald, D. Kim. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry: Award Symposium Honoring G. M. Hieftje III C. B. Boss,

Presiding

9:00—40. Laser Spectroscopy by Degener­ ate Four-Wave Mixing. J. M. Ramsey, W. B. Whitten, T. G. Nolan. 9:20—41. Analytical Look at Analytical Ap­ plications of Multiphoton Ionization Spec­ troscopy. S. W. Downey. 9:40—42. Elemental Analysis Using a Quadrupole Ion Storage Device. M. W. Blades, B. Daigle. 10:00—43. Detection of Analyte and Plasma Species Images in Inductively Coupled Plasmas. J. W. Olesik, K. R. Bradley, E. Williamsen. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—44. Determination of Ruthenium by AAS. D. Rojas de Olivares, X. Romero.

11:00—45. Signal to Noise Enhancement for the ICP/Fourier Transform Spectrome­ ter. L. R. Layman. 11:20—46. Curve Fitting in Atomic Spec­ trometry Calibration. C. B. Boss. Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Zephyr Room (2nd Floor) Division of Analytical Chemistry Award in Chemical Instrumentation. Award Sympo­ sium Honoring F. E. Lytle—I T. D. Harris, J. M. Harris, T. D. Harris,

2:10—62. Quantitative Raman Spectrosco­ py of Impurities in Semiconductors. T. D. Harris, M. G. Lamont. 2:50—Intermission. 3:00—63. Laser-Based Microchemical Analysis. N. J. Dovichi. 3:40—64. In Situ for Real Time Process Op­ timization. R. W. Chrisman, R. A. Bredeweg, M. V. Koch, L. B. Westover, M. B. Gibbs. 4:20—65. Creating an Environment for In­ strumentation Development. J. W. Amy. Section Β

Organizers

Presiding

9:00—Presentation of Analytical Chemistry Division Award in Chemical Instrumenta­ tion to F. E. Lytle. M. A. Kaiser. 9:10—47. Award Address. Pump/Probe Spectroscopy by Asynchronous Optical Sampling. F. E. Lytle, P. A. Elzinga, R. J. Kneisler, Y. Jiang, G. B. King, N. M. Laurendeau. 10:00—Intermission. 10:10—48. Molecular Modeling and Spec­ troscopic Studies Relating to Liquid Chro­ matographic Fractionations Using Chiral Stationary Phases. L. B. Rogers. 10:50—49. Characterization of Organic Ma­ terials with Laser Mass Spectrometry. D. M. Hercules. 11:30—50. Time-Resolution as a Focus in Spectroscopic Instrumentation. J. M. Har­ ris.

Executive Tower Inn, Zephyr Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Analytical Chemistry and Surfaces—IV: Probing Polymers and Chro­ matographic Substrates N. Schlotter,

Presiding

2:00—66. ESCA Non-Destructive Depth Profiles of Polymeric Biomaterial Sur­ faces. B. D. Ratner. 2:45—67. Ion, Electron and Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies of Polymeric Inter­ faces: Multitechnique Microstructure So­ lutions. J. A. Gardella, Jr. 3:30—68. Chromatographic and Spectrometric Studies of Surface Immobilized Ligands. R. K. Gilpin. 4:15—69. Fluorescence Studies in, on and Perhaps Near Chromatographic Bonded Phases. C. H. Lochmuller.

Section C

Section C Executive Tower Inn, Curtis-Caucus (2nd Floor) Symposium on Analytical Chemistry and Surfaces—III: Organic Films J. Garde I la,

R. W. Murray,

Presiding

9:00—51. Surface Raman Spectroscopy of Organic Monolayers. Ν. Ε. Schlotter. 9:45—52. FTIR SEW Spectroscopy of Langmuir-Blodgett Monolayers on Silicon Sub­ strate. H. Ishida, Y. Ishino. 10:30—53. SERS as a Probe of Adsorptivity and Reactivity at the Solution-Metal Inter­ face. R. L. Garrell, K. D. Beer, W. Tanner, A. M. Ahem. 11:15—54. Quantitative Analysis of Cover­ age and Orientation of Organic Films on Semiconductor and Insulator Substrates Using Infrared External Reflection Spec­ troscopy. D. L. Allara, M. D. Porter. Section D Executive Tower Inn, Gold Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Chemical Characterizations of Ion-Containing Polymers—III D. A. Buttry,

Presiding

2:00—70. Structure and Ionic Conducting Properties of Co-Polymers of Diphenylsiloxane and Ethylene Oxide. T. A. Skotheim, X.-Q. Yang, H. L. Mei, Y. Okamoto. 2:30—71. Ionic Conductivity in Amorphous Siloxane-Based Polymer Electrolytes. R. Spindler, D. F. Shriver. 3:00—72. Polyphosphazene Polymer Elec­ trolytes and Mixed Ionic Conductors. J. S. Tonge, D. F. Shriver, P. M. Blonsky, L. Cheng-Ming, H. R. Allcock, P. E. Austin, T. X. Neenan, J. T. Sisko. 3:30—73. Diffusion of Lithium in Polyethyl­ ene oxide). G. T. Davis, C. K. Chiang. 4:00—74. Thermal and High Pressure Elec­ trical Properties of Ion Conducting Poly­ mers. M. C. Wintersgill, J. J. Fontanella, C. G. Andeen. ' 4:30—75. 23 Na NMR Studies of Ion Conduct­ ing Polymers. S. G. Greenbaum.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) Division of Analytical Chemistry Award in Chemical Instrumentation. Award Sympo­ sium Honoring F. E. Lytle—II

Executive Tower Inn, Gold Room (3rd Floor) Atomic Spectroscopy: Optimization

J. H. Kali vas, Presiding 2:00—76. Determination of Inorganic Spe­ cies of Selenium and Tellurium in Air by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. S. Muangnoichareon, Ο. Κ. Manuel, Κ. Υ. Chiou. 2:20—77. Improved Dissolution Procedure and Determination of Tin in Low Tin Sol­ ders. G. G. Janauer, D. W. Sissenstein, Jr. 2:40—78. Determination of Organotin Com­ pounds in Water. M. S. Ismail, D. A. Bath. 3:00—79. Simplex Optimization of an ICP Spectrometer with Minimization of Spec­ tral Interferences. J. H. Kalivas. 3:20—80. Optimization Methods for Resolu­ tion of Multidimensional Spectroscopic Data. S. L. Neal, E. R. Davidson, I. M. Warner. 3:40—81. Application of Pattern Recogni­ tion in Characterization of Solid Products in Autoxidation of Hydrocarbon Mixtures. K. Zarrabi, S. L. Durfee, S. R. Daniel, K. J. Voorhees. 4:00—82. Procedure for Estimating Parame­ ters for Nonlinear Perturbations of a Straight Line. D. E. Hughes.

D. E. Honigs, Organizer,

Presiding

8:25—Introductory Remarks. 8:30—83. Near Infrared Analysis: An Over­ view. D. E. Honigs. 9:00—84. Near Infrared Reflectance Analy­ sis of Oils and Fats. R. B. Roy, M. Dzwinczyk. 9:30—85. NIRA for Silicone Coating Weights. C. Paralusz. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—86. Online^ Near Infrared Tech­ niques. L. G. Weyer. 10:45—87. Near Infrared Reflectance Spec­ troscopy and Fourier Self-Deconvolution of Materials in Absorbing Matrices. P. R. j Griffiths, J. M. Olinger. 11:15—88. Analysis of NIR Spectra in Fouri­ er Space: Band Enhancements via Deriva­ tives and Self Deconvolution. S. A. Nokes, W. F. McClure. Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Zephyr Room (2nd Floor) Garvan Medal Symposium Honoring J. G. j Osteryoung I M. Wojciechowski, Presiding

Organizer,

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—89. Electrochemical Study of the Re­ duction of Thyroxine and Its Analogs. R. A. Osteryoung, Κ. Η. Wong. 9:25—90. Dual Cell Electrochemical Detec­ tors in Flow Stream Analyses. D. J. Curran, T. Duhamel, R. McKean. 9:45—91. Industrial Applications of Square Wave Voltammetry. J. D. McLean. 10:05—92. Determination of Sulfur Speciation in Geologic Materials. L. L. Jackson. 10:25—93. Normal Pulse Voltammetry at Microelectrodes. T. Hepel. 10:45—Intermission. 10:55—94. Hydrodynamic Square Wave Voltammetry. M. Wojciechowski. 11:15—95. Square Wave Voltammetry in Studies of Reactant Adsorption and Micellar Electrocatalysis. J. F. Rusling, A. Owlia, C.-N. Shi. 11:35—96. Pulsed-Potential Chronoamperometric and Chronocoulometric Detec­ tion at Hydrodynamic Electrodes. D. C. Johnson, G. G. Neuburger. 11:55—97. Award Address. (Garvan Medal sponsored by Olin Corp.) Analytical Pulse Voltammetry. J. G. Osteryoung.

Section C Executive Tower Inn, Curtis-Caucus Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Chemical Characterizations of Ion-Containing Polymers—V •T. A. Skotheim,

Presiding

9:00—98. Use of Microgravimetric Tech­ niques for Determining Ion Content of Electroactive Polymers. D. A. Buttry, D. Orata, P. Varineau, T-C. Wen. 9:30—99. Ion Transport in Oxidized Polyacetylene. J. C. W. Chien, J. B. Schlenoff. 10:00—100. Counterioo Transport in Polypyrrole Membranes Having a Fibrillar/Microporous Morphology. R. M. Penner, C. R. Martin. 10:30—101. Self-Doped Conducting Poly­ mers. A. J. Heeger, F. Wudl, A. O. Patil, Y. Ikenoue, N. Colaneri. 11:00—102. Conductive Polymers Contain­ ing Bound Dopant Ions. N. S. Sundaresan, J. R. Reynolds, S. Basak, M. Pomerantz.

Section D Executive Tower Inn, Beethoven Room (3rd Floor) ACS Award in Chromatography: Award Symposium Honoring C. H. Lochmuller—I D. B. Marshall, Organizer,

Presiding

9:15—104. Automated Multidimensional Gas Chromatography: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Complex Mix­ tures. Β. Μ. Gordon, M. S. Uhrig, W. M. Coleman III, E. L. White, M. F. Borgerding, J,. F. Elder, H. L. Chung, D. S. Moore, J. A. Giles. 10:00—105. Effect of Immobilization on the Selectivity of Immobilized Reagents. M. A. Ditzler. 10:45—106. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Studies of Molecular Interactions at Reversed-Phase Silica Surfaces. J. M. Har­ ris, A. Wong, M. L. Hunnicutt, J. W. Carr. 11:30—107. Surface Perturbation of Vibra­ tional Transitions of Pyrenesilanes Bound to Silica. M. L. Hunnicutt, J. M. Harris, C. H. Lochmuller. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Near Infrared Analysis—II B. Tenge,

Presiding

2:00—108. Scattering-Absorption Interac­ tions in NIR Spectroscopy. E. W. Stark. 2:30—109. A Spectroscopic Technique for Noninvasive Analysis. K. H. Norris. 3:00—110. Using Discriminant Analysis for Quality Control. H. Mark, J. Workman. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—111. NIR Spectral Search and Match Algorithms and Their Application. P. J. Cooper. 4:15—112. Effect of Wavelength Searches on NIR Calibrations. B. Tenge, D. E. Hon­ igs. Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Beethoven Room (3rd Floor) ACS Award in Chromatography: Award Symposium Honoring C. H. Lochmuller—II D. B. Marshall,

Presiding

2:00—113. Pre and Post Micellar Studies of Fluorocarbon and Hydrocarbon Surfac­ tants as HPLC Modifiers. R. K. Gilpin, A. Kasturi, Μ. Ε. Gangoda. 2:45—114. Dead Volume Measurements in Liquid Chromatographic Systems. R. P. W. Scott. 3:30—115. Unified Molecular Theory of Chromatography. D. E. Martire. 4:15—Award Address. (ACS Award in Chromatography Sponsored by SUPELCO, Inc.) C. H. Lochmuller.

Section C Executive Tower Inn, Curtis-Caucus Room (2nd Floor) General

N. C. Fawcett, Presiding 2:00—116. Study of Pyrrole in Chloroaluminate Ionic Liquids. T. A. Zawodzinski, Jr., R. A. Osteryoung. 2:20—117. Flow Injection Analysis Study of the Selectivity of Four Crown Ethers for Lithium Ion Selective Electrodes. A. S. Attiyat, G. D. Christian, R. A. Bartsch. 2:40—118. Voltammetric and Liquid Chro­ matographic Identification of Organic Products of Microwave-Assisted Wet Ash­ ing of Biological Samples. K. W. Pratt, H. M. Kingston, W. A. MacCrehan, W. F. Koch. 3:00—119. Orthophosphate Ion-Selective Electrode Design for Dual Ion Analysis. S. A. Glazier, M. A. Arnold. 3:20—120. Sensitive and Rapid Method for Assay of Microbial Collagenases Using Fluorescamine. J. H. Dreisbach, G. Pettinato, L. Shantz. 3:40—121. Piezoelectric Detection of Nu­ cleic Acid Hybridization. N. C. Fawcett, J. A. Evans, L. C. Chien, Ν. Flowers, D. Hub­ bard, R. B. Towery. 4:00—122. Fission Track Determination of Sub-ppb Concentrations of Uranium in Solutions. R. McCorkell.

8:30—103. Kinetics of Sorption-Desorption in Liquid Chromatography. D. B. Marshall, J. W. Burns.

Presiding

1:30—61. Analytical Measurements with Ul­ tra-stable Mode-locked Lasers. M. J. Wirth, C. E. Mohler, J. A. Shaer.

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Near Infrared Analysis—I

Section D

Presiding

9:00—55. Dielectric Relaxation Studies of Ion Motions in Electrolyte Containing Perfluorosulfonate lonomers. K. A. Mauritz, R-M. Lo. 9:30—56. Chemical Investigations of Nafion-Coated Electrodes Using Transition Metal Complexes. M. H. Schmidt, N. S. Lewis. 10:00—57. Influence of Supporting Electro­ lyte Concentration and Composition on Formal Potentials of Redox Couples Incor­ porated in Nation Coatings on Electrodes. J. Redepenning, R. Naegeli, F. C. Anson. 10:30—58. Ion Transport in lonically Con­ ductive Composite Polymer Membranes. C. Liu, C. R. Martin. 11:00—59. Electrochemical Voltammetry in the Absence of Liquids. R. W. Murray, R. A. Reed, L. Geng, M. Longmire. 11:30—60. Ferrocene Redox Reaction in Low Molecular Weight Poly(Ethylene Ox­ ide). W. T. Yap, E. A. Blubaugh, R. A. Durst.

J. M. Harris,

Executive Tower Inn, Curtis-Caucus Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Chemical Characterizations of Ion-Containing Polymers—IV

I WEDNESDAY MORNING

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

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Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Novel Detection Methods in Liquid Chromatography—I E. S. Yeung, Organizer,

Presiding

8:45—123. Study of the Qualitative and Quantitative Properties of the Light Scat­ tering Detector. A. Stolyhwo, H. Colin, M. Martin, G. Guiochon. 9:15—124. Pulsed Amperometry. D. C. Johnson. 9:45—125. Rotoreflected Double Beam Thermal Lens System for Indirect Ion Chromatography Detection. Y. Yang, M. S. de la Cruz, S. C. Hall. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—126. Laser Fluorescence Detection in Liquid Chromatography. V. L. McGuffin. 11:00—127. Detection in HPLC Based on Optical Activity. E. S. Yeung. 11:30—128. Chemiluminescence and Pho­ tochemical Reaction Detection in HPLC. J. Birks, C. Shellum, J. Poulsen.

Section Β

ζ

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Executive Tower Inn, Zephyr Room (2nd Floor)

11:10—145. Electrical Field-Flow Fraction­ ation of Proteins. D. D. Russell. 11:30—146. Peak Parameters in Field-Flow Fractionation: Results of Monte-Carlo Simulations. T. A. Turano, M. R. Schure. 11:50—147. What Do Particle Trajectories Look Like in Field-Flow Fractionation? The FFF Movie. M. R. Schure. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Novel Detection Methods in Liquid Chromatography—II

P. Uden, Presiding 2:00—148. Photoionization and Photoacoustic Detection. E. Voigtman. 2:30—149. Solvent Elimination Techniques for Microbore HPLC/FTIR. P. R. Griffiths, D. J. J. Fraser, K. L. Norton. 3:00—150. Mass Spectrometry: A Selective and Universal Detector for Liquid Chroma­ tography. M. L. Vestal. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—151. Atomic Plasma Emission Spec­ tral Detection for HPLC. P. C. Uden. 4:15—152. Swept-Potential Electrochemi­ cal Detection. P. E. Sturrock.

Mass Spectrometry—I

Section Β

D. A. Lee, Presiding 8:30—129. Supercritical Fluid Injection of Nonvolatiles into Supersonic Beam Mass Spectrometry with Resonant Two-Photon Ionization Detection. D. M. Lubman, C. H. Sin, Η. Μ. Pang. 8:50—130. Pulsed Laser Desorption of Biologicals in Supersonic Jets with Resonant Two-Photon Ionization Detection. D. M. Lubman, R. Tembreull, L. Li. 9:10—131. Capillary Chromatography/Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy. S. W. Stiller, M. V. Johnston. 9:30—132. Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy with a Supercritical Fluid Inlet. B. D. An­ derson, M. V. Johnston. 9:50—133. Molecular Structure Elucidation Using Multiphoton Ionization Spectrome­ try. G. R. Kinsel, K. B. Segar, M. V. John­ ston. 10:10—134. Microwave Induced Plasma as an Ion Source for Mass Spectrometry. R. D. Satzger, F. L. Fricke, P. G. Brown, J. A. Caruso. 10:30—135. Effect of Ion Origin on Daugh­ ter Ion MS/MS Spectra. K. L. Busch, G. C. DiDonato. 10J50—136. Preparation of Uranium Sam­ ples for Isotopic Assay. D. A. Lee, E. L. Fuller, Jr.

Section C Executive Tower Inn, Curtis-Caucus Room (2nd Floor) Field-Flow Fractionation

P. Y. Lau, Presiding 8:30—137. Overview of Recent Advances in Field-Flow Fractionation. J. C. Giddings. 8:50—138. Comparision of Thermal FieldFlow Fractionation and Size Exclusion Chromatography for Polymer Analysis. J. J. Gunderson, J. C. Giddings. 9:10—139. Determination of Molecular Weight Distributions of Polymers by Ther­ mal Field-Flow Fractionation. M. E. Schimpf, P. S. Williams, J. C. Giddings. 9:30—140. Fractionating Power in Pro­ grammed Field-Flow Fractionation. P. S. Williams, R. Beckett, J. C. Giddings. 9:50—141. Continuous Fractionation of Col­ loids of Different Density by Split-Flow Thin (SPLITT) FFF-Like Separation Cells. B. N. Barnam, J. C. Giddings. 10:10—142. Continuous Fractionation by Diffusion in Split-Flow Thin (SPLITT) FFFLike Separation Cells. S. Levin, T. T. Lenczycki, P. S. Williams, J. C. Giddings. 10:30—143. Cyclical-Field Field-Flow Frac­ tionation: A New FFF Approach. S. Lee, M. N. Myers, J. C. Giddings. 10:50—144. Cell Separation and Character­ ization by Field-Flow Fractionation and Related Techniques. J. C. Bigelow, T. Koch, K. Kataoka, J. C. Giddings.

Executive Tower Inn, Zephyr Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Photothermal Spectroscopy

J. M. Harris, Organizer, Presiding 1:30—153. Crossed-beam Thermal Lens. N. J. Dovichi, D. S. Burgi. 2:10—154. Photothermal Densitometry of Proteins on Electrophoresis Gels. M. D. Morris, K. Peck. 2:50—155. Digital and Optical Signal Pro­ cessing of Applied to Pulsed Laser Excited Photothermal Spectroscopy. S. E. Bialkowski. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—156. Sensitivity and Accuracy in Pho­ tothermal Methods. E. S. Yeung. 4:20—157. Photothermal Measurements in the Adiabatic and Isobaric Limits. J. M. Harris, P. E. Poston, R. Zhu, D. J. McGraw.

Section C Executive Tower Inn, Curtis-Caucus Room (2nd Floor) Mass Spectrometry—II: Gas Chromatogra­ phy J. G. Nikelly,

Presiding

2:00—158. Identification of Aldehydes, Ke­ tones, Esters, and Carboxylic Acids in Complex Samples Using Water Chemical Ionization GC/MS. S. B. Hawthorne, D. J. Miller. 2:20—159. Tandem Mass Spectrometric Determination of 12 Chlorinated Phenolic/Phenoxy Analytes in Urine. R. H. Hill, Jr., J. S. Holler, D. M. Fast, F. L. Cardinali, G. D. Todd, J. M. McCraw, S. L. Bailey, L. L. Needham. 2:40—160. Evaluation of 4-Trifluoromethylo-phenylenediamine for Gas Chromato­ graphic Related Analysis of Selenium in Biological Materials. W. R. Wolf, D. E. LaCroix, J. Kochansky. 3:00—161. Pyrolysis GC and GCMS of Free, Bound and Metal Complexed Phenylala­ nine, G. G. Smith, G. S. Reddy. 3:20—162. Selected Pesticides in Extracts of Core Materials and in Ground Water from Kansas. T. R. Steinheimer. 3:40—163. Characterization of Complex Organic Mixtures Using a Multimode Ion­ ization Gas Chromatographic Detector. J. W. Haas III, M. V. Buchanan, M. B. Wise. 4:00—164. Comparison of the Performance of Sampling Loops Constructed of Several Different Materials for Gas Chromato­ graphic Analysis of Parts-per-billion Level Organic Gases. J. M. Allen, R. K. M. Jayanty, D. J. von Lehmden. 4:20—165. Identification of some Nitro-Aromatics in Used Motor Oils. N. D. Jespersen, A. Naughton. 4:40—166. Determination of Spiromustine in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid by Cap­ illary Gas Chromatography with Therm­ ionic Detection. J. S. Roth, R. L. Heideman, J. A. Kelley.

Section D Executive Tower Inn, Brahms Room (3rd Floor) Liquid Chromatography—I A. M. Ervin,

Presiding

2:00—167. Negative Temperature Gradient for Density Programming in Supercritical Fluid Chromatography. B. W. Wenclawiak, P. A. Garry. 2:20—168. Performance Characteristics of a Multichannel Fluorometer Using a Pulsed Xe Arc Light Source. J. G. Wegrzyn, G. Patonay, M. A. Ford, I. M. Warner. 2:40—169. Study of the Causes of Deteriorization of the Chromatographic Peak When Large Sample Volumes are Injected into the Chromatographic System. A. M. Rustum, Ν. Ε. Hoffman. 3:00—170. Micelle Chromatography: Effect of Solute Polarity and Column Tempera­ ture on the Retention Characteristics. P. R. Bédard, M. L. Cotton. 3:20—171. Redox Chemiluminescence Detection-Chemistry at Gold Catalyst Surfaces. S. A. Montzka, N. Pourreza, R. M. Barkley, R. E. Sievers. 3:40—172. Improved Chromatographic Separation of Platinum Metal Chelates. M. Flemming, B. W. Wenclawiak. 4:00—173. HPLC Post-Column Photolysis of Pesticides for Generation of Fluorophores. H. A. Moye, C. J. Miles. 4:20—174. Comparison of Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatography of Polychlorinated Aromatic Compounds with C-18 and Pyrene Columns. E. R. Barnhart, D. G. Patterson, Jr., L. R. Alexander, D. L. Ashley. 4:40—175. Determination of Cations by Ion Chromatography and Anions by DC Plasma Emission. A. M. Ervin, R. Panayappan, S. Constantine, K. Ho, J. C. Cooper. FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Assembly Room (2nd Floor) Spectroscopy

H. S. Gold, Presiding 8:30—176. Investigation of Ligand Binding to Albumin Using Multidimensional Luminescence Techniques. M. P. Thomas, G. Patonay, I. M. Warner. 8:50—177. Enhanced Fluorescence Measurements Using Cyclodextrins. G. Nelson, V. Mitchell, G. Patonay, I. M. Warner. 9:10—178. Ternary Cyclodextrin Complexes in Mixed Solvents. G. Patonay, K. Fowler, I. M. Warner. 9:30—179. Fingerprinting Haemophilus Aegytius and Haemophilus Influenzae Biotype III Using Multidimensional Fluorescence. H-S. Lin, C. Pau, G. Patonay, I. M. Warner. 9:50—180. Effect of Surface Preparation Methods on the Corrosion Rate and Surface Chemistry of Type 304 Stainless Steel in N 2 0 4 . S. L. Koontz, I. D. Smith. 10:10—181. Speciation of Nickel Emissions from Stationary Sources. P. M. Grohse, R. W. Linten, F. E. Butler. 10:30—182. Spectrophotometry Determination of Platinum (IV). Ν. Μ. Made Gowda, A. Thimmegowda. 10:50—183. Preparation of C0 2 Fiber Optic Chemical Sensor. C. Munkholm, D. R. Walt, F. P. Milanovich. 11:10—184. Depth Profiling with Photons. D. R. Miller, P. W. Bohn. 11:30—185. Low Level Absorbance Mea­ surements in Organic Thin Films. D. A. Stephens, P. W. Bohn.

Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Zephyr Room (2nd Floor) Vibrational Spectroscopy/Nuclear Magnet­ ic Resonance Spectroscopy/Flow Injection Analysis/Biosensors

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Section C Executive Tower Inn, Curtis-Caucus Room (2nd Floor) Liquid Chromatography—II

A. M. Rustum, Presiding 8:30—196. New Enantiomeric Separations Using Cyclodextrin Bonded Phases. S. M. Han, D. W. Armstrong. 8:50—197. Purification of a Legionella Pneumophila Serogroup 1 Protein Antigen by HPLC. C.-P. Pau, B. Plikaytis, G. Carlone, I. M. Warner. 9:10—198. (R)-1-(/3-Naphthyl)Ethyl Isothiocyanate (R-BEIT), a New Homochiral Derivatizing Agent for the Liquid-Chromatographic (LC) Resolution of Chiral Amines. S. Meyer-Lehnert, J. Gal. 9:30—199. HPLC Resolution of the Enantiomers of Four New Antiarrhythmic Drugs. D. Desai, S. Meyer-Lehnert, J. Gal. 9:50—200. Quaternary Structural Changes of Tumor Necrosis Factor Mediated by a Hydrophobic Column Surface. R. L. Cunico, S. Staats, M. G. Kunitani. 10:10—201. Determination of Ranitidine in Plasma and Whole Blood by HPLC. A. M. Rustum. 10:30—202. HPLC Method for Measuring 2',3'-Dideoxycytidine, an in-vivo Inhibitor of HTLV-III Infectivity, in Biological Fluids. J. A. Kelley, C. L. Litterst, J. S. Roth. 10:50—203. Sample Transfer Processes in Electrophoresis/SIMS. K. L. Busch, M. S. Stanley. 11:10—204. Capillary Zone Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry. J. A. Olivares, N. T. Nguyen, R. D. Smith. 11:30—205. Physical Considerations in Capillary Zone Electrophoresis. Ν. Τ. Nguyen, J. A. Olivares, R. D. Smith.

CARB DIVISION OF CARBOHYDRATE CHEMISTRY Κ. Β. Hicks, Executive Program Liaison

Secretary/

A. L. Hriciga, Presiding 8:30—186. Forensic Characterization of Epoxy Glues Using FTIR. P. A. Sanderson, R. O. Allen.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) 40

8:50—187. Direct Analysis of Interferometric Data from Passive Infrared Sensors. G. W. Small, J. M. Bjerga, A. B. Reno, R. T. Kroutil, J. T. Ditillo, W. R. Loerop. 9:10—188. Diffuse Reflectance FTIR Stud­ ies of Hydrazine-Surface Interactions. D. D. Davis, J. E. Kilduff, S. L. Koontz. 9:30—189. Micelle-Mediated Resonance Raman Spectroscopy Using Ultraviolet Excitation. L. A. Spino, D. W. Armstrong. 9:50—190. Use of Proton NMR in Determin­ ing Substitution and Addition Products of Chlorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons. D. L. Ashley, R. E. Barnhart, D. G. Patterson, Jr., R. H. Hill, Jr. 10:10—191. NMR Spectroscopy in Super­ critical Fluids. J. M. Robert, R. F. Evilia. 10:30—192. Applied Chemometrics: The Etiology of Substituent Effects on Carbon13 Chemical Shifts of Heterocyclic and Aromatic Molecules. E. A. Cioffi. 10:50—193. Organic Functional Group De­ terminations by FIA-IR. D. J. Curran, S. K. Marden. 11:10—194. Development of a Fiber Optic Biosensor for Glutamate. J. Wangsa, M. A. Arnold. 11:30—195. Fiber Optic Enzyme Urea Sen­ sor. T. D. Rhines, M. A. Arnold.

OTHER DIVISION'S SYMPOSIUM OF INTEREST: Chemistry and Processing of the Sugar Beet {see Division of Agriculture & Food Chemistry, Tu» page 36) DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Social Hour, Tu, W Dinner, W

MONDAY MORNING Brown Palace, Georgetown-Silver PlumeLeadville Room (2nd Floor) General—Macromolecular Aspects Κ. Β. Hicks, Presiding 9:00—1. Gradient PAGE and Strong Anion Exchange (SAX) HPLC as Analytical Tools for Sequencing the Heparin Polymer. K. G. Rice, Y. S. Kim, D. L. Lohse, R. J. Linhardt. 9:20—2. High Performance Thin-Layer Chromatographic Resolution of Oligogalacturonides and Application to Assay for Exo- and Endo-Polygalacturonases Activi­ ties. L. W. Doner, P. L. Irwin, M. J. Kurantz. 9:40—3. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering of Reduced Oxyheparins. B. A. Khorramian. 10:00—4. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering of Bovine Nasal Cartilage Proteoglycan in Solution. S. S. Stlvala, A. Patel, B. Khorra­ mian, J. D. Gregory, S. Damle. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—5. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering of Gellan Gum in Solutions. B. A. Khorra­ mian. 10:50—6. Structural Characterization of Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola Lipopolysaccharide. S. F. Osman, W. F. Fett, Κ. Β. Hicks. 11:10—7. Characterization of Exocellular Polysaccharides from Azotobacter chroococcum. G. L. Cote, L. H. Krull. 11:30—8. Starch Paste Clarity. S. A. S. Craig, C. C. Maningat, P. A. Seib, R. C. Hoseney. 11:50—9. Conformations of Group Β Poly­ saccharide of N. meningitidis. R. Yamasaki, J. M. Griffiss. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Brown Palace, Georgetown-Silver PlumeLeadville Room (2nd Floor) General—Synthetic & Medicinal Aspects E. S. Hawkins, Presiding 2:00—10. Synthesis of Acyclic Nucleosides with Bridgehead Nitrogens: HEM Deriva­ tives of Pyrazolo-[1,5-D]-1,2,4-Triazines. D. L Swartz, M. A. Scialdone. 2:20—11. Stereospecific Synthesis of β-6'Fluoro Analog of (±)-Aristeromycin. G. V. Bindu Madhavan, E. J. Prisbe, J. P. H. Verheyden, J. C. Martin. 2:40—12. Adducts Between Adenosine An­ alogues and L-Homocysteine with S-C5' or S-C6' Bonds. V. M. Vrudhula, F. Kappler, A. Hampton. 3:00—13. Practical and Efficient Synthesis of 5-(|C?-D-Ribofuranosyl) Nicotinamide. E. Sochacka, M. M. Kabat, K. W. Pankiewicz, K. A. Watanabe. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—14. First Direct Introduction of Fluo­ ride into the 2'-"Up" Arabino Configura­ tion of Purine Nucleoside. Synthesis of 2'Fluoro-2'-Deoxy Inosine via the 2'-Triflate Derivative and of the 2'-Keto-3'-Deoxy In­ osine- by Elimination of the 3'-Triflate Function. K. W. Pankiewicz, B. Nawrot, K. A. Watanabe. 4:00—15. Preparation of Deoxyribonucleoside Phosphoramidites of Deoxy-5-Azacytidine and Deoxydihydro-5-Azacytidine. A. J. Goddard, V. E. Marquez. 4:20—16. C-Nucleosides from 2-(Aminomethyl)Pyridine and 4-(Aminomethyl)Pyrimidine. H. El Khadem, J. Kawai. 4:40—17. Structure and Stereochemistry of Conjugated Bile Acids and Bile Alcohols in Patients with Liver Disease and in Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis (CTX). B. Dayal, G. Salen, R. Dayal, A. K. Bose. Section Β Brown Palace, Ballroom Β (2nd Floor) Symposium on Modifications and Applica­ tions of Industrial Polysaccharides M. Yalpani, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—18. Conformational Characterization of Chitosan and its Salts in the Solid State by Means of High-Resolution Solid-State 13 C NMR. H. Saitô, R. Tabeta, K. Ogawa. 2:05—19. CP/MAS 13C-NMR Studies on Aqueous Polysaccharide Gels. A. J. Stipanovic, P. J. Giammatteo.

2:35—20. Structural Studies on Galactomannans and their Complexes. W. T. Winter, B. K. Song, H. Bouckris. 3:05—Intermission. 3:15—21. Solid State NMR Approaches to Structure and Mobility in Mannans and Galactomannans. R. H. Marchessault, M. G. Taylor, W. T. Winter. 3:50—22. Effect of Mono-O-Acetyl Groups on the Conformation and Interactions of Microbial Polysaccharides. E..Atkins. 4:25—23. Monomer Composition of Polysaccharide Ethers: Carbon-13 NMR Analysis and Mathematical Models. J. Reuben.

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Brown Palace, Ballroom Β (2nd Floor) Symposium on the Claude S. Hudson Award D. C. Baker, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—24. Conformational Studies on Sugar Derivatives: Polysubstituted Carbon Chains and Oxygenated Heterocycles. D. Horion. 9:50—25. Combining Stable Isotopic En­ richment, Modern NMR Methods, and ab initio Molecular Orbital Calculations to Study Carbohydrate Structure and Reac­ tivity. A. S. Serianni, J. R. Snyder, P. C. Kline, M. J. King-Morris, P. Bondo. 10:35—26. Regulation of Yeast Mannoprotein Glycosylation. C. E. Ballou, P. K. Gopal. 11:20—27. Solution Reactivity of Carbohy­ drates in Hydrogen Fluoride. J. Defaye, A. Gadelle, C. Pedersen. L. Anderson,

Presiding

2:00—28. Award Address. (Claude S. Hud­ son Award in Carbohydrate Chemistry sponsored by Merck, Sharp & Dohme Re­ search Laboratories, Inc. and Kelco, Divi­ sions of Merck & Co.) Effect of Cations on the Properties of Sugars and Polyols. S. J. Angyal. 2:50—29. Cation Coordination by Sugar Ac­ ids and Their Borate Esters in Water. A. P. G. Kieboom. 3:35—30. Analytical and Preparative HPLC of Carbohydrates on Cation-Exchange Resins. Κ. Β. Hicks. 4:20—31. Synthesis and Enzymology of Deoxy and Deoxyhalogeno Analogues of myoinositol. D. C. Baker, C. Jiang, J. D. Moyer, O. Reizes.

TUESDAY EVENING Brown Palace, Ballroom Foyer (2nd Floor) Symposium on Modifications and Applica­ tions of Industrial Polysaccharides Poster Session/Social Hour 5:30-7:00 (Posters Displayed 9:00 AM to 7:00 PM) M. Yalpani,

Presiding

5:30—32. Chemical Modification of Chitin and Chitosan, and their Novel Applica­ tions. S. Hirano. —33. Calcium Complexation by Oxidized Maltodextrins in Water. A, P. G. Kieboom. —34. Molecular Weight of Chitosans Stud­ ied by Laser Light Scattering. R. Muzzarelli. —35. Chemically Modified Group Β Menin­ gococcal Polysaccharides as Human Vac­ cines. H. J. Jennings, A. Gamian, F. Michon, R. Roy, F. E. Ashton. —36. Aminomethylation of Amylose. J. De­ faye, A. Gadelle, F. Movilliat. —37. Properties of Phase-Separated Aque­ ous Solutions of Polysaccharides and Polyethylene Glycol. D. Skuse, R. NorrisJones, D. E. Brooks, M. M. Abdel-Malik, M. Yalpani.

—38. Immunological Aspects of Chitin De­ rivatives. S. Tokurra, N. Nishi, I. Azuma. —39. Influence of Carbohydrate Polymer Concentration on Adduct Uniformity of Substitution. S. D. Seneker, J. E. Glass. —40. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering of Chitosan-6-Sulfate in Salt Solutions. S. S. Stlvala, A. Patel, D. A. DeLuca. — 4 1 . Preparation and Interactions of Branched Chitosan Derivatives. K. R. Holme, L. D. Hall. —42. Self-Association of Hyaluronic Acid. R. E. Turner, P. Y. Lin, M. K. Cowman. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Brown Palace, Georgetown-Silver PlumeLeadville Room (2nd Floor) General—Chemical and Analytical As­ pects

J. R. Vercellotti, Presiding 9:00—43. Production of Acrylic Acid from Lactic Acid in Supercritical Water. W. S. Mok, M. J. Antal, Jr. 9:20—44. Improved Synthesis of D-[6- 13 C]Glucose. M. J. King-Morris, P. Bondo, R. Mrowca, A. S. Serianni. 9:40—45. Anomerization of D-[1- 13 C]Talose: A Comparison of Experimental and Computational Methods to Evaluate Reaction Kinetics. J. R. Snyder, E. R. Johnston, A. S. Serianni. 10:00—46. ESR of Nitroxide-Cyclodextrin Complexes in Liquid and Frozen Aqueous Solutions. M. P. Eastman, B. Freiha, S. Hsu, K. C. Lum, C. A. Chang. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—47. GC-MS Data Bank Analysis of Volatile Compounds Arising from Thermal Degradation of Glucose-Methionine Amadori Intermediates. G. Vernin, J. Metzger, M. H. Murello, A. Siouffi, C. Pârkânyi. 11:00—48. Interference by Flavonoids in Phenol-Sulfuric Acid Analysis of Carbohydrates. M. D. Rahman, G. N. Richards. 11:20—49. Isomerization of Hexoses in Dilute Alkali. H. S. El Khadem, S. Ennifar, H. S. Isbell. 11:40—50. Oxidation of Monosaccharides with Oxygen in Alkalies. H. S. El Khadem, M. A. Shalaby, H. S. Isbell. Section Β Brown Palace, Ballroom Β (2nd Floor) Symposium on Modifications and Applica­ tions of Industrial Polysaccharides W. T. Winter,

Presiding

9:00—51. Role of Structural Modification in Controlling Polysaccharide Functionality. I. C. M. Dea. 9:30—52. Glycol Modified Polysaccharides. G. L. Brode, J. P. Stanley, E. M. Partain, R. L. Kreeger. 10:00—53. Natural and Synthetic Deriva­ tives of Agarose and their Use in Bio­ chemical Separations. K. B. Guiseley. 10:25—Intermission. 10:35—54. Organoleptic Properties of Food Polysaccharides in Thickened Systems. E. R. Morris. 11:05—55. Sidechains Functionalization and Gelling Behaviour of the Capsular Polysaccharide from Rhizobium trifolii. Strain TA-1. V. Crescenzi, S. Paoletti, F. Delben, A. Cesaro, M. Dentini. 11:30—56. Properties of Polysaccharides. Relation Between Chemical Structure and Physical Properties. M. Rinaudo, M. Milas. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Brown Palace, Georgetown-Silver PlumeLeadville Room (2nd Floor) General—Biochemical and Analytical As­ pects A. S. Serianni,

Presiding

2:00—57. Interactions Between Metal Ions and Sugars: Chromatographic Analysis of Enzyme Reaction Products. J. O. Baker, S. M. Lastick, K. Tatsumoto, M. E. Himmel. 2:20—58. In Vivo 13C NMR Studies of Tem­ perature Effects on Glucose Metabolism in a Freeze-Tolerant Arctic Insect. O. Kukal, J. Duman, A. S. Serianni. 2:40—59. 1H-NMR Analysis of Branched Type 2 Chain Lacto-Series Gangliosides from Human and Bovine Erythrocytes. S. B. Levery, S. Hakomori.

3:00—60. Crystal Structure of Ethynylestradiol-17/?,a-D-Glucopyranosiduronic Acid (K Salt) (I). H. E. Hadd, K. Streib, J. P. Snyder. 3:20—61. Alpha-Lactalbumin is a Calcium Modulated Protein. M. P. Thompson, D. P. Brower, G. J. Piazza, H. M. Farrell, Jr., R. Jenness. 3:40—62. Quantitation of Free Saccharides in Plant Tissues by Use of GLC and Re­ cording Integrators. F. R. Seymour, D. A. Nehlich, S. L. Unruh. 4:00—63. Fructose Analogs as Food Intake Modulators. M. G. Tordoff, M. I. Friedman R. J. Rafka, M. J. DINovi. Section Β Brown Palace, Ballroom Β (2nd Floor) Symposium on Modifications and Applica­ tions of Industrial Polysaccharides

P. Sandford, Presiding 1:30—64. Linear and Branched Malto-Oligosaccharides and their Hydroxypropyl De­ rivatives Produced by Amylolytic Enzyme Actions on Corn Starches. G. E. Inglett. 1:55—65. Genetically Engineered Polymers: Manipulation of Xanthan Biosynthesis. M. R. Betlach, M. A. Capage, D. H. Doherty, R. A. Hassler, N. M. Henderson, R. W. Vanderslice, J. D. Marrelli, M. B. Ward. 2:25—66. Polysaccharide Modification—A Physiological Approach. I. W. Sutherland. 2:55—Intermission. 3:05—67. Secretion and Properties of Serratia liquefaciens Chitinases. S. Joshi, M. Kozlowski. 3:35—68. Xanthanase Active at Elevated Temperatures and Salt Concentrations. M. C. Cadmus, Μ. Ε. Slodki. 4:05—69. Hydrolysis Products of Pichia (Hansenula) Holstii O-Phosphonomannan. M. E. Slodki. 4:35—70. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB): A Model System for Biopolymer Engineer­ ing. O. P. Peoples, A. J. Sinskey.

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Brown Palace, Ballroom Β (2nd Floor) Symposium on Modifications and Applica­ tions of Industrial Polysaccharides A. Stipanovic,

Presiding

8:30—71. Production and Characterization of Novel Cyclodextrin Glycosyltransferases. H. Aoki, D. Yao, M. Misawa. 9:00—72. Controlled Biosynthesis of Yeast Glucan Particles. S. Jamas, A. J. Sinskey, C. K. Rha. 9:35—73. Biopolymer Engineering: Isolation of the Genes Coding for Exopolysaccharide Biosynthesis in Zoogloea Ramigera. D. D. Easson, Jr., O. P. Peoples, A. J. Sinskey. 10:05—Intermission. 10:15—74. Chitosan—A Natural, Cationic Biopolymer: Commercial Applications. P. A. Sandford, G. P. Hutchings. 10:45—75. Binding of Metal Cations by Chi­ tin Derivatives: Improvement of Adsorp­ tion Ability Through Chemical Modifica­ tions. K. Kurita. 11:20—76. Solvent and Charge Effects on the Conformational Properties of Polysac­ charides. A. Cesàro, F. Delben, S. Paoletti. D. Brant, Presiding 1:30—77. Modifications of Dextrans and Application in Prodrug Design. Ε. Η. Schacht. 2:00—78. Hydrophilic Polymer Coatings for Control of Electroosmosis and Wetting. J. M. Harris. 2:30—79. Polysaccharide Structure from Circular Dichroism. I. Tobias. 3:05—Intermission.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

February 9, 1987 C&EN

41

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3:15—80. Structure/Property Relationships of a Family of Microbial Polysaccharides. R. Moorhouse. 3:45—81. Rheological Characterization of High Viscosity Polysaccharides. B-D. Kwon, C. Rha. 4:15—82. Influence of the Oligosaccharide Sidechains on the Solution Configuration of Comblike Branched Microbial Polysac­ charides. B. T. Stokke, D. A. Brant, T. A. Talashek. 4:55—Closing Remarks. M. Yalpani.

S

FRIDAY

χ ϋ

Brown Palace, Georgetown-Silver PlumeLeadville Room (2nd Floor)

Ρ

MORNING

Κ. Β. Hicks,

Presiding

9:00—Roundtable Discussion: Current Top­ ics in Carbohydrate Research.

LU

2:00—7. Effect of Temperature on Liquid Product Composition from the Fast Pyrol­ ysis of Cellulose. D. S. Scott, J. Piskorz, A. Grinshpun, R. G. Graham. 2:30—8. Production of Pyrolytic Liquids from Wood and Cellulose by Fast Pyroly­ sis (Ultrapyrolysis). R. G. Graham, M. A. Bergougnou. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—9. Preliminary Engineering Data for Scale-Up of a Biomass Vacuum Pyrolysis Reactor. R. Lemieux, C. Roy, B. de Caumia, D. Blanchette. 3:45—10. Production of Primary Pyrolysis Oils in a Vortex Reactor. J. P. Diebold, J. W. Scahill. 4:15—11. Fast Pyrolysis of Pretreated Wood and Cellulose. D. Radlein, J. Piskorz, A. Grinshpun. 4:45—12. Experimental Process Research Study and Techno-Economic Analysis of the GIT Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process. R. J. Kovac, C. W. Gorton, D. J. O'Neill, C. J. Newman.

ϋ

Section Β

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Marriott, Colorado Salon Β (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Delignification Reactions, Pretreatment, and Cellulose Enzyme Hy­ drolysis I—Chemical Mechanisms of Delignification Reactions

CELL

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CELLULOSE, PAPER AND TEXTILE DIVISION H. L. Needles, Program

Chairman

OTHER DIVISIONS SYMPOSIUM OF INTEREST: Modifications and Applications of in­ dustrial Polysaccharides (see Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry, M, Tu Eve., W, Thu, page 41)

MONDAY MORNING Marriott, Colorado Salon A (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Cellulose and Related Mate­ rials H. L. Needles, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Fabric Construction, Crosslink Dis­ tribution, and Textile Performance of Du­ rable Press Cotton Fabrics. N. R. Bertoniere, W. D. King. 9:30—2. Relationship of Crosslink Density to Thermal Activity of Polyethylene Gly­ cols Affixed to Fibers. T. L. Vigo, J. S. Bruno. 9:55—3. On the Development of Crystalline Structure in Cotton Fibers—Relation to Maturity. J. Perel. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—4. Exploitation of Dual Detector Gel Permeation Chromatography to Deter­ mine Nitrate Group Distribution in Cellu­ lose Nitrate. E. V. Turngren, Y. P. Carignan. 10:55—5. Determination of Nitrogen Con­ tent in Cellulose Nitrate by Adiabatic Calorimetry. C. T. Cichinski, E. Hayes, Y. P. Carignan. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon A (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Production, Analysis and Upgrading of Pyrolysis Oils from Biomass, cosponsored with Division of Fuel Chemistry I—Production of Primary Pyrolysis Oils— Systems T. A. Milne, E. J. Soltes, R. D. Hayes, Presiding

Organizers

1:15—Introductory Remarks. T. A. Milne. 1:30—6. Overview of Canada's Biomass Liquefaction Program. R. D. Hayes.

1:30—13. Interpretation of the Kinetics of Delignification Processes. K. V. Sarkanen. 2:10—14. New Concept in Pulping Chemis­ try—Electron Transfer Reactions. D. R. Dimmel, L. F. Schuller, D. A. Smith, P. B. Apfeld. 2:50—15. Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide as Bleaching Reagents, Their Selectivity and Co-Operation in Lignin Degradation. N-O. Nilvebrant, J. Gierer. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—16. Non-isothermal Approach to the Kinetics of Alkaline Delignification. V. L. Chiang, M. A. Dolk. 4:05—17. Involvement of Radicals in Bleaching Processes. J. Gierer, K. Jansbo, T. Reitberger. 4:35—18. Formation of Covalent Bonds Be­ tween Lignin and Carbohydrates During Alkaline Pulping. J. Gierer, S. Wânnstrôm. 5:05—19. Brightness and Colour Problems in UHY Pulp from Jack Pine by Sulphite/ SAQ Pulping. C. H. Tay.

H. L. Chum,

Presiding

8:45—27. Lignin Biogenesis in Living Plants. N. G. Lewis, E. Yamamoto, J. B. Wooten. 9:15—28. Kraft Lignins: The Legacy of Na­ tive Structural Characteristics. T. M. Garver, Jr., S. Sarkanen. 9:40—29. Effect of Pulping Conditions on Kraft Lignin Molecular Weight. H. Kim, A. L. Fricke. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—30. Characterization of Some Lig­ nins from Steam-Treated Aspen wood. R. Sutcliffe, J. N. Saddler. 11:00—31. Structural Comparison Between Aspen Organosolv Lignins and SteamTreated Lignins. H. L. Chum, D. K. John­ son, K. V. Sarkanen, H. A. Schroeder, D. Robert. 11:30—32. Lignin Model Polymers: Synthe­ sis, Stereochemistry, and Decomposition in the Presence of Anthraquinone. D. K. Johnson, P. Palasz, H. L. Chum, C. Z. Smith, J. H. P. Utley, L. Schuller, D. Dim­ mel. Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon A (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Production, Analysis and Upgrading of Pyrolysis Oils from Biomass III—Production of Liquids at High Pressure D. C. Elliott,

Presiding

1:45—33. Production and Evaluation of Oils from the Steam Pyrolysis of Poplar Chips. D. G. B. Boocock, A. Chowdhury, S. G. Allen, R. D. Hayes. 2:15—34. Outline of a Method for Evaluating Liquid Products Obtained by Catalytic Conversion of Biomass. A. Burton, D. de Zutter, E. Churin, G. Poncelet, P. Grange. 2:45—35. Oil Production by High-Pressure Thermal Treatment of Black Liquors: Aqueous-Phase P r o d u c t s . P. J. McKeough, A. A. Johansson. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—36. Biomass Liquefaction Utilizing Extruder-Feeder Reactor System. D. H. White, D. Wolf, Y. Zhao. 4:00—37. Characterization of Products Formed During Coliquefaction of Lignin and Bituminous Coal at 400°C. R. W. Coughlin, P. Altieri.

5:00—44. Cellulase Enzymology: Current Topics and Opportunities. R. Lovrien. WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Marriott, Colorado Salon A (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Production, Analysis and Upgrading of Pyrolysis Oils from Biomass IV—Pyrolysis in Novel Environments H. L. Chum,

Presiding

8:30—50. Wood Liquefaction Under Low Severity Conditions. W. J. M. Douglas, D. G. Cooper, Ν. Ε. Cooke, O. Ali, S. Afrashtefar, D. Ng. 9:00—46. Pyrolysis and Solvolysis of Bio­ mass in Supercritical Fluid Solvents. S. H. Townsend, M. T. Klein. 9:30—47. Solvolysis of Wood. J. M. Bouvier, M. Gelus, S. Maugendre. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—48. Formation of Aromatic Com­ pounds from Carbohydrates. O. Theander, D. A. Nelson, R. T. Hallen. 10:45—49. Kinetics of Alkaline Thermochemical Degradation of Polysaccharides to Organic Acids. J. M. Krochta, J. S. Hudson, S. J. Tillin. 11:15—45. Dehydration of Carbohydrates in Supercritical Water. I. Simkovic, T. Leesonboon, W. Mok, M. J. Antal, Jr. V—Analysis of Pyrolysis Oils I R. P. Overend,

Presiding

1:45—51. Canadian Efforts in Analytical Chemistry of Liquefaction/Pyrolysis Prod­ ucts from the Perspective of a Unified Treatment Methodology. R. P. Overend, E. Chornet. 2:15—52. Analysis of Partially Converted Lignocellulosic Materials. J. L. Grandmaison, A. Ahmed, S. Kaliaguine. 2:45—53. Some Aspects of Pyrolysis Oils Characterization by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC). D. K. Johnson, H. L. Chum. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—54. Chromatography of Non-Derivatized Pyrolysis Oils and Upgraded Prod­ ucts. E. J. Soltes, S-C.K. Lin. 4:00—55. Product Analysis from Direct Liq­ uefaction of Several High-Moisture Bio­ mass Feedstocks. D. C. Elliott, L. J. Sealock, Jr., R. S. Butner. 4:30—56. Integrated Spectroscopic Ap­ proach to the Chemical Characterization of Pyrolysis Oils. B. L. Hoesterey, W. Windig, H. L. C. Meuzelaar, E. M. Eyring, D. M: Grant, R. J. Pugmire.

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon A (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Production, Analysis and Upgrading of Pyrolysis Oils from Biomass II—Production of Primary Pyrolysis Oils— Fundamentals M. J. Antal, Jr.,

II—Lignin Characterization

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

H. L. Chum, Organizer R. Eckert, Presiding

TUESDAY MORNING

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon Β (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Delignification Reactions, Pretreatment and Cellulose Enzyme Hydro­ lysis

Presiding

8:30—20. Early Products of Pyrolysis of Wood. W. F. DeGroot, W-P. Pan, M. D. Rahman, G. N. Richards. 9:00—21. Conditions that Favor Tar Production from Pyrolysis of Large, Moist Wood Particles. M. Kelborn, S. Bousman, B. Krieger-Brockett. 9:30—22. Effects of Extra-Particle Secondary Reactions of Fresh Tars on Liquids Yields in Hardwood Pyrolysis. M. L. Boroson, J. B. Howard, J. P. Longwell, W. A. Peters. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—23. Relation of Reaction Time/Temperature to the Chemical Properties of Pyrolysis Oils. D. C. Elliott. 10:45—24. Fusion-Like Behavior of Biomass Pyrolysis. J. Lede, H. Z. Li, J. Villermaux. 11:15—25. Heat Flux Requirements for Fast Pyrolysis and a New Method for Generating Biomass Vapor. T. B. Reed, C. D. Cowdery. 11:45—26. Production and Characterization of Pyrolysis Liquids from Municipal Solid Waste. J. E. Helt, R. K. Agrawal.

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon Β (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Delignification Reactions, Pretreatment, and Cellulose Enzyme Hy­ drolysis III—Pretreatment and Cellulose Enzyme Hydrolysis K. V. Sarkanen,

Presiding

1:30—38. Enzyme Hydrolysis of Steam-Ex­ ploded Wheat Straw and Poplar Wood. KE. Ericksson, L. Vallander. 2:10—39. Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Bio­ mass. K. Grohmann, R. W. Torget, M. E. Himmel, C. E. Wyman. 2:40—40. Combined Dilute Acid Hydrolysis/ Organosolv Pretreatment. J. C. Linden, V. G. Murphy. 3:10—41. Organosolv Pretreatment. H. L. Chum, D. K. Johnson, S. Black, J. Baker, K. Grohmann, K. V. Sarkanen, H. A. Schroeder. 3:40—Intermission. 4:00—42. Effect of Agitation on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose. R. T. Elander, L. L. Henk, J. C. Linden, V. G. Murphy, C. E. Wyman. 4:30—43. Characterization of the Highly Thermal-Stable Cellulose System from Acidothermus Cellulolyticus. M. Tucker, K. Oh, C. Rivard, A. Mohagheghi, K. Groh­ mann, M. Himmel.

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Marriott, Colorado Salon A (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Production, Analysis and Upgrading of Pyrolysis Oils from Biomass VI—Analysis of Pyrolysis Oils II D. G. B. Boocock,

Presiding

8:30—57. Chemical Characterization of Wood Oils Obtained in a Vacuum Pyroly­ sis Process Development Unit. H. Pakdel, C. Roy. 9:00—58. Composition of Oils Obtained by the Fast Pyrolysis of Different Woods. J. Piskorz. D. S. Scott. 9:30—59. Chemical Analysis of Oils Ob­ tained by Hydropyrolysis of Wood; Influ­ ence of Heating Rate, Temperature and Catalyst. N. Soyer, F. Hyvrard, C. Bruneau, A. Brault. 10:00—60. Experiences in Coal and Coal Liquids Characterization: Possible Impli­ cations in Biomass Research. H. L. Retcofsky, R. G. Lett, G. A. Gibbon, H. Schultz, D. H. Finseth, A. W. Wells, C. E. Schmidt, C. M. White. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—Panel Discussion. Needs for Stan­ dard Methods Reference Materials and Open Up Round Robin Tests. T. A. Milne. VII—High Pressure Upgrading

D. J. Stevens, Presiding 1:45—61. Overview of Biomass Thermochemical Liquefaction Research Spon­ sored by the U.S. Department of Energy. D. J. Stevens.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) 42

February 9, 1987 C&EN

2:15—62. Catalyst Specificities in High Pressure Hydroprocessing of Pyrolysis and Gasification Tars. E. J. Soltes, S-C.K. Lin, Y-H.E. Sheu. 2:45—63. Chemical and Stochastic Modeling of Lignin Hydrodeoxygenation. P. M. Train, M. T. Klein. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—64. Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation and Dealkylation of a Lignin Model Compound, M. Ratcliff, F. Posey, H. Chum. 4:00—65. Upgrading of Bio-Oils by Hydrotreatments. E. Churin, P. Grange, B. Delmon. 4:30—66. Catalytic Hydrotreating of Biomass-Derived Oils. E. G. Baker, D. C. Elliott.

FRIDAY MORNING Marriott, Colorado Salon A (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Production, Analysis and Upgrading of Pyrolysis Oils from Biomass VIII—Low Pressure Upgrading E. J. Soltes,

Presiding

8:30—67. Fluidized Bed Upgrading of Wood Pyrolysis Liquids and Related Compounds. N. Y. Chen, D. E. Walsh, L. R. Koenig. 9:00—68. Conversion of Vacuum Pyrolysis Oils from Populus Deltoïdes Over H-ZSM5. M. Renaud, J. L. Grandmaison, C. Roy, S. Kaliaguine. 9:30—69. Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapor Conversion Over Zeolites. R. J. Evans, T. A. Milne. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—70. Biomass to Gasoline (BTG): Upgrading Pyrolysis Vapors to Aromatic Gasoline with Zeolite Catalysts at Atmospheric Pressure. J. P. Diebold, J. W. Scahill. 10:45—71. Reactions of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils Over ZSM-5 Zeolite Catalysts. L. H. Dao, M. Haniff, A. Houle, D. Lamothe. 11:15—72. Catalytic Cracking of Pyrolysis Oil Over Dolomite. X. Deglise. 11:45—Closing Remarks.

CHED DIVISION OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION, INC. L. T. Pryde, Program K. O. Berry, Meeting

Chairman Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: Award Symposium Honoring Harold W, Heine, recipient of the ACS Award for Research at Undergraduate Institutions (see Division of Organic Chemistry, W, page 68)

OTHER DIVISIONS' SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: End Users Reflections on End User Searching {see Division of Chemical Information, M, page 46) Fume Hoods and Laboratory Ventilation {see Division of Chemical Health & Safety, Tu, page 45) BUSINESS MEETING: Tu SOCIAL EVENTS: Social Hour, Sun, Tu Dinner, Tu Luncheon, F

SUNDAY

AFTERNOON

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) Chemistry for Kids R. P. Steiner, Organizer,

Presiding

2:30—Chemistry for Kids. R. P. Steiner, et.al. MONDAY

MORNING

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Beethoven Room (3rd Floor) Teaching Chemistry To Special Students J. O. Schreck, Organizer, Non-traditional Students

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Intensive Course for Adult Health Science Students. L. A. Funke, M. K. Kirk, S. M. Gregory, T. Y. Isaacs. 9:30—2. Chemistry for Elementary School Teachers. A. George, R. Johnson. 9:50—3. Adult Learner—A Special Population? S. Steiner. 10:10—4. Breaking the Chemistry Code: Effective Teaching of Non-Traditional Students. E. Kean, C. Middlecamp. Handicapped Students 11:10—5. Overcoming Participation Barriers for Handicapped Science Students. M. J. Sullivan. 11:30—6. Using High Technology to Develop Aids for the Visually Impaired Scientist. R. C. Morrison, D. Lunney.

Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Symphony Ballroom (3rd Floor) Student Affiliates Poster Session—Physi­ cal, Inorganic, and Analytical N. S. Mills,

Organizer

A. W. Kozlowski,

Presiding

9:00—7. System Hydrochloric Acid + Alu­ minum Chloride + Water at Different Temperatures. A Study of Simple Harned's Rule. J. Connole, D. A. Johnson, R. N. Roy. 8. Thermodynamic Studies of Biochemical Phosphate Buffer in Ethylene Glycol-Water and Methanol-Water Mixtures at 25° C and Sub-Zero Temperatures. K. Hufford, R. N. Roy, D. A. Johnson. 9. Ionization Constant of Boric Acid and the pH of Boric Acid-Borate Buffer in the Pres­ ence of Barium Chloride Solutions from 5° to 55° C. P. J. Lord, R. N. Roy, D. A. Johnson. 10. Application of Pitzer's Equations for the Aqueous System of Boric Acid + Sodium Borate + Strontium Chlorides from 5° to 55° C. D. R. Mrad, R. N. Roy, D. A. John­ son. 11. Uptake of Copper, Cadmium, and Zinc by Fluvial Sediments. T. A. Foderaro, M. R. Trivisonno, R. M. Martinez, K. I. Mahan. 12. Effect of Browsing on Tannin Level in Aspen Leaves. D. Reid, G. Tomasi. 13. Reactions of Tetraminecopper(ll) Com­ plexes with Active Oxygen Donors. M.S. McDowell, C. J. White. 14. Preparation of Sulfur, Pyrite, and Other Mineral Matter Free Coal Samples. Esti­ mation of Sulfur (Elemental & Pyritic) by Lithium Alumium Hydride & Atomic Ab­ sorption Spectroscopy. C. G. Venier, D. Gorton, K. Swartz, M. M. Singh. 15. Wettability Alteration of Model Porous Systems. C. B. Douglas, N. E. Takach. 16. Quasiclassical Trajectory Calculation of Rate Constants for Gas Phase Ar2 Forma­ tion. T. Plank, R. E. Howard. 17. Measurement of Surface and Interfacial Properties Using a Dynamic Wilhelmy Plate Technique. J. F. Wilson, D. Teeters. 18. Thermal Characterization of Polypropyl­ ene Oxide)-Metal Thiocyanate Salt Com­ plexes. S. L. Stewart, D. Teeters. 19. Spin-Labeled Copper Porphyrins. E. D. A. Stemp, G. R. Eaton, S. S. Eaton. 20. 2,6-Diacetylpyridinebis(Furoylhydrazone) as an Analytical Reagent for Urani­ um. D. J. Davis, J. S. Fritz. 21. Herbicide Analysis by HPLC. J. Archer, D. Schroeder.

22. Investigation of the Effect of Water Com­ position on the Transport of Phosphates in the Cottonwood River. K. Morris, J. Ar­ cher, S. Capes, C. Langley, D. Lastick, K. Mitchell, J. Rhodes, J. Walton, D. Schroe­ der. 23. Computer Interfacing an IBM AT to an EPR Spectrometer Using the ASYST Pro­ gramming Language. M. V. O'Neill, D. R. Anderson, J. T. Swanson. 24. Evaluating a Simple Computer-Inter­ faced Colorimeter. P. P. Miles, J. W. Moore. 25. HPLC Retention Studies on Polar Bonded Phases Using Isopropanol as a Modifier. S. Racine, R. Carty, A. W. Salotto, E. L. Weiser, L. R. Snyder. 26. Metal Ion Complexes of 4N-Methyl-and 4N-Dimethyl-Thiosemicarbazones Prepared with 2-Acetylpyridine and 2-Acetylpyridine N-Oxide. N. C. Lewis, D. X. West. 27. Reproducible Data from a Modified At­ tenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) FTIR Spectrometer Cell. G. E. Cabaniss, V. S. Smentkowski. 28. Matrix Isolation Studies of the Role of Group IVA Elements in Hydrogen Bond Formation. A. M. Delaat, B. S. Ault. 29. Preliminary Analysis of Archaeological Pottery Using SEM-XRF. D. Radamacher, T. Shimotake, N. Bower, S. Peckham. 30. Simple, Inexpensive Inductively Coupled Plasma. S. E. Van Bramer, N. W. Bower, T. G. Lindeman. 31. Pulsed Photothermal and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy as Probes of Relaxation Phenomena. T. J. Walker, T. G. Lindeman. 32. Non-Colligative Freezing Resistance In Vitro. C. J. Corley, T. G. Lindeman. 33. Analysis of Geologicals Using ICP-MS. C. C. Lundstrom, N. W. Bower, E. S. Gladney. 34. Reactions of Atoms and Small Radicals in a Flowing Afterglow. M. J. Travers, T. G. Lindeman. 35. Equilibria and Rates of Formation of Dimers of Mono-Aquo Complexes of Plati­ num II. I. E. Burgeson. 36. Fluorescence of Ethidium Bromide Inter­ calated in Lac Operator DNA Fragments. T. Randall, K. Miller. 37. Real-Time Simulation of a Laboratory Scale Multistage High Vacuum System. R. E. Marcotte, J. Pye. 38. Synthesis of Bis [(1-377)Pentadienyl] Bis(Trimethylphosphine) Iron (II) and [ ( 1 37j)Pentadienyl] [(1-5r?)Pentadienyl] Triethylphosphine Iron (II) A Possible Ho­ mogeneous Catalysts. K. Zeimet, J. Bleeke. 39. Cyclic Voltammetry of Mercury on GoldCoated Piezoelectric Crystals. J. C. Spann, D. G. Grande, D. W. Paul. 40. Characterization of Carbon Paste Elec­ trode Surfaces with Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Imaging. S. DesJarlais, R. C. Engstrom. 41. Preparation of Crystalline Sodium Norcarnitine. An Easily Handled Precursor for the Preparation of Carnitine Analogues and Radiolabeled Carnitine. S. P. Turnbull, Jr., W. J. Colucci, R. D. Gandour. 42. Metal Chloride Complexes in an AICI3Methyl Ethyl Imidizolium Chloride Molten Salt. R. Bertrand, C. Martin, J. Joyner. 43. Arylphosphine Copper (I) Halides-Synthesis and Characterization. M. T. McGuire, D. J. Fife. 44. Determination of Solubility and Enthalpy of Dissociation of HMTA-2HgCI2. Y. Hiranuma, R. A. Hermens. 45. Analysis of Organic Compounds in Pon­ ce Air Particulate Matter. N. Pagan, N. Santiago, J. Irizarry, N. Negron, L. Pefia, A. Carrasquillo, R. Infante. 46. Regional Variations of Airborne Particu­ late of Ponce and its Public Health Effects. N. Santiago, G. L. Rosado, R. N. Infante, A. Carrasquillo. 47. Oxidation of Organic Sulfur in Model Compounds with Perchloric Acid. K. Q. Cates, C. W. McGowan, R. Markuszewski. 48. Use of Crown Ethers as Synergistic Ex­ traction Agents for Trivalent Lanthanides. P. S. Reynolds, D. D. Ensor. 49. Synergistic Extraction of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides Using ΗΤΤΑ and an Aza-Crown Ether. M. E. Nicks, D. D. En­ sor, D. J. Pruett. 50. Electrochemical Analysis for Airborne Particulate Pb. K. C. Smetanka, V. J. Thielmann. 51. Precursor-mediated Molecular Chemisorption and Thermal Desorption: Micro­ scopic Enhancements of a Macroscopic Kinetic Model. C. J. Mundy, E. S. Hood.

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Beethoven Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Teaching Chemistry to Spe­ cial Students

J. O. Schreck, Organizer, Presiding Handicapped Students 2:35—52. Laboratory Chemistry for Blind Students. B. R. Horowitz, E. Foulke, G. L. Shoemaker, J. C. Deck, K. G. Taylor, W. E. Sattich. 3:35—53. Hearing-Impaired/Deaf Students Can Survive Chemistry! Β. Ε. Cain. 3:50—Intermission. Children 4:00—54. Chemistry in the Elementary School: How Can We Make It Work? R. P. . Steiner. 4:20—55. Teaching Chemistry to Gifted and Talented Children. A. George, R. Johnson. 4:40—56. Chemistry Activities for a Sum­ mer Enrichment Program for Talented and Gifted Students. J. O. Schreck, G. Betts.

Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Brahms Room (3rd Floor) Phosphorus: Modern Facets of Its Descrip­ tive Chemistry J. G. Verkade, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30-57. Industrial Phosphorus Chemistry. A. D. F. Toy. 2:00—58. Low Coordination Number Phos­ phorus Chemistry. A. H. Cowley. 2:30—59. High-Coordinate Phosphorus. J. C. Martin. 3:00—60. Biochemistry of Phosphorus: Modem Facets of Its Descriptive Chemis­ try. D. G. Gorenstein. 3:30—61. Phosphorus in High Polymers. H. R. Allcock. 4:00—62. Phosphides of Interest in SolidState Chemistry. H. F. Franzen. 4:30—63. Phosphorus Ligands in Homoge­ neous Catalysis. C. A. Tolman. Section C Executive Tower Inn, Symphony Ballroom (3rd Floor) N. S. Mills,

Organizer

A. M. Menting,

Presiding

Lecture in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of Student Affiliate Chapters. 1:30—64. Reflections. L. C. Pauling. Student Affiliates Poster Session—Organic and Biochemistry 2:30—65. Daunorubicin Decreases BetaAdrenoceptor Concentrations in Cardiac Tissue. V. Rao, J. W. Banning., A. C. Abram. 66. Rates of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Organic Solvents by Phenyl Radical. Κ. Μ. Marr. 67. N9-Alkyl-6-Thiopurines: Synthesis, Char­ acterization, and Metabolism. J. M. Berg­ man, R. M. Hyslop. 68. S-Alkyl-6-Thiopurines: Synthesis, Char­ acterization, and Metabolism. S. G. Brieske, J. E. Bowers, R. M. Hyslop. 69. Synthesis and Complexation Properties of "Switched On" lonophores. J. E. Butrynski, E. Hortelano, A. Belguise, J. Quin III, M. Raban. 70. Induction and Inhibition of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair in Tetrahymena Pyriformis. E. Skoufos. 71. Cationic "Diels-Alder" Reactions of 2vinyl-1,3-dioxolane. P. G. Gassman, J. J. Wilwerding. 72. Aromatic Electrophilic Substitution Re­ actions in Room Temperature Molten Salts. L. M. Skrzynecki-Cooke, S. W. Lander. 73. Phosphorylation of Alcohols in Amide Solvents. C. A. Martin.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings February 9, 1987 C&EN

43

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74. Study of Stereospecif icity: The Acid-Cat­ alyzed Beckmann Rearrangement of the Oximes of 2-Methyl-1-lndanone. J. Musachio. 75. Acid-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Aromatic Photosubstitution. Ε. Β. Coughlin. 76. Reactions of Benzyl Phenyl Ether and Hydroquinone Monobenzyl Ether with Su­ percritical Water. H. T. Fish, M. A. Mikita. 77. Preparation of a Pyrrolyltetrahydroindole Needed for the Synthesis of Cyclohexano Petroporphyrins. R. P. Balasubramaniam, T. D. Lash. 78. Synthesis of Porphyrins from Tetrahydroindoles. K. A. Bladel, T. D. Lash. 79. Fourth-Order Derivative Spectroscopy as a Tool for Monitoring Protein Denaturation. A. Veca, J. H. Dreisbach. 80. Improved Purification of α-Amylase Iso­ lated from R. Pusillus by Affinity Chroma­ tography. T. C. Becker, S. L. Turchi. 81. Nutritional Evaluation of Morama Bean Seeds. K. Hertel, N. Bower, R. Storey. 82. Facile Preparation of 1-Alkyl-3-Azetidinols. Q. L. Eaton, R. H. Higgins. 83. Fluorescence and Circular Dichroism Studies of Bacterial Rhodopsins. T. W. Beatty, C. M. Bravo, T. G. Dewey. 84. Addition of 2-Fluoro-2,2-Dinitroethanol to Norbornene in the Presence of Xenon Difluoride. G. M. Hambalek, M. L. Druelinger. 85. Effect of Stereochemistry on β-Silyl In­ volvement in Solvolysis. R. Casanova, S. Bass, R. B. Finzel. 86. Utility of (l-Ethoxy)Vinyltrimethyltin as an Acyl Anion Equivalent. Β. Η. McKee, M. E. Krolski, J. K. Stille. 87. Electrical and Magnetic Properties of He­ moglobin in Terms of Structure, SemiConductivity and Hyperelectronic Polar­ ization. M. H. Bailey, J. 0. Williams, J. Padilla. 88. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution: A New Micro Organic Laboratory Experi­ ment. J. L. Crow, W. B. Avila. 89. Effects of Soluble Rat Liver Proteins on an Artificial Membrane. D. Schieltz, T. Vickstrom, A. Cassens, T. Herrmann, K. McCoy. 90. Interactions of Nitrofurans with DNA. R. Costas, J. Navas, C. Asencio, C. Mercado. 91. Interaction of Heme-Proteins with Phos­ pholipid Vesicles. H. Rivera, J. R. EscabiPérez. 92. Radiation Chemical Studies of Azapurines in Aqueous Solutions. M. J. Vidal, E. Gonzalez, G. A. Infante. 93. Radiation Sensitization Studies Using CHO Cells. L. Laboy, P. Guzman, I. Rodriguez, G. A. Infante, J. A. Myers. 94. Systemic Effects of Brown Recluse Spider {Loxosceles Reclusa) Venom in Mice. H. P. Hendrickson, M. D. Edwards, C. R. Geren. 95. Psoralen Crosslinking Under Denaturing Conditions in the Elucidation of mRNA Secondary Structure. J. R. Bishop III, R. A. Kopper, C. D. Liarakos. 96. Synthesis of Enkephalin Analogues. A. N. Voldeng, T. Day, T. E. Goodwin. 97. Investigation of Psoralen Photochemistry of Nucleic Acids. K. A. Hilscher, R. A. Kopper, C. D. Liarakos. 98. Mechanism of Colchicine-Tubulin Interaction. M. D. Kyzer, R. A. Kopper. 99. Preparation of Diazaborines from Azulene Carboxaldehydes. C. Lichti, T. E. Goodwin. 100. Synthesis and Rearrangement of Isoxazolidine Tosylates. J. Montgomery, D. Coussens, E. Jacobs, T. E. Goodwin. 101. Synthesis of Novel Carbohydrate-Derived Chirons. B. L. Shirkey, T. E. Goodwin. 102. New Method for Hydroxymethylation of Alkyl Halides. T. E. Wilson, C. A. Ogle. TUESDAY

MORNING

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Symphony Ballroom (3rd Floor) Chemical Education Awards Symposium K. O. Berry,

Organizer

Β. Ζ. Shakhashiri,

9:05—Introduction of the Breakthrough Lecturer. Β. Ζ. Shakhashiri. 9:10—103. Gas Phase Organic Ions: From Laboratory to Interstellar Space. C. H. DePuy, V. M. Bierbaum. The Awards Lectures 10:00—Introduction of the 1987 James Bryant Conant Awardee. Β. Ζ. Shakha­ shiri. 10:05—104. Award Address. (James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching sponsored by Ethyl Corp.) Teaching Chemistry—the Fun, the Beauty and the Challenge. M. C. Johnson. 10:55—Introduction of the 1987 ACS Awardee in Chemical Education. Β. Ζ. Shakhashiri. 11:00—105. Award Address. (ACS Award in Chemical Education sponsored by Union Carbide Corp.) Textbooks of Ele­ mentary Chemistry. L. C. Pauling. Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Brahms Room (3rd Floor) State-of-the-Art Symposium—Fourier Transform Methods in Instrumentation P. R. Griffiths, Organizer,

Presiding

8:40—Introductory Remarks. 8:45—106. Fourier Transform. T. L. Isenhour. 9:30—107. Theory and Instrumentation for FTIR. W. G. Fateley. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—108. Applications of FTIR. P. R. Griffiths. 11:15—109. Data Processing I: Deconvolution, Smoothing, Differentiation. D. G. Cameron. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Symphony Ballroom (3rd Floor) State-of-the-Art Symposium—Fourier Transform Methods in Instrumentation P. W. Griffiths, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30—110. Data Processing II: Correlation. J. M. Ramsey. 2:15—111. Theory and Instrumentation for FTMS. A. G. Marshall. 3:00—Intermission 3:15—112. Applications of FTMS. B. S. Freiser. 4:00—113. Fourier Transform in Chroma­ tography. J. B. Phillips. Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Brahms Room (3rd Floor) Symposium in Honor of Moses Passer cosponsored with Society Committee on Edu­ cation S. Kirschner, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—114. Changing Needs in Chemical Education. M. Passer. 2:25—115. Profound Effect of the Society Committee on Budget and Finance on the Educational Activities of the Society. N. W. Bortnick. 2:45—116. Lifetime Careers in Chemistry in the Twenty-First Century—Myth or Possi­ bility? A. Cairncross. 3:05—117. Defining the Educational Role of the ACS. G. A. Crosby. 3:25—118. Career Counseling for Chemis­ try Majors—Nonsense! J. A. Dixon. 3:45—119. CHEMCOM Alternative—or What Should High School Students Really Know About Chemistry? W. T. Lippincott, S. A. Ware, H. Heikkinen. 4:05—120. Chemical Education: Trouble Ahead Unless A. L. McClelland. 4:25—121. "Tomorrow" Report Today. P. E. Yankwlch. 4:45—122. American Chemical Society and ChemicaHEducation. S. Kirschner. 5:05—Closing Remarks. S. Kirschner. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting.

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. The Breakthrough Lecture

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details)

44

February 9, 1987 C&EN

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Symphony Ballroom (3rd Floor) State-of-the-Art Symposium—Fourier Transform Methods in Instrumentation P. R. Griffiths, Organizer,

Presiding

8:45—123. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis in the Fourier Domain. J. A. deHaseth. 9:30—124. Theory and Instrumentation of FT-NMR. J. B. Grutzner. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—125. Applications of FT-NMR. D. L. Rabenstein. 11:15—126. Hyphenated Techniques in Chemical Analysis. C. L. Wilkins, R. S. Brown, D. A. Laude, Jr., J. R. Cooper. Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Brahms Room (3rd Floor) Chemical Health and Safety Education in Academic Institutions J. J. Fitzgerald, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—127. Overview—Formal and Informal Approaches to Incorporate Chemical Health and Safety into the Curriculum. J. J. Fitzgerald. 9:15—128. Formal College Level Courses in Chemical Laboratory Safety. L. J. Nicholls. 9:45—129. Evaluating Experiments in the Academic Laboratory. D. A. Katz. 10:15—130. Chemical Health Hazards: Tox­ icity Terms and Toxicity Data Bases. J. J. Fitzgerald. 10:45—131. Lab Safety-Flammable Sub­ stances in Teaching and Research Labs. W. C. Gottschall. 11:15—132. Safe Storage and Handling of Laboratory Chemicals. N. V. Steere. 11:45—133. Management of Hazardous Wastes in the Academic Setting. R. O. Allen, T. J. Loving. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Symphony Ballroom (3rd Floor) Symmetry in the Undergraduate Curricu­ lum—How Much, How Soon? J. J. Alexander, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—134. Symmetry Rules for Chemical Reactions. R. G. Pearson. 2:45—135. Symmetry Models for Ideal Structures in Nature. W. O. J. Boo. 3:05—136. Easy but Honest Approach to Teaching Molecular Bonding. J. G. Verkade. 3:45—137. Let's Stop Teaching Symmetry and Group Theory. C. L. Perrin. 4:05—138. Beyond Point Groups in Under­ graduate Chemistry. R. L. Flurry, Jr., T. H. Siddall III. 4:45—139. Learning Symmetry Through a Diborane Molecule. E. Gonzâlez-Vergara, J. A. Guevara Garcia. Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Brahms Room (3rd Floor) General J. A. Marcello, Organizer,

Presiding

1:00—Introductory Remarks. 1:05—140. Development and Implementa­ tion of a Community Chemistry Program. S. A. Davis. 1:20—141. Supermarket Chemistry Work­ shop. J. A. Marcello. 1:40—142. Results of an NSF Summer Workshop for Chemistry and Physical Sci­ ence Teachers. V. Vandegrift. 2:00—143. Workshop in Industrial Chemis­ try for High School Chemistry Teachers. P. J. Chenier. 2:20—144. Intensive Workshops for Jr. High/High School Teachers. J. A. Marcello. 2:40—145. Pronunciation Practice for ESL (English as a Second Language) TA's. A. A. Russell. 3:00—146. Textbook Errors. S. J. Hawkes. 3:20—147. Preparation for the Chemistry Section of the Medical College Admission Test. J. E. Teggins, J. B. Hill.

3:35—148. Evaluating Predictors of Suc­ cess. M. C. Hallada, J. E. Bauman. 3:55—149. Groups-of-Three Laboratory Re­ ports in General Chemistry. C. W. Bowen, W. R. Robinson. 4:20—150. Reversible Activators of En­ zymes. J. F. Sebastian. 4:40—151. Determination of the Hydration Number of Sodium Ion. Simple NMR Experi­ ment for the Physical/Inorganic Chem­ istry Laboratory. R. E. Saul, L. M. Wilkes. 5:00-151A. Phosphorus in the General Chemistry Course. R. J. Gillespie. WEDNESDAY EVENING

Section A

Metropolitan State College, Science Build­ ing General—Posters J. Marcello, Organizer,

Presiding

7:00—152. Trivia as a Chemistry Learning Tool. J. D. Navratil, S. Tascher. 153. Teaching Science with Toys. T. Mulli­ gan, A. M. Sarquis, J. L. Sarquis, J. P. Williams. 154. Teaching-Methods Course for Prospec­ tive and In-Service Teachers of High School Chemistry Taught in an Arts and Sciences Chemistry Department. Ε. Κ. Mellon. 155. Equilibrium Problems the Easy Way: Graphically. N. A. Daugherty. 156. Structural Formulas from Dreiding Mod­ els via Chemdraw. M. L. Caspar. 157. Determination of Chloride in Water: An Environmental Experiment for Introduc­ tory College Chemistry. W. J. Stratton, G. R. Bakker, P. J. Ogren, L. E. Strong. 158. Rxn X: Project Lab for General Chemis­ try. W. Killingsworth, J. D. Hostettler. 159. Candy-Bar-Like Chromatography in the Coordination Chemistry Laboratory. E. R. Moreno, M. G. Hernandez, J. A. Guevara, E. Gonzâlez-Vergara. 160. Biochemistry Techniques—An Alternative to A. P. Chemistry. Ν. Μ. LeMieux. 161. Chemistry of the New Biology. R. Aikin, M. Hart, D. Hendricks, B. Hill, C. John­ son, K. Mack, E. Malin, L. McGaw, G. Pratt, R. Trowell, J. Wilkins. Section Β Metropolitan State College, Science Build­ ing Demonstration Session Κ. Ε. Kolb, Organizer,

Presiding

7:00—162. Demonstration Instruments. D. A. Bath 163. Dramatic Demonstration. G. Pratt, L. Hill, R. Curtright, S. Clarke, L. De Back, S. Radtke. 164. Chemistry in a Ziploc® Bag. A. M. Sar­ quis, J. L. Sarquis. 165. Using Demonstrations to Stimulate Thinking in the Lecture and Tutorial. D. A. Humphreys. 166. Colloid and Surface Chemistry Demon­ strations. G. H. Kennedy, T. R. Wildeman. 167. When Oil and Water Don't Mix. G. L. Trammed. 168. Easy Spot Test for Cyanide Contaminat­ ed Products. J. A. Crifasi, G. L. Trammell. 169. Illustrating Osmosis with a Decalcified Egg. D. B. Shaw. 170. Illustrating some Lewis Acid/Base Properties of Organic Compounds. D. B. Shaw. 171. Chemical Demonstration Road Show for High School Students. O. S. Rothenberger, J. W. Webb. 172. Synthesis and Reaction of N-phenyl-aStyryl-(E)-Nitrone: An Alternative Diels Al­ der Demonstration. O. S. Rothenberger. 173. Polymer Demonstration Using Popcorn Flakes and Polystyrene Foams. T. A. Ev­ ans. 174. Reaction Intermediates: Some Colorful Examples. J. W. Hill. 175. Colorful Organic Demos for the Over­ head Projector. K. E. Kolb. 176. Catalysis of Dinitrophenylhydrazone Formation Demonstrated on the Overhead Projector. K. W. Field, Κ. Ε. Kolb. 177. Overhead Demonstrations Using Bio­ chemical Materials. D. K. Kolb. 178. Lecture Demonstrations and Experi­ ments with Quinones and Vitamin C. D. A. Davenport.

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Executive Tower Inn, Beethoven Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Educational Ideas from Oth­ er Disciplines M. J. Pavelich, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—179. Improving Teaching Through a University-wide Center for Teaching Ef­ fectiveness. K. G. Lewis. 10:00—180. Psychological Type and Learn­ ing. E. D. Sloan. 11:00—181. Educating for Maturity: Perry's Model for Intellectual Development. R. S. Culver. Section Β Executive Tower Inn, Brahms Room (3rd Floor)

12:00—Interface Luncheon, (see Social Events) Address: Caring Is Not Enough!. G. A. Crosby. 1:40—Introduction. H. Burk. 1:50—196. Constructivist Approach to Real Education: The Constructivist Theory: G. M. Bodner. (Continued) 1:50—201. New Solutions to Microcomput­ er Interfacing. J. O. Currie, Jr. 1:50—202. More Demonstrations from ICE Program. F. H. Juergens. 1:50—199. Computer Advances to Reduce Expenses: SERAPHIM Laboratory Mod­ ules. J. W. Moore, P. P. Miles, K. Hartman, P. Barker, J. Estell, M. Rasmussen. (Con­ tinued) 1:50—200. Doing Chemistry. D. W. Brooks. (Continued) 1:50—203. Consumer Chemicals. G. A. Crosby, J. L. Crosby.

J. Marcello, Organizer, Presiding 8:50—Introductory Remarks. 8:55—182. Design and Location of Safe Laboratories: Guidelines Are Not Enough. D. B. Shaw, C. B. Ferge. 9:25—183. Flammable Liquids: Friend or Foe? W. A. Walton. 9:45—184. Four Useful Exercises for a Course in Chemical Information Retrieval. G. Gorin. 10:00—185. Reaction Optimization by Com­ puter Simulation. R. B. Finzel. 10:20—186. Backwards with Computers: Top-Down Teaching of Electronics for Scientists. A. Scheeline. 10:40—187. Evolution and Revolution in Chemistry Software. E. S. Hood, R. A. Howald. 11:00—188. Teaching Relative Acidity in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Course. J. G. Traynham. 11:20—189. Down Scaling Organic Experi­ ments. R. Shelden, H.-T. Thio. 11:40—190. Writing in Organic Chemistry. T. A. Newton. 12:00—191. Concepts in Water Treatment Chemistry. K. P. Fivizzani.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Executive Tower Inn, Beethoven Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Educational Ideas from Oth­ er Disciplines

CHAS

FRIDAY MORNING & AFTERNOON Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) High School Teachers Program: WE CARE P. Ogata, H. Burk,

Organizer Presiding

8:00—Registration. 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—196. Constructivist Approach to Real Education: Constructivist Theory of Knowledge. G. M. Bodner. 9:25—197. Computer Applications to Revi­ talize Education; Classroom Uses and Misuses of Computers. J. O. Currie, Jr. 10:05—Intermission. 10:20—198. Chemical Accents Render En­ lightenment. F. H. Juergens. 11:20—199. Computer Advances to Reduce Expenses: SERAPHIM Laboratory Mod­ ules. J. W. Moore, P. P. Miles, K. Hartman, P. Barker, J. K. Estell, M. Rasmussen. 11:35—200. Doing Chemistry. D. W. Brooks. 11:55—Concluding Remarks. H. Burk.

Section A

Westin, Lawrence Room A (Meeting Room Level) Fume Hoods and Laboratory Ventilation, cosponsored with Committee on Chemical Safety

DIVISION OF CHEMICAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

8:50—8. Regulations and Practices in Oper­ ating Fume Hoods. M. M. Renfrew. 9:20—9. Laboratory Ventilation. E. L. Walls. 9:50—10. Re-entry of Gases Released With­ in Fume Hoods: Field Studies and Model­ ing. F. Shair, R. Horrell. 10:20—11. Hood Performance: Test Results and Objectives. G. W. Knutson. 10:50—12. Industrial Approach to Optimiz­ ing the Performance and Usage of Fume Hoods. S. G. Abrahamson. 11:20—13. Cost Effective Operation and Evaluation of Laboratory Fume Hoods. R. W. Bohl, S. K. Norwood, R. E. Cook, Ν. Η. Wetterstroem, E. L. Caldwell. 11:45—Discussion. Section Β

P. A. Redden, Program Chairman D. Marsick, Program Secretary

OTHER DIVISIONS' SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Drug Testing in the Work Place, Tech­ nical, Legal and Ethical Issues (see Di­ vision of Professional Relations, M, page 79) Chemical Health and Safety Education in Academic Institutions (see Division of Chemical Education, W, Page 44) DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Reception, Tu Dinner, M

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Westin, Lawrence Room (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Right-to-Know L. Meek, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—1. Hazard Communication Training: Keeping It Going. H. L. Richardson. 9:45—2. Selected Microcomputer Re­ sources for MSDS. D. J. Marsick. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—3. Label Your Container Before OSHA Labels You. D. D. Hedberg, J. A. Kilby. 11:00—4. OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard: Preemption Issues and Liabil­ ities for Non-compliance. M. N. Duvall. 11:30—5. Enforcement Activities and Fu­ ture Developments. J. J. Healy. 2:00—6. OSHA's Proposed Laboratory Standard: Occupational Exposures to Tox­ ic Substances. L. K. Clark. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—7. Emergency Planning and Commu­ nity Right to Know Under Superfund. J. T. O'Reilly. 4:45—Discussion. Closing Remarks.

J. A. Young, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—14. Introductory Remarks. J. A. Young 9:10—15. Through the Jungle of Product Li­ ability with Gun and Camera. F. M. Fried­ man. 10:10—16. I've Been Sued! Where is Perry Mason? Τ. Μ. Schrant. 11:10—17. What? You Want Me to Be an Expert Witness? J. A. Young. 11:45—Discussion. Closing Remarks. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Westin, Lawrence Room A (Meeting Room Level) Fume Hoods and Laboratory Ventilation L. J. Nicholls,

Presiding

2:00—18. Performance Upgrading of Older Fume Hoods. G. T. Saunders. 2:30—19. Effect of Work Procedure and Ac­ tivities on Laboratory Fume Hood Perfor­ mance. R. E. Ivany, M. W. First, L. J. Diberardinis. 3:00—20. Good Hood Practices for Safe Hood Operation. W. G. Mikell, F. H. Fuller. 3:30—21. University Programs for the In­ stallation, Maintenance, and Operation of Fume Hoods. F. M. Thompson, P. G. Thompson. 4:00—22. Special Hoods and Capture and Containment Devices. N. V. Steere. 4:30—Discussion. Section Β Westin, Daniels Suite (4th Floor) Me? Somebody Is Suing Me? Symposium on Liability Issues and Chemical Safety J. Young, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—A Mock Trial. Symposium partici­ pants and the audience. After the judge has explained the case to the jury, the audience, attorneys for plaintiff and de­ fense will examine the expert witness in order to show the jury who was, or was not, negligent. The jury will determine its finding, by majority vote. This mock trial is based on an actual case. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Westin, Daniels Suite (4th Floor) Safety Concerns of Small Chemical Busi­ nesses, J. K. Kasper, Organizer,

10:50—24. State Legislatures and Hazard­ ous Materials Regulation. B. Foster. 1125—25. Keeping Pace with Changing Chemical Regulations: Current Aware­ ness for the Small Chemical Business. K. B. Clansky. Section Β

M. M. Renfrew, Organizer S. H. Pine, Presiding

Westin, Daniels Suite (4th Floor) Me? Somebody Is Suing Me? Symposium on Liability Issues and Chemical Safety, cosponsored with Division of Chemistry & the Law

M. J. Pavelich, Organizer, Presiding 2:00—192. EPICS: Experiment in Engineer­ ing Education. F. R. Yeatts. 3:00—193. Are We Overlooking Some­ thing? A. A. Bartlett. 4:00—194. Interdisciplinary Research and Stressing the Fundamentals in Chemistry. R. J. Otto. 4:30—195. Plant Derived Medicines: Where Anthropology and Botany Meet Chemistry. M. A. Mikita, D. M. Hosier.

TUESDAY MORNING

Presiding

9:30—23. ABC's of Chemical Safety. Η. Η. Fawcett. 10:35—Intermission.

Westin, Fisher Suite (4th Floor) Microcomputer Resources and Right to Know—Products and Vendors L. Meek, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—26. Computer Assisted Instruction: The Benefits of an Interactive Learning Environment. M. Planding. 9:45—27. Interactive Laser Disc Technol­ ogy and Health and Safety Training. J. Mason. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—28. Toxic Alert Compliance Man­ agement Software System. D. Snyder, D. B. Fullerton. 11:00—29. MSDS Engine. B. Caseholt, J. O. Accrocco. 11:30—30. Chemtox and Database MSDS Access Software. J. Wood, D. Deutsch.

Westin, Fisher Suite (4th Floor) Safety Concerns of Small Chemical Busi­ nesses Presiding

2:00—31. Use of Material Safety Data Sheets in Small Industries. R. A. Hatha­ way. 2:30—32. Guiding the Mini-sized Chemical Compounder Through Right to Know. M. A. Solstad. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—33. Uniform Health and Safety Stan­ dards for Multi-Nationals. L. C. Moore. 3:45—34. Implementation of Right to Know by the Specialty Chemical Manufacturer. J. K. Kasper. THURSDAY

MORNING

Westin, Continental Ballroom A (Meeting Room Level) Why Chemicals are Toxic S. Szabo, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30—35. Why Chemicals Are Toxic. D. H. Wegman. 9:05—36. Mechanisms of Chemically In­ duced Cell and Tissue Injury. S. Szabo. 9:40—37. Mechanisms of Pesticide Toxic­ ity. D. J. Ecobichon. 10:15—38. The Liver: A Target Tissue for Chemical Injury. I. G. Sipes. 10:50—39. Chemical-Induced Nephrotoxi­ city: An Overview. W. R. Hewitt. 11:25—40. Chemically Induced Lung Injury. A. F. Tryka. THURSDAY

AFTERNOON

Westin, Continental Ballroom A (Meeting Room Level) Effect of Occupational Chemicals on Hor­ mones and Reproduction S. Szabo, J. A. Thomas, Presiding

Organizers,

1:45—41. Survey of Chemical Hazards and Reproduction. J. A. Thomas. 2:15—42. Endocrine Glands and Hormones as Targets of Exogenous Chemicals. S. Szabo. 2:45—43. Occupational Hazards and Repro­ duction. K. Hemminki, M.-L. Lindbohm, H. Taskinen. 3:15—44. Occupational Reproductive Haz­ ards for Women. B. D. Hardin. 3:45—45. Identification of Occupational and Environmental Hazards to Male Reproduc­ tion. J. C. Lamb IV. 4:15—46. "Clusters" Associated with Chemical Exposures: Their Significance and Causality. A. M. Ducatman.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings February 9, 1987 C&EN

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Westin, Continental Ballroom Β (Meeting Room Level) General. P. A. Redden, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—47. CHEMPOX—A Toxic Substances Database Manager. A. Milch. 9:35—48. Identification of Unknown Chemi­ cals to Enable Their Disposal. W. A. Wal­ ton. 10:10—49. Implementation of a Compre­ hensive Chemical Waste Minimization Program. R. A. Feild, W. R. Thomann. 10:45—Intermission. 11:00—50. Comparison of Dry vs. Wet Wipe Tests for Monitoring Dioxin Surface Con­ tamination in Laboratories. G. L. Myers, F. W. Spierto, D. G. Patterson, Jr. 11:35—51 Development and Implementa­ tion of a Right to Know Training Program at a Liberal Arts College. P. A. Redden, S. T. Morneweck, R. J. Uriarte.

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DIVISION OF CHEMICAL INFORMATION J. L. Witiak, Program Chair

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TUESDAY MORNING 12:00—Divisional Luncheon. Speaker: O. Chapman. Topic: Optical Disc Technology and Applications, (see Social Events) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

OTHER DIVISION'S SYMPOSIUM OF INTEREST: Recent Computer Applications of Sym­ bolic Methods in Structural Studies, Award Symposium Honoring W. T. Wipke (see Division of Computers in Chemistry, Tu, page 49) DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Luncheon, Tu Reception, Tu

MONDAY MORNING Westin, Continental Ballroom A (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on End Users' Reflections on End User Searching

R. R. Dueltgen, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—3. On-line Information Retrieval at a Specialty Chemical Company. R. E. Kass. 9:35—4. Let Your Fingers Do the Search­ ing—End Users at Cyanamid. R. J. Manfre. 10:00—5. End User Limit? Applications-Ori­ ented Databases. J. K. Borchardt. 10:25—6. Frontiers of Technology with a PC and an Information Specialist. A. R. Zigman. 10:50—1. Information Searching by the Ac­ ademic Scientist. A. S. Kende. 11:15—2. Information Retrieval by the Lone Consultant. E.M. Beavers. MONDAY AFTERNOON Westin, Continental Ballroom A (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Data/Information Resource Management (DRM/IRM) M. K. Landsberg,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—7. Information Resources Manage­ ment: Challenge and Opportunity. G. Lev­ in.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

DIVISION OF CHEMICAL MARKETING AND ECONOMICS P. R. Lantos, Program Chairman

CHAL

Presiding

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: New Technologies and Material for Food Packaging {see Division of Poly­ meric Materials: Science & Engineering, M, page 77)

2:00—15. Some Observations on Chemical Information Activities and Instruction in MONDAY AFTERNOON the People's Republic of China. Ο. Β. Ramsay. Radisson, Convention Complex, Brecken2:25—14. Structure Registration and Re­ ridge Room (Ground Level) trieval in the Beilstein Online System. C. Symposium on New Technologies for Food Jochum, S. M. Welford. 2:50—13. Applying Expert Systems to Envi­ I Packaging ronmental Problems. J. M. Hushon. D. F. Toner, Presiding 3:15—16. Envirotrends: The Subject and 2:00—1. Recent Developments and Trends People in the Field of Environmental Sci­ in Food Packaging. P. R. Lantos. ences. S. S. Miller. 2:40—2. Innovative Plastic Technologies and their Application to Food Packaging. Section Β R. A. lezzi. Westin, Continental Foyer (Meeting Room 3:20—Intermission. Level) 3:40—3. High-barrier Plastic Packaging— the Risks and the Rewards. R. W. Fox. Microcomputer Information Handling Soft­ 4:20—4. Meeting the Barrier Performance ware Demonstration Challenge for Rigid Plastic Food Contain­ J. L. Chapman, Presiding ers. S. A. Marcus, P. T. DeLassus. 2:30—17. Software Demonstration: Micro­ computer Information Handling. J. L. Chap­ TUESDAY MORNING AND man. AFTERNOON WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Westin, Continental Ballroom A (Meeting Room Level) L. R. Garson, Presiding Symposium on Small Computer S y s t e m s Software for Chemists—I 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—18. Improving the Quality of Techni­ cal Publications. B. Byer. 9:30—19. Improving Technical Writing with the Unix Writer's Workbench Software. C. R. Smith, Κ. Ε. Kiefer. 10:00—20. Desktop Technical Manuscript Preparation for Scientific Writers. R. A. Love, C. K. Gerson. 10:30—21. Approaches to Chemical Text Processing. R. S. Hong. 11:00—22. Chemical Structure Manage­ ment Software: A Comparison of Micro­ computer-Based Programs. D. E. Meyer. 11:30—23. Text Management Software for Chemists. C. C. Mundy. 1:30—24. A Comparative Investigation of PC-Based Text Retrieval Software. J. L. Chapman. 2:00—25. Seraphim: A Software Clearing­ house for Chemists. J. W. Moore, E. A. Moore. 2:30—26. Computers Aid Learning—for Chemists as Well as Students. Κ. Μ. Chapman. 3:00—27. Local Area Networks with Lab­ oratory Information Management Sys­ tems. R. Megargle. 3:30—28. LIMS: What are the Choices? G. A. Gibbon. 4:00—29. An Expert System for Choosing Appropriate Experimental Designs. S. N. Deming.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) 46

CMEC

1:30—Introductory Remarks. W. S. Durrell. 1:45—17. Practical Creative Methods and Insights. R. W. Coughlin. 2:30—18. Adjusting for risk in an R&D Port­ folio. L. M. Landoll. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—19. Technology Transfer in a Diversi­ fied and Changing Company. E. L. Menger. 3:45—Discussion.

Section A

Westin, Continental Ballroom A (Meeting Room Level) General J. L. Witiak,

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2:30—8. Environmental Data Resource Management. M. E. Courain. 2:55—9. Information Resource Manage­ ment in Industry and its Implications to Research and Development Organiza­ tions. F. H. Bishop. 3:20—10. Data Management in a Large Or­ ganization. D. C. Wigley. 3:45—11. Dealing with the Information Ex­ plosion at General Foods. D. Rothkopf. 4:10—12. Managing the Data Resource. A. Rigby.

Radisson, Convention Complex, Terrace Room (Terrace Level) Symposium on Intermaterial Competition

P. R. Lantos, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—5. Advances in Aluminum Technol­ ogy and their Impact on Plastics Compos­ ite Applications. A. K. Dhingra. 9:45—6. Liquid Crystal Polymers. J. H. Levy. 10:25—Intermission. 10:40—7. Elastomeric Alloys: Competition for Both Thermoplastic and Rubber. D. E. Emge. 11:20—8. Performance Plastics—Why Not Thermosets? P. R. Lantos. 2:00—9. Race for Barrier Resin Markets in Packaging Containers. W. Sacks. 2:40—10. Working with Plastics in Business Machines. M. E. Dolde. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—11. Thermoset Technology for Com­ posites. W. T. McCarvill. 4:20—12. Rovel Weatherable Polymer Ap­ plications. J. D. Striebel.

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Radisson, Convention Complex, Terrace Room (Terrace Level) Symposium on Managing for Change in the Chemical Industry W. S. Durrell,

Presiding

9:00—13. Investigating Industry Associa­ tions, a Tool for Market Issues Analysis. J. M. Renner. 9:45—14. Managing the New Chemical Company. M. J. Bennett, A. A. Boccone, C. H. Kline. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—15. Managing the Corporate Life Cy­ cle. P. R. Lantos. 11:15—16. Model for Managing Technology in Fast Changing Markets. P. Everson, W. N. Knopka.

DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY AND THE LAW R. D. Middlekauff, Program Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: Liability issues and Chemical Safety (see Division of Chemical Health & Safety, Tu, page 45)

MONDAY AFTERNOON Westin, Continental Ballroom Β (Meeting Room Level) Impact of the New Tax Legislation cosponsored with Division of Professional Relations L. Sacco, R. Middlekauff, D. Kaiser, Presiding.

Organizer

1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—1. Tax Reform and the Individual Tax Return. R. D. Middlekauff. 2:30—2. Impact of the Tax Reform on Em­ ployee Benefit Plans. L. S. Hartshorn. 3:00—3. Impact of the Reform on Corpora­ tions and Other Businesses. C. H. Economos. 3:30—4. Effect of Tax Reform on Financial Planning. W. E. Wilson. 4:00—Panel Discussion. Speakers, L. Sac­ co.

COLL DIVISION OF COLLOID AND SURFACE CHEMISTRY D. W. Osborne, Meeting Secretary

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: Chemical Problems in Electronic Mate­ rials (see ACS Committee on Science, Thu, page 35)

OTHER DIVISION'S SYMPOSIUM OF INTEREST: ACS Award in Petroleum Chemistry (see Division of Petroleum Chemistry, W, page 70) BUSINESS MEETING: M DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Social Hours, Tu, W Luncheon, W

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salons I & J (Ballroom Level) Electrochemical and Photochemical Sur­ face Science: Symposium on Recent Ad­ vances in Photoelectrochemistry. Dyes and Dye Sensitization B. Holmstrom, A. Bocarsley,

Presiding

9:00—1. Invited Lecture. Photoelectroche­ mistry and Photochemistry of Dyes Ad­ sorbed at Semiconductor Electrodes. M. T. Spitler. 9:40—2. Photochemical Studies of Dyes Absorbed or Attached to Semiconductor Electrodes. M. A. Ryan, M. T. Spitler. 10:00—3. Dye Sensitization of the Van Der Waals Surface of SnS2. B. A. Parkinson. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—4. Spectroscopic and Photoelectrochemical Studies of Trivalent and Tetravalent Metal Phthalocyanine Thin Films. T. D. Sims, T. J. Klofta, N. R. Armstrong. 10:50—5. Photoelectrochemistries and Mi­ crocircuit Photoconductivities of Titanyl Phthalocyanine Thin Films. J. W. Pankow, P. A. Lee, J. L. Danziger, T. J. Klofta, N. R. Armstrong. 11:10—6. Co(ll) Tetrasulfophthalocyanine on Ti0 2 : A New Efficient Electron Relay for Photocatalytic Reactions ir> Aqueous Suspensions. A. P. Hong, D. W. Bahnemann, M. R. Hoffmann. 11:30—7. Solvent Dependence of Intramo­ lecular Photochemical Electro/i Transfer Rates in a Porphyrin-Quinone Molecule. M. D. Archer, V. P. Y. Gadzekpo.

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon Η (Ballroom Level) Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Spectroscopy of Intermediates and Adsorbate Interactions—I N. D. Shinn, Organizer,

11:00—19. Polar Properties and Mechanism of some of the Activities of Biosurfactants. C. J. van Oss, R. J. Good, M. K. Chaudhury. 11:30—20. Effect of a Dicarboxylic Acid Hydrotrope on Biosurfactant Bilayers. D. W. Osborne. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Marriott, Colorado Salons I & J (Ballroom Level) Photoelectrochemistry of Small Structures

W. Gomes, B. Parkinson, Presiding 2:00—21. Invited Lecture. Quantization Ef­ fects in Photoelectrochemistry. A. J. Nozik, B. R. Thacker, J. A. Turner, J. Olson, O. Micic. 2:40—22. Photoelectrochemistry of Colloi­ dal Zinc Oxide: Synthesis, Quantum-size and Non-Linear Optical Effects. C. Kormann, D. W. Bahnemann, M. R. Hoffmann. 3:00—23. Colloidal Metal Oxides as Effi­ cient Photocatalysts: Kinetics and Mecha­ nisms of Sulfite Oxidation and Dioxygen Reduction of Fe 2 0 3 , ZnO and Ti0 2 . D. W. Bahnemann, J. Kern, C. Kormann, M. R. Hoffmann. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—24. Perturbation of Particulate ll-VI Photocatalyst Photophysics by Surface Modification. M. R. V. Sahyun 3:50—25. Flash Photolysis-TRDL as a Probe of Photocatalyst Function. M. R. V. Sa­ hyun. 4:10—26. Selectivity in the Photoelectrochemical Dehydration. D. A. Chandler, H. Ogawa, M. A. Fox, P. Pichat. 4:30—27. Initial Stage of Electroorganic Re­ actions at Photoexcited Semiconductor Surface. S. Yamagata, A. Fujishima. 4:50—28. Use of Photocapacity for the Study of Supperlattice Photoelectrodes. D. Meisner, J. A. Turner, A. J. Nozik.

Presiding

8:50—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—8. Dynamics of Laser Driven Thermal Desorption: Internal States Distributions Induced by Laser Heating Pulses. R. R. Cavanagh, D. R. Burgess, D. S. King. 9:40—9. NO + CO Reaction on Clean Pt(100): Rate Multiplicity and Oscillations. S. B. Schwartz, L. D. Schmidt. 10:00—10. Infrared Study of the Behavior of CO, NO and CO + NO Over Rh/Al 2 0 3 Catalysts. R. Dictor. 10:20—11. Precursor Dynamics. D. J. Doren, J. C. Tully. 11:00—12. CO Oxidation: Rapid Transient FTIR Studies. Y.-E. Li, D. Bocker, R. D. Gonzalez. 11:20—13. Comparison of the Dynamics of CO Oxidation on Pt and Pd. G. L. Haller, K. Kunimori. 11:40—14. Formaldehyde Oxidation on Sili­ ca-Supported Platinum: Spectroscopic Evidence for Adsorbed CO Intermediate. M. P. Lapinski, R. G. Silver, J. G. Ekerdt, R. W. McCabe.

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salon G (Ballroom Level) Continuing Symposium Series on Surfac­ tants and Colloids: Biosurfactant Sys­ tems—I: Lipid and Protein Systems

E. A. Dennis, Organizer L. J. Mag id, M. F. Roberts, Presiding 8:55—Introductory Remarks. E. A. Dennis. 9:00—15. Structure of the Stratum Corneum Lipids and Its Implications. S. E. Friberg, I. Kayali, L. B. Goldsmith. 9:30—16. Modification of Hydrophobic Poly­ mer Surfaces Through Hydrophilic Bipolymer Adsorption. A. W. Neumann, D. R. Absolom, Z. Zingg. 10:00—17. Interaction of Phospholipases with the Lipid-Water Interface. E. A. Den­ nis, R. E. Stafford. 10:30—18. Spectroscopic Studies of Signal Peptides in Lipid Systems: How Do These Natural Surfactants Effect Protein Export? L. M. Gierasch, D. G. Cornell, R. A. Dluhy, M. Rafalski, M. S. Briggs, D. Hoyt, C. J. McKnight, A. N. Stroup.

Section A

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon Η (Ballroom Level) Molecular Process at Solid Surfaces: Spec­ troscopy of Intermediates and Adsorbate Interactions—II

D. W. Goodman, Presiding 2:00—29. Spectroscopic Probe of the Influ­ ence of Surface Structure and AdsorbateAdsorbate Interactions on the Nature of Surface Intermediates. W. Ho. 2:40—30. Intermediates to Dissociative Chemisorption of CO and CH3OH on Fe(100). D. J. Dwyer, J. Gland, M. Albert, S. Bernasek. 3:00—31. Relative Importance of 5σ and 27Γ* Orbitals in CO Chemisorption on Pro­ moted Ni(100). A. K. Myers, G. R. Schoofs, J. B. Benziger. 3:20—32. CO/O Interactions on Cr(110): Spectroscopic Manifestation of Poison­ ing. N. D. Shinn. 3:40—33. Photoelectron Diffraction Studies of Adsorbates and Catalytic Intermedi­ ates. C. S. Fadley. 4:20—34. Electronic Effects of Κ on the Adsorption and Decomposition of Ethyl­ ene on Pt(111): Comparison of Κ and Bi Coadsorption. R. G. Windham, Β. Ε. Koel. 4:40—35. Coadsorbate Induced Ordering. G. S. Blackman, C. M. Mate, C. T. Kao, B. E. Bent, D. f. Ogletree, M. A. Van Hove, G. A. Somorjai.

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salon G (Ballroom Level) Continuing Symposium Series on Surfac­ tants and Colloids: Biosurfactant Sys­ tems—II: Membrane Systems

V. A. Parsegian, E. A. Dennis, Presiding 2:00—36. Forces Stabilizing Biosurfactant Assemblies. V. A. Parsegian, R. P. Rand, S. M. Gruner. 2:30—37. Short-Chain Lecithins: How to Form Unilamellar Vesicles from Micelles and Phospholipid Multibilayers. M. F. Rob­ erts, Ν. Ε. Gabriel. 3:00—38. Direct Determination of Surfac­ tant Microstructure by Video Enhanced Microscopy (VEM) and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (C-TEM). D. F. Ev­ ans, D. D. Miller, J. R. Bellare, Y. Talmon, B. W. Ninham.

3:30-39. Properties of Lipid Bilayer Mem­ branes: Cohesion, Elasticity, and (Colloi­ dal) Interactions. E. A. Evans. 4:00—40. Dynamics of the L (r H M Phase Transition and the Kinetics of Liposome Fusion and Destabilization. J. Bentz. 4:30—41. Determination of the Relative Molal Heat Content of DPPC Vesicles in Various Physical States. G. C. Kresheck, H. B. Long. 5:30—Divisional Business Meeting.

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon C (Ballroom Level) Electrochemical and Photochemical Sur­ face Science: Symposium on Recent Ad­ vances in Photoelectrochemistry. Modifi­ cation of Semiconductor Electrodes P. Salvador, N. R. Armstrong, Presiding 9:00—42. Invited Lecture. Chemically Derivatized Semiconductor Photoelectrodes. J. J. Hickman, D. Albagli, M. S. Wrighton. 9:40—43. Interfacial Structure as a Control­ ling Element in Photoinduced Charge Transfer in n-CdS and n-CdSe/Fe(CN)64/ 3-Cells. A. B. Bocarsly, D. J. Arent, L. J. Amos. 10:00—44. Solid-State Polymer Photovolta­ ic Cells. M. P. Hagemeister, H. S. White. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—45. Molecular Water-Oxidation Cat­ alyst. A. J. Frank, M. Gratzel, J. K. Hurst, F-J. Pern. 10:50—46. Characterizations of Electroni­ cally Conductive Polymers. S. Glenis, A. J. Frank. 11:10—47. Thin Film Preparation and Photocatalytic Properties of Linear-Chain Platninum Complexes on a Solid Polymer Electrolyte. K. Honda, K. Chiba, H. Hayashi, A. J. Frank, R. Palmans. 11:30—48. Molecular Semiconductor Based on a Linear Chain Platinum Com­ plex. R. Palmans, A. J. Frank. Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon Η (Ballroom Level) Molecular Process at Solid Surfaces: Spec­ troscopy of Intermediates and Adsorbate Interactions—III D. J. Dwyer,

Presiding

8:40—49. First-Principles Force and Total Energy Calculations for Adsorption Sys­ tems. P. J. Feibelman. 9:20—50. Isotope Dilution Neutron Spec­ troscopy: A Vibrational Probe of Adsor­ bate Interactions. T. J. Udovic, R. R. Ca­ vanagh, R. D. Kelley, J. J. Rush. 9:40—51. Coadsorption of Hydrocarbon Fragments with Carbon Monoxide on Ni( 100) and Ru(001 ). S. Akhter, M. A. Hen­ derson, G. E. Mitchell, J. M. White. 10:00—52. Adsorption of C2H2 and C2H4 on Metallic and Oxidized Gd(001). R. J. Simonson, J. R. Wang, S. T. Ceyer. 10:20—53. Formation and Reactivity of C2 and C4 Intermediates on Supported Nickel Catalysts. J. G. Ekerdt, M. P. Lapinski. 10:40—54. Surface Structure and Thermal Decomposition of Acetylene and Coadsorbed Acetylene with CO on the Rh(111) Single Crystal Surface. C. T. Kao, C: M. Mate, B. E. Bent, G. A. Somorjai. 11:00—55. Adsorption of N0 2 on Pt(111) Studied by Temperature Programmed De­ sorption and Vibrational Spectroscopy. M. E. Bartram, R. G. Windham, Β. Ε. Koel. 11:20—56. Infrared Studies of η-Butane Se­ lective Oxidation to Maleic Anhydride Un­ der in situ Conditions. R. W. Wenig, G. L. Schrader. 11:40—57. Spectroscopic Studies of Inter­ mediates Formed During the Adsorption of Alcohols in H-ZSM-5. M. T. Aronson, R. J. Gorte, D. White, W. E. Farneth.

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salon G (Ballroom Level) Continuing Symposium Series on Surfac­ tants and Colloids: Biosurfactant Sys­ tems—III: Micelle Systems

J. P. Kratohvil, K. J. Mysels, Presiding 9:00—58. Proteins as Guest Molecules of Reverse Micelles. L. Magid, P. L. Luisi. 9:30—59. Solution Properties of Bile Salts: Recent Advances. J. P. Kratohvil. 10:00—60. Some Colloidal Aspects of Bile Salts. A. F. Hofmann, K. J. Mysels. 10:30—61. Solubilization in Bile Salt Solu­ tions and Microenvironmenta! Poiarities of Solubilized Species. P. Mukerjee, A. Y. S. Yang, N. A. Williams. 11:00—62. Application of Bile Salt in Saline Water System. Y. C. Chiu, I. J. Liu, Y. C. Sun. Section D Marriott, Colorado Salons I & J (Ballroom Level) Kendall Award Symposium on Surface Sci­ ence Honoring J. T. Yates, Jr.—I: Adsor­ bate Structure G. B. Fisher, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—63. Direct Determination of Molecu­ lar Structure at Surfaces. T. E. Madey. 10:00—Intermission. 10:10—64. Reactivity, Structure, and Bond­ ing on Group 1B Metal Surfaces. R. J. Madix. 11:05—65. Organometallic Chemistry of Transition Metal Surfaces. W. H. Wein­ berg. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon C (Ballroom Level) Energetics of the Semiconductor/Electro­ lyte Interface C. Levy, A. Ellis,

Presiding

1:00—66. Invited Lecture. Kinetic Studies of Silicon Photoanodes. N. S. Lewis, M. L. Rosenbluth 1:40—67. Electrochemistry of Metallocenes at Tungsten Diselenide Electrodes. J. B. Olson, G. A. Koval. 2:00—68. Pinning and Unpinning of Energy Bands by Surface State Charging. D. Meissner, Ch. Sinn, R. Memming. 2:20—Intermission. 2:30—69. Coordination Chemistry Studies of Semiconductor Photoelectrodes. N. S. Lewis, I. L. Abrahams, L. G. Casagrande, B. J. Tufts. 2:50—70. Participation of Chemical Steps in Competing Hole Processes at Illuminat­ ed η-Type lll-V Electrodes. W. P. Gomes, S. Lingier, D. Vanmaekelbergh. 3:10—71. Binding Energies and Heats of Surface Chemical Reactions on Semicon­ ductor and Metal Electrodes. K. W. Frese, Jr., D. P. Summers. 3:30—72. Surface Science Studies of Iron Oxide Photocatalysts. G. H. Vurens, M. M. Khader, M. Salmeron, G. A. Somorjai. 4:00—Kendall Award Address. (See Sec­ tion C.)

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon Η (Ballroom Level) Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Spectroscopy of Intermediates and Adsor­ bate Interactions—IV C. S. Feigerle,

Presiding

2:00—73. Formation and Adhesion of Vapor Deposited Ultra-Thin Poiyimide Films on Metal Surfaces. M. Grunze. 2:40—74. Chemical Interactions at the Poly­ mer/Metal Interface. P. D. Deck, I. CzakoNagy, A. Vertes, H. Leidheiser, Jr. 3:00—75. Fundamental Interactions of Ad­ sorbates on Model Organic Surfaces. R. G. Nuzzo, L. H. Dubois, B. R. Zegarski. 3:20—76. Identification of Organic Interme­ diates on ZnO Surfaces by XPS and TPD. J. M. Vohs, M. A. Barteau. 4:00—Kendall Award Address. (See Sec­ tion C.)

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

February 9, 1987 C&EN

47

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Section C Marriott, Colorado Salons I & J (Ballroom Level) Kendall Award Symposium on Surface Sci­ ence Honoring J. T. Yates, Jr.—II. Chemi­ cal Effects of Modified Surfaces G. B. Fisher, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—77. Effects of Substrate Changes on Chemisorption: H/Mo (100). P. J. Estrup. 2:55—78. Structural, Catalytic, and Elec­ tronic Properties of Strained-Metal Overlayers. D. W. Goodman. 3:50—Intermission. 4:00—79. Award Address. (ACS Award on Colloid or Surface Chemistry sponsored by Kendall Co.) Alkali Metal Activation of Chemisorbed CO on Ni(111). J. T. Yates, Jr., K. Uram, L. Ng, Z. Xu, A.-M. Lanzillotto, M. D. Alvey. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Marriott, Colorado Salon C (Ballroom Level) Electrochemical and Photochemical Sur­ face Science: Symposium on Recent Ad­ vances in Photoelectrochemistry Techniques for the Study of the Semicon­ ductor/Electrolyte Interface H. Tsubomura, K. Frese,

Presiding

9:00—80. Invited Lecture. Investigation of the Photoresponse in Semiconductor/Liq­ uid Junction Cells with 100 ps Time Reso­ lution. K. Bitterling, F. Willig. 9:40—81. Electrolyte Electroreflectance: An Interesting Technique for the in situ study of the semiconductor-electrolyte in­ terface. M. Pujadas, J. Ganadia, I. J. Fer­ rer, P. Salvador. 10:00—82. Detection of Primary Processes at Photoelectrodes using Magnetic and Optical Transient Techniques. K. Itoh, R. Baba, A. Fujishima. 10:20—Intermission. New Applications and Materials for Photoe­ lectrochemistry 10:30—83. New Class of Chemical Sensors Based on Photoluminescence from Semi­ conductor-Derived Interfaces. A. B. Ellis, G. J. Meyer, G. C. Lisensky. 10:50—84. Synthesis and Photoelectrochemical Characterization of a New Rhodium Iodide Semiconducting Phase. M. W. Pe­ terson, B. A. Parkinson. 11:10—85. Photoelectrochemistry and Sur­ face Characterization of Polycrystalline Thin Films of p-WSe2. C. R. Cabrera, H. D. Abrufia. 11:30—86. Photoelectrochemical Studies of Ga(As,P) in Acetonitrile. T. Gruszecki, B. Holmstrom. Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon G (Ballroom Level) Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Spectroscopy of Intermediates and Adsorbate Interactions—V Β. Ε. Koel,

Presiding

9:00—87. Generation of Paramagnetic Rho­ dium Species in Rh Containing Ca-A Zeo­ lites. D. Goldfarb, L. Kevan, M. E. Davis, C. Saldarriaga, J. A. Rossin. 9:20—88. Activity of Cu/Ru Surfaces To­ wards Ethylene Decomposition. A. Swift, B. Sakakini, J. C. Vickerman. 9:40—89. Surface Chemistry of Monolayers Under Reactive Atmospheres: Fluores­ cence Yield Near Edge Spectroscopy (FYNES) Above the Carbon K-Edge. J. L. Gland, D. A. Fischer, F. Zaera, S. Shen. 10:00—90. Bridging Methoxy Intermediate in the Heterogeneous Reaction of Metha­ nol on a Molybdenum Hetropolyanion Sur­ face. W. E. Farneth, R. H. Staley, P. J. Domaille, R. D. Farlee. 10:20—91. First Row Protic Hydrides Ad­ sorbed on Si(100): Structure and Reactiv­ ity. A. L. Johnson, T. E. Madey. 10:40—92. Water Adsorption on Clean and Oxygen-Predosed Rh(111): Comparison with Pt(111). F. T. Wagner, T. E. Moylan. 11:00—93. SHG and Differential Capaci­ tance: A Comparative Study of Ion and Molecular Adsorption at Electrode Sur­ faces. H. M. Rojhantalab, G. L. Richmond.

48

February 9, 1987 C&EN

11:20—94. In Situ Study of Bonding Mecha­ nisms of Aqueous Benzoic and Phenolic Compounds on Goethite Suspensions Us­ ing CIS-FTIR. E. C. Yost, M. I. TejedorTejedor, M. A. Anderson. 11:40—95. Lead Adsorption at Aqueous/ Oxide Interfaces: An EXAFS Study. A. L. Roe, K. F. Hayes, G. E. Brown, K. O. Hodg­ son, J. O. Leckie, G. A. Parks.

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salon H (Ballroom Level) Kendall Award Symposium on Surface Sci­ ence Honoring J. T. Yates, Jr.—III: Surface Structure, Bonding, and Adsorbate Orienta­ tion

G. L. Haller, Presiding 9:00—96. Imaging of Atoms and Surface Chemical Bonds with the STM. J. E. Demuth, R. J. Hamers, R. M. Tromp. 9:55—Intermission. 10:05—97. Universal Properties of Bonding at Metal Surfaces and Interfaces. J. R. Smith. 11:00—98. NEXAFS Studies of Complex Molecules and Molecular Chains Bonded to Surfaces. J. Stohr.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salon H (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Surface Chemistry in Biolo­ gy, Medicine and Dentistry: Bioelectrochemistry—I M. Blank, H. T. Tien,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—110. Surface Free Energy as the Po­ tential in Oligomeric Equilibria: Prediction of Hemoglobin Disaggregation Constant. M. Blank, L. Soo. 2:30—111. Modelling Electrostatic Forces and Charge in the Filament Lattice of Stri­ ated Muscle. B. M. Millman. 2:55—112. Site-Specific Kinetics of LightInduced Rapid Proton Movements Across a Bacteriorhodopsin Membrane and Its Membrane-Water Interfaces. F. T. Hong. 3:20—113. H/OH Transport Along Water Chains Across Membranes. I. R. Miller. 3:45—114. Membrane Potentials and Elec­ tron Transfer Reactions at Electron-Con­ ducting Membranes. J. O'M. Bockris, F. B. Diniz. 4:10—115. Bilayer Lipid Membranes (BLM): An Experimental Approach to Biomolecular Electronics. H. T. Tien. 4:35—116. Application of the Concepts of Electrochemistry and Surface and Colloid Chemistry to Biological Systems. M. Bender.

Marriott, Colorado Salon C (Ballroom Level) Catalysis at the Semiconductor/Electrolyte Interface

THURSDAY MORNING

L. M. Peter, C. Koval,

Catalysis and Related Topics: General—I

Presiding

2:00—99. Invited Lecture. Controlled Supression or Enhancement of the Photoactivity of Ti0 2 (Rutile) Pigment. A. Hell­ er, Y. Degani, D. W. Johnson, Jr., P. K. Gallagher. 2:40—100. Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Using η-Silicon Photoelectrodes Coated with Metal Islands. H. Tsubomura, Y. Nakato. 3:00—101. SEXAFS Studies of Platinum Is­ lands Photoelectrochemically Plated on pInSe. C. Levy-Clement, D. Sedaries, C. Godart. 3:20—Intermission. Photoelectrochemistry of Thin Semicon­ ducting Layers 3:30—102. Electrochemistry, Photoelectro­ chemistry and Related Aspects of Con­ ducting Oxide-Based Electrode Systems. K. Rajeshwar. 3:50—103. Investigation of Passive Films on Titanium by Photoelectrochemical Meth­ ods. M. R. Kozlowksi, P. S. Tyler, W. H. Smyrl. 4:10—104. Control of Microstructure in the n-Silicon/Thallic Oxide Heterojunction. J. A. Switzer. 4:30—105. Intensity Modulated Photocurrent Spectroscopy (IMPS). R. Peat, L. M. Peter. 4:50—106. Electrooptical Investigation of the Potential Drop at the lll-V Semicon­ ductor/Aqueous Electrolyte Interface. Ph. L. Lemasson, C. N. van Huong.

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon G (Ballroom Level) Kendall Award Symposium on Surface Sci­ ence Honoring J. T. Yates, Jr.—IV: Dynami­ cal Effects in Adsorption, Dissociation, and Reaction J. C. Tully,

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon C (Ballroom Level) I. E. Wachs,

Presiding

9:00—117. Alloy Formation in Supported PtRe Catalysts, S. Augustine, W. M. H. Sachtler. 9:25—118. Diffuse Reflectance IR(DRIFTS) Studies of Carbon-Supported Metal Clus­ ters. J. J. Venter, M. A. Vannice. 9:50—119. Generation of Paramagnetic Rhodium Species in Rh Containing Ca-A Zeolite. D. Goldfarb, L. Kevan. 10:15—120. EXAFS of Rh/Ti0 2 (SMSI). J. H. A. Martens, D. C. Koningsberger, R. Prins. 10:40—121. Mechanism for Catalyzed Gas­ ification of Carbon. J. M. Saber, J. L. Fal­ coner, L. F. Brown. 11:05—122. Selective Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Alkanes Over V-Mg-0 Cata­ lysts. M. A. Chaar, D. Patel, M. C. Kung, K. Nguyen, H. H. Kung. 11:30—123. Characterization of V 2 0 5 /Ti0 2 (Anatase) Catalysts for the Oxidation of Oxylene to Phthalic Anhydride: Reaction Network and Kinetics. R. Y. Saleh, I. E. Wachs.

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon Η (Ballroom Level) Surface Science of Catalysis: Applications of Surface Science Techniques to Support­ ed Catalysts—I S. M. Davis, Organizer,

Presiding

8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—124. On the Dispersion and State of Alkali Promoters on C r C 4 Alcohol Syn­ thesis Catalysts. P. Himelfarb, G. W. Sim­ mons, J. G. Nunan, K. Klier. 9:30—125. Calibration of H2-Chemisorption by EXAFS. R. Prins, B. J. Kip, F. B. M. Duivenvoorden, K. C. Koningsberger.

Presiding

10:00—126. Preparation of Novel OxideMetal Interfaces by the Deposition of Ox­ ide Islands or Monolayers on Transition Metal Crystal Surfaces. M. Salmeron, A. T. Bell, T. Rucker, K. Williams, G. A. Somorjai. 10:30—127. Vanadium Passivation in FCC Catalysts by Rare Earths. C. S. Hemminger, Z. C. Mester. 11:00—128. Image Processing Techniques Applied to Supported Catalyst Character­ ization. J. G. Perez-Ramirez, S. Fuentes, A. Vazquez, M. Jose-Yacaman. 11:30—129. Kinetic, CAEM and XPS Stud­ ies of Nickel-Potassium Oxide Catalysts for the Gasification of Carbon Solids with Steam. J. Carrazza, R. T. K. Baker, J. J. Chludzinsky, R. Pande, D. J. Sullivan, H. Heinemann, G. A. Somorjai.

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salons I & J (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Surface Chemistry in Biolo­ gy, Medicine and Dentistry: Bioelectrochemistry—II

M. Blank, V. A. Parsegian, Presiding 9:00—130. New Model for the Electrical Double Layer. I. Graham, M. J. Zuckermann. 9:25—131. Charge Density Profiles in Interfacial Regions. V. S. Vaidhyanathan. 9:50—132. Theory and Experiments of Membrane Fusion. S. Ohki. 10:15—133. Individual Cell Electroporation: Determination by Flow Cytometry. J. C. Weaver, G. I. Harrison, P. A. Ulrich. 10:40—134. Concentration Changes at So­ dium Channels Due to Oscillating Electric Fields. M. Blank. 11:05—135. Surface Forces in Membrane Ion Channel Gating. V. A. Parsegian, J. J. Zimmerberg. 11:30—136. Voltage Clamp Studies of the Isolated Olfactory Mucosa: Implications for Olfactory Transduction. J. A. DeSimone, K. Persuad, G. L. Heck, T. V. Getchell. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon C (Ballroom Level) Catalysis and Related Topics: General—II B. J. Taturchuk,

Presiding

2:00—137. Raman Spectroscopy of Sur­ face Chromium Oxide on Alumina. I. E. Wachs, F. D. Hardcastle. 2:25—138. Interpretation of SERS Spectra for Pyridine Adsorbed on Gold with the Help of Data on Pyridine Adsorption on Stepped and Kinked Gold Single Crystal Surfaces. J. Lipkowski, D. E. Irish, L. Stolberg. 2:50—139. Surface Analogs of Coordina­ tion Complexes. Β. Η. Loo, Y. G. Lee. 3:15—140. Investigations of Silver Elec­ trode Surfaces in Tetrahydrofuran/Alkali Halide Electrolytes by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering. D. E. Irish, M. Krell. 3:40—141. In Situ Measurements of the Sur­ face Order of Single Crystal Electrodes by Second Harmonic Generation. V. L. Shan­ non, D. A. Koos, G. L. Richmond. 4:05—142. Monitoring of Electrochemical Reactions Employing Infrared Absorption Spectrometry. P. J. Shiller, D. W. Mincey. 4:30—143. FTIR Studies of In Situ Decom­ position and Oxidation of Metal Carbonyls in Solid Polymer Matrices, R. I. Tannenbaum.

Section Β

2:00—107. Time Dependent Quantum Meth­ ods for Surface-Molecule Collisions. H. Metiu. 2:55—108. Dynamics of Dissociative Che­ misorption. D. J. Auerbach, C. T. Rettner. 3:50—109. Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Re­ action on Single Crystal Rhodium Sur­ faces: Dissociative Sticking Coefficients, Steady-State Reaction Rates, and Adsor­ bate Coverages. G. B. Fisher, S. B. Schwartz, L. D. Schmidt.

Marriott, Colorado Salon Η (Ballroom Level) Surface Science of Catalysis: Applications of Surface Science Techniques to Support­ ed Catalysts—II C. S. Hemminger,

Presiding

2:00—144. Support Effects in the Catalytic Hydrogénation of CO Over Pt. D. J. Dwyer, J. L. Robbins.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

2:30—145. AES and XPS Characterization of the TiOx-Promoted Rh. M. E. Levin, K. Williams, M. Zalmeron, G. A. Somorjai, A. T. Bell. 3:00—146. Effect of Titania and Silica Overlayers on the Catalytic Activity of Palladium in CO Hydrogénation to Form Methane and Methanol. T. G. Rucker, G. A. Somorjai. 3:30—147. Ultrasonically Induced Enhancement of Isotope Exchange Catalysts: A Morphological Examination. E. A. Cioffi, W. S. Willis, S. L. Suib. Section C Marriott, Colorado Salons I & J (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Surface Chemistry in Biology, Medicine and Dentistry: Bioelectrochemistry—III M. Blank, H. Wachtel,

Presiding

2:00—148. Sensitivity of Neuronal Membranes to Temperature Rate of Rise. H. Wachtel, F. S. Barnes. 2:25—149. Some Theoretical Possibilities for Neuronal Temperature Rate Sensitivities. F. S. Barnes, H. Wachtel. 2:50—150. Rate of Energy Transduction from Electric Field by Membrane Bound ATPase. T. Y. Tsong, R. D. Astumian, F. Chauvin. 3:15—151. Electromagnetically Induced Continuous Phase Transitions in Biological Membranes. J. D. Bond, N. C. Wyeth. 3:40—152. Effect of Low Frequency Nonionizing Radiation on Transcription/Translation. R. Goodman, A. S. Henderson. 4:05—153. Cell Membranes, Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer Promotion. W. R. Adey. 4:30—154. Field/Cell Interactions: The Electrical Homeostasis Factor. E. Findl. FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

9:40—163. Laser Raman Spectroscopy of Supported Metal Oxides on Alumina. I. E. Wachs, F. D. Hardcastle, N. C. Dispenziere. 10:20—164. Phase Restructuring of Cata­ lysts Containing Pt or Pd on Alumina/Ceria Supports. J. Z. Shyu, K. Otto. 10:50—165. CO/C0 2 Interconversion on Pt/ CeCo2. T. Jin, T. Okuhara, G. J. Mains, J. M. White. 11:20—166. Particle Size Information from X-Ray Photoemission. S. M. Davis. 11:50—167. Perturbed Angular Correlation Spectroscopy for Characterization of Mo­ lybdenum Catalysts. T. Butz, A. Lerf, C. Vogdt, H. Knozinger. Section C Marriott, Colorado Salons I & J (Ballroom Level) Colloid Science and Related Topics R. A. Mackay,

Presiding

9:00—168. Overview of Experimental Meth­ ods of Measuring Solubilization of Organic Compounds by Micelles. C. M. Nguyen, S. D. Christian, J. F. Scamehorn. 9:20—169. 129 Xe and 131Xe NMR Studies of Xenon as a Probe of Associated Polyethyl­ ene Oxide Polymer-Surfactant Mixtures. S. M. Hosseini, R. L. Rowell. 9:40—170. Activity and Selectivity of Xan­ thine Oxidase in Reversed Micelles. A. S. Bommarius, T. A. Hatton, D. I. C. Wanq. 10:00—171. Conductivity in Oil Based Micellar Solutions: Power Law Behavior Far Below Percolation. W. R. Heffner, M. A. Marcus. 10:20—172. Withdrawn. 10:40—173. Advances in Colloid Character­ ization by Sedimentation Field-Flow Frac­ tionation. J. C. Giddings. 11:00—174. Chemisorption, Potential, and Capacitance of Lead Ion Selective Elec­ trode. S. X. R. Yang, K. L. Cheng.

Marriott, Colorado Salon C (Ballroom Level) Catalysis and Related Topics: General—III E. Stuve,

Presiding

9:00—155. Ethylene on Rh(111) Single Crystal Surfaces: Molecular Adsorption and Conversion to Ethylidyne—An HREELS, LEED, and TDS Study. Β. Ε. Bent, C. M. Mate, G. A. Somorjai. 9:25—156. Thiophene Adsorption and De­ composition on Ru(0001). W. H. Heise, B. J. Tatarchuk. 9:50—157. Structural and Electronic Modifi­ cation of Ruthenium Surfaces by Sulfur: Comparison of Supported Crystallites and Single Crystals. Y. J. Kuo, W. H. Heise, B. J. Tatarchuk. 10:15—158. Angle Resolved SIMS, LEED, and AES Studies of the Oxygen/A 1(100) Interaction. L. L. Lauderback, S. A. Lar­ son. 10:40—159. Effect of Ion Bombardment on the Surface Chemistry of GaAs. J. Epp, J. G. pillard. 11:05—160. Studies of Adsorbates on Po­ rous Silicon Using Transmission FTIR Spectroscopy. P. Gupta, N. Tro, S. M. George. 11:30—161. Withdrawn. Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon Η (Ballroom Level) Surface Science of Catalysis: Applications of Surface Science Techniques to Support­ ed Catalysts—III D. J. Dwyer,

Presiding

9:00—162. Adsorption and Catalysis on Nickel-Germanium Bimetallic Surfaces: From Single Crystals to High Surface Area Materials. R. G. Nuzzo, L. H. DuBois, J. San Fillipo, Jr.

COMP DIVISION OF COMPUTERS IN CHEMISTRY K. L. Ratzlaff, Program

Chairman

cmwHSomm SYMPOSIA: Chemistry on «^supercomputers aiu* Supercomputers (see D/vfefono/Fftys^ 1 ; cat £Mmtetry> T,\W, Thu„ Fy pagel·??} · Robotics in the Industrial Laboratory

(see-Bivk^m of Mu$trktr& Engineering
Data/Information Resource Management ( m i l / I B M ) *($m" melon*'of* Chemtcat fnform0on, H . pags146)

MONDAY AFTERNOON Westin, Daniels Suite (4th Floor) General

1:50—2. Information Flow in the Automated Laboratory, B. C. Schaeffer, F. L. Tobin. 2:10—3. Computer Animation of an AtomMolecule Chemical Reaction. C. L. Duncan, L. D. Foust, H. D. Kutz. 2:30—4. MMIO: A PC-Based Front End for Molecular Modeling, K. E. Gilbert, J. J. Gajewski. 2:50—5. A Complete Algorithm for the Computer-Assisted Modeling of the Active Receptor Site. A. K. Ghose, G. M. Crippen. 3:10—Intermission. 3:20—6. QSAR Chemical Assessment System—A Status Report, R. H. Hunter, F. D. Culver, J. R. Hill III, A. Fitzgerald. 3:40—7. Evaluating Published Data on Selenium in Food Using an Expert System. S. R. Heller, D. Bigwood, A. Schubert, W. R. Wolf, J. M. Holden, G. R. Beecher. 4:00—8. Development and Operation of an Electronic Coal Properties Database with Real-Time Plotting and Cartographic Capability, W. C. Peters, R. R. DeSantis, T. C. Ruppel. 4:20—9. Use of Computers for Studying Galenic Forms Able to Control the Drug Delivery. J. L. Taverdet, J. Bouzon, J. Rollet, J. M. Vergnaud.

TUESDAY MORNING Westin, Continental Ballroom A (Meeting Room Level) Division of Computers in Chemistry Award Honoring W. T. Wipke: Recent Computer Applications of Symbolic Methods in Structural Studies W. J. Howe, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—10. Application of Artificial Intelligence to Modeling of Drugs, Enzymes, and Receptors. M. N. Liebman. 9:45—11. Assignment of Protein Three-Dimensional Structure. R. M. Abarbanel, F. E. Cohen, I. D. Kuntz. 10:35—12. Symbolic Reasoning in Conformation Analysis. D. P. Dolata, C. K. Prout. 11:15—13. Award Address (ACS Award in Computers in Chemistry sponsored by Digital Equipment Corp.). Analogy and Intelligence in Model Building (AIMB). W. T. Wipke, M. A. Hahn.

fie

ENVR

I

DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY R. L. Jolley, Program

ζ Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: Principles of Environmental Sampling (see Committee on Environmental /mprovemenf, M> Tu, W, Thu, page 35) OTHER DIVISIONS* SYMPOSIA OP INTEREST: Surface Runoff of Chemicals from Agrî* cultural Watersheds {see Division of Agrochemicate* Tu, page 37) Fume Hoods and Laboratory Ventilation (see Division of Chemical He&ith & Safety, Tu, page 45) Atmospheric Methane: Formation and Fluxes from the Biosphere and the Geosphere {see Division of Geochemistry, M, Tu, W, Thu, F, page 53) DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Social Heurs, M, Tu Dirmer, Τυ

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Fairmont, Far East Room (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Influence of Aquatic Humic Substances on Fate and Treatment of Pol­ lutants—I: Keynotes—The Nature of Aquatic Humics

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

P. MacCarthy, I. H. Suffet,

Westin, Continental Ballroom Β (Meeting Room Level) Computer-Assisted Analysis of Motion in Larger Molecules

9:00—1. Influences of Aquatic Humic Sub­ stances on Fate and Treatment of Pollut­ ants. I. H. Suffet, P. MacCarthy. 9:15—2. Characterization of Humic Sub­ stances from Diverse Sources, P. Mac­ Carthy, R. L. Malcolm. 9:45—3. Models of Aquatic Humic Sub­ stances. R. L. Wershaw, J. A. Marinsky. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—4. Dissolved Humic Substances— Hydrophobic Organic Compound Interac­ tions: An Overview. G. Caron, I. H. Suffet. 11:00—5. Water Solubility Enhancements of Nonionic Organic Contaminants by Dis­ solved Soil and Aquatic Humic Materials and Commercial Humic Acids. D. E. Kile, T. I. Brinton, C. T. Chiou. 11:30—6. Influences of Aquatic Humic Sub­ stances on the Abiotic Hydrolysis of Or­ ganic Contaminants: A Critical Review. D. L. Macalady, N. L. Wolfe.

M. Wise, Co-organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—14. Capsid Dynamics of the Rhinovirus. B. M. Pettit, W. F. Lau. 9:45—15. Multiple Conformational States of Proteins: A Molecular Dynamics Analysis, R. Elber, M. Karplus. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—16. Applications of Molecular Dy­ namics for Conformational Exploration. B. R. Brooks. 11:20—17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Myoglobin-Xenon Complex. R. F. Tilton, C. Singh, P. A. Kollman, I. D. Kuntz. J. S. Dixon, Co-organizer,

Presiding

2:00—18. Design and Synthesis of Inhibitors of Aspartic Proteinases Based on X-Ray Crystal Structures. D. H. Rich. 2:40—19. Protein-Ligand Docking Simula­ tions. J. M. Blaney. 3:20—20. Drug Design via Receptor Dock­ ing. J. S. Dixon, R. Desjarlais, I. D. Kuntz, R. Sheridan.

I. H. Suffet,

Section Β Fairmont, Florentine Room, (3rd Floor) Symposium on Structure-Activity Relation­ ships in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry—I B. Walton, T. Mill, B. Walton,

K. L. Ratzlaff, Presiding 1:30—1. Fourier Encoded Templates for an Optic RAM Proximity Computer Lab Robot Eye. W. E. Pettit, M. A. Smith.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details)

Organizers

Presiding

Organizers

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks 8:45—7. Application of SAR and QSAR to Narcosis, Electrophile, and Proelectrophile Toxicity Mechanisms. R. L. Lipnick. 9:15—8. Molecular Topology and StructureActivity Correlations for Organotin Com­ pounds. Η. Ε. Guard, F. E. Brinckman, R. B. Laughlin, Jr. 9:45—9. Structure-Activity Relationships of Insecticides Utilizing an NMR Method for Estimating σ*. J. R. Coats, J. W. Williams, C. Chang, A. Lee, R. L. Metcalf. 10:15—Intermission. 10:45—10. Structure-Activity Relationships among Cyclodiene-Type Insecticides. F. Matsumura, Y. Ozoe, K. Tanaka.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

49

1

8

11:15—11. Competitive Binding of Chlori­ nated Azo- and Azoxybenzenes to the Ah Receptor Protein. N. J. Bunce, J. P. Land­ ers, S. H. Safe, T. R. Zacharewski. 11:45—12. Prediction of Gas Chromato­ graphic Retention of PCBs. M. N. Hasan, P. C. Jurs.

Section C Fairmont, Parisienne Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Luminescence Spectrosco­ py—I: Bioluminescence M. C. Goldberg, L. A. Sklar,

oc

Organizer

Presiding

8:25—Introductory Remarks. 8:30—13. Spectrofluorometric Analysis of Cell Responses. G. A. Omann, L. A. Sklar. 9:00—14. Instrument System for Fluores­ cence Measurements Within the Living Cell: A Possible Alternative to Animal Studies for Tumorigenic Screening. J. F. Holland, J. E. Trosko, M. H. Wade. 9:30—15. DNA Sequencing Using MultiFluorescently Tagged Oligonucleotides. J. A. Brumbaugh, L. R. Middendorf, J. L. Ruth. 10:00—Intermission. 10:30—16. Fluorescence Methods for the Analysis of Nucleic Acids in Recombinant Biological Preparations. W. W. Holl, R. L. Webb. 11:00—17. Dynamics of Ligand-Receptor-G Protein Interactions. L. A. Sklar. 11:30—18. Detection of Calcium Signals in Neutrophils Using Fluorescent Dyes: Hyperosmolarity Inhibits Lysosomal Enzyme Release and the Preceding Rise in Free Calcium. C. J. Kazilek, C. Merkle, D. E. Chandler. Section D Fairmont, Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Waste Management Trends: The Interface of Engineering with Chemis­ try and Toxicological Monitoring—I R. L. Jolley, R. G. M. Wang, Organizers, Presiding 8:50—19. Waste Mangement Trends: The Interface of Engineering with Chemistry and Toxicological Monitoring. R. L. Jolley. 9:00—20. Oak Ridge Model: A Case Study in Waste Management Trends. T. H. Row, C. M. Kendrick. 9:25—21. Problems with the Use of Devel­ oping Technologies at Hazardous Waste Sites. R. B. Pojasek. 9:50—22. Hazardous Waste Management: There Are No Experts. G. J. Hyfantis, Jr. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—23. Analysis and Planning of Inte­ grated Waste Management Systems. A. L. Rivera. 10:55—24. Use of Information on Transport, Fate and Environmental Effects in Risk Assessment and Management of Hazard­ ous Waste. A. Hirsch. 11:20—25. Assessing the Health Risks of Hazardous Waste Sites. N. P. Page, F. L. Cavender. 11:45—26. Role of Toxicology in Safe Drinking Water Management. G. M. Wang. MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Fairmont, Far East Room (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Influence of Aquatic Humic Substances on Fate and Treatment of Pol­ lutants—II P. MacCarthy,

Presiding

2:00—27. Behavior and Characterization of Humic Substances in Water Treatment Processes. H. Sontheimer, F. Fuchs. 2:30—28. Effect of Humic Substances on the Treatment of Drinking Water. F. Feissinger, J. P. Duget, J. Mallevialle. 3:00—29. Humic Substances and the Fates of Hazardous Waste Chemicals. S. E. Manahan. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—30. Implications of Mixture Charac­ teristics on Humic Substance Chemistry. J. A. Leenheer. 4:15—31. Effects of Humic Substances on Metal Speciation. Ε. Μ. Perdue.

50

February 9, 1987 C&EN

I

Section Β Fairmont, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Structure-Activity Relation­ ships in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry—II T. Mill,

Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks 1:45—32. Structure Activity Relationships for Environmental Oxidation Processes. T. Mill. 2:15—33. Quantitative Relationships of Mi­ crobial Transformations of Organic Com­ pounds with Physical and Chemical Pa­ rameters. D. F. Paris, N. L. Wolfe. 2:45—34. Estimation of Gas-Phase Hydroxyl Radical Rate Constants for Organic Chemicals. R. Atkinson. 3:15—Intermission. 3:45—35. Structure-Stability Relationships of Metal Complexes and Metal Speciation in Environmental Waters. A. E. Martell, R. M. Smith, R. J. Motekaitis. 4:15—36. Roles of Soil Organic Matter, Min­ erals, and Moisture in Soil Sorption and Chemical Activity of Nonionic Organic Pollutants and Pesticides. C. T. Chiou. 4:45—37. Sorption of Water Soluble Oligo­ mers on Sediments. R. T. Podoll, K. C. Irwin. Section C Fairmont, Parisienne Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Luminescence Spectrosco­ py—II: Luminescence in Natural Systems T. G. Dewey,

Presiding

1:25—Introductory Remarks 1:30—38. Probing Membrane Protein Dy­ namics Using Fluorescence Energy Transfer. T. G. Dewey. 2:00—39. Measurement of Intracellular pH and Ca 2+ Changes Important to Sperm Activation. R. W. Schackmann. 2:30—40. Applications of Element-Specific Epifluorescence Microscopy to In Vivo Monitoring of Metal Biotransformations in Environmental Matrices. F. E. Brinckman, R. A. Faltynek, G. J. Olson, T. K. Trout, J. M. Bellama. 3:00—Intermission. 3:30—41. Characterization of Sulfate Aero­ sols Generated from the Crystallization of Seawater Droplets. R. J. Cheng. 4:00—42. Sensitivity Limitations to En­ hanced Horseradish Peroxidase Catalysed Chemiluminescence. M. A. Motsenbocker. 4:30—43. Matrix Isolation LIF Characteriza­ tion of Plasma Decomposition Intermedi­ ates. D. E. Tevault. MONDAY

EVENING

Fairmont, Grand Ballroom (Ballroom Level) Special Topics: Poster Session/Social Hour R. L. Jolley, Organizer,

Presiding

5:00-6:30—44. Microbial Degradation of Metal-Cyanide Complexes in Mining Waste. L. C. Thompson. —45. Oxalate Precipitation for Zinc Remov­ al from Diazo Coating Industrial Dis­ charge. W. L. Gulden, G. E. Janauer. —46. Comparison of Supercritical Fluid Sol­ vents for the Extraction and Recovery of PAH from Environmental Solids. S. B. Hawthorne, D. J. Miller. —47. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in SRP Aquatic Sediments Derived from Coal Pile Runoff. G. L. Mills, D. M. Norton. —48. Biological Recovery of Selenium from Highly Selenated Soils. D. A. Coe, D. B. Stierle. —49. Elemental Distribution Coefficients for 12 Elements on Natural Aquifer Materials with and without Complexing Agents. R. V. Moore, M. A. Noble. —50. Thermodynamics of Trace Elements Distribution in Aquatic Systems at Savan­ nah River Plant (SRP). S. S. Sandhu, M. C. Newman. — 5 1 . An Ultra Sensitive Immunoassay De­ tector for HPLC. A. M. Cheh. —52. HPLC Separation of Inositol Phos­ phates by Ion Exchange Chromatography: Phosphorus Specific Detection by Post Column Reaction and Flow Injection Anal­ ysis. R. A. Minear, Z. Davidovitz, M. Dehghani. —53. Analysis of Anions, Monovalent and Divalent Cations in Soft Waters. V. Cheam, A. S. Y. Chau.

—54. Sensitivity of High Mountain Lakes in I 9:30—78. Rate Constants for OH Radical New Mexico to Acid Deposition. C. J. Scavenging by Humic Substances: Role in Popp, T. R. Lynch, G. Z. Jacobi. Ozonation and in a Few Photochemical —55. Photochemical Degradation of TetraProcesses for the Elimination of Micropolphenylboron Sensitized by Dissolved Or­ lutants. J. Hoigne, H. Bader, L. H. Nowell. ganic Matter in Natural Water. G. L. Mills, 10:00—79. Catalytic/Competition Effects of D. J. Carter. Humic Substances on Photolytic Ozona­ —56. Experimentally Determined Henry's tion of Organic Compounds. G. R. Peyton, Law Constants for 17 PCB Congeners. F. C. S. Gee, J. Bandy, S. W. Maloney. M. Dunnivant, J. T. Coates, A. W. Elzer10:25—Intermission. man. I 10:35—80. Effect of Sorption and Oxidative —57. Degradation of Halogenated Hydrocar­ Processes on Humic Substances in Wa­ bons with Natural Sunlight in a Waterter. J. C. Kruithof, M. A. van der Gaag, D. Photolysis System. T. C. Wang, C. K. Tan. van der Kooij. —58. Withdrawn. 11:05—81. Chlorinated Humic Acid Mix­ —59. Volatile Organic Amines in Municipal tures Establish Criteria for Detection of Wastewater. F. E. Scully, Jr., G. D. How­ Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Wa­ ell, H. H. Penn. ter. A. A. Stevens, L. A. Moore, C. J. —60. Estimates of Vapor-Particle Partition­ Slocum, B. L. Smith. ing for Individual Polychlorinated Biphen11:35—82. Aquatic Humic Substances as yls and n-Alkanes in Denver Air. W. T. Sources and Sinks of Photochemically Foreman, W. F. Bidleman. Produced Transient Reactants. J. Hoigne, — 6 1 . New Method for Collection of Gaseous B. C. Faust, W. R. Haag, R. G. Zepp. H 2 0 2 in Air. H. Sakugawa, I. R. Kaplan. —62. Withdrawn. Section Β —63. Rapid, Low-Cost Procedure for Sepa­ Fairmont, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) ration of Organic Analytes from Bovine Symposium on the Use of SAR-Analysis in and Human Adipose Tissue. W. Liao, T. C. Carcinogenicity/Mutagenicity Assessment: Chiang, L. R. Williams. ACS Award Symposium for Creative Ad­ —64. Bioaccumulation of a Mixture of Or­ vances in Environmental Science and ganic Toxicants by the Baltic Clam (Macoma balthica). G. D. Foster, J. C. Means, Technology—I W. E. Johnson. T. Mill, J. C. Arcos, Organizers —65. Analysis of Fulvic and Humic Acids by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation. J. C. BigeV. D. Adams, Presiding low, Z. Jue, R. Beckett, J. C. Giddings. 8:45—83. Award Address. (ACS Award for —66. Structure/Activity Relationships in Creative Advances in Environmental Sci­ Chlorinated α,β—Unsaturated Carbonyl ence and Technology sponsored by Air Compounds. R. P. Streicher, H. Zimmer, Products & Chemicals.) SAR and other J. R. Meier, R. B. Knohl, F. C. Kopfler, W. Criteria for Predicting the Carcinogenic E. Coleman, J. W. Munch, Κ. Μ. Schenck. Activity of Chemical Compounds. J. C. —67. Copper-Fulvic Acid Interactions: A Arcos. Chromatographic and Spectroscopic 9:35—84. Mutagens, Carcinogens and Com­ Study. F. Y. Saleh, D. Y. Chang, I. Kim, C. puters. H. S. Rosenkranz. J. Lai. 10:10—Discussion. —68. Mobilization of Co-58 from Cobalt Sul­ 10:20—Intermission. fide by Humic Substances Present in 10:35—85. Structure-Activity Relationship Landfill Leachate. E. S. K. Chian, S. B. Investigation of the Organ Specificity of NGhosh, M. Giabbai, E. M. Perdue, B. Kahn, Nitroso Carcinogens. J. K. Main-Bobo, P. F. G. Pohland. C. Jurs. —69. Effects of Humic Acid on the Adsorp­ 11:10—86. Structure-Activity Analysis of an tion of Tetrachlorobiphenyl by Kaolinite. Evaluated Database for Chemical Carci­ G. A. Keoleian, R. L. Curl. nogenicity. C. T. Helmes, C. C. Sigman, J. —70. Low Molecular Weight Halocarbons R. Fay. (LMHS) and Humic Acid. K. V. Gabbita. 11:45—87. Carcinogenicity Assessment — 7 1 . Effect of Dissolved Organic Matter on and the Role of SAR under TSCA Section the Extraction Efficiencies of Organochlo5. C. M. Auer, D. H. Gould. rine Compounds from the Niagara River. 12:20—Discussion. M. S. Driscoll, J. P. Hassett, C. Fetters, S. Litten. Section C —72. Methods for Dissolving Hydrophobics for Studies of Aqueous Solution Interac­ Fairmont, Parisienne Room (3rd Floor) tions with Dissolved Organic Matter. G. R. Symposium on Luminescence Spectrosco­ B. Webster, L. P. Sarna, G. G. Choudhry, py—III: Luminescence Techniques Applied M. R. Servos, D. C. G. Muir. to the Study of Environmental Materials —73. Binding of Tetrachlorobiphenyl to Dis­ solved Organic Carbon in Sediment Inter­ M. C. Goldberg, Presiding stitial Waters. G. Caron, I. H. Suffet. —74. Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonates in 8:25—Introductory Remarks. Groundwater—Potential for Co-Isolation 8:30—88. Analysis of PCB's and other Halo­ with Humic Substances. Ε. Μ. Thurman. genated Aromatics by Fluorescence/Lu­ —75. EPR Measurements of Photoinitiated minescence Techniques. D. Eastwood, R. Radical Production in Humic Acid. N. V. L. Lidberg, L. J. C. Love. Blough. 9:00—89. Fluorescence Quenching Studies of Interactions Between Polynuclear Aro­ —76. Photochemical Activity of Mirex Asso­ matic Hydrocarbons and Humic Materials. ciated with Dissolved Organic Matter. A. T. D. Gauthier, Κ. A. Booth, C. L. Grant, W. R. Mudambi, J. P. Hassett. R. Seitz. 9:30—90. Multidimensional Fluorescence TUESDAY MORNING Section A Evaluation of Cyclodextrin Solvent Extrac­ Fairmont, Far East Room (Ballroom Level) tion Systems. L. A. Blyshak, G. Patonay, I. Symposium on Influence of Aquatic Humic M. Warner. Substances on Fate and Treatment of Pol­ 10:00—Intermission. 10:30—91. Fluorescence Quenching Stud­ lutants—III: Oxidation Processes ies of Cu 2 + Complexation by Humic Mate­ W. J. Cooper, Presiding rials: Theory and Comparison of Data Treatments. D. K. Ryan, L. J. Holden, L. S. 9:00—77. Effect of Humic Substances on Ventry. Oxidation Processes: Formation of Natu­ 11:00—92. Characterization of Aquatic Hu­ ral Reactive Species and Reactions with mic and Fulvic Acid Fractions by Fluores­ Oxidants for Disinfection. W. J. Cooper. cence Depolarization Spectroscopy. M. C. Goldberg, P. M. Negomir. 11:30—93. Solid-Matrix Interactions in Sol­ id-Surface Luminescence Analysis. R. J. Hurtubise, J. M. Bello, S. M. Ramasamy, G. J. Burrell, L. A. Citta.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details)

Section D

Section C

Section C

Fairmont, Moulin Rouge (Lobby Level) Symposium on the Formation and Control of NOx Emissions from Combustion Sources; ACS Award Symposium on the Chemistry of Contemporary Technological Problems—I, cosponsored with Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry

Fairmont, Parisienne Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Luminescence Spectrosco­ py—IV: New Methods and Applications Us­ ing Luminescence Technology to Environ­ mental Problems

Fairmont, Parisienne Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Luminescence Spectrosco­ py—V: New Methods and Applications Us­ ing Luminescence Technology to Solve En­ vironmental Problems

J. E. Kenny,

R. A. Velapoldi,

W. Bartok,

Organizer

J. D. Johnson,

Presiding

9:00—94. Award Address. (ACS Award in the Chemistry of Contemporary Techno­ logical Problems sponsored by Mobay Chemical Corp.) Control of NOx Emissions from Stationary Combustion Sources. W. Bartok. 9:30—95. Rich Mixture Reactions of Nitro­ gen Species in a Stirred Reactor with Eth­ ylene Fuel. W. H. Sun, J. P. Longwell, A. F. Sarofim. 10:00—96. Formation of N 2 0 in Laminar, Premixed, Fuel-Rich Flames. C. T. Bow­ man, R. J. Roby. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—97. Mechanism and Modeling of Ni­ trogen Chemistry in Flames. J. A. Miller. 11:15—98. Mechanisms Governing the Fate of Coal Nitrogen During the Staged Com­ bustion of High and Low Rank Pulverized Coals. J. O. L. Wendt, A. C. Bose, Κ. Μ. Dannecker. 11:45—99. Impact of Fuel Composition on the Effectiveness of Advanced NOx Con­ trol Concepts. S. L. Chen, J. S. LaFond, J. M. McCarthy, E. C. Moller, M. P. Heap, D. W. Pershing. TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Fairmont, Far East Room (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Influence of Aquatic Humic Substances on Fate and Treatment of Pol­ lutants—IV: Biological Processes J. F. McCarthy,

Presiding

2:00—100. Humic Substances Reduce Bio­ availability and Toxicity of Contaminants. J. F. McCarthy. 2:30 — 1 0 1 . Enzymatic Detoxification Through Binding of Pollutants to Humic Substances. J-M. Bollag. 3:00—102. Confirmation of the ReversePhase Measure of Xenobiotic Partitioning to Dissolved Organic Matter by Toxicokinetic Studies. P. F. Landrum, B. J. Eadie, S. R. Nihart, M. D. Reinhold. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—103. Humic Substances Reduce the Uptake of Organic Contaminants by the Gills of Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri). M. C. Black, J. F. McCarthy. 4:05—104. Relative Importance of Humic and Non-humic Components in Dissolved Phase Sorption of Organic Pollutants. L. L. Henry, I. H. Suffet, S. L. Friant. 4:30—105. Abiotic Reduction of Methyl Parathion in Laboratory Systems De­ signed to Model Dissolved Organic Matter. P. G. Tratynek, D. L. Macalady. Section Β Fairmont, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Structure-Activity Relation­ ships in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry—III B. Walton, T. Mill,

Presiding

1:30—106. Structure-Activity Relationships for Selecting and Priority Setting of Exist­ ing Chemicals—A Computer Assisted Approach. A. W. Klein. 2:00—107. Acid-Base Concepts and QSAR's. R. W. Taft. 2:30—108. QSAR for Toxicities of Carbonyl Compounds. M. Charton. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—109. Toxicity of Organic Chemicals to Aquatic Organisms: The Key Role of Partitioning. D. Mackay, S. Abemethy. 3:45—110. CHEMEST, a Chemical Property Estimation System. W. J. Lyman, R. G. Potts. 4:15—111. Structure-Activity Relationships in a Model of the Fates and Effects of PAH's in Aquatic Ecosystems. S. M. Bartell.

Presiding

1:25—Introductory Remarks. 1:30—112. Peroxyoxalate Chemiluminescence Reaction: An Investigation of Ver­ satile Method for Activation of Fluorophore Luminescence. R. S. Givens, K. Nakashima, L. Venham, R. L. Schowen. 2:00—113. Groundwater Monitoring Using Remote Laser-Induced Fluorescence. J. E. Kenny, G. B. Jarvis, W. A. Chudyk, K. O. Pohlig. 2:30—114. Uncommon Methods in Fluores­ cence Spectrometry: Special Application to Environmental Assays. R. J. Meltzer. 3:00—Intermission. 3:30—115. Use of Fluorescent 1,3-Disubstituted-2-Pyridones for Environmental Ar->lysis. D. A. Nelson. 4:00—116. A Photochemical Reactor Ap­ plied to the Liquid Chromatographic De­ tection of Benzo(a)Pyrene Quinone Me­ tabolites. J. M. Morgan, B. Tan. 4:30—117. Measurement of Radionuclides in the Environment via Cherenkov Radia­ tion. H. H. Ross. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Fairmont, Far East Room (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Influence of Aquatic Humic Substances on Fate and Treatment of Pol­ lutants— V: Sorption (Treatment) W. J. Weber, Jr.,

Presiding

9:00—118. Effects of Background Dissolved Organic Matter on Adsorption Processes. W. J. Weber, Jr., Ε. Η. Smith. 9:30—119. Activated Carbon Adsorption of Organic Pollutants in the Presence of Hu­ mic Substances. G. Zimmer, H. Sontheimer. 10:00—120. Effect of Ozonation and Coagu­ lation on Adsorption of Aquatic Humic Substances on Activated Carbon. F. A. DiGiano, G. W. Harrington, J. Fettig. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—121. Removal of Humic Material by Conventional Treatment and Carbon. B. W. Lykins, Jr., R. M. Clark. 10:50—122. Removal of Aquatic Humus by Ozonation and Activated Carbon Adsorp­ tion. E. Kaastrup, T. M. Halmo. 11:15—123. Removal of 1,1,2-Trichloroethane from Highly Colored River Water by Activated Carbon. R. M. Narbaitz, A. Benedek. 11:40—124. Competitive Effect of Humic Substances on the Adsorption of Volatile Halogenated Organics in Drinking Water. R. Baker, T. Yohe, I. H. Suffet. Section Β Fairmont, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Structure-Activity Relation­ ships in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry—IV B. Walton, T. Mill,

Presiding

8:30—125. Effects of Volatile Organics on Soil Respiration: Structure-Activity Rela­ tionships. Β. Τ. Walton, M. S. Hendricks, T. A. Anderson. S. S. Talmage. 9:00—126. Estimation of Environmental and Toxicological Properties: Approach and Methodology. L. H. Hall, L. B. Kier. 9:30—127. Biodehalogenation. Compara­ tive Reactivities of Cytochromes P-450 with HEME and Whole Cell Models. C. E. Castro, W. Yokoyama, N. O. Belser. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—128. Predicting Trout LC50's from LD50's and Log P. P. V. Hodson. 10:45—129. Prediction of Rat Oral LD50 from Daphnia magna LC50 and Structure. K. Enslein, T. M. Tuzzeo, Η. Η. Borgstedt, B. W. Blake, J. B. Hart. 11:15—130. Relationship Between the Biodegradability of Chemicals and Parameter Calculated From LCMO Method. M. Takatsuki. 11:45—Concluding Remarks.

Presiding

8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—131. Luminescence Standards for Macro- and Microspectrofluorimetry. R. A. Velapoldi. 9:30—132. Quantitation in Fluorescence Using Calibrated Microbeads. A. Schwartz. 10:00—Intermission. 10:30—133. Interaction of Perfluorohalomethanes with Active Nitrogen. A. Ongstad. 11:00—134. Studies of Taurocholate Mi­ celles by Phase-Modulation Spectrofluorometry. K. Nithipatikom, L. B. McGown. 11:30—135. Luminescence Spectroscopy Using a Personal Computer. A. F. Theisen. Section D Fairmont, Moulin Rouge (Lobby Level) Symposium on Effects of Soil Components on the Transformation of Organic Contami­ nants—I: Microbial Transformation

3:45—147. Dependence of Aqueous Sorption Coefficients on Sorbent Concentration: A Hypothetical Mechanism. D. Mackay, B. Powers. 4:10—148. Binding of Organochlorines by Lake Sediment Porewater Colloids. P. D. Capel, S. J. Eisenreich. 4:35—149. Effect of Complexation of MicroPollutants with Humic Substances on Activated Carbon. M. Pirbazari, M. Stevens, V. Ravindran. Section Β Fairmont, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Colloid Controlled Migration of Pollutants—I: Methods and Models T. F. Rees, Organizer,

Presiding

C. R, Frink,

Presiding

WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Fairmont, Far East Room (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Influence of Aquatic Humic Substances on Fate and Treatment of Pol­ lutants—VI: Sorption (Fate in the Environ­ ment) J. Hassett,

Presiding

2:00—143. Nature of the Binding Interaction Between Humic Materials and Hydropho­ bic Molecules. M. E. Melcer, M. S. Zalewski, J. P. Hassett, M. A. Brisk. 2:25—144. Sorption of Benzidine, Tolidine, and Âzobenzene to Colloidal Organic Matter. J. C. Means, R. D. Wijayaratne. 2:45—145. Three-Phase Partitioning of Hydrophobic Organic Compounds in Great Lakes Waters. B. J. Eadie, N. R. Morehead, P. F. Landrum. 3:10—146. Practical Field Sampling Methods for Determining Free vs. Bound Concentrations of Hydrophobic Compounds in Natural Water Systems. P. J. McBath, J. P. Hassett. 3:30—Intermission.

Section C Fairmont, Parisienne Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Luminescence Spectrosco­ py—IV: Advances in Luminescence Tech­ nology: A Five-Year Projection M. C. Goldberg,

Presiding

1:30—Panel Discussion. Advances in Lumi­ nescence Technology: A Five-Year Pro­ jection. M. C. Goldberg, Moderator; F. Brinckman, T. G. Dewey, D. Eastwood, R. A. Velapoldi, R. Givens, R. J. Hurtubise, L. A. Sklar, A. Schwartz, M. Motsenbocker, C. L. Grant. 3:30—Concluding Remarks. Section D Fairmont, Moulin Rouge (Lobby Level) Symposium on Effects of Soil Components on the Transformation of Organic Contami­ nants—II: Chemical Transformations J. J. Pignatello,

Presiding

1:25—Introductory Remarks. 1:30—154. Occurrence of Organic Contam­ inants in Soil and Water. P. J. Isaacson, H. B. McCarty, J. F. Fisk. 1:55-^-155. Overview of the Effects of Hu­ mic Substances on Pollutant Transforma­ tions. E. M. Perdue., 2:20—156. Enhanced Rates of Organic Pol­ lutant Hydrolysis in Metal Oxide Suspen­ sions. A. T. Stone. 2:45—Intermission. 3:00—157. Alteration of Aromatic Mole­ cules by Modified Clays. M. M. Mortland. 3:25—158. Dynamics of the Adsorption of 2,4-D by Soils. P. M. Huang. 3:50—159. Soil-Catalyzed Chemical Degra­ dation of Tetraphenylboron. G. Mills, D. Carter, D. Kaplan, D. Adriano. 4:15—160. Photooxidation of Pesticides on Soil Surfaces. G. C. Miller, J. Mendosa, V. Hébert. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Fairmont, Far East Room (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Influence of Aquatic Humic Substances on Fate and Treatment of Pollutants—VII: Coagulation J. K. Edzwald,

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

tu

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:45—150. Electrostatic Interactions in the Transport of Pollutants Associated with Colloidal Particles. J. C. Westall. 2:30—151. Predicting Colloid Removal Dur­ ing Groundwater Flow. J. R. Hunt, L. M. McDowell-Boyer. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—152. Review of Photon Correlation Spectrometry, T. F. Rees. 4:15—153. Principles and Applications of Electrophoretic Light Scattering. B. R. Ware.

C. R. Frink, J. J. Pignatello, Organizers

8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—136. Influence of Clay Minerals on Microbial Activities in Soil. G. Stotzky. 9:25—137. Immobilization of Enzymes to Enhance Their Activities in Soil. J-M. Bol­ lag, J. M. Sarkar. 9:50—138. Bioavailability of Sorbed Organ­ ic Compounds. H. T. Chang, Β. Ε. Rittmann. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—139. Bioavailability of 1,2-Dibromoethane in Fumigated Soils. J. J. Pigna­ tello. 10:55—140. Degradation of Halogenated Ethanes in Selected Media. C. T. Jafvert, N. L. Wolfe. 11:20—141. Reductive Dechlorination of Organic Toxicants in Anaerobic Soils. S. A. Boyd. 11:45—142. Influence of Humic Substances on Microbial and Enzymic Activities. R. G. Burns.

I

Presiding

9:00—161. Coagulation, Separation, and Fate of Humic Substances in Water Treatment. J. E. Van Benschoten, J. P. Malley, Jr., J. K. Edzwald. 9:30—162. Evaluation of the Extent of Humic Substances Removal by Coagulation. N. Tambo, T. Kamei. 10:00—163. Effect of Humic Substances on Particle Formation, Growth, and Removal During Coagulation Using Aluminum Sulfate. G. L. Amy, M. R. Collins, C. J. Kuo, Z. K. Chowdhury, R. C. Bales. 10:20—Intermission.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

51

I

10:35—164. Effect of Humic Substances on the Colloidal Stability of Particles. J. A. Felix-Filho, P. C. Singer, W. B. Dowbiggin. 11:05—165. Analogy in the Effect of Humic Substances, Algogenic Organic Matter, and Biopolymers on Flocculation Process­ es. R. Klute. 11:40—166. Reactions Between Fluvic Acid and Aluminum—Effects on the Coagula­ tion Process. B. A. Dempsey.

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1 Ρ EJL

Section Β Fairmont, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Colloid Controlled Migration of Pollutants—II: Organics and Pathogens C. P. Gerba,

Presiding

9:00—167. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Colloids. Η. Ε. Nuttall. 9:30—168. Electrochemical Study of Interfacial Phenomena in Natural Aquatic Sys­ tems. B. Cosovic. 10:00—169. Trace Metal and Biochemical Components in River and Estuarine Col­ loids. A. C. Sigleo. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—170. Factors Controlling Virus Transport in the Subsurface. C. P. Gerba, R. C. Bales, G. H. Grondin, S. R. Yates, M. V. Yates. 11:15—171. Transport of Bacteria Through a Contaminated Freshwater Aquifer. R. W. Harvey, L. H. George, D. R. LeBlanc.

Section C Fairmont, Parisienne Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Photochemical Oxidants—I

D. H. Stedman, Organizer J. G. Calvert, Presiding 8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—172. Observations of Nitrogen Oxide Fluxes Over Grass. D. L. Sisterson, R. L. Hart, M. L Wesely. 9:30—173. Studies of Dry Deposition to a Wheat Field in Bennett, Colorado. B. A. Evilsizor, D. W. Stocker. 10:00—174. Measurement of NO and N0 2 Soil/Crop Level Fluxes with a Micrometeorological Technique. A. C. Delany, D. H. Lenschow. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—175. Flux and Deposition Velocities of Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone to Desert Soil by Eddy Correlation. D. W. Stocker, M. R. Burkhardt, D. H. Stedman. 11:15—176. Photochemical Formation and Fate of Nitric Acid in the Metropolitan De­ troit Area. N. A. Kelly. 11:45—177. Gas Chromatographic Analysis of PAN and N0 2 Using Luminol Detection. N. I. Maniga, D. H. Stedman. THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Fairmont, Far East Room (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Influence of Aquatic Humic Substances on Fate and Treatment of Pol­ lutants—VIII: Ion Exchange and Membrane Processes J. Mallevialle,

Presiding

2:00—178. Effect of Humic Substances on Membrane Processes. J. Mallevialle, C. Anselme, D. Marsigny, O. Marsigny. 2:30—179. Removal of Humic Substances by Ion Exchange and Membrane Process­ es. H. Odegaard, B. E. Kenbrokk, T. Thorsen. 3:00—180. Mechanistic Interactions of Aquatic Organic Substances on Anion Ex­ change Resins. P. L. Fu, J. M. Symons. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—181. Effect of Humic Acid on Reverse Osmosis Membrane. J. Glater, K. V. Gabbita, J. B. Neethling, M. K. Stenstrom. 4:00—182. Process Interactions of Humic Substances in Membrane Separations. J. K. Smith, S. C. Lynch, B. Zimny. 4:30—183. Effect of Natural Organics on Membrane Flux and Permeate Water Quality. J. S. Taylor, J. K. Carswell.

Section Β I 11:45—203. Removal and Characteristical Transformation of Humic Substances in Fairmont, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Water Treatment. J. S. Kim, E. S. K. ChiSymposium on Colloid Controlled Migration an, F. M. Saunders, Ε. Μ. Perdue. M. F. of Pollutants—III: Radioactive Contami­ Giabbai. 12:10—204. Use of a Model Probe as a nants Surrogate for Humic Substances in Ultra­ R. W. Buddemeier, Presiding filtration (UF) and Reverse Osmosis (RO). A. M. Wowk, I. H. Suffet. 1:30—184. Size Distribution of Dissolved Uranium in Natural Waters. D. K. Mann, G. Section Β T. F. Wong. 2:00—185. Radionuclides in Nevada Test Fairmont, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Site Groundwater: Transport by Clay Col­ Symposium on Colloid Controlled Migration loids. R. W. Buddemeier, J. R. Hunt. of Pollutants—V: Heavy Metals 2:30—186. Reactor Accident at Chernobyl: A Possibility to Test Colloid-Controlled J. O. Leckie, Presiding Transport of Radionuclides. H. R. von Gunten, U. Waber, U. Kràhenbuhl. 8:30—205. Pressure-Jump Kinetic Studies 3:00—Intermission. of Lead Ion Adsorption at the GeothiteIV—Heavy Metals Aqueous Interface. K. F. Hayes, J. O. Leckie. J. F. Ranville, Presiding 9:00—206. Potentiometric Titration and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements in 3:15—187. Role of Solid Solution Formation Colloidal Goethite Suspensions: Effect of in Trace Metal Sorption by Oxides and C0 2 Adsorption. M. A. Anderson, W. A. Carbonates. J. A. Davis, C. C. Fuller. Zeltner. 4:00—188. Fundamental Characteristics of 9:30—207. Colloidal Ferrous Phosphate in Metal Adsorption on Metal Oxide Surfaces Groundwater. P. M. Gschwend, M. D. in Aqueous-Organic Cosolvent Mixtures. Reynolds, D. B. Backhus. G. D. Redden, J. O. Leckie. 10:00—Intermission. 4:30—189. Characterization of the Adsorp10:15—208. Influence of Colloids on the tion Properties of Oxides: Particle Size Inorganic Geochemistry of Whitewood and Structure. D. B. Kent, J. O. Leckie. Creek, S. D.: A Preliminary Field Investi­ 5:00—190. Partitioning of Arsenic by Iron gation. J. F. Ranville, T. F. Rees. Oxides in Whitewood Creek, S.D. C. C. 10:45—209. Coagulation of Aluminum Ox­ Fuller, J. A. Davis, R. G. Claypool-Frey. ide Colloids by Silica. D. Kebler, R. Bales, G. Amy. Section C 11:15—210. Effect of Changes in Oxidation Fairmont, Parisienne Room (3rd Floor) State on Mobility of Selenium. K. A. Gruebel, J. O. Leckie, J. A. Davis. Symposium on Photochemical Oxidants—II 11:45—Discussion and Closing Remarks. D. H. Stedman, Presiding

Section C 1:25—Introductory Remarks. 1:30—191. Synchronous Changes of OxyFairmont, Parisienne Room (3rd Floor) gen-Containing Organics in Atmospheric Symposium on Photochemical Oxidants— Aerosols. P. R. Veltkamp, S. A. Beaton, III R. C. Greaves, R. M. Barkley, R. E. Sievers. ι L. G. Anderson, Presiding 2:00—192. Acetylene vs. Ethane as Photo8:25—Introductory Remarks chemical Oxidant Precursors: A Matched 8:30—211. Miscibility of Ozonized Soot with Experiment Comparison. R. Arnts, J.J. Water. J. A. Jassim, A. R. Chughtai, D. M. Bufalini, B. Dimitriades. Smith, D. H. Stedman. 2:30—193. Characterization of NMOC Species in Transported Air Masses. H. West- ' 9:00—212. Inhibition of Photochemical Smog —X. Model Calculations of the Effect of berg, L. MacGregor. (C5H5)2NOH on NOx-C2H4-C4H8-2 Atmos­ 3:00—Intermission. pheres. J. Heicklen. 3:15—194. Oxidant Measurements at Re9:30—213. Laboratory Determinations of mote Continental and Marine Coastal Sticking Coefficients for S0 2 and H 2 0 2 on Sites in the Western United States. J. S. Aqueous Droplet Surfaces. J. Gardner, Y. Gaffney, E. Mroz, D. Finnegan, J. H. Hall, Adewuyi, L. Sharfman, P. Davidovits, M. E. Prestbo, J. Zieman, W. H. Zoller. Zahniser, D. Worsnot, C. Kolb. 3:45—195. Oxidant Production in Remote 10:00—214. Selectivity of Singlet Oxygen Atmospheres: Modeling Clean and PerTraps Used in Natural Waters. W. R. turbed Situations. G. E. Streit, J. S. GaffHaag, T. Mill. ney. 10:30—Intermission. 4:15—196. Ozone Production in Rural Ar10:45—215. Role of HOx in the Formation of eas: A Photochemical Model Study. S. Photochemical Oxidants. R. J. O'Brien, J. Sillman, J. A. Logan. W. Theisen, W. H. Pan, T. M. Hard, C. Y. Chan, A. A. Mehrabzadeh. FRIDAY MORNING Section A 11:15—216. Measurements of OH Concen­ Fairmont, Far East Room (Ballroom Level) trations in Air Using the Fluorescence Symposium on Influences of Aquatic Humic Technique at Low Pressures. C. C. Wang, B. Shirinzadeh, D. Q. Deng. Substances on Fate and Treatment of Pol11:45—217. Response of the PERCA Total lutants—IX. Characterization, Chemical InFree Radical Detector to R0 2 Radicals. D. teraction, and Treatment of Humic SubH. Stedman, J. D. Ray. stances I. H. Suffet,

Presiding

9:00—197. Fate and Removal of Radioactive Iodine in the Aquatic Environment. R. S. Summers, F. Fuchs, H. Sontheimer. 9:25—198. Geochemistry of Dissolved Chromium-Organic Complexes in Narragansett Bay Intersitital Waters. G. S. Douglas, J. G. Quinn. 9:50—199. Characterization of a StreamSediment Humin. J. A. Rice, P. MacCarthy. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—200. Reductive Degradation of Aquatic Humic Material. L B. Sonnenberg, J. D. Johnson, R. F. Christman. 10:55—201. Chemical Structure of Aquatic Humic Substances. K. A. Thorn. 11:20—202. NMR Spectroscopic Characterization of several Preparations of Humic Substances. G. G. Choudhry, G. R. B. Webster.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

52

February 9, 1987 C&EN

FUEL DIVISION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY Ε. Μ. Suuberg, Program

Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIA: Advances in Off Shate Chemistry (see Division ofP&rotwm Chemistry, Tu, W, Thu, F, page 70) Production, Analysis and Upgrading of Pyroiysis Oils from BJomass (see C$tiih toste, Pûpm, <£ Texttte Division, U, TU, W„ Thu,F,page42) BUSINESS MEETING: Tu DIVISION SOCIAL EVENT: Luncheon, Tu MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon F (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Structure and Properties of Low Rank Coals H. H. Schobert, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—1. Chemical Structure of a Sporinite from a Lignite: Comparison with a Synthetic Sporinite Transformed from Sporopollenin. R. Hayatsu, R. E. Botto, R. L. McBeth, R. G. Scott, R. E. Winans. 9:45—2. Effect of Solvent Extraction on the Reflectance of Coal and Coal-Oil Mixtures. B. Kybett, J. Potter, M. Etter, M. Krahe. 10:15—3. 1H NMR Evidence to Support the Guest-Host Model of Brown Coals. R. Sakurovs, L. J. Lynch, D. S. Webster. 10:45—Intermission. 11:00—4. Changes in the Chemical Structure of Low Rank Coal after Low Temperature Oxidation or Demineralization by Acid Treatment. Analysis by IRTF and UV Fluorescence. J. Kister, M. Guiliano, G. Mille, H. Dou. 11:30—5. Structure and Reactivity of a Wyodak Subbituminous Coal. S. L. Huang, R. Narayan.

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon C (Ballroom Level) General Ε. Μ. Suuberg,

Organizer

8:45—6. Simple Method for the Preparation of Deuterated Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Heterocyclic Compounds. S. B. Haw­ thorne, D. J. Miller, T. R. Aulich, S. A. Farnum. 9:15—7. New Method for Estimation of Acti­ vation Energies Associated with Coal Gasification Reactions. K. Raghunathan, R. Y. K. Yang 9:45—8. Chemical Basis for Removal of Or­ ganic Sulfur from Coal Via JPL Chlorinolysis. T. Aida, C. G. Venier, T. G. Squires. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—9. Eight Coals in the Premium Coal Sample Program. K. S. Vorres, S. K. Janikowski. 11:00—10. Relationship Between Cation Mobility and Acid-Base Behavior in Coal Ash and Similar Oxide Systems. K. S. Vorres. 11:30—11. Removal of Sulfur Dioxide from Hot Combustion Gases. C. D. Chriswell, S. V. Gollakota.

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon F (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Structure and Properties of Low Rank Coals H. H. Schobert, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—12. Relationships Between Inorganic Constituents and Organic Matter in a Northern Ontario Lignite. E. Van der FlierKeller, W. S. Fyfe. 2:30—13. Quantitative Analysis of Coal and Coal Components by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron Microprobe Analysis. F. R. Karner, H. H. Schobert, C. J. Zygarlicke, J. L. Hoff, T. P. Huber. 3:00—14. Characterization of Mineral Mat­ ter in Sub-Bituminous Coals by AIA-SEM. W. E. Straszheim, J. G. Yousling, K. A. Younkin, R. Markuszewski. 3:30—-Intermission. 3:45—15. Role of Heat of Immersion Calorimetry and Gas Adsorption in Determin­ ing the Surface Areas of a Thermally Treated Lignite and Supercritically Sol­ vent Extracted Low-Rank Coal Residues. C. Tye, D. J. Maas, M. L. Swanson. 4:15—16. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering from Victorian Brown Coal. H. K. Wagenfeld, M. H. Reich, I. K. Snook.

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon C (Ballroom Level) General G. W. Mushrush,

Presiding

2:00—17. Reactions Involving Hydroperox­ ide Formation in Jet Fuels. J. M. Watkins, G. W. Mushrush, R. N. Hazlett. 2:30—18. Liquid Phase Co-Oxidation of Thiophenol and Olefins by Oxygen and tButyl Hydroperoxide. G. W. Mushrush, J. M. Watkins, R. N. Hazlett, H. G. Eaton, D. R. Hardy. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—19. Chemical Factors Affecting Inso­ lubles Formation in Shale-Derived Diesel Fuel. E. J. Beal, J. V. Cooney. 3:45—20. 2,5-Dimethylpyrrole and Oxida­ tive Fuel Stability. B. D. Beaver, R. N. Hazlett, J. V. Cooney, J. M. Watkins, Jr. TUESDAY

MORNING

Marriott, Colorado Salon F (Ballroom Level) Storch Award Symposium L. M. Stock, Awardee,

Presiding

9:00—21. Density Separation of Chemically Modified Coal Macérais, a Two-dimensional Separation Method for More Homogeneous Macérais. G. R. Dyrkacz, C-Y. Choi, L. M. Stock. 10:00—22. Two Dimensional Solid State NMR Methods Applied to Whole Coals and Chemically Modified Coals. K. W. Zilm, G. G. Webb, J. M. Millar. 11:00—23. Award Address. (Henry H. Storch Award in Fuel Chemistry sponsored by Exxon Research & Engineering Co.). Coal Alkylation and Pyrolysis. L. M. Stock. TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Marriott, Colorado Salon F (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Surface Chemistry of Coals O. P. Mahajan, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—24. Role of Vitrinite Macérais in Low Temperature Coal Oxidation Processes. Y. Yun, E. Jakab, I. Karas, H. L. C. Meuzeallar. 2:30—25. Characterization of Surface Functionality of Coals by Photoacoustic FTIR (PAIFT) Spectroscopy, Reflectance Infrared Microspectrometry, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Β. Μ. Lynch, L-l. Lancaster, A. M. MacEachem, J. T. Fahey, J. A. MacPhee. 3:00—26. Effect of Weathering on Solvent Extraction of Coal. D. H. Buchanan, L. C. Warfel, W. Mai, D. Lucas. 3:30—Intermission.

3:45—27. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrome­ try and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Derivatized Coal Surfaces. R. R. Mar­ tin, N. S. Mclntyre, K. T. Aye, J. A. Mac­ Phee. 4:15—28. Self-Heating of Coal in Barges. J. T. Riley, J. W. Reasoner, S. M. Fatemi, G. S. Yates. 4:45—29. Aerial Oxidation of Naturally Oc­ curring Australian Macérai Isolates. A. G. Pandolfo, R. B. Johns, P. D. Nichols, D. C. White.

Section Β Marriott, Denver Ballroom 2 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Structure and Properties of Low Rank Coals Η. Η. Schobert, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—30. Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectrometry of a Series of Buried Woods and Coalified Logs that Increase in Rank from Peat to Subbituminous Coal. P. G. Hatcher, H. C. Lerch III, R. K. Kotra. 2:30—31. Preparation and Reactivity of La­ texes from Low Rank Coals. E. Olson, J. Diehl, M. Froelich. 3:00—32. Dry Catalytic Liquefaction of a Subbituminous Coal: Structural Infer­ ences. F. J. Derbyshire, A. Davis, R. Lin, M-T. Terrer. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—33. Investigations of Anodically Oxi­ dised Coal. S. B. Lalvani. 4:15—34. Explosibility of Victorian Brown Coal Dust. F. Woskoboenko. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Marriott, Colorado Salon F (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Surface Chemistry of Coals

O. P. Mahajan, R. G. Jenkins, Presiding 9:00—35. Measurement of Water Tightly Bound by Low Rank Coals. E. J. Hippo, R. C. Neavel, S. E. Smith, R. J. Lang, R. N. Miller. 9:30—36. Enthalpies of Desorption of Water from Coal Surfaces. J. E. Callanan, B. J. Filla, Κ. Μ. McDermott. 10:00—37. Effect of Surface Oxides on Heats of Immersion and Water Adsorp­ tion. S. Barton. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—38. Heats of Immersion of Bitumi­ nous Coal in Liquids. J. P. Wightman, J. B. Hollenhead, K. M. Phillips, J. O. Glanville. 11:15—39. Characterization of Coal Interfacial Behavior Through Flow Microcalorimetry. D. W. Fuerstenau, G. C. C. Yang, S. Chander. 11:45—40. Surface Chemistry of Coal by Flow Microcalorimetry. F. M. Fowkes, K. L. Jones, T. B. Lloyd, G. Li. Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon Β (Ballroom Level) Studies on the Structure and Reactions of Coals Ε. Μ. Suuberg, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30—41. Spontaneous Luminescence of Coal. R. K. Hessley, L. M. Coyne. 9:00—-42. Characterization of a Resinite Macérai Fraction. D. M. Bodily, V. Kopp. 9:30—43. Oxidations of Coals at Ambient Temperatures. F. R. Mayo. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—44. Use of SEM with Wave-length Dispersive Spectrometry for Organic Oxygen in Coal. G. A. Norton, K. A. Younkin, W. E. Straszheim, R. Markuszewski. 10:45—45. Solvent Swelling Behavior of AICI3-Treated Coal Molecules. T. K. Green, G. T. Ransdell, J. S. Flynn. 11:15—46. Hydrogen Bonding and Coal Structure. P. Painter, M. Sobkowiak, J. Youtcheff. 11:45—47. Studies on the Reaction of Coal with Ethoxycarbonyl-Carbene. M. Pomerantz, P. Rooney.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Marriott, Colorado Salon F (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Surface Chemistry of Coals

O. P. Mahajan, H. Marsh, Presiding 2:00—48. Surface Structure of Coals Studied by Iodine and Water Adsorption. Ν. Μ. Rodriguez, H. Marsh. 2:30—49. Porosity and Solvent-Induced Pore Reconstruction in Coal as Determined by Neutron and Light Scattering Techniques. J. S. Gethner. 3:00—50. Microstructural Variations of Three American Coals and their High Temperature Chars. W. D. Jiang, I. C. Lee, R. Y. K. Yang. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—51. Gas and Vapor-Induced Coal Swelling. P. J. Reucroft, A. Sethuraman. 4:15—52. Influence of the Supercritical Tol­ uene Extraction of Brown Coals on the Development of Porosity during Carbon­ ization and Steam Gasification. K. Tomkow, T. Siemieniewska. A. Albiniak, J. Kaczmarczyk.

1:30—66. In Situ Acetylation Study of a Sub­ bituminous Coal by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) Spec­ troscopy. E. L. Fuller, Jr., N. R. Smyrl. 2:00—67. Electrophoretic Mobility as a Probe of the Surface Chemistry of Coal Dispersions. R. L. Rowell, R. E. Marganski. 2:30—68. Comparison of the Acoustic Mo­ bility and the Electrophoretic Mobility of Coal Dispersions. B. J. Marlow, R. L. Rowell. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—69. Coal Electrokinetics: The Origin of Charge at Coal/Water Interface. J. S. Laskowski. 3:45—70. Electrokinetic Behavior and Sur­ face Characteristics of Coals. D. W. Fuer­ stenau, J. M. Rosenbaum, Y. S. You. 4:15—71. Electrophoretic Mobility of Con­ centrated Coal Suspensions. Ε. Ζ. Casassa, E. W. Toor. FRIDAY

Section Β

Ε. Μ. Suuberg, T. G. Squires,

Organizer Presiding

1:30—53. Elucidation of Chemical Process­ es in Coal Liquefaction: Effect of Radical Quenchers. T. Aida, B. Slomka, T. G. Squires. 2:00—54. Catalyzed Coal Conversion in Su­ percritical Fluids. B. C. Bockrath. 2:30—55. Intrinsic Viscosity of Lignite-De­ rived Preasphaltenes and Model Com­ pounds. J. K. Argasinski, M. B. Jones. 3:00—56. "New Fuels" Via Direct Coal Liq­ uefaction. E. C. Moroni. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—57. Catalytic Hydrocracking of Tar Vapors in Hydropyrolysis. C. Bolton, C. E. Snape, H. P. Stephens. 4:15—58. Role of Iron Vacancies in Pyrrhotite-Catalyzed Liquefaction Using H2S and CO. J. Nowok, V. I. Stenberg. 4:45—59. Effect of Temperature Program­ ming on the Liquefaction of Indianhead Lignite in an Inorganic (H2S-H20) Solvent System. P. G. Sweeny, V. Guntenkunst, M. E. Martin-Schwan, V. I. Stenberg. THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

9:00—72. Surface Charge of Illinois Coal for Dry Electrostatic Cleaning. A. Mukherjee, D. Gidaspow, D. T. Wasan. 9:30—73. Effects of Weathering on Flota­ tion and Thermoplastic Properties of Coal. M. M. Wu, G. A. Robbins, R. A. Winschel, F. P. Burke. 10:00—74. Assessing Oxidation and the Wettability of Coal by a Film Flotation Technique. D. W. Fuerstenau, M. C. Wil­ liams, K. S. Narayanan, J. L. Diao. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—75. Agglomeration Characteristics of Hydrophilic Coals and Pyrite/Coal Mix­ tures. R. Venkatadri, R. Markuszewski, T. D. Wheelock. 11:15—76. Study of Interfacial Properties in the Liquid C02-Water-Coal System. B. Chi, B. I. Morsi, G. E. Klinzing, S-H. Chiang. 11:45—77. Measurement of Surface Prop­ erties of Coals Using a Modified Washburn Technique. G. K. Tampy, W-J. R. Chen, M. E. Prudich, R. L. Savage.

GEOC

Marriott, Colorado Salon Β (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Surface Chemistry of Coals

O. P. Mahajan, J. S. Gethner, Presiding

DIVISION OF GEOCHEMISTRY, INC.

9:00—60. TPD Study on H20-Gasified and 02-Chemisorbed Coal Chars. T. Kyotani, Z. G. Zhang, S. Hayashi, A. Tomita. 9:30—61. Kinetics of 02-Chemisorption on Chars and its Relevance to Char Reactiv­ ity. H-J. Muehlen, K. H. van Heek, H. Juntgen. 10:00—62. Reactivity of Low-Temperature Chars: Significance of Active Surface Area as a Reactivity Parameter. M. R. Khan. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—63. Examination of Oxygen Func­ tional Groups on Carbonaceous Solids by Linear Temperature Desorption. Y. Otake, R. G. Jenkins. 11:15—64. Surface Characterization of 0 2 and C0 2 Adsorption on Clean and Oxi­ dized Glassy Carbon Surfaces. S. R. Kelemen, H. Freund. 11:45—65. Effect of Weathering on the Gas­ ification of Anthracite. P. L. Rozelle, A. W. Scaroni.

R. H. Filby, Program

O. P. Mahajan, B. J. Marlow, Presiding

CL

o

MORNING

Marriott, Colorado Salon Β (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Surface Chemistry of Coals

O. P. Mahajan, Organizer, Presiding Marriott, Colorado Salon Β (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Coal Liquefac­ tion

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Chairman

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MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Atmospheric Methane: Formation and Fluxes from the Biosphere and the Geosphere Session I: Atmospheric Methane

R. S. Oremland, Organizer R. Cicerone, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. R. S. Oremland. 8:40—Opening Comments. R. Cicerone. 8:45—1. Atmospheric Cycle of Methane: An Overview. D. H. Ehhalt.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

53

LU UL

I

9:20—2. Measurements of Atmospheric Methane. L. P. Steele, K. A. Masarie, R. C. Martin, P. M. Lang. 9:55—3. Global Trends of Methane: The Re­ cord Over the Last 10,000 Years. Μ. Α. Κ. Khalil, R. A. Rasmussen. 10:20—Intermission. 10:35—4. Global Methane: A Southern Hemispheric Perspective. P. J. Fraser. 11:00—5. Atmospheric Methane Response to Chemistry: Results from a 3-D Chemi­ cal Tracer Model. M. Prather, C. Spivakovsky, J. Logan. 11:25—6. Atmospheric Methane Response to Biogenic Sources: Results from a 3-D Atmospheric Tracer Model. I. Fung, E. Matthews, J. Lerner.

Section Β Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Pyrolysis in Petroleum Ex­ ploration Geochemistry—I: Pyrolysis Meth­ ods for Simulating Burial Maturation of Source Rocks and Their Applications to Ba­ sin Modeling Κ. Ε. Peters,

Organizer

M. D. Le wan,

Presiding

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Atmospheric Methane: For­ mation and Fluxes from the Biosphere and the Geosphere—II: Atmospheric Methane Presiding

1:10—12. Increasing Global Concentrations of Tropospheric Methane, 1978-1986. D. R. Blake, F. S. Rowland. 1:35—13. Tropospheric HO Radical Con­ centrations as Indicated by Atmospheric Measurements of CH4, CH3CCI3, CO and C2-C4 Alkanes. F. S. Rowland, D. R. Blake, J. Silzel, D. Hurst. 2:00—Intermission. Session II: Biogeochemistry of Methane Generation G. M. King,

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Atmospheric Methane: For­ mation and Fluxes from the Biosphere and the Geosphere—III: Biogeochemistry of Methane Generation

G. M. King, Presiding

9:00—Opening Remarks. 9:10—7. Thermal and Hydrocarbon Matura­ tion Modeling of the Pismo and Santa Ma­ ria Basins, Coastal Southern California. H. P. Heasler, R. C. Surdam. 9:45—8. Kinetic Parameters (E, A) for the Thermal Degradation of Organic Matter from the Woodford Shale as a Function of Maturity. C. Barker, L. Wang, E. B. Butler. 10:10—9. Kinetics of Oil Generation Using Quartz Pyrolysis. J. E. Zumberge, S. J. Martin. 10:35—Intermission. 10:50—10. Low-Temperature—High Pres­ sure Pyrolysis of Four Pure Hydrocarbons and of a Crude Oil: Experimental Study and Computer Simulations Implications for Geochemical Modeling. F. Domine, F. Behar, P-M Marquaire. 11:15—11. Comparison of Methods for Measuring Kerogen Pyrolysis Rates and Fitting Kinetic Parameters. A. K. Burnham, R. L. Braun, H. R. Gregg, A. Samoun.

R. Cicerone,

2:05—20. Computer-Assisted Interpretation of Pyrolysis Mass Spectra of Two Oil Shales and Their Corresponding Kerogens. T. Chakravarty, H. L. C. Meuzelaar. 2:35—21. Hydrocarbon Distributions from Crude-Oil Asphaltene Pyrolysis. D. M. Jones, A. G. Douglas, J. Connan. 3:00—22. Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions in the Thermal Cracking of Asphaltenes. F. Behar, R. Pelet. 3:25—Intermission. 3:40—23. Hydrocarbon Characterization of Resinite. R. J. Hwang, S. C. Teerman. 4:05—24. Hydrous Pyrolysis of Fossil Res­ ins. S. L. Bend. 4 : 4 0 ^ 2 5 . Geochemistry of Exinites; 1. Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography and Spectro­ scopic Characterization of Resinites. J. T. Sentfle, S. R. Larter.

Presiding

2:15—Introductory Remarks. 2:20—14. Fermentations Leading to the Substrates of Methanogenic Bacteria. G. Gottschalk. 2:45—15. Carbon Flow to Methane in Anox­ ic Ecosystems. S. H. Zinder. 3:10—16. Methane Production from Hydro­ gen and Acetate in Aquatic Sediments. D. R. Lovely. 3:45—17. Methane Production from Methyl­ ated Amines in Hypersaline Environ­ ments. G. M. King. 4:10—18. Methanogenesis from Methylated Sulfur Compounds. R. P. Kiene, R. S. Oremland. 4:35—19. H2 Turnover and Interspecies H2 Transfer in Methanogenic Environments. R. Conrad, S. Goodwin, F. S. Lupton, T. J. Phelps, J. G. Zeikus.

8:25—Introductory Remarks. 8:30—26. Evidence of Microbiological Ac­ tivity in DSDP Sediments. J. K. Whelan, R. S. Oremland, M. E. Tarafa, R. L. Smith. 8:55—27. Worldwide Occurrence of Marine Gas Hydrates: Implications for Future At­ mospheric Methane Concentrations. K. A. Kvenvolden. 9:20—28. Biogeochemistry of Methane For­ mation in Mono Lake, California. R. S. Oremland, L. G. Miller, M. J. Whiticar, R. L. Smith, R. P. Kiene, N. Iversen, G. M. King. 9:45—29. Effects of Temperature and Sub­ strate Quality on Methane Production in Peat from a Moss-Dominated Wetland in West Virginia. G. E. Lang, J. B. Yavitt. 10:10—Intermission. 10:25—30. Methane Production in High Ele­ vation Appalachian Spruce Forests! A. J. Sexstone. 10:55—31. Intensity of Microbial Methane Production in Bottom Sediments of Water Reservoirs. S. S. Belyaev, A. Namaraev, B. Tsyban, C. Gorlatova.

Section Β Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Pyrolysis in Petroleum Ex­ ploration Geochemistry—III. Use of Pyroly­ sis in i.«e Study of Thermal Maturity

J. K. Whelan, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—32. Production of Heteroatomic Com­ pounds from Coals and Source Rocks of Varying Maturities and Source Materials. R. P. Philp, A. Bakel. 9:30—33. Absolute Quantification of Biolog­ ical Markers Released from Kerogens During Hydrous Pyrolysis. T. I. Eglinton, S. J. Rowland. 9:55—34. Programmed Pyrolysis-Gas Chro­ matography Artificially Matured Green River Kerogen. B. J. Huizinga, Z. A. Aizenshtat, Κ. Ε. Peters. 10:20—Intermission. 10:35—35.Thermogravimetric Fourier T r a n s f o r m Infrared S p e c t r o s c o p y (TGFTIR) of Petroleum Source Rocks— Initial Results. P. R. Solomon, J. K. Whe­ lan, R. M. Carangelo, G. V. Deshpande. 11:00—36. Experimental Determination of Carbon Isotope Exchange Between CH 4 C0 2 and CH4 Residual Carbon During the High Temperature Pyrolysis of Kerogen and Shale Samples. M. E. Conkright, W. M. Sackett. 11:25—37. Pyrolysis of C^Cs Hydrocar­ bons in Source Rocks: Indicator of Maturi­ ty and Gas Generation Potential. J. K. Whelan, M. E. Tarafa.

Section Β Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Pyrolysis in Petroleum Ex­ ploration Geochemistry—II: Use of Pyroly­ sis to Determine Organic Matter Type S. R. Larter,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks.

54

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details)

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Atmospheric Methane: For­ mation and Fluxes from the Biosphere and the Geosphere—IV: Biogeochemistry of Methane Oxidation W. S. Reeburg,

Presiding

12:30—Introductory Remarks. 12:35—38. Aerobic Methane Oxidation in Lakes and Marine Basins. M. E. Lidstrom, L. A. Buccholz, A. E. Wopat, L. C. Minnich. 1:00—39. Oceanic Source of Atmospheric Methane Estimated from In-situ Methane Oxidation Rates. Β. Β. Ward. 1:25—40. Methanotrophic Symbiosis in a Mussel Living Near Hydrocarbon Seeps. C. R. Fischer, J. J. Childress, A. E. Ander­ son, R. S. Oremland. 1:50—41. Aerobic Methane Oxidation in the Surface Peat from a Moss-Dominated We^'and in West Virginia. J. B. Yavitt, G. E. Lang. 2:15—42. Bacterial Contribution to Oxida­ tion of Methane in Modern Lake and Sea Sediments. M. Galchenko. 2:40—Intermission. 2:55—43. Methane Oxidation in Spirit Lake and Hot Springs Near Mt. Saint Helens. M. D. Lilley, J. A. Baross, C. N. Dahm. 3:20—44. Field Observations of Anaerobic Methane Oxidation. W. S. Reeburgh, M. J. Alperin. 3:45—45. Methane Oxidation in the Anoxic Waters of the Cariaco Trench. M. I. Scranton. 4:05—46. Methane Oxidation in Sediments. N. Iversen. 4:30—47. Laboratory Studies on Anaerobic Methane Oxidation. K. A. Sandbeck, M. E. Lidstrom. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

Section Β Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Pyrolysis in Petroleum Ex­ ploration Geochemistry—IV: Field Applica­ tions of Pyrolysis to Exploration Problems

G. E. Claypool, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—48. Characterization of Sedimentary Organic Matter by some Pyrolysis Meth­ ods. M. Vandenbroucke, F. Behar. 2:30—49. Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography as an Exploration Tool. M. Collins. 2:55—50. Geochemical Characterization of Coals, Oils, and Asphaltenes from On­ shore Kalimantan. D. J. Curry, Τ. Κ. Bloys. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—51. Correlation of Alberta Tar Sands Using Hydrous Pyrolysis of Asphaltenes. M. G. Fowler. 4:00—52. Pyrolysis Derived Oil Generation Characteristics of the Monterey Forma­ tion in the Santa Maria Basin, California. D. M. Jarvie, W. G. Dow, M. A. Yukler. 4:25—53. Developments in the Application of Pyrolysis to Petroleum Exploration. K. E. Peters. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Atmospheric Methane: For­ mation and Fluxes from the Biosphere and the Geosphere—V: Methane Investigations with Stable Isotopes and "C-dating N. Blair,

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—54. Temporal Trends of the Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition of Atmo­ spheric CH4. C. M. Stevens. 9:00—55. 13C/12C Kinetic Isotope Effect in the Reaction of Methane with OH. J. A. Davidson, C. A. Cantrell, S. C. Tyler, R. E. Shetter, R. J. Cicerone, J. G. Calvert. 9:25—56. 13C/12C Isotope Ratios in Atmo­ spheric CH4 and some of its Sources. S. C. Tyler. 9:50—57. Isotopic Composition of Methane in the Atmosphere and from Various Sources. M. Wahlen, N. Tanaka, R. Henry, T. Yoshinari, R. G. Fairbanks, W. S. Broecker.

10:15—Intermission. 10:30—58. Carbon Isotopes in Atmospheric Methane and Methane Released from Tropical and Temperate Wetlands. P. D. Quay, S. L. King, J. M. Lansdown, D. O. Wilbur. 10:55—59. Isotopic Distinction of Biogenic and Thermogenic Hydrocarbon Gases. M. J. Whiticar. 11:20—60. Identification of Sources of Methane in Mono Lake, California. R. S. Oremland, L. G. Miller, M. J. Whiticar, S. W. Robinson. Section Β Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Inorganic Marine Chemis­ try—I M. L. Sohn, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—61. Effect of Particle Concentration on the Rate of Thorium Adsorption. B. D. Honeyman, P. H. Santschi. 9:25—62. Surface and Bulk Characteristics of Mixed Oxides. P. R. Anderson, M. M. Benjamin. 9:50—63. Calorimetric Analysis of Anion Adsorption onto Goethite. M. L. Machesky. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—64. Photolytic Degradation of Amino Acids Sorbed onto Iron Oxcyhydroxide. K. M. Cunningham, M. C. Goldberg. 10:50—76. Evaluating Effects of Authigenic Clay Formation on Solute Distributions in Marine Sediments. J. E. Mackin, R. A. Mortlock, R. J. Taylor. 11:15—66. Mechanisms of and Factors Af­ fecting Trace Element and Phosphate Ad­ sorption by Oxides. T. B. Goh, G, J. Racz. 11:40—67. Adsorption of Dissolved Vanadi­ um onto Amorphous Ferric Oxyhydroxide in Seawater. C. S. Shieh, I. W. Duedall. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Atmospheric Methane: For­ mation and Fluxes from the Biosphere and the Geosphere—VI: Methane Investigation with Stable Isotopes and "C-dating N. Blair,

Presiding

1:15—68. Methane Flux and Stable Isotopic Compositions from Shallow Aquatic Envi­ ronments. R. A. Burke, Jr., T. R. Barber, W. M. Sackett. 1:40—69. Isotopic Composition of Methane in the Florida Everglades and Seasonal Variations in Methane in a Freshwater Sediment. J. P. Chanton, C. S. Martens. 2:05—70. Biogeochemiçal Processes Controlling the Carbon Isotopic Composition of Methane from Coastal Environments. N. Blair, J. Gower, S. Boehme. 2:30—71. Microbiological Formation of Acetate—Stable Isotope Studies.J. T. Gelwicks, J. M. Hayes, J. B. Risatti. 2:55—Intermission. 3:10—72. Isotope Evidence of Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in Sediments. M. J. Whiticar. 3:35—73. Carbon Isotope Fractionation by Anaerobic Methane Oxidation. M. J. Alperin, W. S.Reebuj-gh. 4:25—74. Fractionation of 12C and 13C Isotopes in Microbial Production and Oxidation of Methane. M. Ivanov, S. Belyaev, D. Ziakun.

Section Β Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Inorganic Marine Chemis­ try—II M. Sohn,

Presiding

1:30—75. Coprecipitation of Manganese with Calcite: An Experimental Study. Ν. Ε. Pingitore, Jr., M. P. Eastman, M. Sandige. 1:55—65. Cylindrical Internal Reflection FTIR Spectroscopy (CIR-FTIR). Studies of Phosphate and Benzoic Type Compounds at the Goethite-Aqueous Solution Inter­ face. M. A. Anderson, I. Tejedor-Tejedor, E. Yost. 2:20—77. Seasonal Variation in 2Co 2 δ 13 0 Values from an Anoxic Coastal Sediment. N. E. Blair, S. E. Boehme, J. P. Chanton. 2:45—78. Contrasting Behavior of Dis­ solved Iodine in Estuaries along the East Coast of the United States. W. J. Ullman, G. W. Luther III, R. C. Aller.

3:10—79. Application of Electroanalytical Methods to the Determination of Dis­ solved Surfur Species in the Marine Envi­ ronment. D. Shea, W. A. MacCrehan. 3:35—80. Pyrite Oxidation and Reduction: Molecular Orbital Theory Considerations. G. W. Luther, III. 4:00—81. Early Diagenesis in Deep Sea Sediments: An Imprint of Oxidative and Reductive Flux. D. E. Buckley. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Atmospheric Methane: For­ mation and Fluxes from the Biosphere and the Geosphere—VII: Fluxes of Methane to the Atmosphere from Various Sources

J. Dacey, Presiding 8:25—Introductory Remarks. 8:30—82. CH4 Emission from Natural and Anthropogenic Sources. W. Seiler. 8:55—83. Global Methane Production by Termites. P. R. Zimmerman, C. Westberg, J. Darlington. 9:20—84. Fluxes of Methane: Termites, Rice Paddy Fields, Βίο-Gas Generators, and Soils. R. A. Rassmussen, Μ. Α. Κ. Khalil. 9:45—85. Physical and Biological Aspects of Methane Emission from Wetland Soils. J. W. H. Dacey. 10:10—Intermission. 10:25—86. Production, Oxidation, and Emis­ sion of Methane from Rice Paddies. R. Conrad, H. Schiitz, A. Holzapfel-Pschorn, W. Seiler. 10:50—87. Methane Production in and Emission from Paddy Soils. S. N. Huang, M. J. Klug. 11:15—88. Methane Flux from the Florida Everglades. R. C. Harris, D. I. Sebacher, K. B. Bartlett, D. S. Bartlett.

Section Β Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Marine Inorganic Chemis­ try—Ill F. Mi Hero,

Presiding

9:00—89. Field, Laboratory,,and Modeling Studies of MN(II) Oxidation in Estuarine Sediment. R. J. Taylor, B. J. Presley. 9:25—90. Composition and Trace Metal Geochemistry of Sediments in a Florida Coastal Estuary. M. A. Sisler, C. J. Glas­ cock, J. H. Trefry. 9:50—91. Mobilization of Metals in Sedi­ ments: The Reduction of Manganese (III, IV), Iron (III), and Cobalt (III) Oxides by Natural Organic Compounds. A. T. Stone, J. S. LaKind, B. G. Katz. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—92. Geochemistry of Rare Earth Ele­ ments in Pacific Hydrothermal Sediments. R. M. Owen, A. M. Olivarez. 10:55—93. Seasonal Redox Diagenesis of Selenium in a Coastal Salt Marsh. D. J. Velinsky, G. A. Cutter. 11:20—94. Speciation of Cu(ll) in Estuarine Waters. T. M. Church, K. Johnston, G. W. Luther. THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Atmospheric Methane: For­ mation and Fluxes from the Biosphere and the Geosphere—VIII: Fluxes of Methane to the Atmosphere from Various Sources J. Dacey,

Presiding

1:15—95. Methane Flux Across the Air-Wa­ ter Interface from Warm Wetland Environ­ ments. T. R. Barber, R. A. Burke, Jr., W. M. Sackett. 1:40—96. Amazon Wetlands as a Source of Tropospheric Methane. A. H. Devol, J. E. Richey. 2:05—97. Temperature Dependence of CH4-Emission and CH4-Production from Rice Paddy Soil. H. Schutz, R. Conrad, W. Seiler. 2:30—98. Emission of CH4 from Rice Paddy Fields—Effects of Mineral Fertilizer Ap­ plication and Organic Matter Input. H. Schutz, A. Holzapfel-Pschorn, W. Seiler. 2:55—Intermission. 3:10—99. Methane Flux from Stratified Lakes. L. G. Miller, R. S. Oremland.

3:35—100. Methane Concentrations In and Fluxes from Alaskan Coastal Waters. J. D. Cline, C. M. Katz, K. Kelly-Hansen. 4:00—101. Methane Fluxes from Coal Rank Increase and Natural Coal Fires. J. R. Her­ ring, W. E. Dean.

Section Β Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3 (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Inorganic Marine Chemis­ try—IV G. Luther,

Presiding

2:00—102. Oxidation Kinetics of Cu(l) in Natural Waters. F. J. Millero, V. K. Sharma. 2:25—103. Modelling Cooper Binding by Dissolved Organic Matter. S. E. Cabaniss, M. S. Shuman. 2:50—Intermission. 3:00—104. Trace Metal Speciation in the Upper Ocean. R. H. Byrne. 3:25—105. Total Metal Determination in Seawater Using Anodic Stripping Voltammetry. M. Martin-Goldberg, M. S. Shu­ man. 3:50—106. Uranium and Radium in the Gan­ ges-Brahmaputra River System. B. L. K. Somayajulu, M. M. Sarin, W. S. Moore.

FRIDAY MORNING

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salon G (Ballroom Level) General R. H. Filby,

Presiding

8:30—115. Relationship Between the Extractable Organic Content of Coals and the Organic Content of Leachates. N. J. Fendinger, J. C. Means, J. H. Tuttle, J. C. Radway. 8:55—116. Preliminary Statistical Study on C^Cy Near Surface Hydrocarbon Con­ tents Over Producing and Barren Struc­ tures. G. Saenz, N. E. Pingitore. 9:20—117. Physiochemical Studies of Uraninite from an Oklo Natural Reactor. J. D. Purson, D. B. Curtis, P. G. Eller, E. M. Larson, D. R. Karraker. 9:45—Intermission. 10:10—118. Deconvolution of Ion-Ex­ change Isotherms. I. R. Triay, R. S. Rundberg. 10:35—119. Atmospheric Emissions of S, N, C0 2 , Organics, and Trace Metals from Natural Coal Fires. J. R. Herring. 11:00—120. Similar Origins Implied for Dif­ ferently Sited Xenon Isotopes in Meteor­ ites. K. Kavana-Saeb0

Section A

HIST

Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3 (Ballroom Level) P. A. Baedecker, Organizer,

Presiding

8:25—Introductory Remarks. 8:30—107. Classical Chemical and X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopic Determina­ tion of Major Elements in Ten U.S.G.S. Rock Standards. L. L. Jackson, J. E. Taggart, Jr., E. L. Brandt, E. E. Engleman, A. J. Bartel. 8:55—108. Analysis of Trace Elements in the New U.S. Geological Survey Standard Coal (CLB-1) and Selected Premium Coal Reference Materials. C. A. Palmer, W. B. Crandell, J. R. Evans, J. R. Gillison, R. Moore, G. A. Sellers, C. J. Skeen, L. J. Winters. 9:20—109. Data Compilation and Consen­ sus Value Determination for NBS, USGS, and CCRMP Reference Materials. E. S. Gladney. 9:45—110. Comparison of Seven Analytical Techniques for the Characterization of Sulfide Standards. R. G. Johnson, J. Kane, C. Palmer, J. Mee, H. Kirschenbaum, N. Rait, Z.-A. Brown, C. Skeen, W. Crandell, J. Philpotts. 10:10—Intermission. 10:25—111. Verification of the Accuracy of Simultaneous Multielement Atomic Ab­ sorption Spectrometry Using Geochemi­ cal Standards. J. S. Kane, A. F. Dorrzapf, Jr., D. W. Dotson. 10:50—112. In-house Reference Materials of the Ontario Geological Survey. C. Rid­ dle. 11:15—113. Application of an Ion-Selective Electrode Method to the Determination of Chloride in 41 International Geochemical Reference Materials. H. N. Elsheimer. 11:40—114. Compositions of Reference Samples—Which Estimate to Use? F. J. Flanagan. 12:05—114A. Statistical Summary of Geo­ chemical DATA Furnished by 147 Labora­ tories for Six Geochemical Exploration Reference Samples. B. F. Arbogast, D. E. Betra, G. VanTrump.

M. V. Orna, Program

Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: 8th Symposium on Archaeological Chemistry I and II: Application of Nu­ clear Techniques to Archaeology (see Division of Nuclear Chemistry <$ Tech­ nology, Tu, page 65}

OTHER DIVISION'S SYMPOSIUM OF INTEREST: True Stories of Smalt Chemical Busi­ nesses {see Division of Small Chemical Businesses, Tu, page 79) BUSINESS MEETING: Tu DIVISION SOCIAL EVENT: Luncheon, Tu

MONDAY MORNING Holiday Inn, Gold Links Room (Lobby Level) Selected Topics in the History of Physical Chemistry: A Symposium J. Sturchio, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—1. Introduction: Emergence of Physi­ cal Chemistry. J. L. Sturchio. 9:15—2. Eighteenth-Century French Roots, Conceptual and Lexical. P. Laszlo. 9:45—3. Origins of Mechanistic Photochem­ istry: Studies in the Absorption of Light, 1817-1913. J . J . Bohning. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—4. Impact of Physical Chemistry in Developing Catalysis as a Science. G. A. Fuentes, Β. Η. Davis. 11:00—5. August Horstmann and the Ori­ gins of Chemical Thermodynamics. W. B. Jensen. 11:30—6. Mention the Parachor. J. F. O'Brien. TUESDAY

MORNING

Holiday Inn, Gold Links Room (Lobby Level)

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

M. V. Orna,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—9. The Royal Chemist. J. K. Borchardt. 2:30—10. Mendeleev, Meyer and the Peri­ odic Table. G. Gorin. 2:55—11. Some Thoughts on Fritz Haber and the Electroreduction of Nitrobenzene. J. T. Stock. 3:20—14. Chemistry—A New Scholarly Discipline of 17th Century France. N. S. Leeds. 3:45—12. Some Early Kekulé Detractors. J. H. Wotiz, S. Rudofsky. 4:10—13. Role of Imagination in Science— In the Peoples' Republic of China. Ο. Β. Ramsay.

Holiday Inn, Gold Links Room (Lobby Level) 8th Symposium on Archaeological Chemis­ try III: Organic Substances in Art and Ar­ chaeology R. Berger,

DIVISION OF THE HISTORY OF CHEMISTRY

Dexter Award Session

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Holiday Inn, Gold Links Room (Lobby Level) General

R. O. Allen,

R. S. Oremland, Organizer, Presiding

Symposium on Geochemical Standards

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4 (Ballroom Level) 9:00—Symposium on Atmospheric Meth­ ane: Formation and Fluxes from the Bio­ sphere and the Geosphere—IX: Round Ta­ ble Discussion on Scientific Questions Raised in the Symposium and Direction of Future Studies

Section Β

9:40—7. Divisional Cachet Paper: Charles Frederick Chandler (1836-1925) and the American Chemical Society. J. L. Stur­ chio. 10:15—8. Dexter Award Address: Chemis­ try Preserved. R. G. W. Anderson. 11:15—Divisional Business Meeting.

Organizer Presiding

9:00—15. Archaeological Chemistry of Collagens, Conchiolin and Other Proteins. R. Berger. 9:30—16. Amino Acids in the Del Mar Man Skeleton. J. L. Bada, P. M. Masters. 10:00—17. Amino-Acid and Radiocarbon Dat­ ing of the Cro-Magnon Fossil Find from Kelsterbach, Germany. R. Protsch. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—18. Stable Isotopes in Amino Acids from Fossil Bones and Their Relationship to Ancient Diets. P. E. Hare, M. L. Fogel, T. W. Stafford, T. C. Hoering, A. D. Mitch­ ell. 11:15—19. ESR Studies of Bones from the Lower Palaeolithic Site at Choukoutein, China. D. Robins, K. Sales, D. Oduwole. 11:45—20. Chemical Studies on the Pro­ teins of Archeological Bone and Teeth. D. W. von Endt, W. D. Erhardt.

H. Sobel, Presiding 2:00—21. A Unique Epitope on Human Se­ rum Albumin Recognized by Monoclonal Antibody HSA-1: A Probe for the Identifi­ cation of the Human Origin of Blood or Tissue. J. C. Herr, D. C. Benjamin, M. P. Woodward. 2:30—22. Update on New Testing of the Turin Shroud. R. H. Dinegar, A. D. Adler, E. J. Jumper. 3:00—23. Determination of Elemental Dis­ tribution in Ancient Fibers. K. A. Jakes, A. Angel. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—24. Study of Historic Silk Banners Us­ ing Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry. M. Bal­ lard, R. J. Koestler, C. Blair, N. Indictor. 4:15—25. Photomicrography and Statistical Sampling of Archaeological Textiles. K. A. Jakes, L. R. Sibley, J. T. Kuttruff, V. S. Wimberley, D. Malec, A. Bajamonde. 4:45—26. Effects of Ascorbic Acid arid Cop­ per on Proteins. J. R. Whitaker, A. GolanGoldhirsh, D. T. Osuga, A. O. Chen.

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Holiday Inn, Gold Links Room (Lobby Level) 8th Symposium on Archaeological Chemis­ try V: Chemical Studies of Provenance and Technology R. O. Allen,

Presiding

9:00—27. Analysis of Mexican Amber by Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopy. J. B. Lam­ bert, T. A. Lee, Jr., C. Welch, J. S. Frye.

R. H. Goldsmith, Presiding 9:30—Introductory Remarks. J. J. Bohning.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

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9:30—28. Residues and Linings in Ancient Mediterranean Transport Amphoras. C. W. Beck, C. J. Smart, D. Ossenkop. 10:00—29. Chemical Compositions of Cop­ per-Based Coins of the Roman Republic, 217-31 B.C. G. F. Carter, H. Razi. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—30. Colour of Chrysocolla (Goldsolder): Blue, Green or Yellow? G. Demortier. 11:15—31. Applications of Infrared Microspectroscopy to Art Historical Questions Regarding Medieval Manuscripts. M. V. Orna, J. E. Katon, P. Lang, T. F. Mathews R. Nelson. 11:45—32. Elemental Analysis of Medieval Limoges Enamel. W. S. Williams, P. Hopke, H. Maguire. G. Harbottle, Presiding 2:00—33. Trace Element Analysis of Pueblo II Kayenta Anasazi Sherds. R. D. Foust, Jr., J. R. Ambler, L. Turner. 2:30—34. Archaeological Sites as Chemi­ cal Systems: The Tomb of Queen Nefertari, Eqypt. G. Burns, Κ. Μ. Wilson-Yang, J. E. Smeaton. 3:00—35. Effect of Burial on the Chemical and Mineral Composition of Bones from Eqypt. R. O. Allen, A. El-Kammar, R. Mitchell. 3:30—36. Radiocalcium (Ca-41) Dating: Current Status and Potential Applications in Archaeological and Paleoanthrop­ ology. R. E. Taylor, P. J. Slota, Jr., W. Henning, W. Kutshcera, M. Paul. 4:00—37. Pyramid Man-Made Stone, Myth or Facts, III. Cracking the Code of the Hieroglyphic Names of Chemicals and Minerals Involved in the Construction. J. Davidovits. 4:20—38. Antique Mortars and Antique ManMade Stone Artefacts, Answer into the Tschernobyl Syndrome. J. Davidovits, D. Vial. 4:45—39. Investigations of Thermolumines­ cent Spectra—Archaeological Implica­ tions. W. Heino, R. O. Allen.

Τ. Ε. Whyte, Jr.,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—7. Application of NMR Spectroscopy to the Study of Zeolite Synthesis. A. T. Bell, A. McCormick, W. Hendricks, C. J. Radke. 9:45—8. Surface Characterization of Iron Fisher-Tropsch Catalysts. J. B. Butt, C. S. Kuivila, P. Stair. 10:25—9. Reactivation of Lead Poisoned PT/AI 2 0 3 Catalyst by Sulfur Dioxide. J. W. A. Sachtler, I. Onal, R. E. Marinangeli. 11:00—10. Award Address. (E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry sponsored by Exxon Research and Engineering Co.) W. M. H. Sachtler. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

G. E. Keller, II, R. T. Yang, Cochairmen G. E. Keller, II, Presiding

DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY, INC. Secretary

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIA: Formation * Control of NOx Emissions from Combustion Sources: ACS Award Symposium sponsored by Mobay Corp. honoring W. Bartok (see Division ofBrh vironmentat Chemistry, Tu, page 51} Chemical Problems in Electronic Mate­ rials {see Committee on Science, Thu, page 35) OTHER DIVISION'S SYMPOSIUM OF INTEREST: Advances in Hydrotreatirtg (see Divi­ sion of Petroleum Chemistry, M, Tu, page 70) BUSINESS MEETING: Tu DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Receptions, Sun, M, Tu Luncheon, Tu

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson Convention Complex, Terrace Room (Terrace Level) Symposium on Improved Adsorbents and Adsorption Processes G. E. Keller, II, R. T. Yang, R. T. Yang, Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 56

Section Β Radisson, Junior Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium in Honor of W. Μ. Η. Sachtler/ E. V. Murphree Award

Radisson Convention Complex, Terrace Room (Terrace Level) Symposium on Improved Adsorbents and Adsorption Processes

lie C. A. Audeh, Program

9:00—1. Polybenzimidazole Resin Based New Chelating Agents. Ferric Ion Selec­ tivity of Resins with Immobilized Polyamines. M. Chanda, K. F. O'Driscoll, G. L. Rempel. 9:30—2. Evaluation of Macroreticular Res­ ins as Gas/Vapour Sorbents to Rival Ac­ tive Carbons. J. Hearn, P. L. Smelt, M. C. Wilkinson. 10:00—3. Recovery of Organic Solutes from Aqueous Solutions by Means of NonWetting Adsorbents. W. G. Rixey, C. J. King. 10:30—4. New Separation and Regenera­ tion Process Using Fixed-Bed Adsolubilization. C. R. Grout, J. H. Harwell. 11:00—5. Surfactant-Enhanced Carbon Re­ generation. D. L. Blakeburn, J. F. Scamehom. 11:30—6. Chromatographic Study of Aque­ ous Phase Adsorption on Activated Carbon Fiber with Bacterial Growth. M. Suzuki, J-E. Sohn.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Organizers

1:15—Introductory Remarks. 1:30—11. Air Fractionation by Adsorption. S. Sircar. 2:00—12. PSA Cycles for Producing HighPurity Hydrogen from Hydrogen-Lean Mix­ tures. M. R. Ghate, L. A. Jarr, R. T. Yang. 2:30—13. Conception of a New Adsorption Process for Purifying Landfill Gas for the Landfill Site Kapiteltal, West Germany. H. Schilling. 3:00—14. Sizing of Vacuum Pumps for Desorption in PSA Systems. H. Amlinger. 3:30—15. Novel Applications of Continuous Annular Chromatography: Separation of Sugars. A. J. Howard, G. Carta, C. H. Byers. 4:00—16. Effects of Process Conditions on the Removal of N-Heptanol from Aqueous Streams Using Admicellar Chromatogra­ phy. T. P. Fitzgerald, J. H. Harwell. Section Β Radisson, Junior Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium in Honor of W. M. H. Sachtler/ E. V. Murphree Award T. E. Whyte,

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson Convention Complex, Breckenridge Room (Ground Level) Symposium on Separations Science and Technology C. J. King, C. D. Scott, C. J. King, Presiding

Organizers

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—Presentation of ACS Award in Sepa­ ration Science and Technology to Frie­ drich G. Hejfferich. 8:50—21. Award Address. (ACS Award in Separations Science and Technology sponsored by Rohm & Haas Co.) Coher­ ence: Power and Challenge of a New Con­ cept. F. G. Helfferich. 9:30—22. Chromatography, Competition, and Coherence. A. Velayudhan, Cs. Horvath. 10:00—23. Multicomponent Chromatogra­ phy Theory and Applications. N-H. L. Wang. 10:30—24. Multicomponent Chromatogra­ phy Theory Applied to Fixed-Bed Anion Exchange. D. Clifford, L. L. Horng, C. C. Lin. 11:00—25. Tracer-Pulse Chromatography: A Better Way to Study Gas Adsorption. R. P. Danner. Section Β Radisson, Junior Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Managing R&D in Today's World Honoring Malcolm E. Pruitt J. D. Idol., Jr., Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Chairman's Welcome and Overview: Where are today's R&D Horizons? J. D. Idol, Jr. 9:15—26. R&D Management in a Changing Technology Climate. S. A. Heininger. 9:40—27. R&D Management in Today's Pe­ troleum World. K. L. Mai. 10:05—28. Challenges and Opportunities in Specialty Chemicals. F. P. Boer. 10:30—29. Award Address. (Earle B. Barnes Award for Leadership in Chemical Research Management sponsored by Dow Chemical Co.) Ingredients for Good R&D Management. M. E. Pruitt. 11:00—Panel Discussion. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Radisson Convention Complex, Breckenridge Room (Ground Level) Symposium on Separations Science and Technology C D . Scott,

Presiding

2:00—30. Coherent Waves in Surfactant Chromatographic Movement. J. H. Har­ well. 2:30—31. Wave Behavior in Reactive Flow. S. L. Bryant, C. Novak, R. S. Schechter, L. W. Lake. 3:00—32. Application of Coherence Theory to Multicomponent and Multiphase Dis­ placement in Porous Media. G. J. Hirasaki. 3:30—33. Twenty-Five Years of Ligand Ex­ change. H. F. Walton. 4:00—34. Applications of Inorganic Ion Ex­ changers in Actinide/Lanthanide Separa­ tions. D. J. Pruett. 4:30—35. Selective Separation of Transi­ tion Metal Ions with Dual Mechanism Bifunctional Polymers. S.D. Alexandratos, C-D. C. Painton, D. R. Quillen, W. J. Mc­ Dowell.

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—17. Pt-Re Reforming Technology: A Perspective. T. R. Hughes. 2:45—18. Scope and Limits of the Field Emission Microscopies for Catalysis Re­ lated Research. A. Melmed. 3:25—19. Epoxidation of Ethylene Catalysis by Silver. R. A. Van Santen. 4:05—20. Catalytica's Olefins to Ketones Technology. F. M. Dautzenberg, J. Vasilevskis, J. DeDeken.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

5:00—Separation Science Business Meeting.

Subdivision

Section Β Radisson Junior Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Robotics in the Industrial Laboratory cosponsored with Division of Computers in Chemistry Session I: Overview Κ. Μ. Stelting, Organizer K. M. Stelting, F. Gainer, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:45—36. Present and Future Promise of Laboratory Robotics. G. D. Owens, R. J. Eckstein. 2:30—37. Why Implement Robotics—A Manager's Perspective. F. E. Gainer. 3:00—Intermission. 3:30—38. Laboratory Robotics, Making Them Work: Or The Crate Is Here, Now What Do I Do? J. B. Cross. 4:00—39. Reality of Robot Applications in Environmental and Industrial Laboratories. M. Markelov, M. F. Antloga, B. R. Seitz, J. L. Buteyn. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson Convention Complex, Columbine Room (Terrace Level) Symposium on Conductive Polymers— Their Emergence and Future. W. R. Menyhert, Chairman A. G. MacDiarmid, Session, Cochairman Synthesis, Process and Methodologies 9:00—Introductory Remarks. W. R. Meny­ hert. 9:10—Session Introduction. A. G. MacDiar­ mid. 9:20—40. Highly Oriented and Stabile Polyacetylene. H. Naarmann, N. Theophilou. 9:50—41. Synthesis of a Conducting Aro­ matic Ladder Polymer: BBM. E. F. Witucki, P. E. D. Morgan. 10:20—42. Organic Conducting and Semi­ conducting Polymers as Molecular Materi­ al for Advanced Technologies. F. Gamier. 10:50—43. Processable Conductive Poly­ mers for Aerospace Application. S. I. Yaniger. 11:20—44. Alkali Metal Ions Insertion in Polyacetylene. P. Bernier, C. Fite, E. Elkhodary, S. Lefrant, E. Perrin. 11:50—45. Synthesis of Conductive Poly­ mers—Poly(Arene Methides). K. Al-Jumah, J. E. Fernandez, D. Peramunage, L. H. Garcia-Rubio. 12:10—46. New Metallic Derivatives of PolyAniline: N-Substituted and Ring Substi­ tuted Derivatives of Emeraldine Salts. M· Angelopoulos, S. P. Ermer, A. Ray, A. G MacDiarmid, A. J. Epstein. Section Β Radisson Convention Complex, Breckenridge Room (Ground Level) Symposium on Robotics in the Industrial Laboratory cosponsored with Division of Computers in Chemistry Session II: Applications T. J. Beugelsdijk, L. W o l f r a m , Presiding 8:30—47. Thinking in Terms of Robotics. B. E. Kropscott. 9:00—48. Laboratory Robotics: Use in Ma­ terials Science Evaluation of Paper and Polymer Films. J. C. Abbott. 9:30—49. Preparation of Protein Crystals Using Robotics and Automaied Visual In­ spection. K. B. Ward, W. M. Zuk. 10:00—50. Flexible Robotic Transfer Sys­ tem for Radioactive Materials. R. M. Tay­ lor, M. Buckner, W. I. Lewis, III. 10:30—51. Characteristics of Lab Applica­ tions Which Require High-Technology Ro­ bots. T. H. Hight.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Radisson Convention Complex, Vail Room (Majestic Level) Symposium on Advances in MembraneBased Separations Processes S. T. Hwang, J. C. Davis,

Organizers

I. Membrane Materials J. C. Davis,

Presiding

Section Β

2:00—Introductory Remarks. S. T. Hwang. 2:15—52. Substituted Polycarbonate Mem­ branes for Gas Separations. N. Muruganandam, W. J. Koros, D. R. Paul. 3:00—53. Studies on Permeability of High Temperature Resistant Silicone Polymer VYCOR Glass Membrane. D. Li, R. D. Seok, S-T. Hwang. 3:45—Intermission. 4:00—54. Asymmetric PSO HF Membranes. R. S. Narayan.

Section Β Radisson Convention Complex, Columbine Room (Terrace Level) Symposium on Conductive Polymers— Their Emergence and Future

S. K. Tripathy, Session Co-chairman Advanced Developments and Concepts 2:00—Introductory Remarks. W. R. Menyhert. 2:05—Session Introduction. S. Tripathy. 2:10—55. Conjugated Polymers: Life Be­ yond Conductivity. G. L. Baker. 2:40—56. Physical Studies of Poly(Pyrrolium Anion) Materials. L. J. Buckley. 3:10—57. Structural Control of the Electron­ ic and Ionic Properties of Polyheterocycles. S. Basak, D. Black, D. S. Marynick, T. Pajkossy, M. Pomerantz, P. A. Poropatic, K. Rajeshwar, J. R. Reynolds, N. Sundaresan, R. Toyooka. 3:40—58. Inhibition of Corrosion of Steel by Conducting Polymers. A. G. MacDiarmid, N. Ahmed. 4:10—59. Multicomponent Conducting Poly­ meric Systems: Approaches to Environ­ mental Stability and Processability. M. A. Druy, S. K. Tripathy. 4:40—60. Aqueous Solutions of Conducting Polymers: Derivatives of PolyAniline. S. P. Ermer, M. Angelopoulos, W. S. Huang, A. G. MacDiarmid, A. J. Epstein. 5:05—61. CARBOFLEX®—A Cost Effective Carbon Filter for Composite Applications. W. P. Hettinger, Jr., J. W. Newman, M. D. Kiser. 5:30—62. Production of Polyisothianaphthene Films by Chemical Methods. T. L. Rose, M. C. Liberto.

Section C Radisson Convention Complex, Breckenridge Room (Ground Level) Symposium on Robotics in the Industrial Laboratory cosponsored with Division of Computers in Chemistry Session III: Advanced Applications K. L. Ratzlaff, J. J. Rollheiser, Presiding 1:30—63. Computers, Robots and Chem­ ists—Brains, Brawn and Good Looks. J. J. Brosemer. 2:00—64. Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and Expert Systems. W. A. Schlieper, T. L. Isenhour. 2:30—65. Purdue Automated Synthesis Sys­ tem. G. W. Kramer, P. L. Fuchs. 3:00—66. Robotics in Radiation Environ­ ments. D. W. Knobeloch, T. J. Beugelsdijk. 3:30—67. Making Robots Really Work, To­ day and Tomorrow. J. Curley. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson Convention Complex, Vail Room (Majestic Level) Symposium on Advances in MembraneBased Separations Processes. II. Membrane Evaluation S. T. Hwang,

9:15—69. Characterization of Transport Properties of Hollow Fiber Membranes for Biological Applications. J. J. Burke. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—70. SEM/(S)TEM Techniques Ap­ plied in the Characterization of Membrane Materials. C. E.Voegele-Kliewer. 11:00—71. Molecular Weight Cutoff Char­ acterization of Ultrafiltration Membranes. R. J. Valus, J. C. Davis.

Presiding

8:30—68. New Applications for Membrane Separation. J. E. Cadotte, R. Petersen, JY. Koo.

Radisson Convention Complex, Columbine Room (Terrace Level) Symposium on Conductive Polymers— Their Emergence and Future

F. E. Karasz, Session Co-chairman Physical Behavior and Unique Character 8:30—Introductory Remarks. W. R. Menyhert. 8:35—Session Introduction. F. E. Karasz. 8:40—72. Measurements of Inter- and Intra-Chain Electron Motion in Highly Ori­ ented Films of Conjugated Polymers. R. H. Friend, D. D. C. Bradley, P. D.Townsend. 9:10—73. Critical Re-Evaluation of Electro­ chemical Measurements on Polyacetylene for Battery Application. J. C. W. Chien, J. B. Schlenoff, F. E. Karasz. 9:40—74. Electrolytic Polymerization Using Ion-Conducting Polymers as a Solid Elec­ trolyte. M. Watanabe, K. Tadano, K. Sanui, N. Ogata. 10:10—75. Soluble Conducting Polymers: The Poly(3-Alkyl-Thienylenes). S.D.D.V. Rughooputh, M. Nowak, S. Hotta, A. J. Heeger, F. Wudl. 10:40—76. Anisotropic Properties of Doped and Undoped Cis- and Trans-(CH)X. G. Leising, H. Kahlert. 11:10—77. Chemical Composition of Con­ ductive Polymers: Analysis by NMR and Mass Spectrometries. C. E. Brown, P. Kovacic, C. A. Wilkie, R. B. Cody, R. E. Hein, J. A. Kinsinger. 11:40—78. Highly Conducting Poly(Thiophene Vinylene) Film via Precursor Route. I. Murase, T. Ohnishi, T. Noguchi, M. Hirooka. 12:10—79. Characterization of Structurally Modified Polyacetylenes. D. H. Whitney, G. E. Wnek. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Radisson Convention Complex, Vail Room (Majestic Level) Symposium on Advances in MembraneBased Separations Processes III. Ion Separation Processes S. T. Hwang, Presiding 2:00—80. Use of Micellar-Enhanced Ultrafil­ tration to Remove Dissolved Cupric Ions from Water. J. F. Scamehorn, R. T. Elling­ ton, S. D. Christian, B. W. Penney, R. O. Dunn, S. N. Bhat. 2:45—81. Use of Electrodialysis to Deionize Acidic Wastewaters. P. M. Shah, J. F. Scamehorn. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—82. Hollow Fiber Membrane Systems as Suppressors in Ion Chromatography. J. C. Davis, T. S. Stevens. 4:30—83. Comparison of Bulk, Emulsion, Supported and Hollow Fiber Liquid Mem­ brane Systems in the Macrocycle-Mediated Transport and Separation of Metal Cat­ ions. R. M. Izatt, R. L. Bruening, G. C. LindH, J. D. Lamb, J. J. Christensen.

Section Β Radisson Convention Complex, Columbine Room (Terrace Level) Symposium on Conductive Polymers— Their Emergence and Future

G. Wnek, Session Co-chairman Electrochemical Interests in Conductive Polymers 2:00—Introductory Remarks. W. R. Menyhert. 2:05—Session Introduction. G. Wnek.

2:10—84. Synthesis and Properties of New Aromatic and Heterocyclic Conducting Polymers. S. A. Jenekhe. 2:40—85. Photovoltaic Effect of K + -ion Im­ planted Polythiophene. A. Usuki, M. Mur­ ase, T. Hioki, T. Kurauchi. 3:10—86. Application of Conducting Poly­ mers in Novel Indicators. R. H. Baughman, R. L. Elsenbaumer, Z. Iqbal, G. G. Miller, H. Eckhardt. 3:40—87. Conducting Polymers and Chemi­ cal Sensors. G. Gustafsson, I. Lundstrôm. 4:10—88. Application of Conduction Variables and Sensitivity in Sensors Using Conductive Polymers. W. R. Menyhert, R. P. Saunders. 4:40—89. Mechanism of Pyrrole Electropolymerisation from Studies of Voltammetry, Pyridine Inhibition and XPS. N. J. Morse, R. J. Mortimer, D. R. Rosseinsky, D. Walton. 5:10—90. Acetylene Functional Precursors for New Intrinsically Conductive Polymers. R. D. Rossi, D. J. Capo, S. P. Fenelli, P. Machiesky. 5:30—91. Conjugated Polymers in Rechargeable Battery Anodes. M. Maxfield, T. R. Jow, M. G. Sewchok, L. W. Shacklette. FRIDAY MORNING

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DIVISION OF INORGANIC CHEMISTRY E. Sinn, Program

Chairman

ο COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: Hydrazine Centennial Conference {see Division of Organic Chemistry, Thu, page 68)

OTHER DIVISION'S SYMPOSIUM OF INTEREST: Electronic Materials (see Committee on Science, Thu, page 35).

Section A

Radisson Convention Complex, Vail Room (Majestic Level) Symposium on Advances in MembraneBased Separations Processes IV. Biological Processes

J. C. Davis, Presiding 9:00—92. Hollow Fiber Bioreactor Optimization Using Isotropic Membranes with Different Porosities. G. E. Fleig. 9:45—93. Affinity Purification of Human Immunoglobulins via Protein A Covalently Immobilized onto Synthetic Ultrafiltration Membranes. A. J. Laccetti, J. R. Hildebrandt, L. T. Hodgins, H. P. Gregor. 10:30—Closing Remarks. J. C. Davis.

Section Β Radisson Convention Complex, Columbine Room (Terrace Level) Symposium on Solvent Extraction Process­ es in the Minerals Industry

D. R. Beuerman, G. Ramadorai, Coorganizers G. Kordosky, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—94. Properties of Chelating Extractants in Commercial Use for Metal Recov­ ery. G. A. Kordosky. 9:30—95. Complexation and Foam Separa­ tion of Trace Amounts of Heavy Metals from Water. T. E. Carleson, M. Moussavi. 9:50—96. Novel Developments in the Appli­ cation of Solvent Extraction to the Recov­ ery of Base Metals from Mixed Metal Waste Materials. D. R. Dahnke, F. E. Diebold, J. L. Downey, L. G. Twidwell. 10:10—97. Application of Solvent Extrac­ tion to the Separation and Recovery of Base Metals from Complex, Mixed-Metal Recovery Solutions. D. G. Laney, L. G. Twidwell, D. R. Dahnke, D. R. Beuerman.. 10:10—Intermission. 10:20—98. Acid Extraction of Metals from Coal. F. E. Diebold, T. J. Snelling, M. Foote, L. L. Lockrem. 10:40—99. Separation of Silver, Palladium, Bismuth and Antimony from Aqueous So­ lutions by Commercially Available Extractants. D. R. Beuerman, G. Wyss, D. Palke. 11:00—100. Selective Macrocycle-Mediated Transport of Ag + in Several Liquid Membrane Systems. R. M. Izatt, R. L. Bruening, G. C. LindH, J. S. Bradshaw, J. J. Christensen. 11:20—101. Selective and Predictable Transport of Neutral Cation-Anion Moi­ eties Through Macrocycle-Mediated Sup­ ported Liquid Membranes Using Cd(ll), Zn(ll) and HG(II) as Cations. R. M. Izatt, R. L. Bruening, G. C. LindH, J. D. Lamb, J. J. Christensen. 11:40—102. Separation of Cd(ll), Hg(ll) and Zn(ll) from Each Other and from Other Cations by Selection of Co-Anion Type and Concentration in a Neutral.Macrocycle-Mediated Emulsion Membrane Sys­ tem. R. M. Izatt, R. L. Bruening, W. Geng, M. H. Cho, J. J. Christensen.

DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Social Hour, Sun, M, Tu

SUNDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzanine Level) Tutorial on Fundamentals in Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers K. J. Wynne, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. M. Zeldin. 9:10—1. Introduction to the Tutorial on Inor­ ganic and Organometallic Polymers. K. J. Wynne. 9:40—2. Inorganic Polymers Containing Phosphorus in the Main Chain. H. R. Allcock. 10:40—Intermission. 11:00—3. Inorganic Polymers Containing Silicon in the Main Chain. J. E. McGrath.

H. R. Allcock, Organizer, Presiding 1:30—4. Some Polymer Characterization Techniques and Illustrative Applications to Inorganic Polymers. J. E. Mark. 2:20—5. Characterization of Inorganic Poly­ mers by Spectroscopic Methods. J. M. Bellama. 3:10—Intermission. 3:25—6. Inorganic Polymer Precursors to Ceramic Materials. R. M. Laine. 4:15—7. Physical-Chemical Aspects of SolGel Processing. C. J. Brinker. MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Arts Auditorium, Theater (Theater Level) Awards Presentations 9:00—Presentation of ACS Award in Inor­ ganic Chemistry, sponsored by Monsanto Co. M. H. Chisholm, Presiding 9:05—8. Award Address. Chemistry of Plat­ inum Complexes with DNA. S. J. Lippard. 10:00—Presentation of the ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advance­ ment of Inorganic Chemistry, sponsored by Mallinckrodt Inc. M. H. Chisholm, Presiding 10:05—9. Award Address. Ligand Transfor­ mations on Metal Ensembles. CCO For­ mation and Reactivity. D. F. Shriver.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

57

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11:00—Presentation of ACS Award in Organometallic Chemistry, sponsored by Dow Chemical Foundation.

R. G. Bergman, Presiding 11:05—10. Award Address. Cobalt-Mediat­ ed [2+2+2]-Cycloadditions: a Maturing Synthetic Strategy. K. P. C. Vollhardt.

Section Β

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Radisson, Convention Complex, Majestic Ballroom (Majestic Level) International Symposium on Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers. Silicon Contain­ ing Polymers, cosponsored with Divisions of Polymer Chemistry and Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering

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Presiding

9:00—11. Polysilane High Polymers. R. West, J. Maxka, R. Sinclair, P. Cotts. 9:45—12. Organosilicon Polymers as Pre­ cursors for Silicon-Containing Ceramics: Recent Developments. D. Seyferth, G. H. Wiseman, C. A. Poutasse, J. M. Schwark, Y-F. Yu. 10:30—13. Catalytic Syntheses of Oligoand Polysilazane Polymers. R. M. Laine, Y. D. Blum, D. Tse, R. Glaser, A. Chow, R. Hamlin. 11:15—14. Methylpolysilanes—Precursors to SiC Ceramics. D. R. Bujalski, G. E. LeGrow, T. F. Lim. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Radisson, Convention Complex, Majestic Ballroom (Majestic Level) International Symposium on Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers. Silicon Contain­ ing Polymers M. Zeldin, Organizer,

Presiding

3:10—15. Recent Advances in Organosiloxane Copolymers. S. Kilic, J. Summers, C. Elsbernd, C. Arnold, J. Pullockaren, J. E. McGrath. 1:30—16. Some Si-N Containing Rings and Polymers Made Therefrom. Z. Lasocki. 2:20—17. Polymerization of Group 14 Hy­ drides by Dehydrogenative Coupling. J. F. Harrod. 4:00—18. Synthesis and Aqueous Solution Phase Behavior of Siloxane-poly(alkylene Glycol) Comb Copolymers. D. R. MacFarlane, D. J. Bannister, W. R. Barry, M. For­ syth, R. L. Jeffery. Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 2-CD (2nd Floor) Symposium on Biological Electron Transfer R. A. Scott, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:40—19. Quantum Simulations of Electron Transfer Pathways in Proteins. P. G. Wolynes, A. Kuki. 2:20—20. Simulating the Energetics and Dy­ namics of Electron Transfer in Proteins; Probing the Role of the Environment on a Microscopic Level. A. Warshel. 3:00—21. Models for Protein Facilitated Electron Transfer Reactions. D. N. Beratan, J. N. Onuchic. 3:40—Intermission. 4:00—22. Experimental Studies of Electron Transfer in Simple Ru and Co Complexes. A. Ludi. 4:40—23. Intramolecular Long Distance Electron Transfer, Experiments and The­ ory. G. L. Closs. Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 1-CD (1st Floor) ACS Award in Organometallic Chemistry, cosponsored with Division of Organic Chem­ istry CE.

Housecraft,

Presiding

2:00—24. New and Old Routes to Old and New Compounds. P. J. Garratt. 2:30—25. New Organolithium Reagents and Reactions Discovered in the Course of Natural Product Synthesis. R. L. Funk, G. L. Bolton.

58

February 9, 1987 C&EN

3:00—26. Unsaturated Six-Membered Tran­ sition Metallacycles. N. T. Allison, W. Yongskulrote, R. Ferede, C. Mike, T. Nel­ son, J. Bramlett, B. Durham. 3:30—27. Cationic Metallacyclopentadiene Chemistry. J. M. O'Connor, L. Pu. 4:00—28. Migrations to Carbene at Molyb­ denum and Tungsten. C. E. Davey, V. A. Osborn, C. A. Parker, M. J. Winter, S. Woodward. 4:30—29. Reactions of Organic Compounds Mediated by Organotransition Metal Com­ plexes. R. G. Bergman.

Section D Arts Auditorium, Room 2-AF (2nd Floor) Mini-Symposium: ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry J. K. Barton,

Presiding

2:00—30. New Cluster Compounds of Early Transition Metals. F. A. Cotton, M. P. Diebold, R. Llusar, W. J. Roth. 2:45—31. Photochemistry of Heterodinuclear Organometallic Complexes. M. S. Wrighton, K. R. Pope. 3:30—32. Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Dimeric Iridium(l) Complexes. J. L. Mar­ shall, L. S. Fox, H. B. Gray. 4:15—33. Molecular Bases for Bacterial Re­ sistance to Organomercurials. C. Walsh. Section Ε Arts Auditorium, Room 2-BE (2nd Floor) ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry—AirSensitive Compounds S. H. Strauss,

Presiding

2:00—34. Resonance Raman Study of Qua­ si-one-dimensional Pt Complex Semicon­ ductors. B. I. Swanson, S. D. Conradson, M. A. Stroud. 2:30—35. Emitting Copper(l) Halide Sys­ tems—Correlation of Structure and Emis­ sion Properties. E. M. Holt, J. A. Tomp­ kins, N. P. Rath, J. L. Maxwell. 3:00—36. Coordination Chemistry of Sever­ al Neutral Potentially Tetradentate Ligands. T. G. Richmond, E. P. Kelson, M. A. King, A. M. Pazos, A. M. Arif, A. T. Patton, G. B. Carpenter. 3:30—37. Stereochemical Control of Dihydrogen vs. Dihydride Coordination by Ligand Variation. G. J. Kubas, R. R. Ryan. 4:00—38. Preparation and Structure of Transition Metal Polytellurium Complex­ es. J. W. Kolis. 4:30—39. Synthesis and Reactivity of Tran­ sition Metal Clusters Containing Large Main Group Atoms: Stability of Metal-Met­ al Bonding in Stabilized and Non-stabi­ lized Systems. K. H. Whitmire, J. S. Leigh, Τ. Κ. Dutta. 5:00—40. Synthesis, Characterization and Unusual Reactivity of Binary Metal Teflates (M(OTeF5)x). S. H. Strauss, M. R. Colsman, P. K. Miller, M. D. Noirot. MONDAY

EVENING

Radisson, Convention Lobby (Lobby Level) International Symposium on Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers: Silicon Contain­ ing Polymers Poster Session/Social Hour M. Zeldin,

Presiding

5:30—41. Preceramic Polysilazane to Sili­ con Nitride. M. Arai, S. Sakurada, T. Isoda, H. Tomizawa. —42. Polysilazanes and Related Com­ pounds Synthesis by Transition Metal Ca­ talysis. Y. D. Blum, R. M. Laine. —43. Catalytic Preparation of Oligomeric Polysilanes. B. Becker, R. Corriu, C. Guérin, B. Henner. —44. Preceramic Polymer Impurities: Their Effects on Processing to Polymer Fibers and on Ceramic Fiber Properties. P. Foley, L. C. Sawyer. —45. Functionalized Polysilylenes by Catalytic Reactions of Primary Silanes with Olefins. J-P. Barry, J. F. Harrod. —46. NMR Characterization of Polymethyldisilylazane—a Precursor to Si-C-N-0 Ceramics. J. Lipowitz, J. A. Rabe, T. M. Carr. —47. New Synthetic Routes to Polysilanes. K. Matyjaszewski, H. K. Kim, Y. L. Chen.

—48. Surface Tension of Polytnfluoropropylmethylsiloxane. M. J. Owen. —49. Preparation and Characterization of Polysilane Copolymers with Varying Compositions. S. P. Sawan, Y-G. Tsai, H-Y. Huang. —50. Study of Polysilylene Preparations. D. J. Worsfold. — 5 1 . Pyridinyl Containing Silane Monomers and Siloxane Dimers and Polymers. M. Zeldin, C-X. Tian, J-M. Xu. —51 A. Synthesis Characterization and Lithographic Properties of Halogenated Derivatives of Poly(trimethylsilyl-1-propyne). A. S. Gozdz, J. A. Schelburne III, G. L Baker, C. F. Klausner, T. N. Bowmer. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson, Convention Complex, Majestic Ballroom (Majestic Level) International Symposium on Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers: Radiation Sensitive Silicon Containing Polymers R. D. Miller,

Presiding

Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 2-CD (2nd Floor) Symposium on Biological Electron Transfer Presiding

8:50—Presentation of ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, sponsored by Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity, to G. L. McLendon. H. B. Gray. 9:00—56. Award Address. Electron Trans­ fer in Protein Complexes: Control of Rate and Specificity. G. L. McLendon. 9:45—57. Long-Range Electron Transfer Between Proteins. Β. Μ. Hoffman. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—58. Probes for Metalloprotein Elec­ tron Transfer Mechanisms. S. S. Isied. 11:15—59. Long-Range Electron Transfer in Ruthenated Proteins. Η. Β. Gray.

Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 1-CD (1st Floor) General—Formation, Dynamics, and Reac­ tions of Unsaturated Ligands R. D. Feltham,

Section D Arts Auditorium, Room 2-AF (2nd Floor) General—Main Group Chemistry

8:30—52. Photochemistry and Photophysics of Polysilanes. J. Michl. 9:25—53. Soluble Substituted Polysilanes. R. D. Miller. 10:20—54. Synthesis, Photophysics and Photochemistry of Organo and Silyl Substituted Polysilane Resist Materials. J. M. Zeigler, L. A. Harrah, A. W. Johnson. 11:15—55. Photochemical Behavior of Organosilicon Polymers Bearing Phenyldisilanyl Units. M. Ishikawa.

R. A. Scott, Organizer,

10:40—66. Synthesis and Properties of Dicarbonyl-77 6 -Arene(alkene)manganese Cations. W. A. Halpin, J. C. Williams, Jr., D. A. Sweigart. 11:00—67. Arene Activation in τ;6 and ηΛComplexes of Chromium (—2). V. S. Leong, N. J. Cooper. 11:20—68. Double Nucleophilic Addition to Rhenium-Coordinated Arènes. T. J. Alavosus, W. A. Halpin, D. A. Sweigart, J. C. Williams, Jr. 11:40—69. Aspects of the Mechanism of Nucleophilic Substitution by [CpM(CO)2]~ (M = Fe, Ru) at (776-Haloaryl)M'(CO)3 (M' = Cr, Mo) Complexes. J. A. Heppert, M. A. Morgenstern, D. J. Scherubel, F. Takusagawa. 12:00—70. Alkyl Migrations to Bound Arènes in (Arene)Mn(CO)2R Complexes: Regioselectivity and Ring Exchange. Y. H. Hong, M. S. Brookhart.

R. B. King,

Presiding

8:40—71. Spectroscopic and Structural Analysis of the OTeF5~ Anion. P. K. Miller, A. K. Rappe, O. P. Anderson, S. H. Strauss. 9:00—72. Studies on Dialkylaminoselenium Derivatives. R. B. King, S. A. Sangokoya. 9:20—73. Synthesis and Characterization of Trimethylaluminum Adducts with Bidentate Phosphines and Arsines. K. J. Ewing, A. D. Berry, R. A. DeMarco. 9:40—74. Synthesis and Reaction Chemistry of Long Chain Achiral and Chiral Phosphines. J. A. Davies, J. G. Mierzwiak, R. Syed. 10:00—75. A Skeletally-Stabilized Cyclophane Phosphazane. A. D. Norman, J. M. Barendt, R. C. Haltiwanger. 10:20—76. New Stabilized Mono- and Diphosphorus P(lll) Phosphazanes. E. G. Bent, J. M. Barendt, A. D. Norman. 10:40—77. Phenylated Main Fourth-Group Metallocenes. D. Tudela, J. J. Zuckerman. 11:00—78. New Silicon- and Tin-Containing Pyrimidines. N. S. Cho, C. Parkanyi. 11:20—79. Generation of Silylenium Cations in Solution. M. D. Noirot, O. P. Anderson, S. H. Strauss. 11:40—80. Reaction of Trimethylaluminum with a Macrocyclic Tetradentate Tertiary Amin. Synthesis and Molecular Structure of [AI(CH3)3]4[N-Tetramethylcyclam]. G. H. Robinson. 12:00—81. Studies on B-Halogenated Pyrazaboles. F. J. Mariategui, K. Niedenzu, K. R. Warner.

Presiding

8:40—60. Unprecedented Bonding in Metal Complexes of Perfluoropolyenyl Ligands. Synthesis and Structure of Novel Trialkyl(tricarbonyl)iron(ll) Complexes. R. T. Carl, R. P. Hughes, R. E. Davis, R. Kashyap. 9:00—61. Proton Transfer Reactivity of Transition Metal Hydrides with a Ruthenium Alkynyl Complex. R. M. Bull­ ock. 9:20—62. Syntheses and Reactions of Chiral Rhenium Vinylidene and Acetylide Complexes of the Formulae [(T7 5 -C 5 H 5 )Re(NO)(PPh 3 )(=C=CRR')] + X- and (η5C5H5)Re(NO)(PPh3)(C=CR). D. R. Senn, J. A. Gladysz. 9:40—63. Interconversion of Alkyne and Vi­ nylidene Complexes of Molybdenum and Tungsten. P. N. Nickias, J. P. Selegue. 10:00—64. Diiron Vinylcarbyne Complexes with Unusually Low Barriers to Vinylcar­ byne Ligand Rotation. C. P. Casey, M. S. Konings, S. R. Marder, Y. Takezawa. 10:20—65. Organometallic Ruthenium and Osmium Porphyrin Complexes. J. P. Coilman, G. D. Venburg.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Section Ε Arts Auditorium, Room 2-BE (2nd Floor) General—Homobimetallic Complexes R. A. Walton,

Presiding

9:00—82. Reversible Dimerization of MetalMetal Triple Bonds. M. H. Chisholm, D. L. Clark, J. C. Huffman, M. J. HampdenSmith. 9:20—83. Synthetic, Structural and Spec­ troscopic Studies of Diphenyldiazoalkane Adducts of W2X4(M-CSiMe3)2 (X = O-i-Pr, CH2SiMe3). M. H. Chisholm, J. A. Heppert, J. C. Huffman, C. D. Ontiveros. 9:40—84. Mechanistic Studies on the For­ mation and Rearrangement of Dimetallaallyl Ditungsten Complexes, W 2 X 4 (MCSiMe3)(M-CR1CR2CSiMe3) (Where X = CH2SiMe3 or O-i-Pr and R\ R2 = Η or SiMe3). M. H. Chisholm, J. A. Heppert, J. C. Huffman, C. D. Ontiveros. 10:00—85. Intermolecular Influences on the Photoelectron Spectra of Thin Film Group IV M4-M Complexes. J. G. Kristofzski, D. L. Lichtenberger. 10:20—86. Bis(diphenylphosphino)methane Complexes of the Multiply Bonded Ditungsten(lll,lll)Core. W. S. Harwood, P. E. Fanwick, R. A. Walton. 10:40—87. Reactions of the Biscarboxylate Complexes of Dirhenium(lll) Re2(02CR)2X4(H20)2 (R = Me, Et; X = CI, Br) with Bidentate Phosphines. A. R. Cutler, P. E. Fanwick, D. R. Root, R. A. Walton. 11:00—88. Isomerization in Multiply Bonded Dimetal Complexes Containing 7r-Acceptor Ligands. L. B. Anderson, A. C. Price, R. A. Walton, F. A. Cotton, K. R. Dunbar, L. R. Falvello.

11:20—89. Homovalent Au(ll)/Au(ll) vs. Heterovalent Au(l)/Au(lll) Dimers. H. H. Mur­ ray, R. G. Raptis, L. C. Porter, J. P. Fackler, Jr. 11:40—90. Role of [(M-BrXAu(CH2)2PPh2X)2] + in the Chemistry of Phosphorus-Ylide-Au Dimer. R. G. Raptis, H. H. Murray, L. C. Porter, J. P. Fackler, Jr.

Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 1-CD (1st Floor) General—π-Ligand Chemistry

G. H. Robinson, Presiding

1:40—110. Synthesis, Structure, and Reac­ tivity of Bis- pentadienyl-iron-phosphine Complexes. M. K. Hays, R. J. Wittenbrink, Section F J. R. Bleeke. 2:00—111. Two Electron Reduction of a DiArts Auditorium, Room 2-G (2nd Floor) meric Iron Complex Containing a Bridging General—Photochemistry and Electron Alkyne Ligand. T. C. Forschner, N. J. Coo­ Transfer per. 2:20—112. Synthesis and Characterization Β. N. Diehl, Presiding of "Open Metallocenes" and "Half-Open Metallocenes" Involving the 1,5-Bis(tri9:00—91. Photochemistry and Photophymethylsilyl)pentadienyl Ligand. R. W. Gesics of d6-Metal Isocyanide Complexes. N. dridge, R. D. Ernst, J. W. Freeman. E. Stacy, R. A. Walton, D. R. McMillin. 9:20—92. Oxidation of the Organochromium 2:40—113. Reactions of Titanium, Vanadi­ and Orqanocobalt Complexes by 2E um and Chromium "Open Metallocenes." Cr(bpy)/+. A. Bakac, J. H. Espenson. T. D. Newbound, D. R. Wilson, M. S. Kralik, J. W. Freeman, A. T. Patton, R. D. 9:40—93. Excited-State Redox Reactions of Ernst. Molybdenum(lll) and Rhenium(IV) Com­ 3:00—114. Regiospecificity in ^2-Bound Ar­ plexes. Q. Yao, M. Lord, A. W. Maverick. omatic Hydrocarbon Complexes. W. D. 10:00—94. Mechanism of Solvent Displace­ Harman, M. Sekine, H. Taube. ment in Solvated, Coordinatively-Unsaturated Metal Carbonyl Transients. G. R. 3:20—115. Synthesis and Reactivity of Dobson. Some Organo-iron Complexes Containing the Tridentate Phosphine Ligand Me10:20—95. Energy Transfer in Excited Si(CH2PMe2)3(TMPS). J. M. Boncella, M. States of Orthometallated Ir(lll) and Rh(lll) L. H. Green. Complexes. K. A. King, F. Garces, S. 3:40—116. Metal Vapor Synthesis of a Nov­ Sprouse, R. J. Watts. el Triple-Decker Sandwich Complex. W. 10:40—96. Two-Photon Photochemistry of M. Lamanna. [Cu(dmp) 2 ] + . R. M. Berger, D. R. McMil­ 4:00—117. Synthesis and Characterization lin, R. F. Dallinger. of [(Hydroxyindenyl)(pentamethylcyclo11:00—97. Spectral and Photochemical Be­ penta-dienyl)cobalt(lll)] Complexes. W. L. havior of Chloro- and Bromocuprate(l) I Bell, D. L. DuBois, J. C. Smart. Complexes in Aqueous Solution. K. L. Stevenson, J. L Braun, J. A. Harber, K. S. 4:20—118. 1,1'-Diarsaferrocene. A. J. Ashe III, S. Mahmoud, C. Elschenbroich, M. Kurtz, R. A. Sparks. Wunsch 11:20—98. Synthesis, Characterization and 4:40—119. Electrochemical Studies of an Photochemistry of Molybdenum TetracarOxidatively Induced Ring Slippage in 17bonyl Bound to the Novel Bridging Ligand Electron [(^-indenylX^-indenyOViCOk]. 2,3-Bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine. J. O. Johnson, G. A. Miller, M. J. Therien, W. C. Trogler. R. R. Ruminski. 11:40—99. Photolysis of Acetyltetracarbonylcobalt(l) in Low Temperature Matrices: Section D Unusual Behavior for a Coordinatively Un­ Arts Auditorium, Room 2-AF (2nd Floor) saturated Intermediate. R.'L. Sweany, F. General—C—H Bond Breaking and Form­ N. Russell. ing Reactions TUESDAY AFTERNÔON : Section A

J. R. Bleeke, Presiding

Radisson, Convention Complex, Majestic Ballroom (Majestic Level) Symposium on Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers: Inorganic/Organic Polymers/ Glasses by Solution Polymerization and Gellation J. O'Reilly,

Presiding

1:30—100. Structure of Sol-Gel-Derived Inorganic Polymers: Silicates and Borates. C. J. Brinker, B. C. Bunker, D. R. Tallant, K. J. Ward. 2:10—101. Sol-Gel Preparation and Properties of Fibers and Coating Films. S. Sakka, K. Kamiya, T. Yoko. 2:50—102. Molecular Growth Pathways in Silica Sol-Gel Polymerization. W. G. Klemperer, S. D. Ramamurthi. 3:30—103. Chemistry and Properties of Organically Modified Silicates. H. Schmidt. 4:10—104. Structure-Property Behavior of New Hybrid Materials Incorporating Organic Oligomeric Species into Sol-Gel Glasses. IV. Characterization of Structure and Extent of Reaction. H-H. Huang, R. H. Glaser, G. L. Wilkes.

Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 2-CD (2nd Floor) Symposium on Biological Electron Transfer R. A. Scott, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30—105. Yeast lso-1 Cytochrome c Mu­ tants at R43, F87, and C107: Electro­ chemical and Kinetic Properties. A. G. Nauk, R. L. Cutler, G. J. Pielak, M. Smith. 2:10—106. NMR Studies of the Binding Sur­ face of Cytochrome c. D. Concar, G. R. Moore, R. J. P. Williams. 2:50—107. Electrostatic Effects on Associ­ ation of Electron Transfer Proteins. J. B. Matthew, F. R. Salemme, R. Hilmer, J. J. Wendoloski, P. C. Weber. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—108. Specificity in Biological Electron Transfer. M. A. Cusanovich, T. E. Meyer, G. Tollin. 4:25—109. Strategies for Studying LongRange Electron Transfer in Metalloproteins. R. A. Scott, S. A. Wallin, D. W. | Conrad.

2:00—120. Evidence for Metal-Centered Biradical Mechanisms with Complexes of Palladium, Rhodium, and Cobalt. R. U. Kirss, S. I. Hommeltoft, R. Eisenberg. 2:20—121. Hydrogen Atom Transfer in Re­ actions of Transition Metal Hydrides with Alkenes. R. M. Bullock, E, G. Samsel. 2:40—122. Mechanistic Studies Based on Polypyridyl Oxo Complexes of Ruthenium(IV); Oxidative C—H Insertion. W. K. Seok, J. C. Dobson, T. J.Meyer. 3:00—123. β-Elimination Reactions in the Permethylscandocene Alkyl System. B. J. Burger, J. E. Bercaw. 3:20—124. Insertion of Acrylonitrile into An­ ionic Transition Metal Hydride Bonds. A Model for Homogeneous Olefin Process­ es. M. Y. Darensbourg, K. A. Youngdahl. 3:40—125. C—H Bond Activation and Re­ ductive Elimination Mechanisms of Cp2W(CH3)H. J. R. Norton, S. E. Kegley, C. E. L. Headford, R. M. Bullock, Κ. Μ. Hennessy. 4:00—126. Intermolecular Vinylic C—H Bond Activation at a Multiply-Bonded Ditantalum Center. C. Ting, L. Messerle. 4:20—127. Insertion of Iridium into the C— H Bonds of Alkenes: the 11-Complex Can­ not be an Intermediate. P. O. Stoutland, R. G. Bergman. 4:40—128. Synthesis, Structure, and Reac­ tivity of a Novel Iridacyclohexadiene Com­ plex. J. R. Bleeke, W-J. Peng.

Section Ε Arts Auditorium, Room 2-BE (2nd Floor) General—Homopolyatomic Complexes A. W. Maverick,

Presiding

2:00—129. Synthesis and Reactions of Dimethylphosphinocyclopentadienylthallium. W. C. Spink, M. D. Rausch. 2:20—130. Synthesis and Redox Reactions of Cofacial Binuclear Bis(/3-ketoenamine) Complexes. J. R. Bradbury, J. L. Hampton, A. W. Maverick. 2:40—131. New Triphosphine Diiron Hexacarbonyl Derivatives. R. B. King, F-J. Wu, Ε. Μ. Holt.

—153. Mixed Sulfur, Nitrogen Ligands in the Cadmium Coordination Sphere: Relationship Between Structure, 113Cd NMR Signal Positions and Shielding Tensor Components. H. Li, K. Lewinski, Ε. Α. Η. Grif­ fith, E. L. Amma. —154. Titanocene Dichloride Adducts with DNA. D. M. Riebeth, R. M. Wing. —155. Synthesis of Chromium(lll) Amino Acid and other Biologically Interesting Complexes. N. Rowan Gordon, L. Tian, W. Weng. —156. NMR Studies of Catechol-1,2-dioxygenase (CTD). J. B. Lynch, B. P. Murch, J. W. Pyrz, L. Que, Jr. —157. Synthesis and 1H NMR Spectroscop­ ic Studies of the Adducts of trans[Pt(NH3)2Ci2] with the DNA Fragments d(GpCpG) and d(ApGpGpCpCpT). C. Lèpre, D. Gibson, K. G. Strothkamp, S. J. Lippard. —158. Synthesis of Novel Mono- and Binuclear Copper Complexes. M. R. Malachowski, M. G. Davidson. Section F —159. ESR Studies of Copper TetraphenylArts Auditorium, Room 1-ABEF (1st Floor) porphyrin in Phospholipid Membranes. A. Pezeshk, P. M. Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, W. General—Applications of Main Group and K. Subczynski, W. E. Antholine. Coordination Chemistry —160. Magnetic Resonance Investigation of D. M. Stanbury, Presiding Tetracycline Metal Complexes. A. Pezeshk, S. C. Swinney. 2:00—138. Stereochemistry of Methanol —161. Models for Photosynthetic Oxygen Addition to Silènes. P. R. Jones, T. F. Evolution. Mono- and Binuclear MangaBates, A. F. Cowley, A. M. Arif. nese Schiff's Base Complexes. X. Li, M. 2:20—139. Preparation and Study of Novel Baker, V. L. Pecoraro. Main-Group Element Containing Hetero—162. Catalysis of Alkene Oxidation by cycles. B. N. Diel, W. G. Ambacher, T. L. Substituted Tetraphenyl Iron Porphyrins; Hubler. Formation of N-Alkylated Species. T. G. 2:40—140. Binucleating N,N' Ethylene BisTraylor, T. Nakano, A. R. Miksztal, B. E. (acetylacetone iminato) Schiff Base MaDunlap. crocycles. R. M. Buchanan, M. S. Ma—163. Fast Kinetic Methods in the Study of shuta, W. M. Pierce. Co and Imidazoles Binding to Iron(ll) Por3:00—141. Synthesis and Characterization phyrins. The Effect of Ortho Substituents of Neutral Cyclic Binucleating Bis-N 2 0 2 in Tetraphenylhemes. T. G. Traylor, D. Macrocycles. R. M. Buchanan, M. S. MaMagde, D. Taube, K. Jongeward, C. F. shuta, W. M. Pierce. Portela. 3:20—142. Synthesis and Characterization —164. Synthesis, Characterization and Reof Binuclear Copper(ll) Complexes Conactivity of Some Iron(lll) Schiff Base Comtaining Imidazole Ligands. R. M. Buchanplexes. X. Wang, M. E. Kotun, C. Blankenan, K. J. Oberhausen, T. Doman. ship, J. C. Fanning. 3:40—143. Rapid Metalloporphyrin Forma—165. Structure of the Calcium Complex of tion by N-Alkylporphyrins with CarbocaDOTA. J. H. Reibenspies, O. P. Anderson. tion Stabilizing Substituents. D. K. Laval—166. Synthesis, Characterization and lee, K. Liddane. Magnetic Properties of Binuclear Cate4:00—144. High Oxygen-Pressure Oxidation cholato Copper(ll) Complexes. R. M. Buof Ferrocyanide; Two Catalytic Pathways. chanan, C. Wilson-Blumenberg. M. A. Islam, D. M. Stanbury. —167. Synthesis and Spectroscopy of some 4:20—145. Synthesis, Structure and ProperCopper(ll) Complexes with N-Substituted ties of Y(lll) Macrocyclic Complexes. F. 2-Pyridylmethylimine Ligands. D. W. Benetollo, G. Bombieri, W. T. Hawkins, A. Johnson. Polo, L. M. Vallarino. —168. Low-Lying Excited Electronic States 4:40—146. Structural Studies of cisof Superexchânge-Coupled Chromium(lll) [PtCI2(PPh3)(XSR'R")] Complexes (X = 0, Binuclear Systems: Thermal, Chemical lone pair; R' = benzyl; R" = benzyl, and Magnetic Perturbations. L. Chen, J. ethyl). J. A. Davies, A. A. Pinkerton, A. W. Kenney III, M. I. S. Kenney. Sood, R. Syed. —169. Structure and Magnetism of some New Two to One Charge Transfer Phases TUESDAY EVENING Section A Based on Decamethyl Ferrocene (DMFc) and Polycyanide Electron Acceptors: On Currigan Exhibition Hall, Upper Lobby the Possibility of Stabilizing Spin Triplet General—Poster Session/Social Hour Species Having Temperature Dependent ( 8 = 1 ^ 8 = 0) Solid State Magnetic B. N. Diehl, G. A. Breuer, Presiding Properties. J. H. Zhang, W. M. Reiff, J. S. 5:30-6:30—147. Chicken Liver Sulfite OxiMiller, J. Calabrese. dase. Kinetics with Photoreduced Flavins —170. Low Temperature Magnetic Behavior and Intramolecular Electron Transfer. C. of some Fluoroferrates. M. J. Kwiecien, L. A. Kipke, M. A. Cusanovich, G. Tollin, R. Takacs, W. M. Reiff. A. Sunde, J. H. Enemark. * —171. Synthesis, Structure and Magnetism —148. Substitution Reactions at Sterically of a New Ferric Hydrogen Phosphate, Crowded Monomeric Molybdenum(V) Fe4P3012(OH)3. W. M. Reiff, L. Takacs, C. Centers. G. Backes-Dahmann, J. H. EneC. Torardi. mark. —172. Structural Features of thé Tetratellur—149. Long-Range Electron Transfer in ide Ion as a Ligand. A. W. Cordes, J. W. (NH3)4pyRu-Modified Myoglobins. J. L. Kolis. Karas, C. M. Lieber, H. B. Gray. —173. Spectrum, Structure and Magnetism —150. Photochemistry of d9-d9 Platinum of Acetamidinium Tetrachlorocuprate(ll). Complexes. M. H. Zietlow, H. B. Gray. K. Emerson, J. E. Drumheller, M. Press—151. Resonance Raman Studies of Iron(lll) prich, D. Nilsen. Dihydroporphyrins. N. J. Boldt, D. F. Bo—174. Absolute Configurations Determinacian. tion of Nickel(ll) Paphy Complexes Using —152. Characterization of Low Valent Iron Spectroscopic and X-ray Crystallographic Porphyrins. R. J. Donohoe, M. Atamian, D. Methods. J. F. Geldard, E. Sinn. F. Bocian. —175. Structures of Dithiophosphinate Complexes of Chromium(lll). A. A. Pinkerton, T. Buranda. —176. Multi-Nuclear NMR Investigations of Ligand-Centered vs. Metal-Centered Isomers of Platinum(ll) Complexes. L. E. Erickson, S. Maluleka. —177. Synthesis and Characterization of a Group of Cyclic Tetrameric Platinum Clusters. E. S. Peterson, Ε. Η. Abbott. 3:00—132. Photoisomerization of HRu3(CO) 1 0 (A*-COCH 3 ), an Unprecedented Oxy-

gen-to-Carbon Alkyl Migration. A. E. Friedman, P. C. Ford. 3:20—133. Synthesis and Characterization of Several New Osmium Isocyanato Clus­ ters. J. L. Zuffa, W. L. Gladfelter. 3:40—134. Asymmetric Recognition Be­ tween Triosmium Clusters and Their μAcyl Ligands. T. J. Lynch, M. C. Helvenston. 4:00—135. Synthesis, Characterization and Properties of Metal Phosphine, Phos­ phide, and Phosphinidine Complexes of Osmium, Ruthenium and Rhenium. A. M. Arif, T. A. Bright, R. A. Jones. 4:20—136. Syntheses and Structures of Coinage Metal Pyrazolato Complexes. R. G. Raptis, H. H. Murray, J. P. Fackler, Jr. 4:40—137. Oxidation of Organometallic Complexes with Organic Radical Cations. C. C. Cummins, S. E. Kegley.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

59

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—178. Synthesis and Reactions of a Red Luminescent Platinum(ll) Cluster Complex with the Pyrophosphite Ligand. D. R. Bedgood, Jr., Ε. Η. Abbott. —179. Neutral Solvent/Crown Ether Inter­ actions. Crystallization and Structural Characterization of Dibenzo-18-crown6.2(CH3CN) and Dibenzo-18-crown-6.2(CH3N02), Assignment of Specific C-H.. .0 Interactions. E. J. Voss, R. D. Rogers. —180. f-Element/Crown Ether Complexes. Hydrogen Bonding in Actinide Complexes of Crown Ethers. M. M. Benning, R. D. Rogers. —181. Study of Uranium Clusters and Hy­ drolysis Polymers Using Fast Atom Bom­ bardment Mass Spectrometry (FABMS). D. L. Perry. —182. Complexation Differences Between Rare Earth Perchlorates and Nitrates in Water and Aqueous Methanol. R. Bakhsandehfar, L. Contreras, Κ. Ho, Η. Β. Silber. —183. Complexation Properties of some Polyprotic Phosphonic Acids. A. J. Bruecken, J. E. Bauman, Jr. —184. Study of the Kinetics and Thermody­ namics of Aqueous Silica Solutions. D. J. Clevette, J. E. Bauman, Jr. —185. Synthesis and Characterization of some New Alkyaminomethylphosphonic Acid Esters. M. R. Charandabi, M. L. Ettel, K. W. Morse. —186. Synthesis and Reactions of Chlorodioxygen(2-phenylazopyridine)-norbomadienerhodium(l). J. J. Robertson, R. A. Krause.

Section Β Currigan Exhibition Hall, Upper Lobby General—Poster Session/Social Hour

N. Rowan Gordon, R. A. Krause, Presiding 6:30-7:30—187. Synthesis, Characteriza­ tion, and Structure of New Gold(l) Com­ plexes. S. I. Cuadrado, M. M. Muir, C. L. Barnes, J. A. Muir, L. B. Pulgar. —188. Photosensitization of Dihalotetraamine Rhodium(lll) Complexes. Η. Μ. Tor­ res, M. M. Muir. —189. Comparison of the Electronic Struc­ ture Factors of Si-Η and C-H Bond Activa­ tion. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of (77sC5H5)Mn(CO)2HSiCl3. A. Rai-Chaudhuri, D. L. Lichtenberger. —190. Valence Electronic Structure of Iron and Ruthenium Nitrosyl and Methylene Bridged Organometallic Dimers. A. S. Copenhaver, D. L. Lichtenberger, J. L. Hub­ bard. —191. Direct Electronic Structure Compari­ son Between Metal-Metal Single Bonded [ C p M ( C O ) 3 ] 2 and T r i p l e Bonded [CpM(CO)2]2: Effect of Carbonyl Addition. G. D. Hlnch, D. L. Lichtenberger. —192. Valence Electronic Structure of [lr^-3,5-Dimethylpyrazole)(CO)2]2. A. S. Copenhaver, D. L. Lichtenberger, M. D. Hopkins, J. L. Marshall, Η. Β. Gray. —193. Transient Species Formed During the Photolysis of frans-[Ru(NH3)4L(S02)]+. D. A. Johnson, E. Wallis. —194. Structural Characterization and Photophysical Properties of Methyl Substitut­ ed Phenylpyridine Iridium(lll) Complexes. F. O. Garces, Κ. A. King, C. A. Craig, P. J. Spellane, R. J. Watts. —195. Photophysical Properties of Orthometallated Pd(ll) and Pd(ll)/Rh(lll) Com­ plexes. C. A. Craig, F. O. Garces, R. J. Watts. —196. Gel Filtration Chromatography and 29 Si NMR Studies of Polymeric Silicates. J. J. Fitzgerald, J. Burns, C. Nebo, M. C. Fuerstenau, C. E. Bronnimann. —197. Physical-Chemical Studies of Aluminosilicate Complexes in Aqueous Solu­ tion. J. J. Fitzgerald, L. Mackley, M. C. Fuerstenau, C. E. Bronnimann. —198. Structures of Copper Acetate Monohydrate and Copper Acetate Monoacetic Acid Solvate at 153K. A. Fitzgerald, J. Fait, R. A. Howald. —199. Stabilization of AICI 2 + by Nitrogen and Oxygen Donor Ligands. C. M. Means, N. C. Means, S. G. Bott, A. W. Coleman, H. Zhang, J. L. Atwood. —200. Novel Metal Complexes of Calixarenes. N. C. Means, A. W. Coleman, S. G. Bott, J. L. Atwood.

60

February 9, 1987 C&EN

—201. Formation of Silicon-Silicon Bonds in Dehydrogenative Coupling of Heterocy­ clic Hydrosilanes. J. Y. Corey, L. S. Chang, E. R. Corey. —202. Synthesis of Boron-Nitride from Polyborazinyl Amines. C. K. Narula, R. T. Paine, R. Schaeffer. —203. Reactions of an Organotungsten Phosphenium Complex. H-U. Reisacher, R. T. Paine. —204. Nature of the Homonuclear Bond in the Dichalcogenides—Revisited. L. Pe­ ter, G. Loi. —205. Luminescence Analyses of the Com­ plexation of Terbium with Dipicolinic Acid. T. K. Trout, F. E. Brinckman, J. M. Bellama, E. J. Parks, R. A. Faltynek. —206. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of F16016OF, F0 18 0 18 F and F18016OF. W. H. Woodruff, Ε. Μ. Larson, B. I. Swanson, S. A. Kinkead, L. H. Jones, P. G. Eller. —207. A Pd Doped Heterogeneous Catalyst Which Converts Synthesis Gas to Isobutyl Alcohol. W. Keim, M. Roper, J. Seibring, G. Kolle-Gorgen, N. A. Goeckner. —208. Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Functionalization Reactions with Iron, Rhodium, and Ruthenium Complexes. W. D. Jones, W. P. Kosar, G. P. Foster, J. M. Putinas, R. Duttweiler. —209. On the Nature of the Hexagonal Molybdates: the Crystal Structure of (Na.2H20)Mo5.33[H4.5]o67018. E. M. McCarron III, D. M. Thomas, J. C. Calabrese. —210. Gas-Phase UV Photoelectron Spec­ tra and DV-Xo Calculations on PR2 Bridged Carbonyl Metal Dimers. G. Granozzi, R. Bertoncello, G. A. Rizzi, M. Casarin. —211. Calculated Deuterium Quadrupole Coupling Constants: Application to MetalHydrogen Bonds and Perturbed Methyl Groups. K. Guo, L. G. Butler. —212. Charge on Carbon in a Bridging Meth­ ylene Iron Dimer as Obtained from SolidState Deuterium NMR. M. I. Altbach, Y. Hiyama, L. G. Butler. —213. Chemistry of Sila-, Germa-, and Stanna-Carboranes. U. Siriwardane, M. S. Islam, T. A. West, N. S. Hosmane. —214. Synthesis of arachno- Boron Hydride Dianions by Alkali Metal Reduction and Deprotonation Reactions: High Yield Con­ version of B5H9 to B 5 Hn. T. D. Getman, J. R. Wermer, S. G. Shore. —215. BH3 as a Dual Reagent. A New Route to Metal Rich Cobaltaboranes. T. P. Fehlner, J. Feilong, A. L. Rheingold. —216. Thiolato-Bridged Ti(IV)-Cu(l) Heterobimetallics with d1° - * d° Dative Bonds. T. A. Wark, D. W. Stephan. —217. Novel Organometallic Complexes In­ corporating Remote Phosphine Substitut­ ed Tetramethylcyclopentadiene (/) Li­ gands. D. M. Bensley, Jr., E. A. Mintz. —218. Thermally Induced Rearrangement of «-Zirconocenyl Thioethers: CarbonCarbon Bond Formation via a Transition Metal Hydroxy Methyl or Metalloxirane Analogue. A. S. Ward, E. A. Mintz, M. P. Kramer. —219. Synthesis and Polymerization of [η5C5H4(CH==CH2)] Mn(NO)(S2C6H3CH3). A New Class of Organometallic Polymers. E. J. Miller, M. J. Naughton, R. Heintz. —220. Alkane and Alcohol Oxidative Addi­ tion to (OC)3Mn-. R. N. McDonald, M. T. Jones. —221. Remarkable Lability Toward Substi­ tution of Sodium Tetracarbonylcobaltate(1—). F. Ungvary, A. Wojcicki. —222. Synthesis and Reactivity of α,βUnsaturated Tungsten Carbene Complex­ es: X-ray Crystal Structure of (CO)5W[qCOCH3X772-CH=CH2)]W(CO)5. M. Liang, D. W. Macomber, R. D. Rogers. —223. Solution Structures of Mixed-Metal Cobalt-Rhodium Carbonyl Derivatives. I. T. Horvath, G. Bor. —224. Formation of a Tetrameric Ruthenium Complex Using an Anionic Oxygen Li­ gand, the Phenoxide Ion. T. D. Kim, T. J. McNeese.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

—225. Structural Isomers of the Triply Bonded Complexes Re2X2^-02CR)2(M-dppm)2 (X = CI, Br; R = Me, Et, Ph; dppm = Ph2PCH2PPh2). D. R. Derringer, P. E. Fanwick, R. A. Walton. —226. Structural Isomerism within the Class of Complexes of the Type M2X4(dppee)2 (M = Mo, Re; X = CI, Br; dppee = c/s-Ph2PCH=CHPPh2). M. Bakir, P. E. Fanwick, R. A. Walton. —227. Synthesis, Structure and Reactivity of Organosamarium Methyl and Tetramethylaluminate Complexes. L. R. Cham­ berlain, J. W. Ziller, W. J. Evans. —227A. New Compounds Containing the Early Transition Metals Relevant to Poly­ merization Catalysts. N. W. Alcock, P. N. Bartlett, D. Gordon, T. F. Illson, M. G. H. Wallbridge. —463. Synthesis and Reactions of Fe(C5H5)(CO)L(NOx). R. D. Feltham, C. A. Han­ sen. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson, Convention Complex, Majestic Ballroom (Majestic Level). International Symposium on Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers: Phosphorus Containing Polymers H. R. Allcock,

Presiding

8:30—228. Overview of the Current Status of Polyphosphazene Chemistry. H. R. Allcock. 9:30—229. Polymer Electrolytes Based on Polyphosphazene Backbones. D. F. Shriver, J. S. Tonge, A. Barriola, P. M. Blonsky, H. R. Allcock, S. Kwon, P. Austin. 10:30—230. Phosphazene Polymers: Syn­ thesis-Structure-Properties. R. E. Singler, M. S. Sennett, R. A. Willingham.

Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 2-CD (2nd Floor) General—Biological Electron Transfer

Ν. Μ. Kostic, Presiding 9:00—232. Photoinduced Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Linked Donor, Accep­ tor, Ruthenium(li) Trisbipyridine Systems. C. M. Elliott, C. E. L. Headford, C. Baldy, E. Danielson, T. J. Meyer, D. F. Kelley. 9:20—233. Covalent Linking of Cytochomes c via a Redox-Active Rhodium Complex— A New Approach to the Study of Intraprotein Electron-Transfer Reactions. J. Chen, Ν. Μ. Kostic. 9:40—234. Partitioning of Ferrocenium Ions Between Multiple Redox Sites on Spinach Plastocyanin. J. R. Pladziewicz, M. S. Brenner. 10:00—235. Redox Properties of the Nitrogenase Iron-Molybdenum Cofactor. W. E. Newton, S. F. Gheller, F. A. Schultz. 10:20—236. Spectral and Electrochemical Studies of Ferric Porphyrin Hydroxide Complexes. S. J. Schmittle, C. M. Elliott. 10:40—237. Anaerobic Reduction of Type-3 Copper in Laccase in the Absence of Type 1 and Type 3 Copper. R. Tamilarasan, D. R. McMillin. 11:00—238. Oxidation Reactions of a Copper(ll) Tripeptideamide by Dioxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide to Form a Stable Copper(lll) Complex. J. P. Hinton, H. D. Lee, D. W. Margerum. 11:20—239. Characterization of the Nickelill) and Nickel(lll) Bis-complexes of Di-«aminoisobutyric acid. S. L. Anliker, M. W. Beach, D. W. Margerum. Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 1-CD (1st Floor) Symposium on Metals in Olefin Polymeriza­ tion S. D. Ittel, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—240. Ethylene Polymerization by Cp2Zr(R)+ Complexes. R. F. Jordan, C. S. Bajgur, S. F. Echols.

9:15—241. Synthesis and Characterization of Chiral Metallocene Catalysts for the Stereospecific Polymerization of Propyl­ ene. Η. Η. Brintzinger. 9:50—242. New Results on the Polymeriza­ tion of Olefins with Chiral Zirconium Cata­ lysts. W. Kaminsky. 10:25—Intermission. 10:35—243. Block Polymers Through Living Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization. R. H. Grubbs, L. Cannizzo, B. Novak, T. Swager, F. Klavetter. 11:05—244. Soluble Vanadium Based Sys­ tems for the Living Polymerization of Ole­ fins. Y. Doi.

Section D Arts Auditorium, Room 2-AF (2nd Floor) Hydrazine Centennial Conference (300): History and Manufacture, cosponsored with Division of Organic Chemistry E. W. Schmidt,

Presiding

9:00—245. Early History of Hydrazine Syn­ thesis: From Hydrazobenzene to "Double Ammonia." J. J. Bohning. 9:40—246. Chemistry of the BAYER Hydra­ zine Process. R. Schliebs. 10:00—247. Hydrazine Manufacture: From Chlorine to Hydrogen Peroxide. J. P. Schirmann. 10:20—248. Dehydration of Hydrazine Aqueous Solutions with Sodium Hydrox­ ide. I. C. C. Calegào, M. A. Ferreira, A. G. de Freitas. 10:40—249. Optimization of Hydrazine Dehydration Process with Sodium Hydroxide. M. A. Ferreira, I. C. C. Calegào, A. G. de Freitas. Section Ε Arts Auditorium, Room 2-BE (2nd Floor) General—Heteropolyatomic Complexes Η. Η. Murray,

Presiding

9:00—250. Dual-Ring Phosphination of a Ti­ tanium Mixed-Sandwich: A New Route to Heterobimetallic Derivatives. L. Β. Κ00Ι, M. D. Rausch, R. D. Rogers. 9:20—251. Conformational Flexibility and Redox Chemistry of Early-Late Heterobimetallics Derived from the "Metalloligand" Cp2Ti(SCH2CH2CH2PPh2)2. G. S. White, D. W. Stephan. 9:40—252. Synthesis and Characterization of (C5H5KCO)2(H)Re-R(H)(PPh3)2. A Hetero­ bimetallic Dihydride. C. P. Casey, E. W. Rutter, Jr. 10:00—253. Dinuclear Reductive Elimina­ tion as a Route to Tin/Rhenium Polyhydride Clusters. B. R. Sutherland, D. E. Westerberg, K. G. Caulton. 10:20—254. Linear Trinuclear Heterometallic Complexes. H. H. Murray, R. G. Raptis, D. A. Briggs, L. C. Porter, J. P. Fackler, Jr. 10:40—255. Nucleophilic Attack and C-C Bond Cleavage of the CCO Ligand on [Fe2Co(CO)9(CCO)]_. S. Ching, D. F. Shriver. 11:00—256. Synthesis, Structure and Reac­ tivity of Butterfly Oxo Clusters. C. K. Schauer, D. F. Shriver. 11:20—257. New Cationic Gold Phosphine Clusters with Rhenium, Platinum and Ruthenium. P. D. Boyle, B. J. Johnson, B. D. Alexander, S. M. Johnson, A. M. Mueting, L. H. Pignolet. 11:40—258. Proton Transfer as a Mechanis­ tic Component of Alcohol Reductive Elim­ ination: Proton-Induced Rearrangement of a ReAu3 Polyhedron. B. R. Sutherland, K. Folting, W. E. Streib, J. C. Huffman, K. G. Caulton.

Section F Arts Auditorium, Room 2-G (2nd Floor) General—Nitrogen, Phosphorus and SulfurContaining Ligands

S. G. Shore, Presiding 9:00—259. Synthesis and Reactivity of the Novel Hydrido-Anilide Complex transPtH(NHPh)(PEt3)2. R. L. Cowan, W. C. Trogler. 9:20—260. Transition Metal Complexes with Bridging Nitride Ligands. N. M. Doherty, C. M. Jones, S. C. Critchlow. 9:40—261. Tris(chromiumtricarbonyl-7j6-benzyl)amine. M. C. Helvenston, T. J. Lynch.

10:00—262. Internal Diels-Alder Cycloaddi­ tion Reactions Promoted by Iron(ll) Metal Centers. L M. Wilkes, J. H. Nelson, H. Ji. 10:20—263. Preparation, Structure and Dy­ namics of S-Bonded Iron Thiophene Com­ plexes. J. D. Goodrich, P. N. Nickias, J. P. Selegue. 10:40—264. Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide with (7?5-C5Me5)Ru(CO)2H: Insertion of S0 2 into the Ru-H Bond and Oxygen Transfer to Form (775-C5Me5)Ru(CO)2S03H. K. A. Kubat-Martin, G. J. Kubas, R. R. Ryan. 11:00—265. Characterization of a Sulfido Bridged Dinuclear Molybdenum Complex with Oxo and Alkenedithiolate Ligands and its Reactivity with Hydrogen. L. Tanner, R. C. Haltiwanger, M. Rakowski Dubois. 11:20—266. Synthesis and Chemistry of [(CpMo) 2 (M-S)(M-SH)(M-S 2 CH 2 )] + (CF 3 OS0 2 )-. T. L. Tonker, J. C. V. Laurie, M. Rakowski Dubois. 11:40—267. Synthesis of Polyphosphazenes and Cyclic Model Compounds with Iron Cyclopentadienyl Carbonyl Side Groups. G. S. McDonnell, M. N. Mang, M. Parvez, H. R. Allcock. 12:00—268. Anionic Iron Carbidocarbonyl Clusters with Sulfur Dioxide Ligands. P. L. Bogdan, M. Sabat, S. A. Sunshine, C. Woodcock, D. F. Shriver. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Radisson, Convention Complex, Majestic Ballroom (Majestic Level) International Symposium on Polymers: Phosphorus Containing Polymers H. R. Allcock,

Presiding

1:30—269. Polyphosphazenes—Perfor­ mance Polymers for Specialty Applica­ tions. H. R. Penton. 2:20—270. Hybrid Inorganic-Organic Poly­ mers Derived from Organofunctional Phosphazenes. C. W. Allen. 3:10—271. Poly(alkyl/arylphosphazenes). R. H. Neilson, R. R. Ford, R. Hani, A. K. Roy, G. M. Scheide, U. G. Wettermark, P. Wisian-Neilson. 4:00—272. Graft Copolymers Derived from Poly(alkyl/arylphosphazenes). P. WisianNeilson, R. R. Ford, M. A. Schaefer. 4:20—273. UV-Preresonance Raman Spec­ tra of Cyclic and Polymeric Phospha­ zenes. D. M. Friedrich, L. S. Dake, G. J. Exarhos. Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 2-CD (2nd Floor) General—Electron Transfer and Advances in Bioinorganic Chemistry A. L. Crumbliss,

Presiding

2:00—274. Model Studies for the Chemical Characterization of the Reactive Interme­ diates for Horseradish Peroxidase and Cy­ tochrome P-450. D. T. Sawyer, H. Sugimoto, H-C. Tung. 2:20—275. Cytochrome P-450 Modelling: Mechanistic Studies of Olefin Epoxidation and Porphyrin N-Alkylation. P. D. Hamp­ ton, J. P. Collman. 2:40—276. Infrared Spectroscopy and Pho­ tochemistry of Iron-Ethylene Oxide in Cryogenic Matrices. FTIR Spectra of Ferraoxetane, Ethylene Iron Oxide 7r-Complex and Vinyliron Hydroxide. Ζ. Η. Kafafi, R. H. Hauge, W. E. Billups, J. L. Margrave. 3:00—277. Sulfur K-Edge and Mo L-Edge XAS of the Nitrogenase Iron-Molybdenum Cofactor. W. E. Newton, S. F. Gheller. B. Hedman, A. L. Roe, K. O. Hodgson. 3:20—278. Resonance Raman Studies of Photosynthetic Reaction Centers and Chlorophyll Model Compounds. N. J. Boldt, R. J. Donohoe, D. F. Bocian. 3:40—279. Chloride-Induced Assembly of Manganese(ll) Complexes Having Tetranuclear and Chain Structures. J. E. Sheats, R. Ponticiello, B. C. Unni-Nàir, D. Van Engen, G. C. Dismukes, V. Petrouleas. 4:00—280. NMR Studies of the Binuclear Iron Site in Anion Complexes of Uteroferrin. R. C. Scarrow, J. W. Pyrz, L. Que, Jr. 4:20—281. Towards a Functional Model for the Catechol Dioxygenases. L. Que, Jr., R. C. Kolanczyk. 4:40—282. 1 H NMR Spectra of Rubredoxins: New Resonances Assignable to α-CH and itf-CH2 Hydrogens of Cysteinate Ligands to Fe(ll). M. T. Werth, D. M. Kurtz, Jr., I. Moura, J. LeGall.

Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 1-CD (1st Floor) Symposium on Metals in Olefin Polymeriza­ tion

S. D. Ittel, Organizer, Presiding 1:30—283. Hydrogen Transfer Catalysis. Cobalt(ll) Catalyzed Molecular Weight Control. A. H. Janowicz. 2:05—284. New Type of «-Olefin Polymer­ ization with Ni(O) Phosphorane Catalysts. G. Fink, V. Mohring. 2:40—285. Nickel Catalysts for the Copolymerization of Ethylene with Co and Polar Olefins. U. Klabunde, D. C. Roe, S. D. Ittel. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—286. Mechanism of Co(lll)-Catalyzed Ethylene Polymerization. M. Brookhart, D. Lincoln, D. Rivers, G. Schmidt. 4:00—287. Mechanistic Aspects of Transi­ tion Metal Catalyzed Copolymerization of Olefins with Carbon Monoxide. T-W. Lai, J. S. Brumbaugh, A. Sen. Section D Arts Auditorium, Theater (Theater Level) Hydrazine Centennial Conference: Analy­ sis and Oxidation E. W. Schmidt,

Presiding

2:00—288. Sub-ppm Hydrazine(s) Dosime­ try. S. L. Rose-Pehrsson, J. R. Wyatt. 2:20—289. Hydrazine Detection Using Smart Microsensors. S. L. Rose-Pehrs­ son, J. Grate, J. R. Wyatt. 2:40—290. Analyses of Mixtures Containing Hydrazine and Water by Gas Chromatog­ raphy in the Absence of Standards. M. A. Ferreira, A. G. de Freitas, I. C. C. Calegâo, L. A. Basso. 3:00—291. Vapor Phase Hydrazine Loss Processes in a Teflon Film Reaction Chamber. D. A. Stone, F. L. Wiseman. 3:20—292. Chemistry of Hydrazine Oxidation in Water at High Temperature. G. R. Brubaker, M. M. Geoffrey. 3:40—293. Chemistry of Corrosion Inhibition and Surface Passivation of Mild Steel by Hydrazine in Power Plant Circuits. G. Bohnsack. 4:00—294. Ozonation of Wastewater Containing Hydrazine, Monomethyl Hydrazine, Unsymmetrical Dimethyl Hydrazine and Dimethylnitrosamine. B. J. Jody, S. Lewis, H. Takimoto, H. Judeikis, E. Hagan, P. Kosenka. 4:40—295. Modeling the Ozonization of Wastewater Containing Hydrazines and Dimethylnitrosamine. H. S. Judeikis. 5:00—296. Surface-Catalyzed Air Oxidation of Hydrazines. J. E. Kilduff, D. D. Davis, S. L. Koontz. Section Ε Arts Auditorium, Room 2-BE (2nd Floor) General—Zeolites and Layered Material T. J. Pinnavaia,

Presiding

2:00—297. Layered Inorganic/Conducting Polymer Hybrid Materials. In Situ Interca­ lation and Polymerization of Pyrrole in FeOCI. M. G. Kanatzidis, H. O. Marcy, L. M. Tonge, C. R. Kannewurf, T. J. Marks. 2:20—298. Intrazeolite Chemistry of Nickel(O) Complexes Studied by EXAFS, Sol­ id-state NMR and FTIR Spectroscopy. T. Bein, S. J. McLain, R. D. Farlee, D. C. Corbin, K. Moller, G. D. Stucky, G. Woolery, D. Sayers. 2:40—299. Size-Entrapped Organometallic Complexes in NaY Zeolite. S. J. McLain, R. D. Farlee. 3:00—300. Flexibility of the Zeolite Rho Framework: Effects of Ion Exchange. D. R. Corbin, G. D. Stucky, M. M. Eddy, Ε. Ε. Prince, L. Abrams, G. A. Jones. 3:20—301. EXAFS Analysis of Pd and Bime­ tallic Exchanged Faujasites. K. Moller, T. Bein. 3:40—302. Solid-state 29Si NMR and Infra­ red Studies of the Reactions of Mono- and Polyfunctional Silanes with Zeolite Sur­ faces. T. Bein, R. F. Carver, R. D. Farlee, G. D. Stucky.

4:00—303. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Ester Derivatives of Zirconium Bis(monohydrogen orthophosphate) Mono­ hydrate with α-Layer Structure. C. Y. Ortiz-Avila, A. Clearfield. 4:20—304. Surface Organometallic Chem­ istry of Layered Double Hydroxides. For­ mation of Rhodium and Platinum Cluster Carbonyl Anions on Hydrotalcite. E. P. Giannelis, T. J. Pinnavaia. 4:40—305. Intercalation and Host Lattice Reconstruction: Two Reaction Paths for Hydrogen Uranyl Phosphate and Hydrogen Uranyl Arsenate. G. L. Rosenthal, P. K. Dorhout, A. B. Ellis. 5:00—306. Intercalation Chemistry of Ammoniated Titanium Disulfide. M. J. McKelvy, G. W. O'Bannon, R. F. Marzke, W. S. Glaunsinger, R. B. Von Dreele.

Section F Arts Auditorium, Room 2-AF (2nd Floor) General—C1( Lanthanide and Actinide Chemistry R. E. Cramer,

Presiding

2:00—307. Reactions of Rhodium Octaethylporphyrin Dimer with Carbon Monoxide: Equilibrium Studies of Competitive Inser­ tion and Adduct Formation Reactions. V. L. Coffin, B. B. Wayland, W. R. Brennen. 2:20—308. Synthesis of Metallacyclic Man­ ganese Complexes from Formyl and Methoxymethyl Complexes. D. H. Gibson, S. K. Mandai, K. Owens. 2:40—309. Syntheses and Reactivity of Bridging Rhenium C0 2 Complexes (TJ5C5H5)Re(NO)(PPh3)(C02M). D. R. Senn, J. A. Gladysz. 3:00—310. Metallocarboxylates of Iron. D. H. Gibson, T-S. Ong. 3:20—311. Alkoxycarbonyls, L2(CO)3MnOC(0)R, Derived from Carbon Monoxide In­ sertion into Manganese Alkoxides. D. J. Sheeran, M. Orchin. 3:40—312. New Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Nitrogen Bond Forming Reactions at a Diiron Methylidyne Complex. C. P. Casey, M. Crocker. 4:00—313. Insertion of PhNCO into the Ura­ nium Carbon Bond of Cp 3 U=CHP(Me)(R)(Ph) to Form Cp3U[(NPh)(0)CCHP(Me)(R)(Ph)]. R. E. Cramer, J. H. Jeong, J. W. Gilje. 4:20—314. Cationic Organoacetinides. Z. Lin, J-F. LeMarechal, T. J. Marks. 4:40—315. Reactivity of (C5Me5)2Sm Unsat­ urated Hydrocarbons. T. A. Ulibarri, W. J. Evans. 5:00—316. f-Element/Crown Ether Com­ plexes. Synthetic and Structural Chemis­ try of Crown Ether Complexes of 4f and 5f Metal Chlorides. R. D. Rogers.

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson, Convention Complex, Majestic Ballroom (Majestic Level) International Symposium on Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers: Other Inorganic/ Organometallic Polymers C. W. Allen,

Presiding

8:30—332. Electron Transport in and Electrocatalysis with Polymeric Films of Metallotetraphenylporphyrins. R. W. Murray, B. A. White, A. Bettelheim. 9:30—333. Electronically Conducting Films of Poly-trisbipyridine Metal Complexes. C. M. Elliott, J. G. Redepenning, S. J. Schmittle, E. Balk, C. Myers. 10:30—334. Cationic and Condensation Po­ lymerization of Organometallic Polymers. K. E. Gonsalves, M. D. Rausch. 11:15—335. Copper Complexes with Poly(2-vinylpyridine). A. M. Lyons, Ε. Μ. Pearce, M. J. Vasile, A. M. Mujsce, J. V. Waszczak. 11:30—336. Soluble Metal Chelate Poly­ mers of Coordination Numbers Six, Seven and Eight. R. D. Archer, B. Wang, V. J. Tramontano, A. Y. Lee, V. O. Ochaya. 11:50—388. Soluble Poly(octaalkoxyphthalocyanatosiloxane)s. T. Sauer, G. Wegner, W. T. Ford. Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 2-CD (2nd Floor) General—Bioorganic and Medicinal

WEDNESDAY EVENING Radisson, Convention Lobby (Lobby Level) International Symposium on Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers Polyphospha­ zenes and Other Inorganic and Organome­ tallic Polymers Poster Session/Social Hour C. W. Allen, J. O'Reilly,

—324. Polymer-Encapsulated Metal Isocyanide Complexes: Synthesis and Elec­ trochemical Studies. C. G. Francis, P. D. Morand, P. P. Radford. —325. Liquid Crystalline Polyphosphazene. C. Kim, H. R. Allcock. —326. Raman Spectroscopy of the pH De­ pendence of the Sol-Gel Transformation. J. L. Lippert, S. B. Melpolder, L. M. Kelts. —327. High Purity (PNCI2)3 and (PNCI2)4 Pro­ cess. T. Nishikawa, H. Tanino, T. Okamoto, S. Ueyama, K. Fujikawa. —328. Liquid Crystalline Side Chain Phos­ phazenes. R. E. Singler, R. A. Willingham, R. W. Lenz, A. Furukawa, H. Finkelmann. —329. Organometallic Liquid Crystal Poly­ mers: Paramagnetic-Diamagnetic Copol­ ymers. S. I. Stupp, J. S. Moore. —330. Polarized Specular Reflectance Spectroscopy of Planar Stacked Conduc­ tors and Their Precursors: σ Overlap vs. Exciton Formation. R. L. Musselman. —331. Solution Properties of Organosilane Polymers as a Function of Temperature. P. M. Cotts, J. Maxka, R. D. Miller. —331 A. Synthesis and Characterization of One- and Two-Atom Bridged Shish-Kebab Polymers, J. P. Collman, G. T. Yee, J. T. McDevitt, M. B. Zisk, L. G. McCullough. —331B. Polybis(pyrrolyl)phosphazene. R. C. Haddon, S. V. Chichester, S. M. Stein.

Presiding

5:30—317. Identification and Kinetics of Dimeric Sol-Gel Species by 29Si NMR. R. A. Assink, B. D. Kay, D. H. Doughty. —318. Hydrolysis and Condensation Kinet­ ics of the Si(OCH3):CH3OH:H20 Sol-Gel Reaction. R. A. Assink, B. D. Kay. —319. Polymers Containing Cyclothiaphosphazene Units. J. C. van de Grampel, A. Jekel, K. S. Dhathathreyan, C. W. Allen, D. E. Brown. —320. Theoretical Models for Inorganic Polymers—Chemical Bonding in Hexafluorotriphosphazene (F2PN)3. K. F. Fer­ ris, P. Friedman, D. M. Friedrich. —321. Dilute Solution Properties of Modified Poly[bis(trifluoroethoxy)phosphazene], [NP(OCH2CF3)2]n. W. T. Ferrar, A. S. Mar­ shall, E. C. Flood, K. E. Goppert, D. Y. Myers. —322. Charge Transport and Novel Chemical Pathways of Electrodes Modified with Electropolymerized Layers of [Co(v-terpy)2]2+ A. R. Guadalupe, D. A. Usifer, K. T. Potts, H. D. Abruna. —323. Oxygen Gas Permeability of Polyorganophosphazene Membranes in Water. M. Kajiwara, T. Kojima.

L. Que, Presiding

,

9:00—338. Synthesis, Characterization and Spectroscopic Properties of Binuclear lron(ll)-lron(lll) Complexes. B. P. Murch, A. S. Borovik, L. Que, Jr. 9:20—339. 1H NMR Studies of High-Spin (S = 5/2) Iron(lll) Porphyrin and Chlorin Com­ plexes. M. J. Pawlik, P. K. Miller, M. A. Levstik, S. H. Strauss. 9:40—340. First Row Transition Metal Perchlorate Adducts with Theobromine. C. M. Mikulski, M. K. Kurlan, M. Bayne, M. Gaul, Ν. Μ. Karayannis. 10:00—341. (Terpyridine)platinum(ll) Chromophore as a Spectroscopic Tag for Pro­ teins. High Selectivity in the Labeling of Histidine Residues in Cytochrome c. H. M. Brothers II, Ν. Μ. Kostic. 10:20—342. Controlled Oligomerization of Myoglobin by Covalent Linking Through Platinum—A New Approach to Hemoglo­ bin Modeling. A. J. Lukes, Ν. Μ. Kostic.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

61

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10:40—343. Metallocene Antitumor Agents. Solution and Solid State Studies of Mo(C5H5)2Cl2 Binding to DNA Constitu­ ents. L Y. Kuo, M. G. Kanatzidis, T. J. Marks. 11:00—344. Preparation and Properties of Tetra[p-<1,2-dicarbadodecaboranyl)phenyl] Porphine and Bilocalization of Its Nido De~- rivative. S. B. Kahl. 11:20—345. Tetranuclear Oxide-bridged Man­ ganese Complexes Containing Mn402 Cores: Models for the Active Site of Photosynthetic Oxygen Evolution. J. B. Vincent, J. C. Huffman, G. Christou, D. N. Hendrickson, H-R. Chang. 11:40—346. "Double Pivot" Mechanism for Photosynthetic Oxygen Evolution. J. B. Vincent, G. Christou.

Section C Arts Auditorium, Theater (Theater Level) Symposium on Metals in Olefin Polymeriza­ tion i

A. H. Janowicz, Organizer; Presiding 9:00—347. Mechanism of Group Transfer Polymerization. W. J. Brittain, D. Y. Sogah. 9:35—348. Theoretical Models for Group Transfer Polymerization. D. A. Dixon, W. B. Farnham. 10:10—349. Aluminum Porphyrin Catalysts for Polymerization of Epoxides, Lactones, and Vinyl Monomers. S. Inoue, T. Aida. 10:45—Intermission. 10:55—350. Catalyst for Producing Bimodal MWD Polyethylene. P. M. Stricklen. 11:30—351. Chemistry of MgCI2/ROH/TiCI4/ Ethyl Benzoate Supported Catalysts for Polypropylene. T. J. Burkhardt, A. W. Langer, D. Barist, W. G. Funk, T. Gaydos.

9:20—363. Synthesis and Structure of a New Trinuclear Cluster Anion M03CIH 2with a Spin Quartet Ground State. T. P. Blatchford, R. E. McCarley. 9:40—364. Molecular Engineering of Solid State Materials: Organometallic Building Blocks. P. J. Fagan, M. D. Ward, J. V. Caspar, J. C. Calabrese. 10:00—365. Structural Effects of Concate­ nated Donor Molecules in Low Dimensional Solids: the [(7?5-C5Me5)Ru(776-C6Me6)][TCNQ] Polymorphs and [(775-C5Me5)Ru(224,4-cyclophane)Ru(775-C5Me5)] [TCNQ] x (x = 2,4). M. D. Ward, P. J. Fagan, J. C. Calabrese, D. C. Johnson. 10:20—366. Encapsulation of Transition Metals within Iodide Clusters of Zirconium and Rare-Earth Metals. T. Hughbanks, G. Rosenthal, J. D. Corbett. 10:40—367. Structure and Properties of Two Extended Chain Compounds, Y4I5C and Y6I7C2. S. M. Kauzlarich, T. Hughbanks, J. D. Corbett, P. Klavins, R. N. Shelton. 11:00—368. Organometallic Precursors to Silicon Carbide/Aluminum Nitride Solid Solutions. M. L. J. Hackney, L. V. Interrante, C. K. Whitmarsh, Z. Jiang, G. A. Slack. 11:20-369. Organometallic Donor-Acceptor Complexes with Non-Planar Constituents: the Zig-zag Linear Chain Complex [(η6C6Me6)2M][/so-C4(CN)6] (M = Fe, Ru). M. D. Ward, D. A. Dixon. 11:40—370. Organometallic Route to the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Titanium Carbide Films at Exceptionally Low Tem­ peratures. G. S. Girolami, J. A. Jensen, D. M. Pollina, C. M. Allocca, A. E. Kaloyeros, W. S. Williams.

Arts Auditorium, Room 2-AF (2nd Floor) General—Catalysis

C. P. Kubiak,

G. A. Brewer,

Presiding

9:00—352. Alkene Hydroformylation Using Soluble Polymer-bound Iridium and Rhodi­ um Complexes. D. R. Treadwell, Y. Ishii, R. Chandran, D. E. Bergbreiter. 9:20—353. Activation of Molecular Hydro­ gen by CoRh(CO)7 and Its Possible Role in Homogeneous Catalytic Hydroformylation of Olefins. I. T. Horvath, M. Garland, G. Bor, P. Pino. 9:40—354. Nucleophilic Activation of Carbon Monoxide and Catalytic Formation of Formamides in the Presence of Rhodium Por­ phyrins. B. B. Wayland, D. N. Lissy. 10:00—355. Electrocatalytic Four-Electron Reduction of Dioxygen by Iridium Porphy­ rins Adsorbed on Graphite. J. P. Collman, K. Kim, M. G. Finn. 10:20—356. Hydrogenolysis Reactions in a Microheterogeneous Catalyzed Aqueous System. C. K. Tan, T. C. Wang. 10:40—357. Co(ll) Amide Complexes as Catalysts for Olefin Epoxidation by lodosylbenzene. J. D. Koola, J. K. Kochi. 11:00—358. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Oxi­ dation of L-Ascorbic Acid by the μ-Amidoμ-superoxobis [ bis(ethy lenediamine)cobalt(III)] Ion in Acidic Aqueous Solution. R. A. Kirby, G. G. Sadler, T. P. Dasgupta. 11:20—359. Magnetic Field Effects on the Catalytic Oxidation of 2,6-di-ferf-butylphenol. R. P. Perito, B. B. Corden. 11:40—360. Catalytic Decomposition of Hy­ drogen Peroxide in Presence of Dowex50W Resin in the Form of Ethylenediamine-Cu(ll) Complex Ion in Aqueous Medi­ um. F. M. Ashmawy, A. M. Habib, M. Y. ElSheikh, A. H. Gemeay, Α. Β. Zaki. 12:00—361. Catalytic Hydrogénation of Polymers in the Bulk. L. R. Gilliom, D. J. Suich. Section Ε Arts Auditorium, Room 2-BE (2nd Floor) General—Solid State from Organometallic Complexes R. E. McCarley,

Presiding

9:00—362. NdMo8014, a Compound Con­ taining a Discrete Octanuclear Molybde­ num Cluster and the First Member of a Proposed New Oligomeric Series Mo 4n 0 6n+ 2. R· E. McCarley, P. R. Gougeon, C. D. Carlson.

62

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Presiding

8:40—371. Activation of Diazene N = N Bonds in Di- and Trinuclear Iron Carbonyl Complexes. E. J. Wucherer, H. Vahrenkamp. 9:00—372. Tridentate Phosphonate and Ar­ senate Complexes of the Triosmium Framework. G. R. Frauenhoff, S. R. Wil­ son, J. R. Shapley. 9:20—373. Synthesis and Characterization of a Series of Mixed-Metal Rhenium Carbido Clusters. T. J. Henly, J. R. Shapley, A. L. Rheingold, S. J. Geib. 9:20—374. Synthesis and Reaction Chemis­ try of lr2(CO)4(PMe2CH2PMe2)2: Formation and Reaction Chemistry of a μ-Methylene Complex, [ lr 2 ^-CH 2 )(CO) 4 (PMe 2 CH 2 PMe 2 ) 2 ] 2+ . M. K. Reinking, P. E. Fanwick, C. P. Kubiak. 10:00—375. Synthesis and Characterization of a Complete Series of [MM'(dppm)(CH3CN)]2(BF4)2 Complexes (M = Ni, Pd, and Pt; M' = Ni, Pd, and Pt). D. L. DuBois, A. Miedaner. 10:20—376. Metal-Carbon Bond Forming Reactions with Trihalomethyl and Dihalocarbene Transition-Metal Complexes. A. M. Crespi, D. F. Shriver. 10:40—377. Synthesis, Structure and Reac­ tivity of a Carbonyl-Bridged Manganese Dimer. R. J. Bernhardt, P. J. Schlom, N. C. Baenziger, D. P. Eyman. 11:00—378. Oxidative Addition of Epoxides and C = 0 , C = S , and C = N Double Bonds to WCI2(PMePh2)4: Scope and Mechanism of the Reaction. J. M. Mayer, J. C. Bryan, S. J. Geib, A. L. Rheingold. 11:20—379. Synthesis, Structure and Reac­ tivity of [Re(0)(MeC=CMe) 2 ] 2 , a Rheni­ um (II) Complex with Terminal Oxo Ligands. J. M. Meyer, E. Valencia, S. J. Geib, A. L. Rheingold. 11:40—380. Formation of Condensed Plati­ num Carbonyl Clusters by Controlled Re­ dox and Decarbonylation Reactions. K. C. Kharas, D. A. Nagaki, W. J. Pietro, L. F. Dahl. 12:00—381. Synthesis, Structural Charac­ terization, and Chemical-Electrochemical Behavior of the [(OC)3XFexCo3.x(/75-C5H4Me)3.x(M3-XKM3-NSiMe3)]n Series (x = 1, 2; X = CO, NO) and I(OC)3xFexCo3.x(r75C5Me5)3-x(M3-CO)(M3-Y)] Series (x = 1,2; Y = NSiMe3, NH) Containing Bicapped Triangular Mixed-Metal Cores. M. S. Ziebarth, L. F. Dahl.

Section A

Radisson, Convention Complex, Majestic Ballroom (Majestic Level) International Symposium on Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers: Other Inorganic/ Organometallic Polymers C. W. Allen,

Presiding

1:30—382. Cofacial Polymers Constructed from Phthalocyanines. What Can They Teach Us About Molecular Metals? J. G. Gaudiello, G. E. Kellogg, S. M. Tetrick, L. S. Tonge, C. R. Kannewurf, H. O. Marcy, W. J. McCarthy, T. J. Marks. 2:30—383. Alkoxysiloxanes from Silicates. G. B. Goodwin, M. E. Kenney. 3:30—384. Boron-Nitrogen Polymer Precur­ sors. S. Y. Shaw, D. A. Dubois, R. H. Neilson. 3:50—385. New Class of Oligomeric Organotin Compounds. R. R. Holmes, R. O. Day, V. Chandrasekhar, C. G. Schmid, J. M. Holmes. 4:10—386. Precursors to Non-Oxide Macromolecules and Ceramics. C. K. Narula, J. Fr. Janik, R. T. Paine, R. Schaeffer. 4:30—387. New Synthetic Approaches to Organotin Polymers. J. W. Labadie, S. A. MacDonald, C. G. Willson. 4:50—337. New Organometallic Polymers Containing Tungsten Carbene Complex­ es. D. W. Macomber. Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 2-CD (2nd Floor) General—Bioinorganic and Mechanism Studies Κ. Β. Merles,

Section F Arts Auditorium, Room 1-CD (1st Floor) General—Polynuclear, Oxo and Organo­ metallic Chemistry

Section D

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Presiding

1:40—389. Axial Ligand Binding to FourCoordinate Fe(ll) And Zn(ll) Porphyrins and Hydroporphyrins. R. G. Thompson, S. H. Strauss. 2:00—390. Polyammonium Macrocycles: Ca­ talysis and/or Activation of Dephosphorylation Reactions. P. G. Yohannes, P. J. Martin, Z. Jiang, K. Piute, M. P. Mertes, K. B. Mertes. 2:20—391. Modeling Studies of the Active Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase. N. C. Jain, C. E. L. Headford, B. R. Serr, C. M. Elliott, O. P. Anderson. 2:40—392. Ruthenium "Pocket" Porphy­ rins. J. P. Collman, J. P. Fitzgerald. 3:00—393. Thermodynamic and Magnetic Properties of Imidazolate Bridged Com­ plexes of Paramagnetic Metalloporphyrins. G. A. Brewer, C. T. Brewer. 3:20—394. Molecular Complex Formation in the Axial Ligation of Fe(porphyrin)CI by a Copper Imidazolate Complex. C. T. Brewer, G. A. Brewer. 3:40—395. Kinetics and Mechanism of Hydroxamic Acid Ligand Exchange at Hexaaquoaluminum(lll) Ion. J. M. Garrison, A. L. Crumbliss. 4:00—396. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reactions of Pentaaquoorganochromium (III) Complexes with S0 2 . C. Simmons, J. H. Espenson, A. Bakac. 4:20—397. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reactions of Di^-hydroxo)-bis[bis(ethylenediamine)chromium(lll)] Ion in Aque­ ous Sulfite Solution. P. T. Maragh, T. P. Dasgupta. 4:40—398. An Exceptionally Effective New Cobalt(ll) Dioxygen Carrier Derived from Dimethylglyoxime by the Replacement of the Proton Bridges with BF 2 + . K. A. Lance, D. H. Busch. Section C Arts Auditorium, Theater (Theater Level) Symposium on Metals in Olefin Polymeriza­ tion A. H. Janowicz, Organizer,

2:40—401. Deactivation in MgCI2-Supported Catalysts for Olefin Polymerization. J. C. W. Chien, T. Ang, Y. Hu, J. Weber. 3:15—402. Effect of Lewis Bases on High Mileage Catalyst for Propylene Polymer­ ization. J. C. W. Chien, Y. Hu. 3:40—403. EPR Study of MgCI2-Supported High Activity Propylene Polymerization Catalysts. T. Ang, J. C. W. Chien. 4:05—404. 13C CPMAS Solid State NMR Studies of Heterogeneous Organoactinide Ethylene Polymerization Catalysts. D. Hedden, J-F. LeMarechal, P. J. Toscano, T. J. Marks.

Section D Arts Auditorium, Room 2-AF (2nd Floor) General—Oxygen-Bound Ligands

R. A. Krause, Presiding 2:00—405. Novel Rhodium Alkoxide Com­ plexes: Structure and Reactivity. S. E. Kegley, C. J. Schaverien, R. G. Bergman. 2:20—406. Organosiloxyrhenium Complex­ es: Synthesis, Photochemistry, and Ana­ lytical Applications. R. A. Faltynek, E. Shen, T. K. Trout. 2:40—407. POMSS: Models for Silica-Sup­ ported Catalysts. F. J. Feher. 3:00—408. Low-Valent Transition Metal Carbonyl Teflates. S. H. Strauss, K. D. Abney, K. M. Long, O. P. Anderson. 3:20—409. Synthesis and Reactivity of Plat­ inum and Palladium Teflate (OTeF5~) Complexes. M. R. Colsman, M. C. Man­ ning, O. P. Anderson, S. H. Strauss. 3:40—410. Extrusion of Alkenes from Zirco­ nium-Tungsten Oxaalkyl Complexes. M. K. Trost, E. N. Jacobsen, R. G. Bergman. 4:00—411,. Synthesis and Reactivity of High Oxidation State Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Rhenium Hydrides and Alkyls. J. Okuda, J. K. Felixberger, W. A. Herrmann. 4:20—412. Phosphine-ruthenium(IV)-oxo Com­ plexes: Selective Oxidation of Organic Substrates. M. E. Marmion, R. A. Leising, J. J. Grzybowski, K. J. Takeuchi. 4:40—413. Phosphine-ruthenium(IV)-oxo Com­ plexes: Aerobic Catalytic Oxidation of Olefins. R. A. Leising, M. E. Marmion, J. J. Grzybowski, K. J. Takeuchi.

Section Ε Arts Auditorium, Room 2-BE (2nd Floor) General—Solid State 2:00—414. New Transition Metal Dithiolene Complexes, Candidates for Synthetic Metals. H. H. Wang, U. Geiser, L. C. Por­ ter, A. J. Schultz, T. J. Allen, S. F. Tytko, A. M. Kini, J. M.Williams. 2:20—415. Characterization of Synthetic Hopcalite. H. C. Cheung, L. Puckhaber, D. L. Cocke, A. Clearfield. 2:40—416. Low Temperature Synthesis of Transition Metal Sulfides. M. J. Martin, D. M. Schleich. 3:00—417. Preparation of Polymeric Pre­ cursors to Metal Nitrides by Ammonolysis of Metal Dialkylamides. G. M. Brown, L. Maya. 3:20—418. Synthesis and Characterization of In Situ Copper Containing Polyimide Films. G. Porta, L. T. Taylor. 3:40—419. Oxidation of Iridium—Clarifica­ tion of the Gaseous Oxides. J. H. Carpen­ ter. 4:00—420. Activated Carbons as Anode Materials in Nonaqueous Batteries. J. G. Murray. 4:20—421. GPC of Zirconium Coordination Polymers, Effect of Endgroup/Substituent Group Modification. R. D. Archer, V. Tra­ montane, M. L. Illingsworth, F. J. Berg.

Presiding

1:30—399. Etylene Polymerizations with High Activity Titanium, Vanadium, and Chromium Catalysts. F. J. Karol, Β. Ε. Wagner, K. J. Cann, A. E. Marcinkowsky. 2:05—400. Vapor Synthesized MgCI2-Supported Polymerization Catalysts. S. D. Ittel, R. Mulhaupt, A. P. Shreve, U. Klabunde.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details)

FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Arts Auditorium, Room 3-CD (3rd Floor) General—Theoretical and Thermodynamic Studies J. F. Geldard,

Presiding

9:00—422. Molecular Orbital Studies of Zero-valent Group 6 Polyalkyne Complexes. D. J. Wink, B. T. Creagan. 9:20—423. Electronic Structure of Dimeric Organotransition Metal and Organoactinide Oxo Complexes. R. H. Cayton, B. E. Bursten. 9:40—424. Individual Electronic Effects of Methylated Cyclopentadienyl Complexes. The Correlation of Core and Valence Ionization Energy Shifts for Methyl-Substituted Ferrocenes. G. P. Darsey, D. L. Lichtenberger. 10:00—425. Electronic Structure of Heterometallic Thiocubane Clusters. S. Harris. 10:20—426. Magnetic Exchange Interactions in Transition Metal Dimer and Trimer Chloride Complexes. J. R. Hart, A. K. Rappé. 10:40—427. Molecular Dynamical Studies of MXn Molecules. J. F. Geldard, H. K. McDowell. 11:00—428. Equilibrium Between |CpCr(CO)3|2 and CpCr(CO)3. The Thermodynamics of Cr-Cr Single Bond Cleavage. S. J. McLain. 11:20—429. Spectral and Calorimetric Equilibrium Studies of Water Complexation with Crown Ethers. S. A. Bryan, B. A. Moyer. R. R. Willis. W. J. McDowell. 11:40—231. Details of the Reaction Phosphorus Trifluoride with Chromium. Molybdenum and Tungsten Carbonyls. R. J. Clark, C. K. Mann, T. Berger, L. T. Lin.

10:00—443. Evidence for Carbon-Metal Bond Insertion Chemistry of Alkyliron(lll) Porphyrin Complexes. I. M. Arafa, K. Shin, Η. Μ. Goff. 10:20—444. Electron Transfer Between Tetrahedral Co(IV) and Co(V) Alkyls. Κ. Η. Theopold, Ε. Κ. Byrne. 10:40—445. Insertion of Nitriles into the Metal-Carbon Bond of Chromium(lll) Al­ kyls. K. H. Theopold, D. S. Richeson. 11:00—446. Synthesis of Tantalum Silyl Complexes from Hydrides by Net Silyene Transfer. D. H. Berry, Q. Jiang. 11:20—447. Heterobimetallic Compounds of the Group IV-Group XIV Elements. D. C. Hrncir, D. K. Cannon. 11:40—448. Preparation and Characteriza­ tion of a Series of Cationic Dihydrogen Complexes of Ruthenium. M. S. Chinn, D. M. Heinekey. 12:00—449. New High-Nuclearity Phosphinidene and Stibinidene Metal Clusters. R. E. DesEnfants, D. A. Nagaki, L. F. Dahl.

Section D Arts Auditorium, Room 2-AF (2nd Floor) Hydrazine Centennial Conference: Appli­ cations and Toxicology E. W. Schmidt,

Presiding

9:00—450. Hydrazine as a Rocket Propellant and Gas Générant. E. W. Schmidt. 9:45—451. Hydrazine as an Alternate Source of Energy. J. A. Carvalho, Jr., C. Bressan, J. L. G. Ferreira. 10:10—452. Homogeneous Catalysis of Propellant Hydrazine Decomposition by Trace Metals. J. M. Bellerby, D. A. Edwards, D. Thompsett. 10:35—453. Hydrazine Toxicology—New Results of Bayer AG. D. Steinhoff.

Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 2-CD (2nd Floor) General—Electrochemistry J. A. Davies,

Presiding

9:00—430. Electrochemical Study of the Reduction of Nitrosyl (Cyclopentadienyl)manganese and Rhenium Cations. C. C. Neto, D. A. Sweigart. 9:20-431. Electrochemical Properties of Cationic Rhenium and Technetium Com­ plexes in Aqueous and Micellar Media. J. R. Kirchhoff, W. R. Heineman, E. Deutsch. 9:40—432. Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of a Tetra(trisbipyridineruthenium(ll))porphyrinatoiron(lll)chloride Complex. S. Paulson, R. F. Beeston, C. M. Elliott. 10:00—433. A Triply Bridged Dinuclear Fe(ll)Bipyridine Dimer. K. A. Andersen, B. R. Serr. C. M. Elliott, O. P. Anderson. 10:20—434. Electropolymerization of Ruthen­ ium Bis( 1.10-phenanthrolineX4-methyl-4'vinyl-2,2'-bipyridine) Complexes Through Direct Attack on the Ligand Ring System. T. F. Guarr, F. C. Anson. 10:40—435. Reductive Electrochemistry of a Series of Cis and Trans- [PtX2(PR3)2| Com­ plexes. J. A. Davies, C. T. Eagle. R. J. Staples. 11:00—436. Reactions of Electrochemically Generated |Pt(PEt3)2|. J. A. Davies, C. T. Eagle. 11:20—437. Identification of a Pt2Hg Complex Formed by the Electrochemical Reduction of trans-| Ptl2(PEt3)21 at a Mercury Pool Elec­ trode. J. A. Davies, C. T. Eagle. 11:40—438. Synthesis, Spectroscopy, Elec­ trochemistry and Molecular Structure of Thiosemicarbazone Metal(ll) Complexes. A. El-Toukhy.

Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 1-CD (1st Floor) General—Hydride, Alkyl and Silyl Com­ plexes Η. Μ. Goff.

Section Ε Arts Auditorium, Room 2-BE (2nd Floor)

DIVISION OF MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY W. Comer, Program Secretary

Chairman;

OTHER DIVISIONS SYMPOSIUM OF INTEREST: Drug Testing in the Work Place, Tech­ nical, Legal and Ethical Issues {see Di­ vision of Professional Relations, M, page 79) BUSINESS MEETING: Sun DIVISION SOCIAL EVENT: Social Hour, Sun

SUNDAY EVENING Executive Tower Inn, Forum Room (2nd Floor) 8:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

MONDAY MORNING Arts Auditorium, Room 1-ABEF (1st Floor) Symposium on Protease Inhibitors

General—Spectroscopy

D. H. Rich, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Inhibition of Human Leukocyte Elastase by Peptide Trifluoromethyl Ke­ tones. S. H. Bergeson, P. D. Edwards, R. D. Krell, A. Shaw, R. L. Stein, M. M. Stein, A. M. Strimpler, D. A. Trainor, R. A. Wildonger, D. J. Wolanin. 9:50—2. Inhibitors of Human Leukocyte Elastase Derived from 7-Aminocephalosporanic Acid. J. B. Doherty. 10:35—3. Use of Various Metallopeptidase Inhibitors to Study the Physiological Role of Endogenous Neuropeptides. B. P. Roques. 11:20—4. Mechanism of Inhibition of Aminopeptidases by Bestatin and Related Ana­ logs. D. H. Rich, S. L. Harbeson, T. D. Ocain.

Presiding

9:00—454. Synthesis and 400 MHz NMR Spectra of some Polyalkyl Derivatives of Anilinetricarbonylchromium. C. A. L. Ma­ haffy, J. Hamilton. 9:20—455. Germanium-73 and Carbon-13 NMR Studies of Organogermanium Com­ pounds. Chemical Shifts, Coupling Con­ stants, Relaxation Times and Character­ ization of Tetramethylgermane as a Chemical Shift Standard. J. D. Odom, W. F. Williams. F. O. Kroh, J. W. Medley. 9:40—456. Chemical Information from Electron-Electron Spin-Spin Coupling Constants. Κ. Μ. More, G. R. Eaton, S. S. Eaton. 10:00—457. Ultraviolet and Infrared Spec­ tra of Substituted Arenetricarbonylchromium Complexes. J. Rawlings, C. A. L. Mahaffy. 10:20—458. Equilibria and Ultraviolet Spec­ tra of lodocuprate(l) Complexes in Aque­ ous Solution. K. L. Stevenson, J. L. Braun, R. I. Sparks, M. A. Stevenson. 10:40—459. Electronic Spectroscopy of Ν,Ν'-Disubstituted Dithiooxamine Ligands and Their Metal Complexes. M. R. Green, N. Jubran, B. E. Bursten, D. H. Busch. 11:00—460. Electron Impact Mass Spectral Characterization of Nickel and Vanadium Compounds: Models for Metal-Containing Compounds in Heavy Crude Petroleums and Residua. J. G. Reynolds, E. J. Gallegos, R. H. Fish. 11:20—461. Cluster Ion Chemistry of Tran­ sition Metal Acetylacetonates: New and Improved Mass Spectrometric Experi­ ments. K. L. Busch, G. C. DiDonato. 11:40—462. Direct Analysis of Organometallic Compounds by Chromatography/ SIMS. K. L. Busch, S. J. Doherty.

MONDAY AFTERNOON Arts Auditorium, Room 1-ABEF (1st Floor) Symposium on Enzyme Inhibitors in Hor­ mone Dependent Cancer P. C. Ruenitz, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—5. Mechanism-Based Aromatase In­ hibitors. D. F. Covey. 2:40—6. 5-Substituted Pyrimidine Carbinols and Related Heterocycles as Potent Inhibi­ tors of Estrogen Biosynthesis. C. D. Jones, K. S. Hirsch, H. M. Taylor, E. V. Krumkalns, M. A. Winter. 3:15—7. Aromatase Inhibitors: Application to Hormone-Dependent Cancers. A. M. Brodie. 3:50—8. Prostate Effects of 5n-Reductase Inhibitors, G. H. Rasmusson, G. F. Reyn­ olds, N. G. Steinberg, G. F. Patel, E. Wal­ ton. TUESDAY MORNING Arts Auditorium, Room 1-ABEF (1st Floor) Symposium on Bioisosterism in Drug De­ sign

C. A. Lipinski, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—9. Structural Aspects of Bioisoster­ ism. J. P. Glusker. The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

TUESDAY

Currigan Exhibition Hall, Upper Lobby Poster Session

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2:00-4:00 13. Cholecystokinin Antagonists. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of S-Triazolo(4,3-a)-3-Substituted-1,4-Benzodiazepines. M. G. Bock, R. M. DiPardo, B. E. Evans, K. E. Rittle, D. F. Veber, R. M. Freidinger, R. S. L. Chang, V. J. Lotti. 14. Pharmacologically Active Natural Prod­ ucts from Marine Fungi. J. B. Gloer, G. K. Poch. 15. Novel Inhibitors of D-Alanine: D-Alanine Ligase as Potential Antibacterial Agents. P. K. Chakravarty, W. J. Greenlee, W. H. Parsons, P. Combs, A. Roth, A. A. Patchett, R. D. Busch, T. Mellin. 16. 1,3-Dihydro-2/-/-lmidazo [4,5-6] Quinolin2-ones—Inhibitors of Blood Platelet Ag­ gregation and cAMP Phosphodiesterase. N. A. Meanwell, H. R. Roth, E. C. R. Smith, D. L. Wedding, J. J. Wright. 17. Synthesis and Inotropic Activity of Spirocyclic Dihydropyridazinone Cardiotonics. D. W. Robertson, J. H. Krushinski, G. D. Pollock, H. Wilson, R. F. Kauffman, J. S. Hayes. 18. Molecular Structure and Conformational SAR of the Dihydropyridazinone Cardio­ tonic LY195115. D. W. Robertson, J. H. Krushinski, N. D. Jones, J. K. Swartzendruber, J. S. Hayes. 19. Cardioactive 1-(lminomethyl)Piperidines and -Piperazines. M. K. Scott, L. R. Hecker, S. O. Nortey, S. F. Flaim, M. Gleason. 20. Preparation and HMG-CoA Reductase In­ hibitory Activities of Methyl 7-Aryl-3Hydroxy-5-Oxo-5-Thiaheptanoate and Re­ lated 5-Thiaheptanoates. J. D. Prugh, A. W. Alberts, A. A. Deana, J. L. Gilfillan, J. W. Huff, J. M. Wiggins. 21. Synthesis and Evaluation of Trans-6(Substituted-l-Naphthyl)Ethyl(or Ethenyl)3,4,5,6-Tetrahydro-4-Hydroxy-2H-Pyran2-Ones as Inhibitors of HMG-CoA Reduc­ tase. J. D. Prugh, A. W. Alberts, A. A. Deana, J. L. Gilfillan, J. W. Huff, J. M. Wiggins. 22. Asymmetric Synthesis of Both Enantiomers of Tomoxetine and Fluoxetine. Y. Gao, K. B. Sharpless. 23. Imidazole Anticonvulsants: StructureActivity Relationships of Biphenylyloxyalkylimidazoles. D. W. Robertson, Ε. Ε. Beedle, R. Lawson, J. D. Leander. 24. Discovery and Anticonvulsant Activity of the Potent Metabolic Inhibitor 4-Amino-N(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-3,5-Dimethylbenzartiide. D. W. Robertson, C. J. Parli, Ε. Ε. Beedle, J. D. Leander, C. R. Clark. 25. Functionalized Amino Acid Derivatives. Potent New Agents for the Treatment of Epilepsy. J. D. Conley, H. Kohn. 26. Acyclic and Cyclic Derivatives of Sulpir­ ide as Dopamine Receptor Antagonists. M. W. Harrold, R. A. Wallace, T. Farooqui, L. J. Wallace, N. Uretsky, D. D. Miller. 27. Tertiary Amine, Sulfide and Sulfonium Analogs of 3-(2-Aminoethyl)-Pyrrole as Potential Dopamine Agonists. M. Smar, D. D. Miller, Y.-A. Chang, R. A. Wallace, T. Farooqui, L. Wallace, N. J. Uretsky. 28. Synthesis and Structure-Activity Rela­ tionships (SAR) of Novel Fentanyl Ana­ logs. B-S. Huang, R. Terrell, L. Kudzma, S. Severnak, K. H. Deutsche. 29. Synthesis and Structure-Activity Rela­ tionships of some 4-Anilidopiperidine An­ algesics, B-S. Huang, J. Getz, J. Molitemi. 30. Synthesis of Novel 3-Methyl-4-Anilidopiperidine Analgesics. N. Lalinde, K. Spen­ cer, D. Wright. 31. Syntheses of Thiosemicarbazone Deriv­ atives of Naltrexone. V. M. Kolb, R. A. Lorenzini. 32. 3-Aryloctahydroindolizines, a New Class of Non-Opiate Analgesics. R. J. Carmosin, J. R. Carson, M. J. Costanzo, J. F. Gardocki, J. L. Vaught, H. R. Almond.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

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AFTERNOON

M. G. Bock, Presiding

C. A. L. Mahaffy,

Presiding

8:40—439. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Acidity of Transition Metal Hydride Com­ plexes. J. R. Norton, S. S. Kristjansdottir, A. E. Moody, G. M. Wieber. 9:00—440. Organo-f-element Thermochem­ istry. Comparative Studies of ZirconiumLigand Bond Disruption Enthalpies in a Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Zr(IV) Se­ ries. L. E. Schock, T. J. Marks. 9:20—441. Reactivity of 1-Sila-3-metallacyclobutanes of Zirconium and Tantalum. J. L. Petersen, J. W. Egan, Jr. 9:40—442. Hydride and N-Alkyl Compounds of Chromium and Iron. E. G. Thaler, B. R. Sutherland, K. Folting, J. C. Huffman, K. G. Caulton.

MEDI

9:45—10. Ligand-Receptor Interactions Via Hydrogen Bond Formation. The Pyrrolo and Pyrido Groups as Bioisosteres for the Phenolic Hydroxyl Group. L. G. Humber. 10:30—11. Bioisosterism in the Develop­ ment of H2-Receptor Histamine Antago­ nists Related to Cimetidine. R. C. Young. 11:15—12. Sequential Replacement of Bioi­ sosteres in Prototype Design of Biaryl His­ tamine H2-Receptor Antagonists. C. A. Li­ pinski, J. L. LaMattina, P. J. Oates.

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33. 6-Oximinonaltrexone Ethers as Opioid Receptor Antagonists and Appetite Sup­ pressants. W. J. Rzeszotarski, B. J. Mavunkel, J. G. Pack, D. L. DeHaven, J. W. Ferkany, L. R. Steranka. 34. Studies Towards Synthesis of C2-Substituted Adenosines: An Efficient Synthesis of (2-Phenylamino)Adenosine [CV-1808]. B. K. Trivedi. 35. Synthesis of 6-Substituted β-Carbolines Which Behave as Benzodiazepine Recep­ tor Antagonists or Inverse Agonists. T. J. Hagen, P. Skolnick, J. M. Cook. 36. Pyridodiindoles. Synthesis of Rigid, Pla­ nar Ligands of Benzodiazepine Recep­ tors. M. L. Trudell, S. Lifer, J. M. Cook. 37. Serotonergic Properties of Spiroxatrine Enantiomers. A. R. Martin, D. L. Nelson, S. S. Nikam. 38. SAR Studies of Tetrahydropyridylindoles at Serotonergic Receptors. R. B. Bates, F. A. J. Camouriolla, A. R. Martin, D. L. Nel­ son, S. S. Nikam. 39. Lossen Rearrangement in Biological Systems. Mechanism-Based Inactivation of Leukocyte Elastase and Alpha-Chymotrypsin. W. C. Groutas, M. J. Brubaker, M. A. Stanga, J. C. Castrisos. 40. New Class of Selective Leukotriene Syn­ thesis Inhibitors. R. A. Scherrer, R. L. Bell, D. M. Hammerbeck, K. Heghinian, V. L. Stelzer, M. A. Rustad. 41. N-(2,2-Diarylethenyl)-3-Hydroxy-Benzo(b)Thiophene-2-Carboxamides as Nov­ el Dual 5-Lipoxygenase and Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors. P. L. Durette, D. L. Allison, R. L. Anderson, T. J. Bach, P. J. Bailey, R. K. Baker, P. L. Barker, R. J. Bonney, A. L. Dallob, M. Derks, H. W. Dougherty, R. W. Egan, T. F. Gallagher, M. M. Goldenberg, E. A. Ham, K. M. Hand, S. L. Hopple, J. L. Humes, T. J. Lanza, S. Luell, R. Meurer, D. Miller, V. L. Moore, R. Rosa, K. M. Rupprecht, A. N. Tischler, B. E. Witzel. 42. Effects of Inhibitors of Arachidonic Acid (AA) Metabolism on the Biosynthesis of Prostacyclin (PGI2) and Monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acids (HETEs) by Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (ECVs). B. O. Ibe, A. R. Johnson, J. R. Falck, W. B. Campbell. 43. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evalua­ tion of Some Potential Non-Steroidal AntiInflammatory Agents with Low Gastric Irri­ tancy. A. Mukherjee, S. C. Lahiri. 44. Dynamic Effects on 15N INEPT Enhance­ ments: A Resolution to the Clastic Binding Question? K. H. Schilling, M. A. Mikita. 45. Technique for Analyzing Molecular Elec­ trostatic Potential Energy (MEP) Calculat­ ed at a Molecular Van Der Waal's Dot Surface and Relating this Energy Surface to Biological Activity in Potential Drug Compounds. C. F. Chabalowski, E. B. Danaher, Y. C. Martin, J. Rys, L. Sanathanan. 46. Mechanism of Antibacterial Action: Elec­ tron Transfer and Oxy Radicals. P. Kovacic, J. R. Ames, M. D. Ryan. 47. Nucleotide Derivatives of Mitomycins. B. S. Iyengar, W. A. Remers, R. T. Dorr, C. D. Kowal. 48. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Mito­ mycin and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Ana­ logues as Potential Antitumor Agents. M. R. Boots, D. Pereira. 49. Unambiguous Assignment of the Stereo­ chemistry of the Linkage Site for the Anthramycin-d(ATGCAT)2 Adduct by Two-Di­ mensional 1H-NMR. F. L. Boyd, Jr., S. Cheatham, L. Hurley. 50. 7«-Substituted Steroidal Aromatase In­ hibitors in Hormone-Dependent Breast Cancer in Culture and In Vivo. R. W. Brueggemeier, N. E. Katlic, P-K. Li, H-H. Chen, M. V. Darby. 51. Synthesis and Antitumor Activity of Nov­ el Bis-9-Aminoacridines. G. D. Jaycox, G. W. Gribble, M. P. Hacker. 52. Substituted Tetrahydropyrimido[4,5c] [2,6]Naphthyridines as Potential Antitu­ mor Agents. I. O. Donkor, A. Gangjee. 53. Synthesis of 4-Acyloxyretinoic Acids as Potential Electrophilic Retinoid Affinity La­ bels. R. W. Curley, Jr., D. L. Carson. 54. Effect of Diaziquone on the Electro-Oxi­ dation of Polynucleotides and Calf-Thymus DNA. B. Nguyen, P. Gutierrez. 55. Substituent Effects on Homolytic Path­ ways in the Peroxidative Degradation of 4Alkyl-4-Peroxyquinols by Cytochrome P450. N. P. Yumibe, J. A. Thompson.

56. Oxidative Metabolism of Butylated Hydroxytoluene. E. W. Mead, M. D. Wand, J. A. Thompson. 57. Effect of conjugation on Urinary Excre­ tion of Ursocholic Acid in Man. A. K. Batta, G. Salen. 57A. Synthesis and in vitro Anti-Tumor Ac­ tivity of Diorganostannylene Derivatives of 2,6-Pyradine Dicarboxylic Acid. M. Gielen, E. Joosen, T. Mancilla, K. Jurkschat, R. Willem, C. Roobol, J. Bemheim.

WEDNESDAY MORNING Arts Auditorium, Room 1-ABEF (1st Floor) Symposium of DNA Associated Targets for Drug Action L. H. Hurley, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—58. RNA Polymerases as Targets for Drug Design. D. M. Crothers, D. C. Straney, D. R. Phillips. 9:50—59. DNA-Methylation. Mechanism and Inhibition. D. V. Santi. 10:35—60. Towards the Design of DNA Se­ quence Selective Alkylating Agents. K. W. Kohn. 11:20-61. DNA Repair Enzymes as Targets for Drug Design. L. H. Hurley.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Arts Auditorium, Room 1-ABEF (1st Floor) General W. H. Parsons,

Presiding

2:00—62. Award Address. (ACS Award for Creative Invention sponsored by The Cor­ poration Associates.) Penicillin Sulfoxide, an Intermediate to /3-Lactam Antibiotic Products. R. B. Morin. 3:00—63. Phosphinic Acid Inhibitors of DAlanyl-D-Alanine Ligase. W. H. Parsons, A. A. Patchett, J. Davidson, W. Schoen, P. Combs, D. Taub, J. P. Springer, T. Mellin, R. Busch, N. Thornberry, H. Gadebusch, B. Weissberger, M. Valiant. 3:15—64. Difficidin and Oxydifficidin, Novel Phosphorous-Containing Macrolide Anti­ biotics. K. E. Wilson, J. E. Flor, R. E. Schwartz, S. B. Zimmerman, J. M. Liesch, O. D. Hensens, J. L. Smith, J. P. Springer, J. Hirschfield, E. D. Thorsett, E. C. Gilfillan, B. A. Pelak, B. Weissberger, M. Zweerink, A. M. Edison. 3:30—65. SAR Studies on Difficidin: A Po­ tent New Antibiotic from Bacillus Subtilis. E. D. Thorsett, L. Cama, H. Kuo, N. Girotra, J. Fishinger, S. Aster, T. F. Walsh, W. V. Ruyle, B. Pelak, E. Gilfillan, B. G. Christensen. 3:45—66. Asymmetric Synthesis and Bio­ logical Activity of Substituted 7-Pyrrolidinyl-1-Aryl-6-Fluoroquinolones. T. Ro­ sen, D. T. W. Chu, S. W. Fesik, C. S. Cooper, V. J. Grief, P. B. Fernandes, L. L. Shen, A. G. Pemet. 4:00—67. Synthesis, Biochemistry and Bio­ logical Activity of Novel Phenolic Sparsomycin Analogs. G. A. Flynn, R. J. Ash, A. Bitonti. 4:15—68. Design and Synthesis of Inhibitors of Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis—Po­ tential Antibacterial Agents. P. Lartey, D. Riley, R. Hallas, W. Rosenbrook, Jr., D. Norbeck, D. Grampovnik, W. Kohlbrenner, N. Wideburg, A. Pernet. 4:30—69. SAR of Inhibitors of Lipopolysac­ charide Biosynthesis—Potential New Class of Antibacterials. P. Lartey, D. Nor­ beck, J. Tadanier, C. Maring, C-K. Lee, R. Hallas, D. Grampovnik, W. Rosenbrook, Jr., J. Kramer, A. Pernet. 4:45—70. Inhibitors of Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis—A New Class of GramNegative Antibacterials. P. Lartey, R. Hal­ las, D. Norbeck, W. Rosenbrook, Jr., R. Goldman, C. Doran, J. Capobianco, A. Pernet.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) 64

February 9, 1987 C&EN

THURSDAY MORNING Arts Auditorium, Room 1-ABEF (1st Floor) Symposium on Therapeutic Applications of Tissue Specific Phosphodiesterase Inhibi­ tors J. Bagli, F. Vinik, Presiding

Organizers,

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—71. Biochemical and Pharmacologi­ cal Properties of Cyclic Nucleotide Phos­ phodiesterases. S. J. Strada, R. L. Garrett, Jr., P. A. Kithas, C-C. Shen, B. H. Tan, W. J. Thompson, M. E. Whalin. 9:50—72. Selective Inhibitors of Cyclic Nu­ cleotide Phosphodiesterases: Application for Elucidating the Function and Regula­ tion of Multiple Molecular Forms of the Enzyme. C. W. Davis. 10:35—73. Cyclic AMP-Specific Phosphodi­ esterases in Left Ventricular Muscle and Their Involvement in Regulating Myocardi­ al Contractility. R. E. Weishaar. 11:20—74. Selective cAMP and cGMP Phosphodiesterase (PDE) Inhibitors: Neu­ rotropic Effects and Structure Activity Re­ lationships. H. Wachtel, R. Schmiechen, H. H. Schneider.

4:30—87. Novel Class of Peptidoleukotriene Antagonists: Development and Optimiza­ tion of Structure-Activity Relationships. V. G. Matassa, P. R. Bernstein, F. J. Brown, B. Hesp, Y. K. Yee, R.D. Krell, R. E. Giles, D. W. Snyder. 4:45—88. Novel Class of Peptidoleukotriene Antagonists: Efficient Strategies for Syn­ thesis. Y. K. Yee, P. R. Bernstein, F. J. Brown, V. G. Matassa.

NUCL DIVISION OF NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY Ε. Κ. Hulet, Program

Chairman

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Arts Auditorium, Room 1-ABEF (1st Floor) General

E. J. Glamkowski, Presiding 1:30—75. A New Class of Atypical Antipsy­ chotic Agents. Synthesis, SAR and Bio­ logical Profile of 6-(4-Methyl-1-Piperazinyl)-Benzo[b]Pyrrolo[3,2,1j k ] [ 1,4] B e n z o d i a z e p i n e s . E. J. Glamkowski, Y. Chiang, M. Comfeldt, R. W. Dunn, H. M. Geyer III, F. P. Huger. 1:45—76. Synthesis and In Vitro Antirhinovirus Activity of Some Novel Heterobiaryls. T. R. Bailey, G. D. Diana, M. A. McKinlay, M. J. Otto, V. Akullian. 2:00—77. Oculoselective /^-Adrenoceptor Antagonists. J. J. Baldwin, G. S. Ponticello, W. C. Randall, M. F. Sugrue, S. L. Varga. 2:15—78. Synthesis and Cardiovascular Evaluation of 4-Diarylmethyl)-1-(3-Aryloxypropyl)Piperidines and Structurally Relat­ ed Compounds Possessing Calcium Channel-Blocking Activity. J. R. Shanklin, Jr., C. P. Johnson III, A. G. Proakis. 2:30—79. Synthesis and Biological Evalua­ tion of BMY 20844 as a Potential Antith­ rombotic Agent. N. A. Meanwell, J. J. Wright, J. S. Fleming, E. Gillespie, H. C. Stanton. 2:45—80. Renin Inhibitors. Design of Angiotensinogen Transition-State Analogues Containing a Novel Dipeptide Isostere. S. Thaisrivongs, D. T. Pals, L T. Kroll, S. R.Turner, F-S. Han. 3:00—81. New Class of Subnanomolar Re­ nin Inhibitors. J. R. Luly, J. L. Soderquist, N. Yi, T. J. Perun, H. D. Kleinert, H. Stein, J. J. Plattner. 3:15—82. Synthetic Approaches to 4-Spiro2-Hydroxytetronic Acids of Interest in Car­ diovascular Research. D. T. Witiak, A. K. Tehim, V. S. Kamanna, K. Romstedt, D. R. Feller, H. A. I. Newman. 3:30—83. Synthesis and Topical Antiinflam­ matory Activity of L-651,896 and Analogs, a Novel Class of Dual Inhibitor of Prosta­ glandin and Leukotriene Synthesis. M. N. Chang, M. L. Hammond, N. P. Jensen, J. McDonald, R. A. Zambias, K. L. Thomp­ son, R. J. Bonney, H. W. Dougherty, J. L. Humes. 3:45—84. Fluorene Spirohydantoins as Irre­ versible Aldose Reductase Inhibitors. D. D. Miller, J. J. Ares, S. D. Black, R. Gurley, P. F. Kador. 4:00—85. Synthesis and Antiallergy Activity of 1-[4-[3-f4-[Bis(4-Fluorophenyl)Hydroxymethyl]-1-Piperidinyl]Propoxy]-3Methoxyphenyl]Ethanone (AHR-5333) and Analogs. D. A. Walsh, J.M. Yanni. 4:15—86. Novel Class of Peptidoleukotriene Antagonists: Discovery and Initial Struc­ ture-Activity Characterization. F. J. Brown, P. R. Bernstein, B. Hesp, A. K. Willard, Y. K. Yee, R. D. Krell, R. E. Giles, D. W. Snyder.

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIA: 8th Symposium on Archaeological Chemistry {see Division of the History of Chemistry, W, Thuf page 55} Chemical Problems in Electronic Mate­ rials (see Committee on Science, Tnu, page 35) BUSINESS MEETING: Tu DIVISION SOCIAL EVENT: Social Hour, Tu

MONDAY MORNING Holiday Inn, Cripple Creek/Silver Heels Room (Lobby Level) Recent Developments in Fission and Nucle­ ar Reaction Mechanisms: Award Symposium Honoring E. Steinberg S. B. Kaufman, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Award Address. (ACS Award for Nuclear Chemistry sponsored by Amersham Corp.) Milestones on the Road To­ ward an Understanding of Nuclear Fission. E. P. Steinberg. 9:45—2. Neophyte Radiochemists. N. Sugarman. 10:05—Intermission. 10:15—3. Fission Process from Saddle to Scission: A Phenomenological Perspec­ tive. B. D. Wilkins. 10:50—4. What Have We Learned About Fragmentation from Activation Experi­ ments? N. T. Porile. 11:25—5. High-Energy Nuclear Reaction Mechanisms—Fission, Fragmentation and Spallation. S. B. Kaufman. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Holiday Inn, Gold Links Room (Lobby Level) General Papers—I Ε. Κ. Hulet,

Presiding

2:00—6. Comprehensive Update of the Atomic Mass Predictions. P. E. Haustein. 2:25—7. Excitation Energy Division in the Quasi-Elastic Region from 12 MeV/u 48Ti + 150-Nd Reaction. T. M. Semkow, D. G. Sarantites, K. Honkanen, L. Ze, M. Ross, J. R. Beene, M. L. Halbert, D. C. Hensley. 2:50—8. An Evaluation of an On-line /3-Flow Monitor for the Rapid Chromatographic Detection of Actinides. R. Morales, C. S. Bartholdi, N. Stalnaker, J. Bubemak. 3:15—Intermission. 3:35—9. Indirect Determination of Plutoni­ um at Trace Levels by Use of Gamma and L X-ray Spectroscopy. S. C. Lee, R. C. Gatti, N. Nitsche.

4:00—10. Synthesis of 11C-Labeled Radio­ pharmaceuticals Using [ 11 C]-C0 2 /: An Application to the Labeling of the Dopa­ mine (DO Antagonists, 3-N-[11C]-MethylBenzazepines. S. Ram, R. E. Ehrenkaufer, L. D. Spicer, R. E. Coleman. 4:25—11. Separation of Soluble Transurani­ um Species from Particulates in Ground­ water by Ultrafiltration. E. M. Standifer, S. C. Lee, H. Nitsche. Section Β Holiday Inn, Cripple Creek/Silver Heels Room (Lobby Level) Symposium on Nuclear Detectors for Nu­ clear and RadioChemistry—I G. J. Wozniak, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—Welcome and Introduction. 2:05—12. Designs and Applications of Posi­ tion-Sensitive Silicon Detectors. J. T. Walton. 2:35—13. Germanium Drift Chambers. P. N. Luke. 3:05—Intermission. 3:20—14. Development of a Novel Readout Scheme Utilizing Fluorescent Flux Con­ centrators and Silicon Photodiodes for In­ organic Scintillators. E. Lorenz, G. Mageras. 3:50—15. Bolometers as Particle and X-Ray Spectrometers. N. J. Coron, H. H. Stroke, G. Artzner, G. Dambier, G. Jegoudez, J. Leblanc, J. P. Lepeltier, B. Jonson, H. L. Ravn, Y. Rocchia, O. Testard, S. Ap. 4:20—16. Detecting the Unbound 2He. R. Jahn. TUESDAY

MORNING

Section A

Holiday Inn, Cripple Creek Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on Central Collision and Frag­ mentation Processes—I C. K. Gelbke,

Organizer

D. Strottman,

Presiding

9:00—17. Transient Times for Nuclear Fis­ sion. H. A. Weidenmuller. 9:45—18. Growth of Density Fluctuations in Hot Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Fragmen­ tation. C. J. Pethick, D. G. Ravenhall. 10:30—Intermission. 11:00—19. Heavy-Ion Collisions and the Nu­ clear Equation of State. R. Stock. 11:45—20. Deconfinement Transitions at High Energy. J. I. Kapusta. Section Β Holiday Inn, Silver Heels Room (Lobby Level) Symposium on Nuclear Detector for Nucle­ ar and RadioChemistry—II. M. A. McMahan,

Presiding

9:00—21. New Generation of γ-ray Detec­ tor Systems: HERA at Berkeley. M-A. Deleplanque. 9:30—22. General Purpose Multi-Detector Gamma-Ray Facility for Use in Studies with Heavy-Ion Beams. R. V. F. Janssens. 10:00—23. 7-ray Hit Detector at the NSCL. D. J. Morrissey. 10:20—Intermission. 10:35—24. Detection of High Energy Gam­ ma-Rays. E. Kashy, W. Benenson, D. J. Morrissey, J. Stevenson. 11:05—25. Applications of Neutron Multi­ plicity Meters in Heavy-Ion Reactions. W. U. Schroder, S. S. Datta, J. Tôke, W. P. Zank, R. T. de Souza, J. R. Huizenga, J. L. Wile. 11:45—26. 4 π Neutron Detector for InBeam Studies. R. P. Schmitt, G. Nebbia, D. Fabris, J. B. Natiowitz, H. Utsunomiya, R. Wada.

Section C Holiday Inn, Molly Gibson Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Eighth Symposium on Archaeological Chemistry: Nuclear Techniques and Appli­ cations—I cosponsored with Division of His­ tory of Chemistry R. Allen, J. S. Olin,

Organizer Presiding

9:00—27. Compositional Data Analysis in Archaeology. R. L. Bishop, H. Neff.

9:25—28. INÀA Study of Lithic Material Use in the Mesolithic and Early Neolithic of Portugal. R. G. V. Hancock, L. A. Pavlish, P. J. Sheppard. 9:50—29. Multivariate Analysis of Multielemental Patterns in Turkish Pottery. P. K. Hopke, M. A. Evins. 10:15—Intermission. 10:35—30. Chemical Characterization of Sealing Clays from Fourth Millennium Sites in Iran. M. J. Blackman. 11:00—31. Analysis of Neolythic Iranian Ceramics. R. G. V. Hancock, S. J. Fleming. 11:25—32. Compositional Classification of Mexican Majolica Ceramics of the Spanish Colonial Period. J. S. Olin, M. J. Blackman. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Holiday Inn, Cripple Creek Room (Lobby Level) Symposium on Central Collision and Fragmentation Processes—II J. Natowitz,

Presiding

2:00—33. Mechanisms for Momentum and Energy Transfer in intermediate-Energy Collisions. V. E. Viola. 2:40—34. Production and Decay of Hot Nuclei Studied by Neutron Emission. D. Hilscher. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—35. Decay Properties of Highly Excited Nuclei Produced in Fast Dissipative Collisions. A. Gobbi. 4:20—36. Recent Results Obtained at Ganil on the Limiting Temperatures in the Fusion of Nuclei and the Onset of Multifragmentation. G. Bizard, R. Brou, A. Drouet, J. M. Harasse, J. L. Laville, J. Natowitz, J. P. Patry, J. C. Steckmeyer, B. Tamain, A. Tiphagne, H. Doubre, J. Peter, F. Guilbault, C. Lebrun, F. Hanappe. 5:00—37. Angular Momentum Dependence of Complex Fragment Emission. L. Sobotka, D. G. Sarantites, E. L. Dines, Li Ze, L. A. Adler M. L. Halbert, J. R. Beene, D. C. Hensley, R. P. Schmitt, G. Nebbia, H. C. Griffin. Section Β Holiday Inn, Silver Heels Room (Lobby Level) Symposium on Nuclear Detectors for Nu­ clear and RadioChemistry—III G. D. Westfall,

Presiding

2:00—38. Nal Pulse Shape Discrimination. R. L. McGrath. 2:40—39. Particle Identification by Pulse Shape Discrimination with Inorganic Scin­ tillators. M. Maier, D. A. Cebra, D. Fox, P. Ugorowski, G. D. Westfall, D. K. Wilson. 3:10—Intermission. 3:25—40. Advances in Light Charged-Particle Detection Using Nal Pulse Shape Dis­ crimination. C. F. Mcguire, C. N. Davids, D. G. Kovar, C. Beck, M. Vineyard, F. W. Prosser, S. V. Reinart, J. J. Kolata, K. Kwiatkowski. 3:55—41. Use Csl(T1) Scintillators with Photodiode Read-out in Heavy Ion Experi­ ments. G. Nebbia, D. Fabris, B. Fornal, J. B. Natowitz, G. Prête, G. Viesti, R. Wada. 4:25—42. "Dwarf Ball": Α 4π Light-Charged Particle Multidetector System for HeavyIon Reaction Mechanisms and Spectros­ copy. D. G. Sarantites, L. G. Sobotka, T. M. Semkow, V. Abenante, J. Elson N. Nicolis, D. Stracener, J. Valdes, D. C. Hensley. 5:30—Divisional Business Meeting.

Section C Holiday Inn, Molly Gibson Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Eighth Symposium on Archaeological Chemistry: Nuclear Techniques and Appli­ cations—II cosponsored with Division of History of Chemistry M. J. Blackman,

Presiding

2:00—43. Proposals for Carbon Dating the Shroud of Turin. G. Harbottle. 2:25—44. Archaeological Implications of Changes in the Trace Element Concentra­ tions of Nile Sediments. R. O. Allen, A. El Kammar, H. Hamroush, W. Heino.

2:50—45. Metal Analyses of Fragments Ex­ cavated at Tel Dan, Israel, Using Neutron Activation Analysis. M. C. Manea-Krichten, N. Heidebrecht, G. E. Miller. 3:15—Intermission. 3:35—46. Ion Beam Analysis Studies of Metal Artifacts. F. Beauchesne, J. N. Barrandon, M. F. Guerra. 4:00—47. Use of Lead Isotopes in Archaeo­ logical and Art Historical Studies. E. C. Joel. 4:25—48. Bronze Age Archaeometallurgy of the Mediterranean. Ν. Η. Gale.

3:40—64. Fragmentation and Flow in Cen­ tral Collisions. B. V. Jacak, J. W. Harris, H. C. Britt, G. Claesson, K. G. R. Doss, R. Ferguson, A. I. Gavron, Η-A. Gustafsson, H. Gutbrod, K-H. Kampert, B. Kolb, F. Lefebvres, A. M. Poskanzer, H-G. Ritter, H. R. Schmidt, L. Teitelbaum, M. Tincknell, S. Weiss, H. Wieman, J. Wilhelmy. 4:20—65. Mean Field Dynamics and NonEquilibrium Particle Emission. M-Y. B. Tsang.

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Holiday Inn, Silver Heels Room (Lobby Level) Symposium on Nuclear Detectors for Nu­ clear and RadioChemistry—V

Section A

Holiday Inn, Cripple Creek Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on Central Collisions and Frag­ mentation Processes—III

P. Haustein, Presiding 9:00—49. Fragment Emission in Proton-Xe­ non Interactions in the Near-Threshold Regime. N. T. Porile, A. Bujak, D. D. Carmony, Y. H. Chung, L. J. Gutay, A. S. Hirsch, M. Mahi, G. L. Paderewski, T. C. Sangster, R. P. Scharenberg, B. C. Stringfellow. 9:40—50. What Can We Learn About Frag­ mentation from Coincidence Experiments? S. B. Kaufman 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—51. Formation of Large Target Resi­ dues in Intermediate Energy Nuclear Colli­ sions. W. Loveland. 11:20—52. Isotope Yield Ratios as a Probe of the Reaction Dynamics. W. Trautmann. Section Β Holiday Inn, Silver Heels Room (Lobby Level) Symposium on Nuclear Detectors for Nu­ clear and RadioChemistry—IV R. P. Schmitt,

Presiding

9:00—53. Compact Gas/Plastic Telescopes in Heavy Ion Experiments. K. D. Hildenbrand. 9:40—54. Position-Sensitive Phoswich De­ tectors. Y. Chan, et al. 10:00—55. Response of Scintillators to Heavy Ions. M. A. McMahan. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—56. 4:00—5. HILI—A Heavy Ion Light Detection System. D. Shapira, H. J. Kim, B. Burks, J. Blankenship, R. Varner, K. Teh, R. Novotny. 11:25—57. MSU 4ττ Array. G. D. Westfall, J. Yurkon, L. Morris, M. Maier, A. Vandermolen, J. van der Plicht. Section C Holiday Inn, Molly Gibson Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on Waste Disposal and Treat­ ment for Fusion Reactor Systems—I D-K. Sze, A. L. Opdenaker, Organizers D-K. Sze, Presiding 9:00—58. Long-Term Radioactive Waste from Fusion Reactors. S. Fetter, Ε. Τ. Cheng, F. M. Mann. 9:40—59. Criteria for Long Term Fusion Waste Management. J. S. Herring. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—60. Waste Disposal Issues as Part of the TITAN High Power Density RFP Fusion Reactor Study. R. W. Conn, Ε. Τ. Cheng, C. P. C. Wong. 11:20—61. Impact of D-3He Fusion Reac­ tors on Waste Disposal. W. F. Vogelsang. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Holiday Inn, Cripple Creek Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on Central Collisions and Frag­ mentation Processes—IV R. Novotny,

Section Β

H. Wieman,

Presiding

Section C Holiday Inn, Molly Gibson Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on Waste Disposal and Treat­ ment for Fusion Reactor Systems—II Presiding

1:30—71. First Wall/Blanket/Magnet Acti­ vation: Status and Implications. F. M. Mann, D. G. Doran. 2:00—72. Processing and Waste Disposal of Fusion Blanket Systems. P. A. Finn, S. Vogler. 2:30—73. Conditioning and Handling of Tritiated Wastes at Canadian Nuclear Power Facilities. R. Stasko, L. Krochmalnek. 3:00—Intermission. 3:20—74. Management of Tritium Contami­ nated Waste. H. Dworschak, F. Mannone. 3:50—75. Tritium Contaminated Waste Han­ dling at the Tritium Systems Test Assem­ bly. R. A. Jalbert, R. V. Carlson. 4:20—76. Treatment and Disposal of Tritium Containing Waste. M. L. Rodgers. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Holiday Inn, Cripple Creek Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on Central Collisions and Frag­ mentation Processes—V

V. E. Viola, Presiding 9:00—77. Complex Fragment Emission Sources Characterized by Linear Momen­ tum Transfer Measurements. K. Kwiat­ kowski. 9:40—78. Space-Time Evolution and Thermodynamical Aspects of Intermediate En­ ergy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions from Two-Particle Correlations. J. Pochodzalla. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—79. Fragmentation and the Emission of Particle Unstable Complex Nuclei. W. G. Lynch. 11:20—80. Statistical Emission of Complex Nuclear Fragments. W. A. Friedman.

Presiding

2:00—62. Entrance Channel Influence on the Formation and Decay of Hot Nuclei. S. Harar. 2:40—63. Complex Fragment Production in Intermediate Energy Reactions. R. J. Charity. 3:20—Intermission.



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2:00—66. Modular Elements for Large Solid Angle Detector Systems. A. Moroni. 2:30—67. Application of Large Area SiliconSilicon-Plastic Detectors for Heavy-ion Detection. W. L. Kehoe. 2:50—68. Applications Pulse Shape Dis­ crimination with Scintillators. 4π Detec­ tor, Small ΔΡ Detector Array, Large Neu­ tron Detector. D. Drain, A. Giorni, H. Nifenecker, et al. F. Merchenz, et. al., J. F. Cavaignac, et. al., J. M. Loiseaux. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—69. Plastic TONNEAU and Other Large Detection Systems in Nautilus Re­ action Chamber at GANIL. A. Peghaire, E. Rosato, J. Kasagi, B. Zwieglinski, J. Pe­ ter. 4:15—70. Composite Charged Particle De­ tectors with Logarithmic Energy Re­ sponse for Large Dynamic Range Energy Measurements. J. Boissevain, H. C. Britt, M. M. Fowler, A. Gavron, B. V. Jacak, P. S. Lysaght, G. Mamane, J. B. Wilhelmy.

G. Nardella,

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The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

February 9, 1987 C&EN

65

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Section B

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Holiday Inn, Silver Heels Room (Lobby Level) Symposium on Nuclear Detectors for Nu­ clear and RadioChemistry—VI K. D. Hildenbrand,

Presiding

9:00—81. Image Enhancement Techniques for a Streamer Chamber Using CCD Cam­ eras. R. S. Tickle. 9:25—82. Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS). T. Kobayashi, F. Bieser, H. J. Crawford, D. E. Greiner, P. J. Lindstrom, W. F. J. Muller, D. L. Olson, T. J. M. Symons, H. Wieman, C. Tull, W. Christie. 10:05—Intermission. 10:20—83. Large-Area Gas Detectors for High Energy Heavy Ions. H. Sann. 11:10—84. New Sampling Electronics Us­ ing CCD for "DIOGENE": A High Multiplic­ ity, 4π Detector, for Relativistic Heavy Ions. R. P. Babinet. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

ORGN

Section A

Holiday Inn, Cripple Creek Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on Central Collisions and Frag­ mentation Processes—VI G. R. Young,

9:20—99. Performance of a Large BraggCurve Spectrometer. B. D. Wilkins. 9:40—100. Large Area Timing Detectors Developed for the Time-of-Flight Isochro­ nous (TOFI) Spectrometer. R. H. Kraus Jr., D. J. Vieira, H. Wollnik, J. M. Wouters. 10:00—Intermission. 10:15—101. Recent Results Using a Low Pressure Gas Avalanche Detector. D. J. Henderson. 10:35—102. Precise Position Measurement by a Parallel Plate Avalanche Chamber. P. Volkov, P. Roussel.

Presiding

2:00—85. Nuclear Fragmentation-Microcanonically. D. H. E. Gross. 2:40—86. Microcanonical Simulation of Nu­ clear Multifragmentation. J. Randrup, S. E. Koonin. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—87. High Energy Gamma Ray Produc­ tion in Intermediate Energy Heavy Ion Col­ lisions. J. Stevenson, W. Benenson, J. Clayton, E. Kashy, A. Lampis, D. J. Morrissey, M. Samuel, R. J. Smith, C. L. Tarn, J. S. Winfield. 4:20—88. Pion Production Below E)ab/ A = 100 MeV: A Probe for Heavy-Ion Reac­ tion Dynamics. P. Braun-Munzinger.

DIVISION OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY J . J . Gajewski, Program

Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIA: ACS Award in OrganometalHc Chemis­ try {see Division of Inorganic Chemistry, M, page 58) Hydrazine Centennial (see Division of Inorganic Chemistry, W, F, page 60) DIVISION SOCIAL EVENT: Social Hour, Sun

Section Β SUNDAY EVENING

Section A

Holiday Inn, Silver Heels Room (Lobby Level) Symposium on Nuclear Detectors for Nu­ clear and RadioChemistry—VII

Currigan Exhibition Hall, Upper Lobby

D. J. Morrissey, Presiding

J. J. Gajewski,

2:00—89. Detectors Used in AGS Experi­ ment E802—A Survey of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions. L. P. Remsberg. 2:40—90. Development of Highly Segment­ ed Cerenkov Detectors for 15 GeV/amu Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions. P. Vincent. 3:05—Intermission. 3:20—91. Neutron Spectroscopy at Very High Counting Rates for Inertial Confine­ ment Fusion. M. D. Cable. 3:40—92. Sectorised Ionisation Chamber. The M.E.Î2. Detection System. D. Gardes, F. Monnet, S. Bergey, Β. Borderie, M. Dumail, A. Gobbi, H. F. Rivet, P. Volkov. 4:20—93. Moderate-Resolution, Large Solid Angle, Proton Spectrometer for the K500 Cyclotron. C. A. Gagliardi.

Authors of posters 1-20 will be available from 8:00 PM-9:30 PM

FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Holiday Inn, Cripple Creek Room (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on Central Collisions and Frag­ mentation Processes—VII

L. Csernai, Presiding 9:00—94. Critical Energy Deposition and Multifragmentation. C. Ngo, J. Desbois, J. Nemeth, M. Barranco. 9:40—95. Nuclear Landau Vlasov Dynamics and Central Collisions. C. Grégoire. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—96. Cascade-Vlasov Approach to Cluster Production in Heavy Ion Collisions. S. Das Gupta. 11:20—97. Computer Simulations of Fragmentation. D. H. Boal.

Section Β Holiday Inn, Silver Heels Room (Lobby Level) Symposium on Nuclear Detectors for Nu­ clear and RadioChemistry—VIII Y. D. Chan,

Presiding

9:00—98. Detector System for Descrete Nuclide Identification of Ions with A 5; 70. K. Kwiatkowski, V. E. Viola, W. G. Wil­ son, H. Breuer.

66

February 9, 1987 C&EN

1-68. Posters Presiding

1. Structure of 3-Cyanocyclopropene by Mi­ crowave Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Mo­ lecular Orbital Calculations. Evidence for Substituent-Ring Double Bond Interac­ tions. S. W. Staley, T. D. Norden, C-F. Su, M. Rail, M. D. Harmony. 2. Characterization of a Symmetric Bishomoaromatic Semibullvalene. K. Grohmann, R. Iyengar, L. Miller, R. Pina, D. van Engen, L. Todaro, J. Kauer, F. Davidson, J. Whitney. 3. Calculations of Relative Sizes of Alkyl Groups in Allopolar Conformations. A. M. Bowler, A. C. Craig. 4. Biphenylcyclophanes: Synthesis, 1H, 13C NMR, X-ray Analysis and Conformation. R. B. Bates, F. A. Camou, J. J. White, V. V. Kane, P. K. Mishra. 5. Isomerization Barriers in Sterically Con­ gested Alkenes: Z-2,2,3,4,5,5-Hexamethyl3-Hexene and Related Alkenes. J. E. Gano, D. Lenoir, B-S. Park, B. A. Roesner. 6. 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition of Nitrile Oxides with Cis- and Trans-ethylene' Substituted. A2-lsoxazoline Derivatives. S. T. AbuOrabi, N. M. Al-Ghezawi. 7. Additional Solvent Ionizing Power Scales (yx) from Studies of the Solvolysis of Adamantyl Esters. D. N. Kevill, D. C. Hawskinson. 8. Correlations of Relative Reactivities of Electrophilic Additions to Alkenes. D. J. Nelson, P. J. Cooper. 9. Influence of Ion-Pairing on the Electroreductive Cleavage of Substituted 9,10Anthraquinones in DMF Solution. R. L. Blankespoor, D. L. Schutt, M. B. Tubergen, R. L. De Jong. 10. Probes of Adsorption of Pyridinium Salts from Solution to Silica Surfaces. N. J. Pienta, L. Eoff. 11. Solvatochromic Measures of the Solvent Properties of Molten Organic Salts. N. J. Pienta, W. B. Harrod.

12. Evidence for cv-Cleavage in the Photo­ chemical Reactions of Cycloalkanones Solubilized in Microheterogeneous Media. F. A. Carroll, S. B. Karki, D. L. Graves. 13. Synthesis and UV-Visible Absorption En­ velopes of Push-Pull Polyenes: Model Structures for Potential Applications in Soliton Switching and Non-Linear Optical Phenomea. C. W. Spangler, R. K. McCoy. 14. Physical and Chemical Properties of the Arylcarbene Anthronylidene. K. W. Field, G. B. Schuster. 15. Photochemistry of 9-Diazo-3,6-Diazafluorene. A Comparison Between Diazadiazofluorene and Diazofluorene. Y-Z. Li. G. B. Schuster. 16. Untold Story, Part III: The Rest of the Story as Seen from 119Sn NMR. S. Castellino, G. E. Keck. 17. Total Synthesis of (+)-Pentalenolactone E. D. H. Hua, M. J. Coulter, I. Badejo. 18. Synthetic Route to BC Intermediates for Taxane Diterpene Synthesis. B. P. Patel, C. S. Swindell. 19. Enantioselective Approach to Bonandiol. E. A. Mash, P. C. Heidt. 20. Synthetic Approach to the Ingenane Class of Compounds. R. L. Funk, M. M. Abelman, T. A. Olmstead. Authors of posters 21-40 will be available from 9:30 PM-11:00 PM 21. Studies Toward the Enantioselective To­ tal Synthesis of (+)-lkarugamycin. M. J. Kurth, C.-M. Yu. 22. Convenient Synthetic Approach to Bicyclic Dioxopiperazines Related to Bicyclomycin. L. K. Maruyama, R. M. Williams. 23. Conjugated Macrocycles Related to the Porphyrins: Attempted Synthesis of Por­ phyrin Analogs with Two Adjacent Thiophene Rings. T. D. Lash, Y. L. S. T. Armiger. 24. Syntheses of the Enantiomers of Carni­ tine and 4-Methylcarnitine via Chromato­ graphic Resolutions. R. N. Comber, W. J. Brouillette. 25. Silicon-Functionalized Silyl Enol Ethers: Synthesis and Characterization of Alkoxydialkylsilyl Enol Ethers which are Chiral at the Silicon. R. D. Walkup, N. U. Obeyesekere. 26. Plasma Oxidation of Methylcyclohexane. S. A. Rodemeyer, H. Suhr. 27. Selectivity of Aromatic Chlorination Re­ actions within a Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatography Column. D. A. Jaeger, M. M. Wegrzyn, D. E. Leyden, R. S. S. Murthy. 28. Enantioselective Synthesis of Prosta­ glandin and Sesquiterpene Synthons via Microbial Oxidation of Toluene. T. Hudlicky, G. Barbieri, H. Luna, L. D. Kwart. 29. Trimethylsilyl Iodide Mediated Ring Opening of Vinylcyclopropanes and Vinylaziridines as a Means of (2+3) Annula­ tions. T. Hudlicky, A. Fleming, G. SinaiZingde, G. Seoane. 30. Diels-Alder Reactions of Indoles. G. A. Kraus, J. Raggon. 31. Intramolecular Azide-Diene Cycloaddi­ tions. An Approach to Fused Bicyclic 3Pyrrolines Based on a One-Pot NitreneDiene Cycloaddition Equivalent. W. H. Pearson, J. E. Celebuski, Y-F. Poon, B. R. Dixon, J. H. Glans. 32. Selective Nitration of (4,5-Dihydroimidazol-2-yl)benzeneamines. D. R. Pierce, V. A. Parkman, J. A. May. 33. Electrophilic Substitution in Pyrroles by Addition-Elimination: Effect of Halogen, Halogenating Agent and Pyrrole Structure. M. De Rosa, G. Cabrera G., F. Ferrer. 34. Studies in Pyrollizidine Alkaloid Synthe­ sis. E. N. Cressman, G. E. Keck. 35. Interconversion of Borinate Esters and Boronhydrides: Synthesis with Dynamic Systems. J. A. Soderquist, A. Negron. 36. Chlorinolysis of Trialkylboranes: A Highly Stereospecific Route to Alkylchlorides. D. J. Nelson, K. J. Sasaki.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

37. Condensations of Silyl Ketene Acetals Catalyzed by Mercuric Iodide. I. B. Dicker. 38. Intramolecular Hydride Transfer: Elec­ tronic Vs. Stereoelectronic Control. S. E. Branz, R. P. Bansal. 39. Ester-Chloride Conversion Under Mild Conditions at Phosphorus Centers. L. Ylagan, A. Benjamin, A. Gupta, R. Engel. 40. Carbon Carbon Bond Cleavage of Olefins with Hypervalent Iodine. R. M. Moriarty, R. Penmasta, I. Prakash.

MONDAY MORNING Authors of posters 41-68 will be available from 9:00 AM-10:30 AM 41. Hypervalent Iodine lodinative Decarbox­ ylation of Cubyl and Homocubyl Carboxylic Acids. R. M. Moriarty, J. S. Khosrowshahi. 42. Promotion of Intramolecular Khand-Pauson Cyclizations. D. Froen, A. Kreager, R. Caple, W. A. Smit. 43. Hypervalent Iodine Oxidation of 3-Substituted and 3-Methyl-4-Substituted Pyrazolin-5-ones. A Facile Synthesis of 2-Alkynoic and 2,3-Allenic Esters. R. M. Moriarty, R. K. Vaid, P. Farid. 44. Zinc Chloride Catalyzed Rearrangements of 5,6-Dialkynyl-5,6-dihydroxy-1,4-dimethoxy-1,3-cyclohexadienes to [2.2.2] and [3.2.1] Bicyclic Systems. M. Fernandez, S. Chang, H. W. Moore. 45. (r76-o-Chlorotoluene)Fe(i75-Cp)+PF6~ in Organic Synthesis. R. M. Moriarty, U. S. Gill, Y. Y. Ku. 46. Synthesis of C-5 Substituted Uracil and Uridine Derivatives Via lodonium Salts. R. M. Moriarty, I. Prakash, M. Doktycz, R. Penmasta. 47. Synthesis of 2-Cumyl-2-adamantanol by the Catalytic Use of Di-terf-butylbiphenyl as an Electron Transfer Agent with Lithi­ um in a Barbier-Type Reaction of Adamantanone and Cumyl Chloride. H. Choi, A. A. Pinkerton, J. L. Fry. 48. Regiospecific 1,4-Addition with Grignard-Derived Mixed Triorganozincates. R. A. Kjonaas, R. K. Hoffer. 49. Application of Low Valent Titanium-In­ duced Reductive Coupling of a Substituted Benzophenone with Substituted Benzaldehydes in Synthesis of Triarylethylenes. P. C. Ruenitz, N. T. Nanavati, R. F. Arrendale. 50. Enhanced Reactivities of a-CarbonylSubstituted Alkyl Hydroperoxides with Co +2 . J. D. Druliner, F. W. Hobbs, W. C. Seidel. 51. Pinacol Coupling Reactions. M. Busman, D. Bruss, A. Fitzgerald, B. P. Mundy. 52. Heteroatom Effects Structure and Reac­ tivity. D. Johnson, S. Glancy, B. P. Mundy. 53. Studies on Bicyclic Ketals. A Tandem Oxymercuration-Solvomercuration Approach to Natural Products. R. Copp, D. Bruss, T. Schwartz, B. P. Mundy, K. Lipkowitz. 54. Synthetic Utility of Polymer Supported 2,6-Di-f-Butylpyridine. S. R. Pulley, M. E. Wright. 55. Synthesis, Reactions and 13C-PFT-NMR Spectroscopy of Polymer-Bound Steroids. E. C. Blossey, W. T. Ford, M. Periyasamy, S. Mohanraj, R. G. Cannon. 56. Isolation and Structure Determination of Lysobactin, a Novel Bacterially Produced Peptide Antibiotic. A. A. Tymiak, T. J. McCormick, S. E. Unger. 57. Two-Dimensional NMR Elucidation of the Structure and Conformation of Lysobac­ tin, an Unusual Macrocyclic Peptide. Ν. Η. Andersen, P. Hammen, K. Banks, M. A. Porubcan, A. A. Tymiak. 58. β-Ketonitrosamines. cv-Nitrogen Carbanionic Synthons with an Additional Activat­ ing Group. J. E. Saavedra, D. W. Farnsworth, G. K. Pei, J. G. Farrelly. 59. Preparation of 15-Substituted Estradiol Derivatives. Comparison of their Relative Estrogen Receptor Binding Affinities. A. A. Leon, F. A. Mettler, M. D. Hylarides. 60. N10-Thymidylyl-8-Deazafolate as a Mech­ anistic Probe of the Thymidylate Synthase Reaction. D. I. Brixner, A. D. Broom. 61. New Antibiotic from a Sponge. R. K. Akee, A. D. Rodriguez, P. J. Scheuer. 62. Biologically Active Metabolites of the Sponge Igemella notabilis. R. L. Hendrickson, J. H. Cardellina II. 63. Studies on the Biosynthesis of the lonophore Antibiotic Nonactin. J. A. Robinson, Z. M. Spavold.

64. Isolation, Synthesis, and Metabolism of the Capsaicinoids P. M. Gannett, D. L. Nagel, B. Toth. 65. Stereochemical and Mechanistic Studies of the Enzyme β-Methylaspartase with Halogenofumaric Acids. M Akhtar, M. A. Cohen, D Gani. 66. Unimolecular Micelles: Synthesis of FourDirectional [9] 4 -Arborols. G. R. Newkome, S. Arai. 67. Synthetic Applications of the PalladiumCatalyzed Coupling of Organotins and Vi­ nyl Iodides. M. P. Sweet, J. K. Stille. 68. Competitive Chlorination-Proton Ex­ change in Reactions of
3:20—86. Iminium Ion Mediated Cyclizations of 4-Aryl-1,4-dihydropyridines. Regio- and Stereospecificity in Intermolecular Reactions G. D. Hartman, B. T. Phil­ lips, W. Halczenko. 3:40—87. Synthesis of Manoalide. R. A. Earl. 4:00—88. lodolactonization of 1,6-Heptadiene-4-carboxylic Acids. M. J. Kurth, E. G. Brown. 4:20—89. Enantioselective Approach to βEudesmol. E. A. Mash, J. A. Fryling. 4:40—90. Reaction of (v-Aminonitriles with Carbon Dioxide: New N-(3)-Substituted Hydantoins. R. A O'Brien, J. J. Worman, E. S. Olson, J. W. Diehl, Κ Uhrich.

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Arts Auditorium, Room 3-CD (3rd Floor) General

Section A

Arts Auditorium, Theater (Theater Level) James Flack Norris Award in Physical Or­ ganic Chemistry P. A. G a s s m a n ,

Presiding

2:00—69. Conformational Cycloenantiomerism. M. D. Singh, J. Siegel, S. E. Biali, K. Mislow. 2:40—70. Conformational Analysis of Or­ ganic and Organometallic Main Group Compounds by Ab Initio Molecular Orbital Theory. D. A. Dixon. 3:20—71. Modeling Selectivity in Organic Reactions. W. J. Hehre, C. F. Pau, S. D. Kahn. 4:00—72. Award Address. (James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemis­ try sponsored by the ACS Northeastern Section.) Discovery of Molecules with Fundamentally New Structures Computa­ tionally. P. R. Schleyer. Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 3-ABEF (3rd Floor) Synthesis I C. A. F e l l o w s ,

Presiding

2:00—73. Enantiospecific Synthesis of Dihydromevinolin from L-Glutamic Acid. A. H. Davidson. 2:20—74. Michael Additions to Acetylenic Esters: An Approach to Resistomycin. K. James, R. A. Raphael, N. G. J. Richards. 2:40—75. Highly Stereoselective Synthesis of the C(19)-C(29) Segment of Rifamycin S. W. R. Roush, A. D. Palkowitz. 3:00—76. Studies Directed Towards the Synthesis of the Ingenane Diterpenes via the Intramolecular Dioxolenone Photocycloaddition. J. D. Winkler, Κ. Ε. Henegar, P. G. Williard. 3:20—77. First Synthesis of the Phorbol Skeleton: Studies on Tumor Promoters and Protein Kinase C Activators. P. A. Wender, H. Y. Lee, R. M. Keenan. 3:40—78. Convergent Synthetic Approach to the Taxane Class of Compounds. R. L. Funk, W. J. Daily. 4:00—79. An A-Ring Annulation Approach to a Tricyclic Taxane Model. C. S. Swin­ dell, B. P. Patel. 4:20—80. Stereoselective Total Syntheses of (±)-Pentalenene, (±)-Pentalenic Acid, (db)-Epipentalenene, and (±)-Epipentalenic Acid. T. Hudlicky, M. G. Natchus, G. Sinai-Zingde, P. Papadopoulos. 4:40—81. Synthetic Approach to Quinocarcin. P. P. Ehrlich, J. Hendrix, W. Zhai, R. M. Williams.

Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 3-G (3rd Floor) Synthesis II R. M. Moriarty,

Presiding

2:00—82. [ 3 + 2 ] Annulation Routes to FiveMembered Heteroaromatic Compounds and Azulenes. R. L. Danheiser, D. A. Becker, D. S. Yamashita, C. A. Kwasigroch. 2:20—83. A Novel Ring A Synthon for Vita­ min D. S. R. Wilson, A. M. Venkatesan. 2:40—84. A Non-Peptidal Approach to the Cyclopeptide Alkaloids via Oxazolophane Intermediates. B. H. Lipshutz, B. Huff, K. McCarthy, S. M. J. Mukarram, W. Vaccar ο. 3:00—85. A Total Synthesis of Acivicin (AT 125). R. A. Whitney, C. M. Yang, S. Mzengeza.

Section D

R. Lichter,

Presiding

2:00—91. Stereochemistry of Nucleophilic Addition to Ethyl Crotonate. J. R. Mohrig, S. S. Fu. 2:20—92. Novel Ways to Heterocycles via Wittig or Horner Type Reactions. H. Zimmer, H. Al-Khatlan, D. M. Nene, S. Smith. 2:40—93. Substituent-Directed Oxidation: The Syn Stereochemistry of Addition of High Valent Oxochromium Reagents to Alkenes. M. F. Schlecht, H-J. Kim. 3:00—94. iv-Hydroxylation/Methoxylation of Ketones, Aldehydes, Esters and Lactones Using Hypervalent Iodine Under Neutral Conditions. R. K. Moriarty, M. P. Duncan, R. K. Vaid, O. Prakash. 3:20—95. Alkoxyfluorinations of Norbornene with Xenon Difluoride and Electron Withdrawing Alcohols. M. L. Druelinger, G. Hambalek, D. F. Shellhamer, S. L. Car­ ter, R. H. Dunham, V L. Heasley, R. D. Chapman, S. A. Shackelford. 3:40—96. Homoconjugated Macrocyclic Polydiynes. L. T. Scott, D. Johnels. 4:00—97. Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling via Nonbonded Interactions: F-F Distance and Orientation Effects. C. W. Mallory, P. J. Carroll, F. B. Mallory. 4:20—98. Conformational Behavior of 3,7Diheterobicyclo[3.3.1]nonanes. V. A. Palyulin, N. S. Zefirov, R. Caple. 4:40—99. Superacid Catalyzed Formylation of Adamantane O. Farooq. M. Marcelli, G. K. S. Prakash, G. A. Olah. 5:00—100. General Approach to the Syn­ thesis of Polyquinenes via the Weiss Re­ action. Studies Directed Toward the Prep­ aration of Dicyclopenta[a,d]pentalene, Dicyclopenta[cd,gh]pentalene and Dicyclopenta[a,e]pentalene. G. Lannoye, J. M. Cook. TUESDAY

MORNING

Section A

Arts Auditorium, Theater (Theater Level) ACS Aldrich Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry L. E. O v e r m a n ,

Presiding

9:00—101. Recent Advances in Natural Products Chemistry. F. E. Ziegler. 9:40—102. Enantioselective Processes for the Reductive Alkylation of Aromatic Ring Systems. A. G. Schultz. 10:20—103. Synthetic Studies on Palytoxin. Y. Kishi. 11:00—104. Award Address. (ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry sponsored by Aldrich Chemical Company, Inc.) New Methods in Natural Products Synthesis. H. H. Wasserman.

Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 3-ABEF (3rd Floor) Stereoselection T. Hudlicky,

Presiding

9:00—105. Steric Effects, as Well as σ*Orbital Energies, are Important in Diastereoface Differentiation in Additions to Chiral Aldehydes. E. P. Lodge, C. H. Heathcock.

9:20—106. Removable Chiral Auxiliary for Stereocontrolled Amidomercuration Re­ actions: The Double Stereodifferentiation Advantage. J. M. Takacs, M. A Helle, L. Yang 9:40—107. Stereoinduction in Catalytic Iron Mediated Carbocyclization Reactions. J. M. Takacs, P. W. Newsome, L. G. Ander­ son, C. Kuehn, 10:00—108. Spiro Asymmetric Induction. Synthesis of Optically Pure Syn- or Anth
Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 3-G (3rd Floor) Ionic Mechanisms R. V. H o f f m a n ,

Presiding

9:00—114. Contribution of Substituent-Substituent Interactions to the PKA's of Meth­ yl Substituted Benzoic Acids. D. J. C. Herr. 9:20—115. Bifunctional Phosphines as Effi­ cient and Mild Reagents in the Carbon Tetrachloride-Promoted Chlorination of Primary and Secondary Alcohols. S. D. Toto, J. T. Doi. 9:40—116. Reaction and Kinetics of Sodium Periodate Oxidation of 7-Substituted Di­ sulfides B. J. Evans, J. T. Doi, W. K. Musker. 10:00—117. Mechanism and Reactivity in Base-Induced Sulfine Formation from Methyl Diarylmethanesulfinat.es. J. L. Kice, J. J. Rudzinski. 10:20—118. Effect of the R-Group on the Racemization of Amino Acids. G. G. Smith, G. V. Reddy. 10:40—119. Mechanism of Formation of Azines from Hydrazones: Steric Hin­ drance to Formation of Hydrazones but not Azines. V. M. Kolb, A. C. Kuffel, H. O. Spiwek. 11:00—120. Another Look at the Cleavage Reactions of the Isomeric Benzoinphenylhydrazones. W. C. Stickier, B. Murugaverl, R. Richards. 11:20—121. Isomerization and Mechanism of Interconversion of some A/-(aminomethyl)benzotriazole Derivatives. A. R. Katritzky, K. Yannakopoulou. 11:00—122. Syn Dehydrohalogenations Promoted by Complex Base. R. A. Bartsch, A. P. Croft.

Section D Arts Auditorium, Room 3-CD (3rd Floor) Structure—Theory and Experiment; Radi­ cals

Κι Ε. Gilbert, Presiding 9:00—123. 15N, 31P and 13C NMR Spec­ troscopy of N-Arylcarbonyl-P,P,P-triarylphospha-X 5 -azenes and N-Phenyl-P,P,Ptriarylphospha-X 5 -azenes. Substituent Ef­ fects and Electronic Structure. M. Pomerantz. W-N. Chou, M. K. Witczak. 9:20—124. Molecular Mechanics Parame­ ters for Organophosphorus Compounds. J. P. Bowen, N. L. Allinger. 9:40—125. Negative Ion-Molecule Chemis­ try of Phosphorus Esters. C. R. Roberts, C. H. DePuy, V. M. Bierbaum. 10:00—126. Production and Reactions of Heteroaromatic Anions in the Gas Phase. C. H. DePuy, G. P. Bean, S. R. Kass.

10:20—127. Applications of 1 7 0 NMR Spec­ troscopy to Determination of the Relative 7r-Donating Abilities of Sulfur and Oxygen, and to Structural Assignments in Bis (Trimethylsily) Amides. H. L. Mark, E, A. Noe 10:40—128. Origin of 1H and 13C Chemical Shifts in Methylenecyclopropene and Re­ lated Cyclopropenes, S. W. Staley, T. D. Norden. 11:00—129. Reaction of Selected Arylmethanes and Heteroarylmethanes with tButoxy Radical. B. Mahiou, G. J. Gleicher. 11:20—130. Radical Stabilization Energies and the Captodative Effect. D. J. Pasto. 11:40—131. Electronic Spectroscopy of Acephenanthrylene. B. F. Plummer. TUESDAY

AFTERNOON

Section A

Arts Auditorium, Theater (Theater Level) Synthesis M. T. C r i m m i n s ,

Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 3-ABEF (3rd Floor) Metal Catalysis in Synthesis Presiding

2:00—141. Nature of C-H Activation in Het­ erogeneous Transition Metal Catalysis. W. F. Maier, J. M Cogen, F. A. Etzkorn, A. B. McEwen. 2:20—142. Stoichiometric and Catalytic Hy­ dride-Mediated Conjugate Reduction of (γ,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Compounds. W. S. Mahoney, D. M. Brestensky, K. G. Caulton, J. M. Stryker. 2:40—143. Transition Metal Promoted Intra­ molecular Cyclizations of «,α-Dichloroesters and Acids. T. K. Hayes, A. J. Freyer, M. Parvez, S. M. Weinreb. 3:00—144. Reactivity of (3-Substituted-2methylenecycloalkyl)palladium Complex­ es: Formation via Chloropalladation and Catalytic Carbopalladation of S2-Methylenebicyclo[n.1.0]alkanes. W. A. Donald­ son. 3:20—145. Palladium Catalyzed Coupling Reactions of Chloroaryl Cr(CO)3-Complexes. W. J. Scott. 3:40—146. Synthesis and Reaction of New [?75-Cp)Ru(?76-Substitutedindole)]PF6. R. M. Moriarty, Y-Y. Ku, U. S. Gill. 4:00—147. Mechanistic Investigations in the Transition Metal Catalyzed Isomeriza­ tion of a Strained Bridgehead Diene. K. J. Shea, D. K. Cooper. 4:20—148. Bridgehead-Olefin 7r-Complexes by Rearrangement. R. S. Bly, M. Raja. 4:40—149. Intramolecular Cyclopropanations Using Cationic r/5-C5H5(CO)2Fe(alkylidene) Complexes. C. J. Knors, K. Brinkman, P. Helquist.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

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2:00—132. Synthesis of Bridged Bicycloalkanes via Intramolecular Tropone-Olefin Cycloadditions. R. L. Funk, G. L. Bolton. 2:20—133. Photochemical Approach to the Total Synthesis of Pleuromutilin. A Relay Synthesis. P. D. Pansegrau, L. A Paquette. 2:40—134. Electroreductive Cyclization: An Approach to Quadrone. R. D. Little, R. L. Wolin. 3:00—135. Studies on the Total Synthesis of Gelsemine T. Oh, L. E. Overman. 3:20—136. Convergence with Mutual Kinet­ ic Resolution. A Synthesis of the Taxol ARing Fragment. M. M. Nikaido, G. R. Clark. 3:40—137. Direct Formation of a Tricyclic Cycloheptanone-Containing System by Enolate Condensation with a Cyclopropanone Derivative. J. T. Carey, C. J. Knors, P. Helquist. 4:00—138. Studies on the Synthesis of the 3-Acyltetramic Acid Antibiotics and Relat­ ed Natural Products. M. J. Taschner, A. S. Aminbhavi, D. J. Black 4:20—139. Synthetic Studies of Colletodiol M. R. Wiley, G. E. Keck. 4:40—140. Synthesis of Quinolizidinones from 1-Acyl-4-methoxypyridinium Salts. D. L. Comins, J. D. Brown.

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Arts Auditorium, Room 3-G (3rd Floor) Cycloadditions A. P. Marchand,

Presiding

2:00—150. Diene Substituent Effect on the Rate of the Retro Diels-Alder Reaction. Y. Chung, B. Duerr, P. Nanjappan, A. W. Czarnik. 2:20—151. Synthesis of Polyfunctional, Lin­ early Condensed Six-membered Ring Systems by Regioselective Tandem DielsAlder Additions. B. Demarchi, P. Vogel, A. A. Pinkerton. 2:40—152. Stereochemistry of Cyclodimerization of Alkenes. J. R. Wiseman, F. P-K. Liu, W. M. Butler. 3:00—153. Unexpected Regioselectivity in Furan Aryne Diels-Alder Reactions. G. W. Gribble, D. J. Keavy. 3:20—154. Alkyl Substituent Effects upon Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reactivity of N-Alkoxycarbonyl-2-(3-butenyl)-1,2-dihydropyridines. G. R. Krow, Y. B. Lee, R. Raghavachari. 3:40—155. Unexpected Regioselectivity in the Singlet Oxygen Cycloadditions to Ε and Ζ 1-Tert-Butoxy-1,3-butadienes. E. L. Clennan, Κ. Κ. Lewis. 4:00—156. New Type of Pericyclic Chemiluminescence. X-Q. Yang, N-C. C. Yang. 4:20—157. Chemistry of Syn-O, Ο -Dibenzene. B. J. Hrnjez, M. G. Horner, N-C. C. Yang. 4:40—158. Chemical and Enzymatic Trig­ gering of 1,2-Dioxetanes. A. P. Schaap, R. S. Handley, T-S. Chen, M. D. Sandison, R. DeSilva, B. P. Giri.

Section D

9:40—170. Flexible Building Block. E. Winterfeldt. 10:20—171. Strategies for the Stereoselective Total Syntheses of Complex Natural Products. S. F. Martin. 11:00—172. Award Address. (The Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Essential Oils and Related Products sponsored by Fritzsche Dodge & Olcott, Inc.) Advances in Camphor-Derived Asymmetric Synthesis. W. Oppolzer. Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 3-ABEF (3rd Floor) Symposium on Multidentate Complexation and Coordination of Anions Η. Ε. Katz,

Presiding

9:00—173. Complexation of Neutral Guest Molecules Via Η-Bonding. D. N. Reinhoudt. 9:30—174. Anion Coordination Chemistry: Molecular Recognition and Catalysis by Anion Receptor Molecules. J. M. Lehn, B. Dietrich, W. Hosseini. 10:00—175. Coordination of Carboxylates and Phosphates to Polyammonium Macrocycles. C. J. Burrows. 10:30—176. Host-Guest Complexation of Anionic Substrates in Protonic Solvents. F. P. Schmidtchen. 11:00—177. Chelation of Gas Phase Ions. T. B. McMahon. 11:30—178. Matrix Isolation Studies of the C202F3-Anion and Related Bidentate AcidBase Interactions. B. S. Ault. Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 3-G (3rd Floor)

Arts Auditorium, Room 3-CD (3rd Floor)

Natural Products

Radical-Cations and Anions

J. F. Wolfe, Presiding

J. A. Franz,

9:00—179. Characterization of Minor De­ composition Products of Maytansine. J. A. Suchocki, A. T. Sneden. 9:20—180. Determination of the Absolute Stereostructure of Botryococcene and Braunicene. J.D. White, T. C. Somers, N. Reddy. 9:40—181. Deuteration as an Aid to Assign­ ment of 1H NMR Spectra of Deoxynucleotides. C. K. Brush, T. M. Harris. 10:00—182. Hypochlorite-Promoted Trans­ formations of Trichothecenes. Deoxynivalenol. E. P. Burrows. L. L. Szafraniec. 10:20—183. Biosynthesis of Marine Sterols in the Australian Sponge Jaspis stellifera. J-H. Cho, J. E. Thompson, M. Zimmer­ man, C. Silva, C. Djerassi. 10:40—184. New Sulfated Metabolites from an Unidentified California Sponge. M. R. Kernan. D. J. Faulkner. 11:00—185. Unusual Sterol, 5n-Cholest-7yene-2(v, 3/3, 5tv, 6cv, 9ix, 11a-, 19-Heptol11,19-diacetate, from the Sponge, Dysl· dea etheria. R. R. West, J. H. Cardellina II. 11:20—186. Constituents of Polemonium viscosum. D. B. Stierle. 11:40—187. Decoupling Modulations Due to One Bond Heteronuclear Spin Couplings in Long Range Heteronuclear 2D-NMR Chemical Shift Correlation Spectra. A. S. Zektzer, G. E. Martin, B. K. John, R. N. Castle.

Presiding

2:00—159. Mechanistic Investigation of the Rearrangement Reactions of 9-Anthryl Ethers. S. E. Branz, R. P. Bansal, J. A. Carr. 2:20—160. Single Electron Transfer In­ duced Ring Opening of Fused Ring Cyclopropanes. P. G. Gassman, S. J. Burns. 2:40—161. Compatibility of Various Stabi­ lized Carbanion Nucleophiles with Heteroaromatic Nucleophilic Substitution by the S RN1 Mechanism. K. J. Natalie, Jr., J-W. Wong, J. F. Wolfe, G. C. Nwokogu. 3:00—162. Solvent Control of Electron Transfer Reactions of Aryl Diazonium Ions. J. D. Druliner, P. J. Krusic, A. J. Mical. 3:20—163. Oxidation of Alkylated Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds by Cu(ll)-peroxydisulfate. Stereoelectronic Effects of Aryl and Alkyl Structure on the Radical Cation Reactions. D. M. Camaioni, M. S. Alnajjar, M. L. Chow, L. A. Deardurff. 3:40—164. Bis(dimethoxymethyl) and Bis(1,1dimethoxyethyl) peroxide. K. R. Kopecky, J. Molina. 4:00—165. Cyclizations of Aminyl Radicals and Aminium Radical Cations. T. M. Deeb, D. J. Marquardt, M. Newcomb. 4:20—166. EPR Study of the Thermal De­ composition of Dinitrotoluenes. Interme­ diate Nitroxide Radicals and Reaction Ki­ netics. D. R. Anderson, J. T. Swanson, F. J. Seiler, W. E. Trafton, Jr. 4:40—167. Radical Cation Perchlorates of Benzo[a]pyrene and 6-Substituted Deriv­ atives: Synthesis and Reaction with Nu­ cleophiles. P. Cremonesi, C. Warner, E. L. Càvalieri, E. G. Rogan. 5:00—168. Formation of Benzo[a]pyrene (BP)—Deoxyguanosine (dG) Adducts by Electrochemical Oxidation. S. R. Tibbels, E. L. Cavalieri, P. Cremonesi, E. G. Rogan. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Arts Auditorium, Theater (Theater Level) Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Essential Oils and Related Products C D . Pou Iter,

Presiding

9:00—169. Concise Synthesis of an Erythronolidé A Seco Acid Derivative. A. R. Chamberlin, M. Dezube, S. H. Reich.

68

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Section D Arts Auditorium, Room 3-CD (3rd Floor) General & Physical Organic L. T. Scott,

9:40—190. Substituent Effects on the Pyrolysis of «-Chloro-oxylenes. Y-H. So. 10:00—191. Rotation and Solvation of Am­ monium Ion. C. L. Perrin, R. K. Gipe. 10:20—192. Mechanistic Studies of the Acid-Catalyzed Homo-Nuclear Steroidal Diene Isomerization. Synthesis of 3-Benzoyloxyergosta-8,14,22-triene and 3-Benz o y l o x y c h o l e s t a - 8 , 1 4 - d i e n e . S. J. Schmidt, R. E. Dolle, L. I. Kruse, D. Eggelston. 10:40—193. Stereochemistry of the Reac­ tion of 7-Substituted Norbornadienes with Iron Carbonyls. Reaction of Fe(CO)5 with 7-Phenoxy- and 7-(p-Cyanophenoxy)norbornadiene. A. P. Marchand, P. R. Dave, W. H. Watson, I. Tavanaiepour. 11:00—194. 1-Methyl-4,5-cyclopentenoborepin: A Neutral Boron Analogue of Tropilium. A. J. Ashe, III, F. J. Drone. 11:20—195. Zwitterion-Accelerated [3,3]Sigmatropic Rearrangement of Allyl Vinyl Sulfoxides to Sulfines. R. J-R. Hwu, D. A. Anderson. 11:40—196. Direct Metalation of Non-Enolizable Ketones by Lithium Dialkylamide Bases. C. S. Shiner, A. H. Berks, A. M. Fisher. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Arts Auditorium, Room 3-ABEF (3rd Floor) Nobel Laureate Signature Award for Gradu­ ate Education in Chemistry J. M. McBride,

Presiding

2:00—197. Time-Resolved Photoacoustic Calorimetry. K. S. Peters. 2:40—198. Mechanisms of Triplet Carbene Reactions in Frozen Polycrystals and Glasses. M. S. Platz. 3:20—199. 1,3-Perinaphthadiyl Biradical: Spectroscopy and Rearrangement Kinet­ ics in Solid State. Site Effects and HeavyAtom Effects on Tunneling and Activated Decay. J. J. Fisher, J. H. Penn, D. Dohnert, J. Michl. 4:00—200. Award Address. (Nobel Laure­ ate Signature Award for Graduate Educa­ tion in Chemistry sponsored by J. T. Baker Chemical Co.) Local Stress and Mecha­ nism in Solid State Photochemistry. M. D. Hollingsworth, J. M. McBride. Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 2-G (2nd Floor) ACS Award for Research at Undergraduate Institutions, cosponsored with Division of Chemical Education A. B. Smith, III, Presiding 2:00—201. Strategy for the Stereocontrolled Total Synthesis of Breynogenin. A. B. Smith III, R. A. Rivero, J. R. Empfield. 2:30—202. Crystal Structures of Enolates & Aldolates—An Aldol Reaction Montage ? ? P. G. Williard, G. B. Carpenter, M. J. Hintze, G. J. Orioli, J. M. Salvino. 3:00—203. Dynamic NMR Studies of Ad­ ducts of an o-Quinone Monoimide with Electron Rich Olefins. E. A. Williams, J. F. Smith, P. E. Donahue, H. W. Heine. 3:30—204. New Polycyclization Reactions. T. R. Hoye. 4:00—205. Award Address. (ACS Award for Research at Undergraduate Institutions sponsored by Research Corp.) Reactions of o-Quinone Monoimides. H. W. Heine, E. A. Williams.

Presiding

9:00—188. Solution Phase Thermolysis and Photochemistry of 5,6-Dimethylene-2,3diazabicyclo[2.1.1 ]hex-2-ene. 2,4-Dimethylenebicyclo[1.1.0]butane. G. J. Snyder, D. A. Doughterty. 9:20—189. Tandem Cyclopropanation/ Cope Rearrangement Sequence. Stereospecific [3+4] Cycloaddition Reaction of Vinyl Carbenoids with Cyclopentadiene. H. M. L. Davies, H. Smith, O. Korkor.

Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 3-G (3rd Floor) Symposium on Multidentate Complexation and Coordination of Anions Η. Ε. Katz,

Presiding

2:00—206. Electrides: Crystalline Salts in Which Anions are Trapped Electrons. J. L. Dye. 2:30—207. Multidentate Lewis Acids. J. D. Wuest, B. Zacharie. 3:00—208. Macrocyles Containing Tin. M. Newcomb. 3:30—209. Complexation Behavior of Some Bis-(Halostannyl) Organic Compounds. H. G. Kuivila, M. Austin, T. J. Karol, K. Swami, K. Gebreyes, J. A. Zubieta. 4:00—210. Main Group Anion Binders: Bi­ dentate and Tridentate. Η. Ε. Katz.

Section D Arts Auditorium, Room 3-CD (3rd Floor) Synthesis S. S. Hall,

Presiding

2:00—211. Application of the Ester Enolate Claisen Rearrangement to the Synthesis of Pseudomonic Acid C. J. C. Barrish, H. L. Lee, E. G. Baggiolini, M. R. Uskokovic. 2:20—212. Asymmetric Synthesis of (+)Corynoline. M. Cushman, J-K. Chen. 2:40—213. Synthesis of Telitoxine. M. D. Menachery, C. D. Muthler, K. T. Buck. 3:00—214. Iterative Carbo- and Heterocy­ clic (2+3) Annulations. Applications to Natural Product Synthesis. T. Hudlicky, L. Radesca, G. Seoane, H. Luna, F. E. Ander­ son III. 3:20—215. Enantiospecific Synthesis of cis and trans β-Lactams. M. S. Manhas, D. R. Wagle, C. Garai, T. Strohmeyer, J. Chiang, A. K. Bose. 3:40—216. Convergent Approach to the Syn­ thesis of Adriamycin. D. M. S. Wheeler, M. M. Wheeler, D. Duran, R. E. Svenningsen, T. Chamberlain. 4:00—217. Studies Directed Toward the Synthesis of Anthraquinones and Anthracyclinones Utilizing Addition of Carbanions. Derived from 3-Cyano-1(3H)-isobenzofuranones to Aryne Intermediates. S. P. Khanapure, R. T. Reddy, E. R. Biehl. 4:20—218. Synthesis of Hydroxylated Ana­ logs of MK-801. T. A. Lyle, P. S. Ander­ son, S. F. Britcher, P. A. Lyle, C. A. Magil, J. E. Thies, W. J. Thompson, S. Varga. 4:40—219. Expedient Synthesis of a New 3(1 -Methyl- 1-pyrrolidinio)methyl Cephalo­ sporin Nucleus via Bis-Trimethylsilylated Intermediates. D. G. Walker, S. P. Brundidge, K. M. Shih, C. Sapino, Jr. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Arts Auditorium, Room 2-G (2nd Floor) Hydrazine Symposium, cosponsored with Division of Inorganic Chemistry D. K. Simpson,

Presiding

9:00—220. Hydrazine in Organic Synthesis. P. A. S. Smith. 9:40—221. Some New Reactions of NAminophthalimide. M. J. Hearn, M. L. Campbell, M. Hoppe, S. A. Lebold, L. E. Lucas, E. R. Lucero, S. B. Prisch, J. Ro­ senberg, A. Shinha, K. Sy. 10:20—222. Hydrazine and Substituted Hy­ drazines in Heterocyclic Synthesis. N. P. Peet. 11:00—223. Hydrazine Based Chemical Blowing Agents. B. A. Hunter. Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 3-ABEF (3rd Floor) Synthetic Methods C. Y. Meyers,

Presiding

9:00—224. 4+2 and Formal 3+2 Cycloaddi­ tion Reactions of 2,6,6-Trimethyl-1-vinylcyclohexane with Quinones: Efficient Preparation of Di- and Triterpene Ring Systems. T. A. Engler, S. Naganathan, D. Yohannes, F. Takusagawa. 9:20—225. Stereochemical Control in Sug­ ar Hex-5-enyl Radical Cyclizations: A Syn­ thesis of Corey Lactone from 3-Deoxyglucose. T. V. RajanBabu. 9:40—226. Competitive Cyclizations of Ep­ oxides. S. K. Taylor, C. L. Blankespoor, P. A. Deck, S. W. Mork, D. H. Motry, R. H. Van Eenenaam. 10:00—227. Synthesis and Reactions of Vi­ nyl Silane Phosphates. G. B. Hammond, D. F. Wiemer. 10:20—228. Carbanionic Claisen Rear­ rangements. Asymmetric Induction via 1,3,2-Oxazaphosphorinanes. J. E. Marlin, S. E. Denmark.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

10:40—229. Synthesis of Isochromans, Tetrahydropyrans, and Alkylidenetetrahydrofurans via the Lewis Acid Assisted Cyclization of Unsaturated Acetals. D. W. Thompson, D. L. Mohler, N. T. Lane, M. M. Fukuda, N. A. Nikolic. 11:00—230. Anionic 3+2 Cyclization-Elimination Route to Cyclopentenes. D. A. Burg, P. Beak. 11:20—231. Stereospecific Skeletal Rear­ rangement Reactions in Bridgehead-Sub­ stituted Bicyclic[2.2.2] Systems Under Neutral Conditions. D. H. Hua, W-Y. Gung, R. A. Ostrander. 11:40—232. Synthesis of 4-Heterosubstituted-Pyranosides via Dioxenium CationOlefin Cyclization. F. Perron, K. F. Albizati. THURSDAY MORNING

Section C

Arts Auditorium, Room 3-G (3rd Floor) Molecular Recognition C. J. Burrows,

Presiding

9:00—233. Electric Stimulus-Response Be­ havior of Liquid Crystalline Viologen. I. Tabushi, K. Yamamura, K. Kominami, M. Watanabe. 9:20—234. Synthesis and Transport Proper­ ties of Proton-lonizable Crown Ethers Containing the 1,2,4-Triazole Subcyclic Unit. C. W. McDaniel, J. S. Bradshaw, B. D. Skidmore, R. B. Nielson, G. C. LindH, R. L. Bruening, B. E. Wilson, N. K. Dalley, J. D. Lamb, R. M. Izatf. 9:40—235. Using the Host-Guest Paradigm in Liquid Crystal Chemistry: A Model for the Molecular Origins of the Polarization in Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals. D. M. Walba, R. T. Vohra, H. A. Razavi, K. Eidman, N. A. Clark, M. A. Handschy, D. S. Parmar. 10:00—236. Synthesis and Anion Binding Properties of Novel Macrobicyclic Anion Receptor Molecules. D. Heyer, J-M. Lehn. 10:20—237. Synthesis and Study of a Rigid "Molecular Tweezer." S. C. Zimmerman. 10:40—238. Extension of Chromatographically Derived Molecular Recognition Con­ cepts to First Order Asymmetric Transfor­ mations. D. S. Reno, W. H. Pirkle. 11:00—239. Molecular Recognition: Chiral Microenvironments in New Model Recep­ tors. B. Askew, J. Rebek, Jr., M. Doa. 11:20—240. Quinone Substituted "Gable"Type Porphyrins. J. L. Sessler, M. R. John­ son. 11:40-241. Expanded Porphyrin: The Syn­ thesis and Structure of a Novel TipyrraneContaining Macrocyle. J. L. Sessler, M. R. Johnson, V.Lynch. Section D Arts Auditorium, Room 3-CD (3rd Floor) Aromatic Synthesis G. W. Kabalka,

11:40—250. Syntheses and Structural Stud­ ies of Nitrophenanthro[4,5-bcd]thiophenes. L. H. Klemm, R. Tsuchiya, E. K. L. Wong, M. P. Stevens, J. J. Lu, C. E. Klopfenstein. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

D. K. Simpson,

Presiding

FRIDAY MORNING

2:00—251. Geometry Relaxation upon Elec­ tron Removal. S. F. Nelsen. 2:40—252. Mechanisms of Rearrangement of 1,2-Diarylhydrazines. H. J. Shine. 3:20—253. Hydrazine Mediated One-Pot Amination-Oxidation Reaction: Facile Synthesis of 4-Amino-$ Carbolines and 4Aminoisoquinolines. M. L. Trudell, N. Fukada, J. M. Cook. 3:40—254. Antioxidant Activity of Hydrazinecarboxamides. B. B. Sandel. 4:00—255. Chloramination of some Pyridine Derivatives. K. Quain, A. E. Koziol, G. J. Palenik, H. H. Sisler. Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 3-ABEF (3rd Floor) Synthesis M. F. Schlecht,

Presiding

2:00—256. Total Synthesis of Delesserine, Leucodrin, and Dilaspirolactone Aglycone. A. J. Poss, R. K. Belter. 2:20—257. Reduction of α, β-Un saturated Nitroalkenes with Borane and Borohydrides. A Convenient Route to 3-Nitro, 3Hydroxylamino-, and 3-Amino-2H-1-benzopyran Derivatives. G. W. Kabalka, Y-Z. Gai, R. S. Varma, N. Goudgaon. 2:40—258. Intramolecular Oxy- and Amidometallations of Aliens: Diastereoselective Syntheses of 2,5-Disubstituted Tetrahydrofurans. R. D. Walkup, G. Park. 3:00—259. "Vicarious" Inhibition of PhaseTransfer-Catalyzed Proton Abstraction. C. Y. Meyers, R. Chan-Yu-King, D. H. Hua. 3:20—260. Striking Differences in the Be­ havior of 9-Keto-Substituted Fluorenes Towards n-BuLi Vs />-BuMgX Vs MeMgX. C. Y. Meyers, S. Manohar. 3:40—261. Azodicarboxylates: Useful [4+2] Dienes for the Synthesis of Biologically Interesting Amines. B. J. Fitzsimmons, Y. Leblanc, J. Rokach. 4:00—262. Ring Opening of THP Ethers, THF Ethers and Glycosides Using Dimethylboron Bromide. P. C. Anderson, M. A. Bernstein, Y. Guindon. 4:20—263. Cycloadditions of Isoquinolinium Salts: Stereochemistry of Adducts and Synthesis of Substituted Tetralins. R. B. Gupta, R. W. Franck. 4:40—264. Cycloadditions of Isoquinolinium Salts: Direct Evidence for a Two-Step Mechanism. R. B. Gupta, R. W. Franck.

Presiding

9:00—242. Functionalized Aryl Boronic Acid Cross Coupling Reactions Based on Aromatic Directed Metalation. General Synthesis of Biphenyls and m-Terphenyls. M. J. Sharp, W. Cheng, V. Snieckus. 9:20—243. One Pot Synthesis of p-Polyphenyls wathe Intramolecular Cyclization of 3-Dimethylaminohex-5-en-1-ynes. M. R. Unroe, B. A. Reinhardt. 9:40—244. Regiospecific Synthesis of Annulated Quinones. S. T. Perri, H. W. Moore. 10:00—245. Chemistry of Azidoquinones. Cyanophenols from 4-Alkynyi-3-azido1,2-benzoquinones. H. W. Moore, K. Chow, N. V. Nguyen. 10:20—246. Improved Synthesis of Dibenzofurans. F. W. Wassmundt, R. P. Pedemonte. 10:40—247. Tandem Arylation-Reduction of Acyl Heterocycles. Synthesis of Benzyl Heterocycles. S. S. Hall, S. E. Farahat. 11:00—248. Four Novel Phenyldithienoindole Isomers from the Oxidative Photocyclization of Dithienylpyrroles. D. M. Perrine, S. J. J. Kagan. 11:20—249. Synthesis of Substituted [1]Benzothieno[2,3-c]quinolines. J. D. McKenney, Jr., R. N. Castle.

Section A

Arts Auditorium, Room 2-G (2nd Floor) Hydrazine Symposium

Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 3-G (3rd Floor) Photochemistry N . J . Pienta,

4:20—272. Possible Phosphoranyl 1,3-Biradicals in the Electrocyclic Photoarrange­ ments of Allyl Phosphites. W. G. Bentrude, S-G. Lee, K. Akutagawa, W. Ye, Y. Charbonnel. 4:40—273. Photochemical Aromatic Alkylation. M. E. Kurz, T. Noreuil, J. Seebauer, S. Cook, D. Geier, A. Leeds, C. Stronach, B. Barnickel, M. Kelley, M. Kerkemeyer.

Presiding

2:00—265. Picosecond Photochemistry of Peresters: Evidence for an Acyloxy Radi­ cal Intermediate. D. E. Falvey, G. B. Schuster. 2:20—266. Deoxygenation of Epoxides by Fluorenylidene. C. J. Shields, G. B. Schuster. 2:40—267. Fluorescence Solvatochromism of Substituted Stilbenes. G. M. Anstead, J. A. Katzenelienbogen. 3:00—268. Photochemistry and Photophysics of 10-Substituted 2-(9-Anthryl)ethyl Glutarates. M. A. Fox, P. Britt. 3:20—269. Effect of Fluorinated Solvents on Relative Rates of Photooxidation on Semi­ conductor Surfaces. M. A. Fox, D. D. Sackett. 3:40—270. Formation of Transient Ions and Hexaene Products from Photolysis of Retinyl Acetate. N. J. Pienta, S. J. Culp, B. Durham, D. A. Johnson. 4:00—271. Two Photon Laser Photochemis­ try of a Coumarin Laser Dye. R. J. von Trebra. T. H. Koch.

Section A

Arts Auditorium, Room 2-G (2nd Floor) Synthesis M. J. Taschner,

Presiding

9:00—274. Synthesis and Properties of Bidentate Complexes Derived from 4,5-Diselenolato-1,3-dithiole-2-thione Dianions. P. J. Nigrey. 9:00—275. Novel Synthesis of Substituted Polyether Diols. P. Castro, S. Tihomirov, C. G. Gutierrez. 9:40—276. Diastereoselective Conjugate Addition Reactions of «-Alkoxyorganocuprates. R. J. Linderman, A. Godfrey, J. McKenzie, K. Home. 10:00—277. Influence of Reaction Parame­ ters on the Palladium-Catalyzed Carboalkoxylation of Aryl Triflates. R. E. Dolle, L. I. Kruse. 10:20—278. Nucleophilic Addition Reac­ tions of Hindered Unsaturated Boranes. A New Synthesis of Organoboranes. M. P. Cooke, Jr., R. K. Widener. 10:40—279. KF/Basic Alumina: An Efficient Base for Michael Condensations of Nitroalkanes. D. E. Bergbrieter, J. J. Lalonde. 11:00—280. Reaction of Chlorofluoropolymers with Sulfur Nucleophiles. M. W. Pelter, R. T. Taylor. 11:20—281. Synthesis and Liquid Crystal Behavior of p-Benzotrifluoride Com­ pounds II. J. C. Liang, J. O. Cross. 11:40—282. Total Synthesis of Petroporphyrins from b-Cycloalkenopyrroles. T. D. Lash, M. C. Johnson, T. J. Perun, Jr., J. J. Catarello.

Section Β Arts Auditorium, Room 3-ABEF (3rd Floor) Mechanisms M. Druelinger,

11:40—291. Mechanism of the Chemical Reductive Cleavage of Phenoxynaphthalene. G. A. Ross, D. E. Bartak, N. F. Woolsey.

Section C Arts Auditorium, Room 3-G (3rd Floor)



J. M. Takacs, Presiding 9:00—292. Synthesis of 8,10-Dideazatetrahydrofolate Toward a Novel Multisubstrate Inhibitor of Thymidylate Synthase. C. A. Samathanam, A. D. Broom. 9:20—293. Novel Multisubstrate Inhibitors of Thymidylate Synthase. R. M. Slusher, IY. Yang, A. D. Broom. 9:40—294. Sequence-Specific Incorpora­ tion of the Cis-Syn Thymidine Photodimer into an Oligonucleotide via Solid Phase Phosphoramidite Based DNA Synthesis Techology. J-S. Taylor, I. R. Brockie, C. O'Day. 10:00—295. 1H-Naphth(2,3-d)imidazole-6,7dicarboxaldehyde: Synthesis and Reac­ tions with Primary Amines and Amino Ac­ ids. H. P. Chokshi, R. G. Carlson, R. S. Givens. 10:20—296. Stereospecific Synthesis of 2Thiophospholipids: A New Class of Mech­ anistic Probes for the Study of Lipolytic Enzymes. S. K. Bhatia, J. Hajdu. 10:40—297. Catalytic Antibodies. P. G. Schultz, S. J. Pollack, J. W. Jacobs. 11:00—298. A New Assay for Peptidylglycine cv-Amidating Monooxygenase. S. E. Ramer, J. C. Vederas, M. M. Palcic. 11:20—299. Kinetic Isotope Effect Probes for the Elucidation of the Mechanisms of Organophosphonate Hydrolysis and Inactivation of Acetylcholinesterase. A. J. Bennet, I. M. Kovach, R. L. Schowen. 11:40—300. Mechanistic Studies on Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase. D. J. Aberhart.

PETR DIVISION OF PETROLEUM CHEMISTRY, INC. S. Lambert, Program

Chairman

BUSINESS MEETING: Tu DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Reception, Tu Dinner, Tu

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon Ε (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Structure of Future Jet Fuels W. E. Harrison, B. Yacabucci, Organizers W. E. Harrison,

οoc α.

Biochemistry Mechanisms

Presiding

9:00—283. Carbon-14 Kinetic Isotope Ef­ fects and Mechanism in the Solvolysis of 1,1,1 -Trif luoro-2-substituted-phenyl-2propyl-3-14C p-tolunenesulfonates. A. Guo, A. Fry. 9:20—284. Aminolysis of N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters. A Structure-Reactivity Study. G. W. Cline, S. B. Hanna. 9:40—285. Bronsted Plots and «-Cyclodextrin Effects on General-Base-Catalyzed Photo-Smiles Rearrangements. G. G. Wubbels, W. D. Cotter. 10:00—286. Photochemistry of 5,6-Diacetoxyindole. A. Chan. 10:20—287. Charge-Transfer Excited States of Phenylethynylpentamethyldisilanes. K. A. Horn, R. B. Grossman, A. A. Whitenack. 10:40—288. 7r-Acceptor Induced Reactions: Unusual Selectivity in Bond Cleavage Through the Use of Photochemical Reac­ tions. J. H. Penn, D-L. Deng, S. K. Aleshire. 11:00—289. Protonation of Radical Anions as an Important Mechanistic Pathway for Dechlorination of Chloroaromatics. J. H. Penn, E. D. Cox, A. Singh. 11:20—290. Reductive Electrochemical C—Ο Bond Cleavage of 1-Phenoxynaphthalene: Intermediacy of the Naphthyl Radical and Naphthyl Anion in the Reac­ tion Pathway. T. A. Thornton, N. F. Woolsey, D. E. Bartak.

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Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—1. Endothermic Fuels for High Mach Vehicles. A. C. Nixon, H. Lander. 9:00—2. Role of Thermodynamics in the De­ sign of Future Jet Fuels. W. V. Steele, R. D. Chirico. 9:25—3. Thermodynamic and Chemical Consequences of Hydrocarbon Structure. J. H. Zoeller, R. A. Zingaro, R. D. Macfarlane. 9:50—4. Gas-Phase Thermal Degradation Behavior of Future Jet Fuels. P. H. Taylor, W. A. Rubey, S. L. Mazer. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—5. Thermal Behavior of a Model En­ dothermic Fuel and Identification of Deg­ radation Products. W. A. Rubey, S. L. Ma­ zer, P. H. Taylor, J. G. Starter.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

69

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10:55—e.Correlations Between Fuel Struc­ ture and Sooting Potential. D. G. Hamb­ len, P. R. Solomon, K. S. Tarantul, R. M. Carangelo. 11:20—7. Review of Molecular Indexing Methods and Related Techniques. E. W. Ptizer.

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Marriott, Colorado Salon D (Ballroom Level)

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M. J. Gattuso, G. J. Antos, Organizers M. J. Gattuso, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—8. Enhanced Catalysts for Hydrodenitrogenation of Coal Liquids. A. S. Hirschon, R. M. Laine, R. B. Wilson, Jr. 9:10—9. Influence of Non-Uniform Active Phase Distributions on Activity and Selec­ tivity of HDS Catalysts. J. L. G. Fierro, J. M. Asua, P. Grange, B. Delmon. 9:40—10. Effect of Support Acidity on the Intermediate Steps for Quinoline and In­ dole Hydrodenitrogenation. A. K. AboulGheit. 10:10—11. Inhibiting Effect of Sulfur and Oxygen Compounds on Carbazole Hydro­ denitrogenation on NiMo/AI 2 0 3 Catalysts and Relation to Gas-Phase Acidity. M. Naqai, T. Ogino. 10:40—12. Phase Composition and Texture of the Active Phases in Co-Mo HDS Cata­ lysts: Relation with the Catalytic Activity. R. Prada Silvy, J. L. G. Fierro, J. Ladriere, P. Grange, B. Delmon. 11:10—13. Catalytic Properties and Physi/«cochemical Characterization of NiWV '•AI2P3 Hydrotreating Catalysts. M. Breysse. 11:40—14. Chemical Evidence for the Exis­ tence of Two Types of Catalytic Sites for Hydroprocessing of Substituted Benzenes over NiW(Mo)/7-AI 2 0 3 Hydrotreating Cat­ alysts. C. Moreau. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon Ε (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Structure of Future Jet Fuels W. E. Harrison,

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—28. Development of Jet Fuels from Oil Sands. M. F. Wilson, I. P. Fisher. 9:05—29. Potential Turbine Fuels from Western Kentucky Tar Sand Bitumen. H. F. Moore, C. A. Johnson, W. A. Sutton, R. M. Benslay. 9:35—30. High-Density Jet Fuels from Coal Syncrudes. R. F. Sullivan. 10:05—Intermission 10:20—31. Composition of Jet Fuel from Tar Oil. C. L. Knudson, W. G. Willson, D. J. Miller, R. O. Ness, Jr., A. Ruud. 10:50—32. A Naphthenic Jet Fuel Produced from an Australian Marine Oil Shale. C. J. R. Fookes. L. C. Stephenson, A. Muradian, A. R. Atkins, B. D. Batts. 11:20—33. High-Density Jet Fuels from Naphthenic Crudes and from Refinery Hydrocracking Operations. C. A. Smits, M. T. Atwood. Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon D (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Hydrotreating G. J. Antos,

Presiding

1:00—Introductory Remarks. 1:05—15. Structure of Future Jet Fuels—A Model for Determining Physical and Chemical Properties from Molecular Structure. J. W. Bunger, D. A. V. Prasad, C. P. Russell, A. G. Oblad. 1:35—16. Property Correlations for Estimat­ ing Engine Effects of Future Fuels. P. H. Kydd, C. J. Nowack. 2:05—17. Establishing a Molecular Struc­ tures Data Base Using Multidimensional Chromatographic Techniques. S. D. An­ derson, P. C. Hayes, Jr. 2:35—Intermission. 2:50—18. Relation of Solids Fraction in Cold Jet Fuel Waxes to Molecular Species Present in the Whole Fuel. D. L. Schruben, R. N. Finch, K. L. Kittelson. 3:20—19. Improvement of Jet Fuel Proper­ ties by Paraffin Isomerization. Ε. Ν. Cop­ pola, A. G. Oblad, J. S. Shabtai. 3:50—20. Possible Use of Polyaphonated Hydrocarbons as Jet Fuels. F. Sebba, R. Neff, J. A. Schetz. 4:20—21. Low-Cost High Energy Density Carbon Black Fuel Mix for Heat Engines. M. Steinberg. Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon D (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Hydrotreating G. J. Antos,

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon Ε (Ballroom Level) Symposium on the Structure of Future Jet Fuels B. Yacabucci,

2:30—23. Kinetics for Simultaneous HDS, HDN, and Hydrogénation Model Reactions. Comparison Between Ni-Mo/AI 2 0 3 and C0-M0/AI2O3 Catalysts. P. H. Zeuthen, P. Stoltze, J. Barthody. 3:00—24. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Hydrotreating Synthetic Middle Distillates. I. P. Fisher, M. F. Wilson. 3:30—25. Kinetics of Hydrogénation of Aromatics Determined by Carbon-13 NMR for Athabasca Bitumen-Derived Middle Distillates. S. M. Yui, E. C. Sanford. 4:00—26. Modeling of Demetallation Catalysts. C. J. Pereira, J. W. Beeckman. 4:30—27. Characterization of Carbon Supported Molybdenum Sulfide Catalysts Using Toluene Chemisorption. A. W. Scaroni, G. M. K. Abotsi, F. J. Derbyshire.

Presiding

2:00—22. Kinetics of Hydrodenitrogenation of Simulated Synfuel Fractions. J. Shab­ tai, J. C. Yeh, C. Russell.

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—34. Outline of a Method for Evaluating Liquid Products Obtained by Catalytic Conversion of Biomass. A. Burton, D. de Zutter, E. Churin, G. Poncelet, P. Grange. 9:10—35. Upgrading of Βίο-Oils by Hydrotreatments. E. Churin, P. Grange, B. Del­ mon. 9:40—36. Comparative Temperature-Pro­ grammed Sulf iding Study of the HDS Cata­ lysts Mo0 3 /AI 2 0 3 and W0 3 /Al 2 0 3 . P. J. Mangnus, B. Scheffer, J. A. Moulijn. 10:10—37. Characterization of Hydrotreat­ ing Catalysts by Reversed-Flow Gas Chromatrography. N. A. Katsanos. 10:40—38. Simulated Regeneration of an Industrial C0M0/7-AI2O3 Catalyst. Influ­ ence of Steam. A. Arteaga, J. L. G. Fierro, P. Grange, B. Delmon. 11:10—39. Role of Co in Co-Mo HDS Cata­ lysts. J. P. R. Vissers, V. H. J. de Beer, R. Prins. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon Ε (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Oil Shale Chemistry, cosponsored with Divisions of Fuel Chemistry and Geochemistry M. Siskin, F. P. Miknis, Geochemistry J. M. Moldowan,

Organizers

Presiding

1:50—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—40. Assisted Vibrational Displace­ ment Mechanism of Geochemical Reac­ tions in Oil Shales. C. Costa Neto. 2:30—41. Separation and Carbon Isotope Compositions of Nickel and Vanadium Porphyrins. D. H. Freeman, R. M. Ange­ les, R. Takigiku, J. M. Hayes. 2:55—42. Novel Identification of (17βΗ)-Ηοpanes in Green River Oil Shale Kerogens. A. O. Barakat, T. F. Yen.

Section Β 3:45—43. Petrologic Chemistry of a Devoni­ an Type II Kerogen. T. L. Robl, D. N. Taulbee, L. S.N Barron. 4:10—44. Characterization of Kerogen-Analytical Limitations and Method Design. S. R. Larter. 4:35—45. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of the Pore Structures of Oil Shales. D. F. R. Mildner. Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon D (Ballroom Level) 1:45—Divisional Business Meeting. Symposium on Advances in Hydrotreating M. J. Gattuso,

Presiding

2:00—46. New Catalysts for Hydrotreatment and Conversion of Heavy Feeds. J. H. Rossarie, L. J. Y. Mariette, J. A. Devanneaux. 2:30—47. New Developments in Hydropro­ cessing Catalysis. J. D. Passaretti, T. C. Ho. 3:00—48. Detailed Analysis of Polar Com­ pounds in Wilmington Gas Oil and Hydrotreated Products. G. P. Sturm, Jr., J. B. Green, S. Y. Tang, J. W. Reynolds, S. K-T. Yu. 3:30—49. Compositional Changes in a Wil­ mington 650°-1000°F Fraction as a Func­ tion of Hydrotreating Severity. Ο. Κ. Bhan, J. G. Green, D. W. Brinkman. 4:00—50. New Developed Hydrodemetallization Catalysts and Its Commercial Ap­ plication. H. Higashi, K. Shirono, Y. Nishimura, S. Egashira.

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salon G (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Hydrocracking J. W. Ward,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—51. Impact of Nitrogen Compounds on the Hydrocracking of Synthetic Gas Oil. J. Chmielowiec, R. K. Lennox, J. Monnier, N. Whitelegg. 2:35—52. Hydrocracking of Gas Oil from Athabasca Syncrude. M. F. Wilson, R. Simmons, H. Notzl. 3:05—53. Indigenous Alkylbenzene Isomers as Probes of Zeolite Shape Selectivity in Hydrodewaxing of Petroleum Distillates. T. J. Carlin, J. G. Bendoraitis. 3:35—54. Paragon Process: A New Hydro­ cracking Concept. D. J. O'Rear. 4:15—55. Primary and Secondary Cracking Analysis: A New and Simple Method for Estimating Diffusional Inhibition. S. J.Tauster, T. C. Ho, S. C. Fung. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon D (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Oil Shale Chemistry Structural Characterization M. Siskin,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—56. Characterization and Classifica­ tion of Kerogens Based on Oxidation Prod­ ucts of their Multistep Alkaline Permanga­ nate Degradation. D. Vitorovic, A. Am­ bles, M. Djordjevic, S. Bajc. 9:30—57. Nature of Cross-Linked Struc­ tures in Kerogen. A. O. Barakat, T. F.Yen. 9:55—58. Molecular Structure of Oil Shale Kerogens. F. Behar, M. Vandenbroucke, R. Pelet. 10:20—Intermission 10:45—59. Influence of Oxidative Weather­ ing on Shale Structure and on the Subse­ quent Devolatilization of Oil Shale. M. R. Khan. 11:10—60. Characterization of Organic Functionalities in Brazilian Oil Shales. C. Costa Neto. 11:35—61. Characterization of Stuart Oil Shale Systems. A. S. Lee, T. F. Yen.

Marriott, Colorado Salon Ε (Ballroom Level) ACS Award in Petroleum Chemistry Sym­ posium Honoring W. Keith Hall

R. P. Eischens, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—62. Characterization and HDS Activi­ ty of Mo/Ti0 2 and Ni(Co)-Mo/Ti02 Cata­ lysts. R. B. Quincy, M. Houalla, D. M. Her­ cules. 9:30—63. Bimetallic Catalysts. J. H. Sinfelt. 10:00—64. Molybdenum Disulfide as Cata­ lyst for Alcohols. K. Klier, J. G. Santiesteban, J. G. Nunan. 10:30—65. Propylene Oxidation: A Model Reaction for the Selective Oxidation of Olefins. G. W. Keulks. 11:00—66. Award Address. (ACS Award in Petroleum Chemistry sponsored by Amoco Foundation.) Relationship Be­ tween Surface Chemistry and Catalysis. W. K. Hall. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon Ε (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Oil Shale Chemistry Kerogen-Mineral Interactions T. F. Yen,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—67. Quantitative Analysis of Minerals in Oil Shales by FTIR Spectroscopy. J. M. Brown, J. J. Elliott. 2:30—68. Effect of the Mineral Matrix on the Extractability of the Kerogen of a Turkish Oil Shale. Y. Yurum, A. Karabakan. 2:55—69. Chemical Beneficiation of Shale Kerogen. J. D. McCollum. 3:20—70. Disruption of Kerogen-Mineral In­ teractions in Oil Shales. M. Siskin, G. Brons, J. F. Payack, Jr. 3:45—Intermission 4:10—71. Product Changes Induced During Pyrolysis by Kerogen/lnorganic Matrix In­ teractions. D. N. Taulbee, E. D. Seibert. 4:35—72. Characterization of Arsenic in Oil Shale and Oil Shale Derivatives by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy. S. P. Cramer, M. Siskin, G. N. George, L. D. Brown. Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon I & J (Ballroom Lev­ el) Symposium on Advances in Resid Upgrad­ ing R. L. Howell, J. Wei, R. L. Howell,

Organizers

Presiding

1:30—73. Structural Studies on Residua. O. P. Strausz. 2:00—74. Analysis of Residuum Desulfurization by Size Exclusion Chromatography with Element Specific Detection. J. G. Reynolds, W. R. Biggs. 2:30—75. Correlation Between Physical Chemical Properties and Reactivity in Hy­ droprocessing of Venezuelan Heavy Ends. L. Carbognani, C. Garcia, A. Izquierdo, M. P. Di Marco, C. Perez, A. Rengel, V. San­ chez. 3:00—76. Initial Reactions in the Coking of Residua. J. G. Speight. 3:30—77. Reductive Alkylation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Petroleum Resid vs. Model Compounds. L. B. Ebert, D. R. Mills, J. C. Scanlon. 4:00—78. Neutral Fraction Compounds: A Representative Sample of Petroleum Asphaltenes? S. Acevedo, O. Leon, H. Ri­ vas, H. Marquez, G. Escobar, L. Gutierrez. 4:30—79. Characterization of Vacuum Res­ idues by Adsorption Chromatography and 2 H-NMR Spectroscopy. C. Liu, G. Que, Y. Chen, W. Liang.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings 70

February 9, 1987 C&EN

THURSDAY MORNING Section A Marriott, Colorado Salon Ε (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Oil Shale Chemistry High Temperature Chemistry

Thermal Chemistry

T. Wildeman,

F. P. Miknis,

Presiding

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Marriott, Colorado Salon Ε (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Oil Shale Chemistry Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—80. DXRD Studies of Oil Shale Miner­ al Reactions. K. A. Helling, W. J. Thom­ son. 9:35—81. Sulfation of Mineral Matter in New Brunswick Oil Shale. D. Karman, S. Kresta. 10:05—Intermission. 10:30—82. Ammonia Evolution During Oil Shale Pyrolysis. M. S. Oh, R. W. Taylor. 11:00—83. Gasification Characteristics and Kinetics for an Eastern Oil Shale. F. S. Lau, D. M. Rue, D. V. Punwani, R. C. Rex. 11:30—84. Intrinsic Oxidation Kinetics of Rapidly Pyrolyzed Oil Shale. F. D. Fujimoto, R. L. Braun, R. W. Taylor, C. J. Morris.

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—96. Pyrolysis Transformation Model of Alginite Kerogen. T. J. Parks, L. J. Lynch, D. S. Webster, D. Barrett. 2:35—97. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Dis­ tribution of Compounds in Australian Oil Shale Pyrolyzates. J. M. Charlesworth, P. J. Sanders, V. T. Borrett. 3:05—98. Free Radical Equilibrium in the Fluidized Bed Retort. T. T. Coburn, M. W. Droege. 3:35—Intermission. 4:00—99. Isothermal Kinetics of New Alba­ ny Oil Shale. S. D. Carter. 4:30—100. Product Evolution During Rapid Pyrolysis of Green River Oil Shale. Ε. Μ. Suuberg, J. Sherman, W. D. Lilly.

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon D (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Resid Upgrad­ ing

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon D (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Resid Upgrad­ ing

J. Wei,

R. L. Howell,

Presiding

8:30—85. Removal of Metals from Heavy Oils with Phosphorus Alumina Catalysts. S. G. Kukes, S. L. Parrott, L. E. Gardner. 9:00—86. Intrinsic Kinetics of the Hydrodemetallation of V- and Ni-Porphyrin over Sulfided CoMo/AI 2 0 3 Catalyst. H-J. Chen, F. E. Massoth. 9:30—87. Accelerated Aging Tests with A Resid Hydrotreating Catalyst. A. W._Aldag. 10:00—88. Characterization of Straight Run and Demetalized Arabian Heavy Atmo­ spheric Resid. H. C. Olbrich, C-W. Hung, R. L. Howell. 10:30—89. New Hydrocracking Catalyst for Heavy Oil Upgrading. T. Itoh. 11:00—90. Modelling RDM Catalysts Deac­ tivation by Metals Sulfides Deposits: An Original Approach Supported by HREM In­ vestigations and Pilot Plant Test Results. H. Toulhoat, J. C. Plumail, C. Houppert, R. Szmanski, P. Bourseau, G. Muratet. 11:30—91. Hydrodemetallization and Hydroconversion of Tia Juana Heavy Residue with Combined Catalyst Systems. C. Zerpa, M. DiMarco, R. Galiasso.

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salon G (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Petrochemical Technology J. E. Lyons, P. E. Ellis, Jr., Organizers Catalytic Oxidation in the Liquid Phase Biomimetic Oxidation J. E. Lyons,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—92. Selective Catalytic Oxygenation of Hydrocarbons with Molecular Oxygen at Room Temperature—a Completely In­ organic Mimic of Monoxygenase En­ zymes. N. Herron, C. A. Tolman. 9:45—93. Polyoxometalates as Homoge­ neous Oxidatively Resistant Catalysts for Difficult Selective Organics Oxidations. Functionalization of Alkanes. C. L. Hill, R. B. Brown, Jr., R. F. Renneke. 10:25—94. Microbial Oxidation of Hydrocar­ bons. C. T. Hou. 11:05—95. First Example of a Molecular Oxygen Oxidation Catalyzed by Ce(IV). The Selective Conversion of Thioethers to Sulfoxides. D. P. Riley, M. R. Smith, P. E. Correa.

Presiding

1:30—101. Thermal Cracking Under Hydro­ gen Pressure: Preliminary Step for Con­ version of Heavy Oils and Residues. J. F. Le Page, F. Morel, A. M. Trassard, J. Bousquet. 2:00—102. Chemical Structural Changes in Advanced Resid Upgrading Process (VisABC). S. Nakata, S. Shimizu, S. Asoaka, Y. Shiroto, Y. Fukui. 2:30—103. VEBA-COMBI Cracking—a Technology for Upgrading of Heavy Oils and Bitumen. W. Dohler, I. K. Kretschmar, L. Merz, K. Niemann. 3:00—Intermission. 3:15—104. Coke Formation in the Visbreaking Process. T. Y. Yan. 3:45—105. New Approach to Supercritical Recovery Solvent in Deasphalting. G. Hotier, F. Cormerai, C. Magnin. 4:15—106. Gulf-Canada DRB P r o c e s s Steps Toward Commercialization. F. Souhrada, H. J. Woods, P. L. Simpson, A. Logan.

Section C Marriott, Colorado Salon G (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Petrochemical Technology Synthesis of Industrial Organics P. E. Ellis, Jr.,

Presiding

2:00—107. Novel Copper (I) Complexes and their Chemistry Relative to the OxidativeCoupling of 2,6-Xylenol. D. A. Haitko. 2:40—108. Catalytic Oxidation of Olefins to Glycols via Molecular Oxygen. R. S. My­ ers, R. C. Michaelson, R. G. Austin. 3:20—109. Homogeneous Models for Mech­ anisms of Surface Reactions: Propylene Ammoxidation. D. M. T. Chan, W. A. Nu­ gent, W. C. Fultz, D. C. Roe, T. H. Tulip. 4:00—110. Advances in Hydroformylation Catalysis. A. A. Oswald, R. V. Kastrup, E. J. Mozeleski. FRIDAY

MORNING

Section A

Marriott, Colorado Salon Ε (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Oil Shale Chemistry Thermal Solution Chemistry V. D. Allred,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—111. Isolation of Carboxylic Acid Salts from Green River Oil Shale. J. F. McKay, M. S. Blanche. 9:30—112. Comparison of the Thermal De­ composition of Colorado and Kentucky Oil Shales. T. F. Turner, F. P. Miknis, G. L. Berdan, P. J. Conn.

9:55—113. ESR Studies of Kerogen Conver­ sion in Shale Pyrolysis. B. G. Silbernagel, L. A. Gebhard, M. Siskin, G. Brons. 10:20—Intermission. 10:45—114. Kerogen Decomposition Kinet­ ics of Selected Green River and Eastern Oil Shales from Thermal Solution Experi­ ments. D. R. Leavitt, A. L. Tyler, A. S. Kafesjian. 11:10—115. Kinetics and Mechanism of Mo­ roccan Oil Shale Solubilization in Super­ critical Toluene. M. Tahiri, C. M. Sliepcevich, R. G. Mallinson. 11:35—116. Pyrolysis and Hydropyrolysis of Two Carbonaceous Australian Oil Shales in Supercritical Toluene and Tetralin. R. M. Baldwin, K. W. Chen.

Section Β Marriott, Colorado Salon D (Ballroom Level) Symposium on Advances in Petrochemical Technology Oxidative Carbonylation

P. E. Ellis, Jr., Presiding 9:00—117. Oxidative Carbonylation of Un­ saturated Hydrocarbons via Heteroge­ neous Palladium Catalysis. J. J. Lin, J. F. Knifton. 9:40—118. Heterogeneous Catalyst for Al­ cohol Oxycarbonylation to Dialkyl Oxa­ lates. A. M. Gaffney, J. J. Leonard, J. A. Sofranko, H-N. Sun. 10:20—119. Oxidative Carbonylation of Amines to Carbamates. F. J. Waller. 11:00—120. Oxidative Carbonylation of Sty­ rène to Methyl Cinnamate. C-Y. Hsu.

PHYS DIVISION OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY T. F. George, Program

Chemical Problems in Electronic Materials (see Committee on Science, Thu, page 35)

OTHER DIVISION'S SYMPOSIUM OF INTEREST: History of Physical Chemistry (see Division of the History of Chemistry, M. page 55) DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Social Hours: M, Tu

Section A

Westin, Tabor Theater (Meeting Room Level) Joel Henry Hildebrand Award Symposium Honoring Stuart A. Rice H. T. Davis, Organizer,

Section Β Westin, Continental Ballroom C (Meeting Room Level) Peter Debye Award Symposium Honoring Harry G. Drickamer D. W. McCall, Organizer,

Presiding

8:25—Introductory Remarks. 8:30—1. Award Address. (Joel Henry Hildebrand Award in the Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry of Liquids sponsored by Shell Companies Foundation Inc.) Studies of the Liquid Vapor Interface and Supported Film. S. A. Rice. 9:30—2. Electron Solvation in Polar and Nonpolar Fluids. B. J. Berne. 10:10—3. Structure and Transport in Interfaces and Confined Fluids. H. T. Davis.

Presiding

8:55—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—6. Award Address. (Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry sponsored by E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co.) Pres­ sure Tuning Spectroscopy. H. G. Drick­ amer. 10:00—7. Density Effects on Dynamic Pro­ cesses in Fluids. J. Jonas. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—8. Vibrations of Crowded Molecules. D. R. Herschbach. 11:30—9. Experimental Studies of Ultrafast Motions in Condensed Phases. R. M. Hochstrasser. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Westin, Tabor Theater (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Electroactive Polymers cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemis­ try P. N. Prasad, D. R. Ulrich, D. R. Ulrich,

Organizers

Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—10. Electroactive Polymers—an Overview. D. R. Ulrich. 1:50—11. Nonlinear Optics: Organic and Polymer Systems. A. F. Garito. 2:35—12. Design, Ultrastructure, and Dy­ namics of Nonlinear Optical Effects in Polymeric Thin Films. P. N. Prasad. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—13. Nonlinear Organic Crystals for Parametric Amplification and Sampling Spectroscopy (PASS). I. Ledoux, J. Badan, J. L. Oudar, J. Zyss. 4:20—14. Electric-Field Poling of Nonlinear Optical Polymers. C. S. Willand, S. E. Feth, M. Scozzafava, D. J. Williams, G. D. Green, J. I. Weinshenk, H. K. Hall, J. E. Mulvaney.

Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM:

MONDAY MORNING

10:50—Intermission. 11:00—4. Random Particle Packings and the Liquid State. F. Stillinger. 11:40—5. Excited States in Liquids 1987. P. G. Woylnes.

Section Β Westin, Continental Ballroom C (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Molecular Line Shapes and Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy

H. S. Kwok, S. Mukamel, Organizers S. Mukamel, Presiding 1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—15. Picosecond Energy Transfer by Four-Wave Mixing. R. M. Rentzepis. 2:35—16. Charge Separation, Electron Transfer and Solvation Dynamics: Some Recent Results at the Femtosecond Timescale. A. Migus, A. Antonetti, Y. Gaudel, J. L. Martin. 3:10—17. Solid State Hole Burning Spec­ troscopy: A Window to Relaxation Dynam­ ics in Glasses and Photosynthetic Reac­ tion Centers. G. J. Small, J. M. Hayes, J. K. Gillie, M. J. Kenney, R. Jankowiak. 3:45—Intermission. 4:05—18. Nature of Chemical Reactions on the Femtosecond Timescale. C. B. Harris. 4:40—19. Ultrafast Photoisometrization of Molecules in the Liquid State. Κ. Β. Eisenthal.

MONDAY EVENING Westin, Continental Ballroom C (Meeting Room Level) General—Poster Session/Social Hour 7:30-9:30 PM

T. F. George, Organizer L. G. Anderson, Presiding 20. Oxidation of GaAs Studied by Angular Dependent X-Ray Photoelectron Spec­ troscopy. W. F. Stickle, K. D. Bomben.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

71

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21. Phosphorescence Quenching of Porphy­ rin Supported on Solid Substrates by Mo­ lecular Oxygen. A. J. Twarowski, L. Good. 22. Photoinitiated Chlorination of Paraffin Hydrocarbons in Low-Temperature Thin Films: CI + C3H8. A. J. Sedlacek, E. S. Mansueto, C. A. Wight. 23. Photoassisted Reduction of C0 2 by H2 in the Presence of H20(g) Over C0O-M0O3 Supported on Al 2 0 3 : Dependence of Yields on Light Intensity, Concentrations of Reactants and Temperature. Ν. Ν. Lichtin, K. M. Vijayakumar. 24. Surface Adsorption and Decomposition of Dimethylmethylphosphonate on ZNO Surfaces. T. L. Rose, T. J. Lewis. 25. XPS Studies of CO Adsorption on Calci­ um Oxide (100). K. H. Casleton, R. V. Siriwardane. 26. Group VI Carbonyls Supported on Alumi­ na as Studied by NMR Spectroscopy. W. M. Shirley. 27. Matrix Isolation Investigation of the Inter­ action of Halogens with Pi Electron Do­ nors. B. S. Ault. 28. Proton Transfer and Relaxation Dynam­ ics of Hydrogen Bonded Molecular Com­ plexes. D. F. Keliey, G. A. Brucker. 29. Solvent Dynamics and Twisted Intramo­ lecular Charge Transfer in 4,4'-Diaminophenyl Sulphone. J. D. Simon, S-G. Su. 30. Laser Photolysis of Trityl Azide in Solu­ tion. Β. Β. Craig, S. K. Chattopadhyay, W. L. Faust. 31. Picosecond Photodynamics of Dyes in Polymer Solutions. K. G. Casey, E. L. Quitevis. 32. Picosecond Cage Recombination of Free Radical Pairs. T. W. Scott, S. N. Liu. 33. C-13 NMR and Spectrophotometric Stud­ ies of Alcohol-Lipid Interactions. L. L. Herold, E. S. Rowe, R. G. Khalifah. 34. Solvation Effects on the Electronic Structure of Isoquinoline and Pyridazine. J. Wanna, E. R. Bernstein. 35. Orientational Dependence of the Metal Ion Perturbers on the Triplet State of Naphthalene in Naphthalene Crown EtherMetal Ion Complexes. S. Ghosh, M. Pétrin, A. H. Maki, L. R. Sousa. 36. Raman Difference Spectroscopy Study of Resonant Intermolecular Coupling in Isotopic Mixtures of Liquids. J. Laane, N. Meinander, M. M. Strube, A. N. Johnson. 37. Conformational Study of the Bending and Twisting Vibrations of Cyclohexene-Like Molecules. M. M. Tecklenburg, J. Laane. 38. Conformational Energies from Matrix Isolated Thermal Molecular Beams. G. 0. Braathen. 39. Electronic and Geometric Structure of Transition Metals Containing Cations. A. Alvarado-Swaisgood, J. F. Harrison. 40. Microwave Spectrum of H2S. . . S0 2 . R. E. Bumgarner, D. J. Pauley, S. G. Kukolich. 41. Vibrational Analysis of Molecules Containing the Peptide Group: Amides. I. Scott. 42. Vibrational Spectra and Hydrogen Bonding Studies of Isotopically Substituted 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene. J. J. P. Stewart, W. R. Carper. 43. Study of the Trinitrotoluene Isomers by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. J. Salo, C. Cichinski, E. Turngren, Y. P. Carignan. 44. Molecular Mechanics Calculations for Nitramines. T. Vladimiroff. 45. Potential Functions and Geometries of Methyl Radical and Its Ions. F. T. Chau. 46. Conformational Dynamics in Solution via Vibrational Lineshapes. R. A. MacPhail. 47. Gas Phase Exchange Reactions of 1 8 0~ at 300K. S. L. Barlow, J. M. VanDoren, V. M. Bierbaum, C. H. DePuy. 48. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Gas Phase Oxidation of Sulfur Dioxide Under Atmospheric Conditions. L. G. Anderson, P. M. Gates, C. R. Nold. 49. Kinetics of Hydroxyl Radical Reactions with Alkyl Radicals. L. G. Anderson, J. L. Bonilla. 50. Catalyzed Reactions of Cyclopropanes. Β. L. Kalra, K. G. Clark, D. K. Lewis. 51. Geometric vs Structural Isometrization of Cyclobutane. D. K. Lewis, D. A. Glenar, B. L. Kalra, S. J. Cianciosi, J. E. Baldwin.

52. Ultrasonic Assistance of Hydrogen-Deu­ terium Isotopic Exchange Over Raney Nickel: A Kinetic Evaluation. E. A. Cioffi, J. H. Prestegard. 53. Molecular Theory of Transition State Sol­ vent Effects on Reaction Rates of Ions in Polar Solvent Mixtures. P. H. Lee, Β. Μ. Ladanyi. 54. Preparation and Characterization by NMR and FTIR of a Weakly Self-Associat­ ing Salt of Guanylyl-(3'-5')-Guanosine. C. R. Toth, J. A. Walmsley. 55. Electron Spin Resonance Study of the Reaction of Thiyl Radicals with Molecular Oxygen. S. G. Swarts, J. W. Herrington, S. Debolt, M. D. Sevilla. 56. Diffusion Controlled Association Rate of Cytochrome c and Cytochrome c Peroxi­ dase in a Detailed Topographical Model. S. H. Northrup, J. C. L. Reynolds, J. O. Boles. 57. Knudsen Effusion-Mass Spectrometric Study of Ti2(S04)3(s); Enthalpy of Forma­ tion of Ti2(S04)3(s). D. L. Myers, P. G. Wahlbeck. 58. Mass Spectrometry of and Standard Enthalpies of Formation of Gaseous NaAICI4 and Its Dimer. P. G. Wahlbeck. 59. Molecular Complexes of HCI and l 2 with Aromatic Donors. L. C. Lewis. 60. Effects of Molecular Shape on Diffusion. T. C. Chan. 61. Organized Molecular Assemblies in the Gas Phase: Reverse Micelles and Microemulsions in Supercritical Fluids. R. D. Smith, R. W. Gale, J. L. Fulton. 62. Gas Phase Diffusion Coefficients of Alkyl Hydrazines. W. C. Mahone, D. D. Davis, S. L. Koontz. 63. Transport Properties of Monatomic Oxy­ gen. P. M. Holland, L. Biolsi, J. C. Rainwa­ ter. 64. Refractive Index Dependence on Molec­ ular Mass. R. H. Higgins. 65. System HBr + SrBr2 + H 2 0 at Different Temperatures. Applications of Harned's Rule and Pitzer's Equations. D. A. John­ son, R. N. Roy. 66. Activity Coefficients of Hydrochloric Acid in Aqueous Higher Valence Thorium Tetrachloride Solutions at Different Tem­ peratures. R. N. Roy, D. A. Johnson. 67. Similar Origins Implied for Differently Sited Xenon Isotopes in Meteorites. K. Kavana-Saebo. 67A. Aqueous Solubility and Hydrolysis Ki­ netics of Peroxy Nitric Acid. J-Y. Park, YN. Lee. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Westin, Tabor Theater (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Electroactive Polymers D. Williams,

Presiding

9:00—68. Frequency and Temperature Variation of Cubic Susceptibility in Polydiacetylenes. P. A. Chollet, F. Kajzar, J. Messier. 9:45—69. Femtosecond Dephasing in a Polydiacetylene Film Measured by Degen­ erate Four-Wave Mixing with an Incoher­ ent Nanosecond Laser. T. Kobayashi, T. Hattori. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—70. Studies of Monomer and Poly­ mer Monolayers Using Optical Second and Third Harmonic Generation. G. Berkovic, Y. R. Shen. 11:30—71. Development of Polymeric Non­ linear Optical Materials. R. N. DeMartino, E. W. Choe, D. Hass, G. Khanarian, T. Leslie, G. Nelson, J. Stamatoff, D. Stuetz, C. C. Teng, H. N. Yoon.

9:35—73. Dynamics of Laser-Multiphoton Ionization and Dissociation of Gaseous Molecules. M. El-Sayed. 10:10—74. Dynamical Temporal Evolution of Molecular IR Absorption Spectra Ob­ served with Picosecond C0 2 Laser Pulses. P. Mukherjee, H. S. Kwok. 10:45—Intermission. 11:05—75. Quantum Tunneling States of Protons in Organic Solids. R. M. Hochstrasser. 11:40—76. Quantum Mechanical Transport in Disordered Systems. J. L. Skinner.

Section C Westin, Continental Ballroom Β (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Chemistry on Minisupercomputers and Supercomputers cosponsored with Division of Computers in Chemis­ try T. H. Dunning, Jr., L. W. Anacker, R. L. Shepard,

Organizers

S. A. Rice,

Presiding

7:55—Introductory Remarks. 8:00—77. Molecular Dynamics of Diffusion in Fluids of Rod-Like Particles. H. T. Da­ vis, J. J. Magda, M. V. Tirrell. 8:40—78. Molecular Dynamics with Nonadditive Interactions. F. Stillinger. 9:20—79. Supercomputer Simulations of Heterogeneous Kinetics: Low-Dimension­ al Bimolecular Reactions. R. Kopelman, L. W. Anacker. 10:00—Intermission. 10:10—80. Simulations of Chemical Dy­ namics in Condensed Media. D. Chandler. 10:50—81. Materials-by-Design. R. Eades, R. W. Broach, J. J. Low, T. L. Barr, J. W. Frazer, H. J. Robota. 11:30—82. Molecular Dynamics of Chemi­ cal Reactions in Solution. K. R. Wilson. 12:10—83. Simulation of Chemical Reac­ tion Dynamics in Liquids. B. J. Berne. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Westin, Tabor Theater (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Electroactive Polymers H. F. King,

Presiding

2:00—84. Theoretical Studies of Electronic States and Defects in Conjugated Poly­ mers. R. J. Silbey. 2:45—85. Electronic Transport in Disor­ dered Polymeric Films. H. Scher. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—86. Conformational Dependence of Transition Moments in Conjugated Poly­ mers. Z. G. Soos, K. S. Schweizer. 4:30—87. Excitations in Conjugated Poly­ mers. E. Mêle, G. W. Hayden. Section Β Westin, Continental Ballroom C (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Molecular Line Shapes and Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy C. B. Moore,

Presiding

2:00—88. Nonlinear Optical Probing of Molecules at Interfaces. Y. R. Shen. 2:35—89. Saturation Effects in Organic Sol­ ids: Excitons and Nonlinear Optics. B. I. Greene, J. Orenstein, D. H. Rapkine, L. H. Williams. 3:10—90. Hole Burning and Relaxation in Glasses at Low Temperature. R. Silbey. 3:45—Intermission.

Section Β Westin, Continental Ballroom C (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Molecular Line Shapes and Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy C. B. Harris,

Presiding

9:00—72. Intramolecular Energy Transfer in Highly Vibrational^ Excited Molecules. CK. Cheng, W. H. Green, D. R. Guyer, W. D. Lawrance, W. F. Polik, C. B. Moore.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

72

February 9, 1987 C&EN

4:05—91. Nonlinear Optical Lineshapes and Four-Wave Mixing in Polyatomic Mole­ cules. S. Mukamel. 4:40—92. Ultrafast Time-Domain Light Scattering Spectroscopy of Vibrational and Orientational Dynamics in Solids and Molecular Liquids. K. A. Nelson, M. R. Farrar, L. R. Williams, S. Ruhman.

Section C Westin, Continental Ballroom Β (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Chemistry on Minisupercomputers and Supercomputers L. Anacker,

Presiding

1:30—93. General Access to Supercom­ puters for Chemists. J. Wooley, A. Har­ vey. 2:20—Discussion Period. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—94. Electronic Structure Program at Cornell. K. Wilson. 4:00—95. Computing Environments for, Chemistry. B. McNamara. 4:15—96. Supercomputing Opportunities for Chemists. B. Clayton, R. Rosskies. 4:30—97. Computational Chemistry Activi­ ties at SDSC. S. Karin, D. Hildebrant. 4:45—98. Supercomputer Computation Re­ search Institute at FSU. J. Lannutti, D. Edelson. 5:00—Panel Discussion and Question/An­ swers. TUESDAY

EVENING

Westin, Continental Ballroom C (Meeting Room Level) General—Poster Session/Social Hour 7:30-9:30 PM T. F. George, S. R. Leone,

Organizer Presiding

99. Laser Probing of Internal State Distribu­ tions of N 2 + from the Penning Ionization of N2 by Ne*(3P2)· D. M. Sonnenfroh, S. R. Leone. 100. I* Quantum Yields for the ICN Â State by Diode Laser Gain Versus Absorption Spectroscopy. W. P. Hess, S. R. Leone. 101. Time-Resolved FTIR Photofragment Emission Spectroscopy: Nascent HCI Rotational Distributions from the 193 nm Photolysis of 1,2 trans Dichloroethylene. T. R. Fletcher, S. R. Leone. 102. T-V Energy Transfer and the Exchange Reaction Product Vibrational Energy Disposal in H(D) + FH at 2.2(2.1) eV: Vibrational State Distributions by Time and Wavelength resolved Infrared Fluorescence. L. M. Cousins, S. R. Leone. 103. Far Wing Infrared Lineshapes. R. Brown, J. Wormhoudt, C. E. Kolb, R. W. Davies, S. A. Clough. 104. Collisional Deactivation Studies of Two-Photon Excited Xe(5p56p) States in Ne and He. J. Xu, D. W. Setser. 105. Rotational-Level-Dependent Quenching at the A 3 IIi State of the NH Radical. N. L. Garland, D. R. Crosley. 106. Laser Diagnostic of Free Radical Reactions. L. Copeland, W. M. Jackson. 107. Photodissociation Dynamics Studies of BrCN Using a Polarized Tunable Ultraviolet Laser. A. J. Paul, E. A. Johnson, W. M. Jackson. 108. Studies of Metastable N-Atom Quenching and Reaction in Halogen Gases. R. B. Sharma, R. A. Ferrieri, D. J. Schlyer, A. P. Wolf. 109. Atomic Oxygen Reactions with Aklenes at 7 eV. R. A. Ferrieri, Y. Y. Chu, A. P. Wolf. 110. Gas Phase Reaction of C2 with Ethylene. C. F. MacKay, M. C. Blaurock, I. Branovan, M. F. Tuchler. 111. Photodissociation Dynamics of W(CO)6 and Cr(CO)6 at 351 nm. J. A. Brown, R. N. Rosenfeld. 112. Photofragment Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Nitrosyls. S. Georgiou, C. A. Wight. 113. Fast Internal Conversion in Cr0 2 CI 2 . Y. J. Xie, C. T. Chin, M. Cecere, H. S. Kwok. 114. Collisional Energy Transjer in Highly Vibrationally Excited HgCCKX^). S. Halle, F. Temps, J. L. Kinsey, R. W. Field.

115. Electronic Structure of Gas Phase MnH. T. D. Varberg, J. A. Gray, R. W. Field. 116. Experimental Measure of the Extent of d-Bonding in NiH. J. A. Gray, R. W. Field. 117. Spectroscopic Study of Acetylene*^ Vinylidene Isomerization. Y. Chen, J. P. Pique, R. W. Field, J. L. Kinsey. 118. LQcal Bending Vibrations in the  1 A" and Χ 1 Σ + States of Monodeuterated Acet­ ylene. C. E. Hamilton, J. L. Kinsey, R. W. Field. 119. Multiphoton Ionization State Selection Studies of Acetylene. T. M. Orlando, S. L. Anderson. 120. Real-Time Gas Electron Diffraction Studies of Laser-Transformed Species. D. L. Monts, J. D. Ewbank, K. Siam, D. W. Paul, L. Schafer, W. L. Faust. 121. Fluorescence Quantum Yields of JetCooled Azulenes. T. M. Woudenberg, S. K. Kulkarni, J. E. Kenny 122. Supersonic Molecular Jet Spectrosco­ py of Non-Rigid Aromatic Molecules. P. J. Breen, J. A. Warren, E. R. Bernstein, J. I. Seeman. 123. Twisted Intramolecular Charge Trans­ fer (TICT) in Molecules and Clusters Probed by Laser Jet Spectroscopy. J. A. Warren, E. R. Bernstein. 124. Solute/Solvent Clusters of Free-Base Phthalocyanine and Magnesium Phthalocyanine. J. A. Menapace, E. R. Bernstein. 125. Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled p-C6H4CI2 and p-C6H4CI2-Ar. W. D. Sands, R. Moore. 126. Ultra High-Resolution Optical Spectros­ copy in Molecular Beams. Applications to Chemical Dynamics. W. A. Majewski, D. W. Pratt. 127. Phosphorescence Excitation Spectrum of Pyrazine in a Supersonic Jet. K. W. Holtzclaw, N. Pugliano, J. L. Tomer, D. W. Pratt. 128. D-D Transitions in Tetrahedral CO +2 Observed by Tunneling Spectroscopy. K. W. Hipps, U. Mazur. 129. Hydrogen Bonding in Ground and Excit­ ed States of Pyrazine. T-Y. Liu, J. E. Ken­ ny, W. M. Moomaw. 130. Influence of Molecular Complexation on the Emission of -κ,-κ* Triplets. A. C. Testa, R. Snyder. 131. Chlorine Quadrupole Coupling in Chloromethyl Cyclopropane. C. D. Cogley. 132. Simulation of Atmospheric Chemistry Using Supercomputers. J. A. Kaye, R. B. Rood, A. M. Thompson, P. D. Guthrie, C. H. Jackman. 133. Higher-Order Interaction Induced Ef­ fects on Light Scattering from Liquids. L. C. Geiger, B. M. Ladanyi, M. Chapin. 134. Conformation Optimization Using Gen­ eralized Simulated Annealing. R. R. Ryan, J. H. Hall, I. 0. Bohachevsky, T. R. Triay, M. L. Stein. 135. Electronic Structure Studies of Heteroatomic Zintl Anions. F. U. Axe, D. S. Marynick. 135A. Geometry Optimizations of Organometallic Molecules. M. B. Hall, R. L. Wil­ liamson. 136. Effect of Electron Correlation on Con­ formational Energies. S. Saebo. 137. Closer Look at the "Multiple-Scattering X « " (MS-Xcv) Method. F. E. Harris, A. G. Koures. 138. Renormalization Group Approach to At­ oms & Molecules. U. Mohanty. 139. Matrix Series Expansion Procedure for Solving Kinetic Equations. T. M. Zamis, L. J. Parkhurst, G. A. Gallup. 140. Hammett Acidity Functions in Nafion. N. Lewis, L. Ferry. 141. Delocalized Electron Polymers: Electri­ cal, Magnetic, and Optical Properties. C. L. Young, L. P. Yu, P. H. Bryson, R. Mont­ gomery, J. Thomson, L. R. Dalton. 142. Electrochemical Properties of Elec­ trodes Modified with Polymers Containing a Dimeric Sulfur Bridged Molybdenum Complex. C. Casewit, J. Dunkle, M. R. Dubois, C. M. Elliot. 143. Bleaching of Exciton in Langmuir-Blodgett Films of Polydiacetylene, F. Kajzar, L. Rothberg, S. Etemad, P. A. Chollet, D. Grec. 144. Some Novel Diacetylene Materials with Potential Applications for Optical Data Processing, Storing and Display. G. H. W. Milburn, A. Weminck, J. Shand, G. Thom­ son, J. Tsibouklis, E. Boltan.

145. Theoretical Studies of Electrical Con­ ductivity in Undoped and Doped Polymers. W. J. Welsh. 146. 23Na NMR Studies of Ion Conducting Polypropylene Oxide)—and Polyethyl­ ene Imine)—Nal Complexes. G. A. Reyn­ olds, S. G. Greenbaum. 147. Semiconducting Metaloxide Photoanodes—Their Characteristics and Implica­ tions (VIII). S. K. Bahador. 148. Electrical Conductance of Liquid and Supercritical Water Evaluated from 0°C and 0.1 MPa to High Temperatures and Pressures—Reduced State Relationships. W. L. Marshall. 149. Characterization of the Interaction of Fluorinating Agents with Optical Materi­ als. J. D. Purson, P. G. Eller, J. D. Farr. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Westin, Tabor Theater (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Electroactive Polymers

I. Goldfarb, Presiding 9:00—150. Soluble Heteroaromatic Ladder Polymers: Polarons and Electrical Con­ ductivity. L. R. Dalton, J. Thomson, C. L. Young, L. P. Yu, P. H. Bryson, R. Mont­ gomery. 9:45—151. Transport Models of Polyacetylene: Insights from Magnetic Resonance Experiments. H. Thomann H. Jin, G. L. Baker, E. Hustedt, B. H. Robinson. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—152. Electronic Structure of Polyphenylene Vinylene. F. E. Karasz, R. W. Lenz, J. Obrzut. 11:30—153. Toward New Electronic Struc­ tures in Crystallographically Ordered Electroactive Conjugated Polymers. D. J. Sandman, M. T. Jones.

10:00—Intermission. 10:10—162. Experimenting with a Parallel Supercomputer in Chemistry and Physics. E. Clementi. 10:50—163. Structured Approach to the Computational Modeling of Chemical Ki­ netics and Molecular Transport in Flowing Systems. R. Kee, J. Miller. 11:30—164. Vector and Parallel MCSCF on the IBM 3090. B. Liu, M. Yoshimine. 12:10—165. Long-Time Scale Simulations with Realistic Potentials Using a Special Purpose Computer. M. Grabow.

Westin, Continental Ballroom C (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Molecular Line Shapes and Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy A. H. Zewail,

Presiding

9:00—154. Spectroscopy with Ten Femto­ second Optical Pulses. C. V. Shank. 9:35—155. Time-Resolved Infrared Spec­ troscopy in Liquids and Gases on the Pico­ second and Subpicosecond Time-Scale. A. Laubereau. 10:10—156. Picosecond Dynamics of Sur­ face Electron Transfer Processes at Sin­ gle Crystal Semiconductor Liquid Inter­ faces. R. J. D. Miller, J. Kasinski, L. Gomez-Jahn. 10:45—Intermission. 11:05—157. Femtosecond Excited State Ring Opening Dynamics of Cyclohexadiene from Resonance Raman Intensities. R. A. Mathies, M. O. Trulson, G. D. Dollinger. 11:40—158. Theory of the Time and Fre­ quency Resolved Fluorescence Line Shape as a Probe of Solvation Dynamics. R. F. Loring, Y. J. Yan, S. Mukamel. Section C Westin, Lawrence Room (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Chemistry on Minisupercomputers and Supercomputers

C. C. J. Roothaan, Presiding 8:00—159. Parallel Techniques for Ab Initio Electronic Structure Calculations. R. A. Bair. 8:40—160. Configuration Interaction Calcu­ lations by the Graphical Unitary Group Ap­ proach on the Cray X-MP. I. Shavitt, D. C. Comeau, M. J. Pepper. 9:20—161. Using the Cyber 205 in Theoreti­ cal Chemistry: Advantages and Disadvan­ tages. R. Ahlrichs.

Section Β

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Westin, Tabor Theater (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Electroactive Polymers L. Davis,

Presiding

2:00—166. Side Chain Liquid Crystalline Copolymers for NLO Response. A. C. Griffin, A. M. Bhatti. 2:30—167. Aromatic Heterocyclic Liquid Crystalline Polymers: Synthesis, Proper­ ties and Use in Electrooptics. S. P. Bitler, J. F. Wolfe. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—168. Synthesis of Electroactive Poly­ mers. F. Wudl, Y. Ikenoue, A. Patil. 4:15—169. Orientationally Ordered ElectroOptic Materials. K. D. Singer, J. E. Sohn, M. G. Kuzyk.

Section Β Westin, Continental Ballroom C (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Molecular Line Shapes and Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy H. S. K wok,

Section Β

9:45—181. Electrically Conductive Poly­ meric Materials and Nonlinear Optical Ma­ terials Based upon Poly(p-phenylenebenzobisthiazole), PBT. P. De Pra, J. G. Gaudiello, J. Giesler, D. Li, S. H. Carr, and M. A. Ratner, T. J. Marks. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—182. Thermodynamic Study of Elec­ tron-Hole Equilibria in Electroactive Poly­ mers. H. Reiss, D. Kim. 11:30—183. Poled Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride) as a Host for Guest Nonlinear Optical Mol­ ecules. P. Pantelis, J. R. Hill, G. J. Davies.

Presiding

2:00—170. Infrared Spectra of the Hydrated Hydronium Ions, H30(H20)+ (n = 1,2,3). L. I. Yeh, M. Okumura, J. D. Myers, Υ. Τ. Lee. 2:35—171. Picosecond and Femtosecond Time-Resolved Laser Photofragmenta­ tion. A. H. Zewail. 3:10—172. How Methyl Groups on Big Mole­ cules Produce Femtosecond IVR's. R. J. Longfellow, C. S. Parmenter. 3:45—Intermission. 4:05—173. Excited State Dynamics of Jet Cooled Molecules and Clusters. D. Demmer, J. Hager, G. Leach, S. C. Wallace. 4:40—174. Quantum Dynamics of Photo­ chemistry with Ultrafast Pulses. J. S. Hutchinson.

Section C Westin, Lawrence Room (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Chemistry on Minisupercomputers and Supercomputers R. M. Petzer,

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Westin, Tabor Theater (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Electroactive Polymers

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χ

Westin, Continental Ballroom Β (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Chemistry on Minisupercomputers and Supercomputers

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T. H. Dunning, Jr.,

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Presiding

9:00—184. Some Recent Progress on Po­ tential Energy Surfaces of Transition Met­ al Complexes. K. Morokuma, N. Koga, C. Daniel. 9:40—185. Application of New Methods for Correlated Ab Initio Studies of Large Mol­ ecules Using an FPS Scientific Computer. R. J. Barlett, L. Adamowicz, D. H. Magers, E. A. Salter. 10:20—186. [5]Paracyclophane: An Impor­ tant Example of Ring Strain and Aromaticity in Hydrocarbon Compounds. J. E. Rice, T. J. Lee, R. B. Remington, W. D. Allen, D. A. Clabo, Jr., H. F. Schaefer III. 11:00—Intermission. 11:10—187. Studies of Interesting Chemi­ cal Systems on Many Different Computers (or if this is Tuesday It must be the Con­ vex) W. A. Goddard III. 11:50—188. Chemical Bonding in [ 1.1.1 ] Propellane: Alternative Models, Current Con­ troversies. L. C. Allen. 12:10—189. Impact of Computer Hardware on Quantum Chemistry Codes and Capa­ bilities. P. Saxe. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Westin, Tabor Theater (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Electroactive Polymers G. Meredith,

Presiding

2:00—190. Electro-Optic Device Applica­ tions of Polymer Liquid Crystals. H. J. Coles. 2:45—191. Nonlinear and Electro-Optic Or­ ganic Devices. R. Lytel, G. F. Lipscomb, J. I. Thackara. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—192. Nonlinear Optical Processes in Optical Fibres. Β. Κ. Nayar. 4:30—193. Nonlinear Optical Processes and Applications in the Near and Far Infra­ red Spectral Region with Liquid Crystals. I. C. Khoo.

Presiding

2:00—175. Mechanisms of the OH + OH Addition and Abstraction Reactions. L. B. Harding. 2:40—176. Structure of Large Carbon Clus­ ters. J. Almlof. 3:20—177. Benchmark Full CI Calculations Using the NAS Cray 2. P. R. Taylor. 4:00—Intermission. 4:10—178. Molecular Modeling in Materials Science. D. A. Dixon. 4:50—179. Hypercube Algorithm for Quan­ tum Chemistry. R. A. Whiteside, S. J. Binkley, M. E. Colbin, H. S. Schaefer.

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Section Β Westin, Continental Ballroom Β (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Chemistry on Minisupercomputers and Supercomputers

J. C. Tully, Presiding 1:30—194. Many-Channel Quantum Me­ chanical Calculations of Vibration-to-Vibration and Rotation-to-Rotation Energy Transfer and Reactive Scattering. D. G. Truhlar. 2:10—195. Quantum Reactive Scattering Using Supercomputers: Results for CI + HCI. G. C. Schatz, B. Amaee, J. N. L. Coonor.

L. Dalton, Presiding 9:00—180. Conformational Transitions in Polydiacetylene Solutions. D. G. Peiffer, T. C. Chung, D. N. Shulz, P. K. Agarwal, R. T. Garner, M. W. Kim, R. R. Chance.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

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2:50—196. Quantum Reactive Scattering in Three Dimensions Using Hyperspherical (ΑΡΗ) Coordinates. G. A. Parker, R. T. Pack, B. J. Archer, R. B. Walker. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—197. Withdrawn. 3:40—198. Collision Dynamics of Polyatom­ ic Molecules. D. C. Clary. 4:00—199. New Algorithms and Code for Solution of the Close-Coupled Equations for Inelastic Molecular Collisions. M. H. Alexander, D. E. Manolopoulos. 4:40—200. Stochastic Trajectory Simula­ tions of Gas-Surface Dynamics. J. C. Tuliy.

POLY DIVISION OF POLYMER CHEMISTRY, INC. S. Israel, Program

FRIDAY MORNING

Chairman

Section A

Westin, Tabor Theater (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Electroactive Polymers G. L. Baker, Presiding 9:00—201. New Synthetic Routes for Novel Electroactive Polymers. J. Thomson, L. R. Dalton. 9:20—202. Polyquinoline Based Intrinsic Conducting Polymers. L. Y. Chiang, D. C. Johnston, J. P. Stokes. 9:40—203. Properties of Low Spin Density Trans-polyacetylene. G. L. Baker, J. A. Shelburne III, S. Etemad, H. Thomann, L. Rothberg. 10:00—204. Towards Understanding Energy Gaps of Conjugated Polymers. M. Kertesz, Y. S. Lee. 10:20—205. Off Resonance, Electronic χ (3) in Conjugated Polymers. S. Etemad, F. Kajzar, G. L. Baker. 10:40—Intermission. 10:55—206. Electrochemistry of Polyaniline. W. W. Focke, G. E. Wnek. 11:15 — 207. Spectro-Electrochemical Study of Polyaniline. R. J. Cushman, S. C. Yang, P. M. McManus. 11:35—208. Electrochemiluminescence and Conduction at Chemically Modified Microelectrode Arrays. C. R. Cabrera, H. D. Abruna. 11:55—209. Synthesis and Conductivity of Polymeric Transition Metal Complexes Coordinated by Diaminobenzenedithiol. O-K. Kim, D. McDermott, T. Tsai. Section Β Westin, Continental Ballroom C (Meeting Room Level) Symposium on Chemistry on Minisupercomputers and Supercomputers P. J. Rossky, Jr.,

Presiding

8:00—210. Refinement of Protein Struc­ tures by Molecular Dynamics with Effec­ tive Potentials from NMR and X-Ray Data. A. T. Brunger, M. Karplus. 8:40—211. Ionic Dynamics in Polyelectrolyte Solutions. P. J. Rossky, R. Reddy. 9:20—212. Probing the Structure and Dy­ namics of Proteins with Supercomputers. R. M. Levy. 10:00—Intermission. 10:10—213. Simulations of Substrate Bind­ ing and Hydrolysis for Phospholipase A2. V. Madison, C. Cook, Z. Berkovitch-Yellin. 10:50—214. Conformational Analysis of Polypeptides and Proteins. H. A. Scheraga. 11:30—215. Free-Energy Pertubation Meth­ ods in Simulations of Complex Molecular Interactions. G. L. Seibel, P. A. Kollman. 12:10—216. Dynamics and Design of Bio­ logical Molecules: Applications of Super­ computers. C. F. Wong, J. A. McCammon.

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIA: Electroactive Polymers (see Division of Physical Chemistry, M, Tu, W. Thu, F, page 71) International Symposium on Inorganic/ Organometalllc Polymers (see Division of Inorganic Chemistry, M, Tu. W, Thu, page 58)

Section A

Radisson, Grand Ballroom (Lobby Level) Polymer Science and Engineering Lecture Series No. 19: Characterization of Poly­ mers by FTIR Techniques A. C. Watterson,

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—1. Introduction to FTIR Spectrometry. J. DeHaseth. 9:40—2. Applications of Data Processing to FTIR. C. W. Brown. 10:40—3. Reflectance Methods for Polymer Characterization. D. J. Gerson.

Section Β Radisson, Assembly Room 2 & 3 (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on High Performance Polymers for Harsh Environments P. M. Hergenrother,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. F. W. Harris, P. M. Hergenrother. 9:05—4. New High Performance Epoxy Res­ ins for Hot/Wet Environments. R. S. Bauer. 9:30—5. Laser Pyrolysis of Characterized Cyanurate Network Polymers. R. F. Cozzens, P. Walter, A. W. Snow. 9:55—6. High Temperature Phthaionitriie Resin. T. M. Keller. 10:20—7. Thermally Stable Poly(enaminonitriles). J. A. Moore, D. R. Robello. 10:45—8. High Performance Polymers: Polypyrazolinones from Aromatic Dihydrazines and Aromatic Bis(Propynoic Esters). R. G. Bass, S. M. Andrews, P. M. Hergen­ rother. 11:10—9. Cyclobutene Containing Mono­ mers and Polymers: Polymerization and Crosslinking Via Thermally Generated Bu­ tadiene Units. L. J. Mathias, D. G. Powell. 11:35—10. Cationic Ring-Opening Polymer­ ization of Bifunctional Aromatic Spiro Orthocarbonates. W. J. Bailey, M. J. Amone.

J. L. Hedrick,

Presiding

9:00—11. Light Scattering Study of lonomers in a Low-Polarity Solvent. M. Hara, A. H. Lee, J. Wu. 9:20—12. Properties of Poly(p-Phenylene Terephthalate)s Prepared from 2-Nitroand 2-Bromo- Telephthalic Acids and Substituted Hydroquinones. J-l. Jin, E-J. Choi, B-W. Jo.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Section A

J. S. Tan, Presiding MONDAY MORNING

Section C

74

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Radisson, Grand Ballroom (Lobby Level) Instrumental Methods for Polymer Charac­ terization No. 5: Characterization of Poly­ mers by FTIR Techniques

DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Social Hour, M, W (2) Dinner, W

Radisson Convention Complex, Columbine Room (Terrace Level) Special Topics

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

9:40—13. Synthesis and Properties of Seg­ mented Poly(Hydroxyether-Siloxane) Co­ polymers. II. Modifications in the Hydroxyether Component. J. L. Hedrick, B. Haidar, T. P. Russell, D. C. Hofer. 10:00—14. Organically Modified Silicates as Inorganic-Organic Polymers. H. K. Schmidt. 10:20—15. Dark Nucleus of Halley's Comet; Hydrogen Cyanide Polymers. C. N. Mat­ thews, R. Ludicky. 10:40—16. Oxyanion Catalysis of Group Transfer Polymerization. I. B. Dicker, G. M. Cohen, W. R. Hertler, W. B. Farnham, E. D. Laganis, D. Y. Sogah. 11:00—17. Chain Transfer in Group Trans­ fer Polymerization. W. R. Hertler. 11:20—18. Influence of Thermal Processing on the Ultimate Structure and Properties of Gold Containing Polyimide Films. D. G. Madeleine, T. C. Ward, L. T.Taylor. 11:40—19. Effect of Dose Rate, Tempera­ ture, and Post-Irradiation Handling on Irra­ diated Polysulfone and Polyetherimide. D. S. Hawkins, J. J. Mosher, G. F. Sykes, Jr., R. L. Kiefer.

2:00—20. Characterization of Polymer Composite Materials by FTIR/PAS. D. J. Gerson. 2:30—21. Surface Studies of Dehydrofluorinated PVF2 Films Using Photoacoustic (PA) and Attenuated Total Reflectance FTIR Spectroscopy. E. M. Salazar-Rojas, M. W. Urban. 3:00—22. Useful Combination of FTIR Pho­ toacoustic Spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Fiber Sur­ face Analysis. C. Q. Yang, J. F. Moulder, W. G. Fately. 3:30—23. Application of Circle ATR FTIR Spectroscopy to Surface Studies of Poly­ mer Films and Fibers. A. M. Tiefenthaler, M. W. Urban. 4:00—24. Effect of Cure States on the Me­ chanical Properties of Bismaleimides IV. FTIR Spectroscopy. C. M. Tung Section Β Radisson, Assembly Room 2 & 3 (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on High Performance Polymers for Harsh Environments F. W. Harris,

Presiding

2:00—25. Synthesis and Degradation of Cyano-Containing Aramids. S. Kim, Ε. Μ. Pearce, Τ. Κ. Kwei. 2:25—26. Synthesis and Solution Properties of some Extended-Chain Poly(benzazoles). A. W. Chow, P. E. Penwell, S. P. Bitler, J. F. Wolfe. 2:50—27. Thermosetting Molecular Com­ posites: (Poly(p-Phenyleneterephthalamide)-Epoxy. D. R. Moore, L. J. Mathias. 3:15—28. Recent Advances in Studies of Aromatic Polybenzimidazole/Aromatic Polyimide Miscible Blends. D. J. Williams, F. E. Karasz, W. J. MacKnight. 3:40—29. Miscible Blends of Poly(aryletherketones) and Polyetherimides. J. E. Har­ ris, L. M. Robeson. 4:05—30. Simulated Space Environment Ef­ fects on the Optical Properties of Poly(arylene ethers). G. F. Sykes, C. A. Hoogstraten, W. S. Slemp, P. M. Hergenrother. 4:30—31. Resistance of PEEK and PPS to Molten Caprolactam. D. L. Wilfong. Section C Radisson Convention Complex, Columbine Room (Terrace Level) Radiation Chemistry of Vinyl Monomers and Polymers: ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry Honoring V. T. Stannett J. Silverman,

Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—32. Acrylic Siloxane Graft Copoly­ mers. S. D. Smith, G. York, D. W. Dwight, J. E. McGrath.

2:05—33. Non-Fouling Biomaterial Sur­ faces: II. Protein Adsorption on RadiationGrafted Polyethylene Glycol Methacrylate Copolymers. Y. Sun, A. S. Hoffman, W. R. Gombotz. 2:35—34. Mineralization of Hydrogels by Gamma Irradiation. D. T. Turner, M. A. Crenshaw, Z. W. Haque, T. W. Wilson. 3:05—35. Photoinitiated Crosslinking of Modified Unsaturated Polyesters. B. Ranby, S. W. Fang. 3:35—36. Kinetics of Free Radical Decay Reactions in Irradiated Solid Polymers. M. Dole. 4:00—37. Award Address. (ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry sponsored by Mobil Chemical Co.) Some Effects of High Ener­ gy Radiation on Monomers and Polymers. V. T. Stannett. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson, Grand Ballroom (Lobby Level) Instrumental Methods for Polymer Charac­ terization No. 5: Characterization of Poly­ mers by FTIR Techniques

A. C. Watterson, Presiding 8:30—38. Three Dimensional Orientation Measurements in Liquid-Crystalline Poly­ mers by FTIR ATR Dichroism. A. Pirnia, C. S. P. Sung. 9:00—39. Molecular Orientation in Ultrathin Films of Disk-Like Molecules on Metal Surfaces. A. Kaito, M. Kardan, S. L. Hsu, B. Reinhold, R. Takur, C. P. Lillya. 9:30—40. Characterization of the Surface Hydrolysis of Kevlar-49 Fibers by Diffuse Reflectance FTIR Spectroscopy. E. G. Chatzi, S. L. Tidrick, J. L. Koenig. 10:00—41. C-13 and FTIR Investigations of Reaction at Lamellar Surfaces of trans1,4-Polyisoprene. M. Gavish, A. Wood­ ward, J. Xu. 10:30—42. Determination and Character­ ization of Solvent Dependent Microstruc­ tural and Morphological Features in Solu­ tion Cast Bis-phenol-A-Poly-Carbonate/ Dimethyl Siloxane Block Copolymers. E. R. Mittlefehldt, H. F. Lee, J. A. Gardella, Jr., L. Salvati, Jr.

Section Β Radisson, Assembly Room 2 & 3 (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on High Performance Polymers for Harsh Environments P. M. Hergenrother,

Presiding

9:00—43. High Performance Coatings from Selected Poly(Arylene Sulfides) and Their Blends. L. R. Kallenbach, M. R. Lindstrom. 9:25—44. Polycyclohexenylenes: Processable Polyphenylene Precursors. J. K. Stille, D. R. McKean. 9:50—45. Synthesis of High Molecular Weight Polyphenylquinoxalines Contain­ ing Thermally Cyclizable Pendant Phenylethynyl Groups. P. M. Lindley, B. A. Reinhardt, F. E. Arnold. 10:15—46. Synthesis and Characterization of Phenolic Hydroxyl Terminated Phenylquinoxaline Oligomers. J. W. Labadie, J. L. Hedrick, D. C. Hofer. 10:40—47. Synthesis of Polyphenylquinox­ alines with High Glass Transition Tem­ peratures. F. W. Harris, C. Arah, M. J. Mazola. 11:05—48. Electron-Rich Comonomeric Reactants and Bismaleimides. D. M. Wil­ son, S. J. Huang. 11:30—49. New Bismaleimide-Chemistry and Applications. B. H. Lee, M. A. Chaudhari. 11:55—50. Solvent Resistant Ketamine and Maleimide Modified Poly(Arylene Ethers) Thermoplastics and Thermosets. G. D. Lyle, M. J. Jurek, D. K. Mohanty, S. D. Wu, J. E. Hedrick, J. E. McGrath.

Section C

Section C

Radisson Convention Complex, Columbine Room (Terrace Level) Radiation Chemistry of Vinyl Monomers and Polymers: ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry Honoring V. T. Stannett

Radisson, Convention Complex, Columbine Room (Terrace Level) Radiation Chemistry of Vinyl Monomers and Polymers: ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry Honoring V. T. Stannett

B. Ranby,

Y. Tabata,

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—51. Radiation Effects on Poly(Glycidyl Methacrylate co-Ethyl Methacrylate) and Other Epoxide-Containing Materials. D. N. Payne, Jr., F. Williams. 9:05—52. Energy and Charge Transfer Pro­ cesses in Polymeric Systems. Y. Tabata. 9:35—53. Ultraviolet Radiation Induced Oxi­ dation of Polymer Mixtures. E. M. Pearce, T. K. Kwei, Y. Y. Chien. 10:05—54. Radiolytic Unsaturation Decay in Polyethylene. B. J. Lyons. 10:35—55. Stability of Polypropylene to Gamma Irradiation. J. L. Williams. 11:05—56. Effect of the Urethane Group on the Mechanical Properties of RadiationCured Elastomers. W. K. Walsh, R. D. Gilbert, M. Khamis. 11:35—57. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Epoxy, Graphite Fibers and Epoxy Graph­ ite Fiber Composites—Radical Types and Radical Decay Behavior. K. S. Seo, R. E. Fornes, J. D. Memory, R. D. Gilbert. 11:05—58. Mathematical Modeling of Radi­ ation Induced Emulsion Polymerization in a Recycle Reactor. S. Omi, V. T. Stannett, E. P. Stahel. TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Radisson, Grand Ballroom (Lobby Level) Instrumental Methods for Polymer Charac­ terization No. 5: Characterization of Poly­ mers by FTIR Techniques J. A. Gardella, Jr.,

Presiding

2:00—59. FTIR Studies of Hydrogen Bond­ ing in Polymer Blends I. Experimental. M. M. Coleman, D. J. Skrovanek, J. Hu, P. C. Painter. 2:30—60. FTIR Studies of Hydrogen Bond­ ing in Polymer Blends II. Theory. P. C. Painter, Y. Park, M. M. Coleman. 3:00—61. FTIR Spectroscopy of EthyleneVinyl Chloride Copolymers. A. E. Tonelli, T. N. Bowmer. 3:30—62. Structural Characterization of Polymers Using FTIR Spectroscopy. Ν. Ε. Schlotter. 4:00—63. End-Group Effects on the Wave­ length Dependence of Laser-Induced Photodegradation in B'isphenol-A Polycarbon­ ate. J. D. Webb, A. W. Czanderna. 4:30—64. Multitechnique Surface Spectro­ scopic Studies of High Density H20 In­ duced Plasma Modified Polymethylmeth­ acrylate). T. Vargo, J. A. Gardella, Jr., L. Salvati, Jr. Section Β Radisson, Assembly Room 2 & 3 (Lobby Lev­ el) Symposium on High Performance Polymers for Harsh Environments F. W. Harris,

Presiding

2:00—65. Polyimidines from 3,5-Dibenzylidenepyromellitide-1,7-Dithione. P. E. Cassidy, C. G. Johnson, J. M. Farley. 2:25—66. Imidization Studies of Polyamic Acids by Dye Labeling Technique. R. Mathisen, C. S. P. Sung. 2:50—67. Synthesis and Characterization of Atomic Oxygen Resistant Poly(siloxaneimide) Coatings. I. Yilgor, E. Yilgor, M. Spinu. 3:15—68. Chemistry and Upper Use Tem­ perature of Chem-Lon 601, Poly(imideamide). D. A. Scola, C. M. Brunette. 3:40—69. Polyimides Based on 3,6-Diphenoxypyromellitic Dianhydride. W. A. Feld, D. Branndelik, F. E. Arnold. 4:05—70. Characterization of Crystalline Polyimide LARC-TPI. T. L St. Clair, H. D. Burks, N. T. Wakelyn, T-H. Hou. 4:30—71. Polyimides Containing Carbonyl and Ether Connecting Groups. P. M. Hergenrother, Ν. Τ. Wakelyn, S. J. Havens.

Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—72. Poly(Alkenylsilane Sulfones) as Positive Resists for Two-Layer Systems. M. J. Bowden, A. S. Gozdz. 2:05—73. Ultra Sensitive Self-Developing Ε-Beam Resists. J. C. W. Chien. 2:35—74. Radiation Sensitivity of Vinyl Polymers with Potential for Lithographic Resists. C. U. Pittman, Jr. 3:05—75. Radiation Curable Langmuir Films and Foils. S. E. Rickert, J. B. Lando. 3:35—76. Radiation Crosslinking of Poly(Organophosphazenes). H. R. Allcock, R. J. Fitzpatrick, M. Gebura, S. Kwon. 4:05—77. Plasms Polymerization and Radi­ ation Polymerization. H. Yasuda. 4:40—78. Prospects for the Study of (Radia­ tion Induced Chain Polymerization in the Vapor Phase. H. Reiss, M. S. El-Shall, A. Bahta, H. Rabeony. TUESDAY

EVENING

Radisson, Convention Lobby (Lobby Level) Special Topics—Poster Session J. S. Riffle,

Presiding

5:30—79. Dimethyl Phosphonomethylmethylsiloxane Dimethylsiloxane Copolymers. C. D. Juengst, W. P. Weber. —80. 1,3-Adamantanyl Dimethylsiloxane Copolymers Preparation and Properties. Y-M. Pai, W. P. Weber. — 8 1 . Potassium Persulphate—Malonic Acid Redox Pair Initiated Polymerization of Methacrylamide. K. C. Gupta, M. Lai, K. Behari. —82. Blends of a Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride) (CPVC) with a Polyurethane. D. Garcia. —83. Synthesis and Characterization of Wholly Aromatic Copolyesters. J-l. Jin, SH. Lee, H-J. Park. —84. Polymeric Supemucleophilic Cata­ lysts. Copolymers of Diallylaminopyridine with Dimethylacrylamide and Diallydimethylammonium Chloride. L. J. Mathias, G. Cei. —85. Radical Reactivity of θ-Trifluoromethylstyrene. M. Ueda, H. Ito. —86. Studies on Crosslinking of Epoxy Res­ in Using Microwaves. R. G. Raj. —87. Gelation of Low Molecular Weight Polyethylene Fractions and of n-Alkanes from Dilute Solution. E. K. M. Chan, L. Mandelkern. —88. Novel Deuterating Agent for Unsatu. rated Hydrocarbons. F. C. Schwab, A. J. Brandolini. —89. Novel Polymer Salt Systems for X-Ray Imaging. J. Smid, I. Cabasso, A. Obligin, S. Sahni, H. R. Rawls, B. F. Zimmerman. —90. Polymerization of 2-Eicosenoic Acid in Langmuir-Blodgett Multilayers. A. Laschewsky, H. Ringsdorf, G. Schmidt. — 9 1 . 13C NMR Study of Poly-1-Octene and Ultra Low Density Ethylene/1-Octene Co­ polymers Synthesized with TiCI4/MgCI2/ AI(C2H5)3. K. W. McLaughlin, R. P. Vanderwal. —92. Polymer Modification Reactions. Esterification and Aminolysis of StyreneAcrylic Acid Copolymers. J. E. White, M. D. Scaia, D. A. Snider-Tung. —93. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) in the Characterization of Water Structuring within PolyHEMA Hydrogels. J. H. Collett, E. J. Pywell, D. E. M. Spillane. —94. Spin-Cast Carbon Films from Polyacrylonitrile. C. L. Renschler, A. P. Sylwester. —95. Use of Muco-Adhesive Polymers to Modify the Gastro-Intestinal Transit of Oral Pharmaceutical Formulations. J. T. Fell, D. Harris, H. L. Sharma, D. C. Taylor. —96. Isotactic Polystyrene Phase Diagrams and Physical Gelation. J. H. Aubert. —97. RhCI(PPh3)3: A Flame Retardant for Poly(methyl methacrylate). S. Sirdesai, C. A. Wilkie.

—98. Synthesis of Polyphenylene Oxide/ Poly(Arylene Ether Sulfone) Block Copoly­ mers as Potential Modifiers for Polysty­ rene and Related Structures. J. L. Hedrick, H. R. Brown, D. C. Hofer. —99. Experimental Test of Induced Rigidity. C. R. Gochanour, C. R. Fincher. —100. Free Radical Ring-Opening Polymer­ ization of Cyclic Acrylates. W. J. Bailey, P-Z. Feng. —101. Instrumentation for Measuring the Oscillatory Birefringence Properties of Polymer Solutions. T. P. Lodge, S. Amelar, K. C. Hermann, R. L. Morris. —102. Thermodynamic Miscibility in Poly­ mer-Liquid Crystal Blends. L. A. Belfiore. —103. Graphic Approaches to Swelling Correlations of Solvent Parameters. M. R. Van De Mark, N. D. Lian, R. R. Puentedura. —104. Effects of Composition and Morphol­ ogy on the Photo- and Thermo-Crosslinking of Diacetylene Containing Poly(Ether Urethanes Ureas). P. Edelman, J. F. John­ son, S. J. Huang. —105. Onset of Interpénétration as Determined by Fluorescence Quenching. W. H. Schwimmer, J. M. Torkelson. —106. Apparent Shear Thickening Effects of Dilute Polymer Solutions in Extensional Flows. P. N. Georgelos, J. M. Torkelson. —107. Effect of Tertiary Hydrogens on the Oxidative Stability of an Ionic Membrane. R. A. Assink, C. Arnold, Jr. —108. Characterization of the Unsaturation in Phenylacetylene-Containing Saran Copolymers by Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopy. B. A. Howell, P. B. Smith. —109. Purification of Saran Copolymers. B. A. Howell, P. B. Smith. —110. ω-Norbomenyl-Polystyrene: An Ole­ fin Metathesis Polymerizable Macromonomer. R. L. Norton, T. J. McCarthy. —111. Polymerization of Styrene with Ace­ tates Activated by Lewis Acid. C-H. Lin, K. Matyjaszewski. —112. Effect of Intra-Molecular Interactions on the Solution Properties of lonomers. M. Hara, D. Zhang, J. Wu, A. H. Lee. —113. Synthesis of Poly(Arylene Ethers) via the Ullmann Condensation Reaction. M. J. Jurek, J. E. McGrath. —114. In-Situ Formation of Polyphenylenes w'athe Thermal Cyclization of Substituted Dimethylaminohex-5-en-1-ynes. M. R. Unroe, B. A. Reinhardt, E. J. Soloski. —115. Twin Model Compounds for Meso­ morphic Flexible Main Chain Polyesters: Thermodynamic Behavior and Induced Chirality. R. S. Kumar, H. Lee, R. B. Blumstein, A. Blumstein. —116. Effect of Ionic Aggregates on the Fatigue Properties of lonomers. M. Hara, P. Jar. —117. Photomodulated Structural Reorgani­ zation in Thin Molecular Films. M. S. Ferrito, D. A. Tirrell. —118. Interaction of Synthetic lonenes with Dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol. R. E. Mc­ Millan, D. A. Tirrell, T. Ikeda, S. Tazuke. —119. Plasma Polymerization of Organosiloxanes. S. P. Sawan, S. Srinivasan. —120. ESCA Analysis of Melanin Com­ pounds. M. B. Clark, Jr., J. A. Gardella, Jr., T. M. Schultz, L. Salvati, Jr. —121. ESCA, ISS and ATR-FTIR Studies of PMMA/PVC Blends. J. J. Schmidt, J. A. Gardella, Jr., L. Salvati, Jr. —122. Ion Beam Studies of Polymer Sur­ faces. K. J. Hook, J. A. Gardella, Jr., L. Salvati, Jr. —123. Quantitative Investigation of the Amorphous and Crystalline Components in trans-1,4-Polybutadiene from Solution. P. Wang, A. Woodward. —124. Kinetic Study of the Polymerization of η-Butyl Vinyl Ether by Hl/I 2 Initiators. C. G. Cho, J. E. McGrath. —125. Inequivalent C-D Bonds in Organic Methylene Units: A Neighboring Oxygen Atom Effect on the Solid-State Deuterium NMR Spectra. M. Jackisch, W. L. Jarrett, K. Guo, L. G. Butler. —126. Effect of Polymeric 2-Hydroxybenzophenone Stabilizers on the Weathering of PMMA Films. H. H. Neidlinger, M. R. Steffeck, R. Goggin. —127. Synthesis of Polyesters Containing a Nonrandomly Placed Highly Polar Repeat­ ing Unit. G. D. Green, J. I. Weinschenk III, J. E. Mulvaney, H. K. Hall, Jr.

—128. Incorporation of Ultraviolet Stabiliz­ ers into Acrylics Prepared by Group Transfer Polymerization. P. M. Gomez, H. H. Neidlinger. —129. Stable Oxidation Products of Polyfurfuryl: Soluble Analogs of Conductive Poly­ mers. S. L. Buchwalter, A. Viehbeck. —130. Inelastic Electron Tunneling Through Conjugated Organic Layers. R. Burzynski, X. Huang, P. N. Prasad. —131. Correlation Among the Physical Characterizations in Polymethacrylic Ac­ ids and Their Hemoglobin Binding Capaci­ ties. P. K. Shieh, G. Sivorinovsky. —132. Chemical Modification of Polypheny­ lene Sulfide: Oxidation with Peracids. K. Udipi. —133. «,ω-Diphenylpolyenes as Model Compounds for Polymers Related to Poly[p-phenylene Vinylene]. C. W. Spangler, E. G. Nickel, T. J. Hall. —134. Synthesis of «,ω-Dialkylpolyenes as Model Structures for Polyacetylene. C. W. Spangler, L. S. Sapochak, G. E. Struck, B. E. Gates, R. K. McCoy. —135. Comparison of Naphthalene Poly­ mers Prepared by Different Routes. J. H. Banning, M. B. Jones. —136. Dynamics of Sorbed 13 C0 2 in Poly­ carbonate by NMR. W-Y. Wen, E. Cain, P. T. Inglefield, A. A. Jones. —137. Degradation of Polypropylene and Polypropylene-Polyethylene Blends in Aqueous Bromine-Containing Electro­ lytes. C. Arnold, Jr., R. L. Clough. —138. ESCA Analysis of the Surface Oxida­ tion of Polyphenylene Sulfide Powder in a Slurry Reaction. A. Kaul. —139. Mono and Dimethylene Containing Polybenzoxazoles and Polyoxadiazoles from AA-BB Monomers. S. U. Ahmed, P. D. Livant, L. J. Mathias. —140. 1,5-Hexadiene and 1,9-Decadiene Metathesis Polymerization. M. LindmarkHamberg, K. B. Wagener. —141. Characterization of Polylactide Syn­ thesis. K. Jamshidi, R. C. Eberhart, S-H. Hyon, Y. Ikada. —142. Carbon-13 Study of the Solid State Photochemistry of Poly(Ethylene-CoCarbon Monoxide). F. A. Bovey, R. Gooden, F. C. Schilling, F. H. Winslow. —143. Novel Synthesis of Cellulose Graft Polymers with Ester Linkages. C. J. Biermann, Z. X. Chen, R. Narayan. —144. Partitioning of Vinyl Chloride in Poly­ v i n y l Chloride) by Head-Space Gas Chro­ matography. S-S. Chang, W. J. Pummer. —145. Specific Heat of Hydrocarbon Poly­ mers. S-S. Chang. —146. Phase Separation in Ternary Sys­ tems with Homogeneous Double Critical Points. Y. C. Yang, K. Sole. —147. Formation of Monodisperse Polymer Microspheres from Styrene and StyreneBased Systems. C. K. Ober. —148. Pyrolysates Produced by C0 2 Laser Processing of Polymers II: Perfluorinated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Ob­ tained from Teflon (Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, DuPont). D. J. Doyle, J. M. Kokosa, D. G. Watson. —149. Stereochemistry and Mechanistic Study of Group-Transfer Polymerization. Y. Wei, G. E. Wnek. —150. Synthesis and Characterization of Thermally and Chemically Stable Hydroxyl Terminated Telechelic Siloxane Oligo­ mers. W. P. Steckle, Jr., R. S. Ward, E. Yilgor, J. S. Riffle, M. Spinu, I. Yilgor. —151. Polypropylene lonomers. L. M. Landoll, D. S. Breslow. —152. Effects of Dimethylsiloxane Diluents on the Optical Properties of Poly(Dimethylsilmethylene) Networks. V. Galiatsatos, J. E. Mark. —153. Characterization of Copolydiorganosilanes with Varying Compositions. S. P. Sawan, Y-G. Tsai, H-Y. Huang. —154. Recent Developments in Inverse Gas Chromatography of Polymer Blends. M. J. El-Hibri, P. Munk. —155. Synthesis of Polyamides from Aro­ matic Diisocyanates and Dicarboxylic Ac­ ids. S. F. Wang, S. J. Grossman.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

75

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—156. Heterogeneous Polymeric Catalysis: Synthesis and Characterization of Cata­ lysts and Kinetic Study of Esterolysis of Activated Phenyl Esters. B-D. Kwon, C. G. Overberger. —157. Polymer, Solvent, and Probe Diffu­ sion in Dilute Solutions of Polystyrene and Polybutadiene in Aroclor 1248. T. P. Lodge, V. F. Man, M. A. Smeltzly, S. Amelar, E. D. von Meerwall. —158. Kinetics of the Thermal Degradation of Poly(Oxypropylene) Glycol by Thermogravimetric Analysis. S. Kilic, J. E. McGrath. —159. Effect of Functional End Groups on Thermal Degradation of Polypropylene Oxide). Y. Yoo, S. Kilic, J. E. McGrath. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Radisson, Grand Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Polymer Self-Diffusion and Related Problems

Έ

H. Yu, Presiding

Ω.

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—160. Reptation and Constraint Re­ lease in Polymer Blends. E. J. Kramer, R. J. Composto. 9:25—161. Measurement of the Viscoelastic Properties of Blends of Linear and Cy­ clic Macromolecules. G. B. McKenna, D. J. Plazek. 9:55—162. Discussion of the Self-Diffusion and Viscosity Behavior of Polymer Melts and Solutions Within the Context of the Coupling Model. R. W. Rendell, K. L. Ngai, D. J. Plazek, G. B. McKenna. 10:25—163. Small Angle Neutron Scatter­ ing Measurement of Small Diffusion Con­ stants. G. C. Summerfield, J. E. Anderson, J. W. Jou, R. W. Ullman. 10:55—164. A Trapped Polymer in Random Media. A. Baumgartner, M. Muthukumar. 11:25—165. Matrix Effects on the Orienta­ tion Relaxation of Linear Polymer Melts, A. Lee, R. P. Wool.

Ο Q.

Section Β Radisson, Junior Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Structure-Property Behav­ ior in Multiphase Systems ACS Polymer Di­ vision Creative Polymer Chemistry Award Honoring G. L. Wilkes

J. E. McGrath, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—166. Phase Separation in Crystalliz­ ing Polymer Blends. R. S. Stein, M. Ree, W. Herman. 10:00—167. Torsion Pendulum (TP) and Tor­ sional Braid Analysis (TBA) of Polymers. J. K. Gilham. 10:55—168. Relationship Between Struc­ ture and Mechanical Properties of SemiCrystalline Polymers. L. Mandelkern.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Radisson, Grand Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Polymer Self-Diffusion and Related Problems

C. C. Han, Presiding 2:00—169. Light Scattering Studies of Poly­ mer Diffusion in Semidilute Solutions. B. Chu, D. Wu, Q. Wang, Z. Wang. 2:50—170. Translational Diffusion of Linear and Star Polystyrenes in Semidilute Poly­ v i n y l Methyl Ether) Solutions. L. M. Wheeler, P. Markland, M. Tirrell, T. P. Lodge. 3:20—171. NMR Measurements of PMMA Self-Diffusion Coefficients in Various Sol­ vents. F. D. Blum, T. L. Maver, R. Raghavan. 3:50—172. Self-Diffusion of Polymer, Sol­ vent, and Ternary Probe Molecules Through Dilute, Semidilute, and Entangled Polystyrene Solutions. E. J. Amis, D. von Meerwall, J. D. Ferry. 4:20—173. Dynamic Light Scattering of High Molecular Weight Atactic Polysty­ renes in the High qRg Region. B. Bhatt, A. M. Jamieson, R. G. Petschek.

76

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Section Β Radisson, Junior Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Structure-Property Behav­ ior in Multiphase Systems ACS Polymer Di­ vision Creative Polymer Chemistry Award Honoring G. L. Wilkes

Radisson, Junior Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Structure-Property Behav­ ior in Multiphase Systems. ACS Polymer Division Creative Polymer Chemistry Award Honoring G. L. Wilkes

T. C. Ward, Presiding

R. D. Lundberg, Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—174. Effect of Flow and Deformation on Structure and Orientation of Thermotropic Copolyesters. K. G. Blizard, D. G. Baird. 2:25—175. Effects of Hard Segment Crystallizability on the Structure and Proper­ ties of Block Copolyether-Ester Thermo­ plastic Elastomers. J. C. Stevenson, S. L. Cooper. 3:20—176. Kinetics of Structure Develop­ ment in Polyurethane Elastomers. J. T. Koberstein, A. F. Galambos, T. P. Russell. 4:15—177. Model MDI/Ethylene Glycol Polyurethane: Molecular Structure and Morphology. R. B. Turner, C. P. Christenson, M. A. Harthcock, M. D. Meadows, W. L. Howard, M. W. Creswick.

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—191. Photophysics of Polyphosphazenes in Solution and the Solid State. A. S. Yeung. C. W. Frank, R. E. Singler. 2:25—192. Surface Thermodynamics and Adhesive Bond Strengths. T. C. Ward. 3:20—193. Synthesis and Characterization of Ion-Containing Block Copolymers by Anionic Techniques. T. E. Long, J. E. McGrath.

THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson, Grand Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Polymer Self-Diffusion and Related Problems

T. P. Lodge, Presiding 8:30—178. Diffusion in Concentrated Dextran Solutions. R. Furukawa, B. R. Ware. 9:20—179. Evidence of an Upper Limit to the Electrostatic Component of the Per­ sistence Length of a Flexible Polyelectrolyte. K. S. Schmitz, J-W. Yu, D. Browning. J. D. Tate. 10:00—180. Diffusion of Latex Spheres in Aqueous Solutions of Hydroxypropylcellulose. P. Russo, M. Mustafa, T. Cao, L. Stephens. 10:40—181. Self-Diffusion of a Polyelectrolyte in Salt-Free Condition: Poly[N-Ethyl2-VinylPyridinium) Bromide] in Water. H. Kim, H. Yu, M. Antonietti. 11:20—182. Mutual Diffusion in Isotopic Mixtures of Polymers. P. F. Green, B. L. Doyle.

Section Β Radisson, Junior Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Structure-Property Behav­ ior in Multiphase Systems. ACS Polymer Di­ vision Creative Polymer Chemistry Award Honoring G. L. Wilkes

J. K. Gillham, Presiding 9:05—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—183. Solution Behavior of Metal Sul­ fonate lonomer-Polymeric Amine Com­ plexes. R. D. Lundberg, R. R. Phillips, D. G. Pfeiffer. 10:05—184. Ring Expansion Polymeriza­ tion. I. Concept and Application with Isobutylene. A. F. Fehervari, R. Faust, J. P. Kennedy. 11:00—185. Award Address. Some Reflec­ tions on a Partial Career of StructureProperty Investigations of Polymeric Ma­ terials. G. L. Wilkes. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Radisson, Grand Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Polymer Self-Diffusion and Related Problems E.J. Amis,

Presiding

2:00—186. Diffusion of Organic Dye Mole­ cules in Amorphous Polymers Above and Below Tg. C-H. Wang, J. Zhang. 2:50—187. Probe Diffusion in Polymer Solu­ tions Near Tg by Forced Rayleigh Scatter­ ing. J. Α.* Lee, T. S. Frick, W. J. Huang, T. P. Lodge, M. Tirrell. 3:20—188. Intramolecular Photodimerizable Probe (BAME) for Mass Diffusion Mea­ surements by the Forced Raleigh Scatter­ ing. C. C. Han, Q. Tran-Cong, T. Chang. 3:50—189. Self-Diffusion Coefficients of Solvents in Polystyrene Gels. W. T. Ford, M. Periyasamy, B. J. Ackerson, F. D. Blum, S. Pickup. 4:20—190. Effects of Polydispersity on Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Mea­ sured Self-Diffusion. T. Finerman, B. Crist.

Section Β

FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson, Grand Ballroom (Lobby Level) Symposium on Polymer Self-Diffusion and Related Problems P. F. Green,

PMSF DIVISION OF POLYMERIC MATERIALS: SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, INC. S. Turner, Program

Chairman

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIA: International Symposium on Inorganic/ Organometaliic Polymers (see Division of Inorganic Chemistry M, Tu, W, Thu. page 58)

Presiding

8:30—194. Universal Scaling Equation for Polymer Self-Diffusion. G. D. J. Phillies. 9:20—195. Polymer Diffusion in an Interact­ ing System. C. C. Han, T. Sato, M. Okada, C. Wu. 9:50—196. Dynamics of Phase Separation in Ordered Fluids. P. Mukherjee, T. Kyu. 10:20—197. Static and Dynamic Light Scat­ tering of Poly((v-Methyl Styrene) in Tolu­ ene. S. H. Kim, D. J. Ramsay, G. D. Patter­ son, J. C. Selser. 10:50—198. Diffusion of Linear Polysty­ renes in Porous Glasses. M. T. Bishop, K. H. Langley, F. E. Karasz. 11:20—199. Surface Composition of Poly­ styrene. R. D. Goldblatt, G. J. Scilla, J. M. Park, J. F. Johnson, S. J. Huang.

Section Β Radisson, Junior Ballroom (Lobby Level) Special Topics

New Technologies and Materials for Food Packaging (see Division of Chem­ ical Marketing & Economics M, page 46)

OTHER DIVISIONS' SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Conductive Polymers—Their Immergence and Future (see Division of In­ dustrial A Engineering Chemistry. W, Thu. page 56) Intermaterial Competition (see Division of Chemical Marketing & Economics, Tu, page 46) Chemical Problems in Electronic Mate­ rials (see Committee on Science, Thu, page 35) DIVISION SOCIAL EVENTS: Social Hour, M (2), W Luncheon, M

D. A. Tirrell, Presiding 9:00—200. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering of High Molecular Weight Linear Polystyrene Using the Kratky Camera. B. A. Khorramian, A. Patel. 9:20—201. SANS Studies of the Spatial Or­ ganization of Single Chains in Heteroge­ neous Block Copolymers. P-L. Cheng, C. V. Berney. R. E. Cohen. 9:40—202. Degradation of Vinylidene Chlo­ ride/Methyl Acrylate Copolymers. B. A. Howell, P. T. DeLassus, C. Gerig. 10:00—203. Vinylidene Chloride-Based Graft Copolymers. R. F. Storey, D. Sudhakar, L. J. Goff. 10:20—204. Investigation of Complexation Between 2-Chloroethyl Vinyl Ether Maleic Anhydride and N-Substituted Maleimides. D. R. Abayasekara, R. M. Ottenbrite. 10:40—205. Polyelectrolyte Adsorption In­ duces a Vesicle-to-Micelle Transition in Aqueous Dispersions of Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. K. A. Borden, D. A. Tir­ rell, S. Tan, C. L. Voycheck. 11:00—206. Drug Release from Multi-Perfo­ rated Hydrogel Laminates. J. H. Collett, E. J. Pywell, S. H. Yalkowsky. 11:20—207. Blends of Semicrystalline Poly­ mers: Nylon 6/Poly(c-Caprolactone). G. M. Venkatesh, R. D. Gilbert, R. E. Fornes. 11:40—208. Lyotropic Star-Block Liquid Crystalline Copolymers. W. H. Dickstein, C. P. Lillys.

MONDAY MORNING

R. S. Bauer, S. S. Labana, R. A. Dickie, Organizers R. S. Bauer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Cross-Linking and Structure of Polymer Networks. K. Dusek. 9:50—2. Status of Flory-Rehner Theory. A. N. Neuburger, B. E. Eichinger. 10:20—3. Rubber Elasticity Modulus of In­ terpenetrating Heteropolymer Networks. C. Tsenoglou. 10:50—4. Selective Quenching of Large Scale Molecular Motions by Cross-linking in the Strained State. O. Kramer. 11:25—5. Intramolecular Reaction and Its Effects on Network Formation and Proper­ ties. R. F. T. Stepto. Section Β Radisson, Denver-Spruce Room (Mezzanine Level) 1987 Award in Applied Polymer Science Symposium Honoring O. A. Battista—I R. B. Seymour;

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

Section A

Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Crosslinking Systems—I: Network Modelling and Molecular Structure

Presiding

9:00—Introduction. Tale of Two Grants in the Land of Giant Molecules. R. B. Sey­ mour. 9:15—6. Plenary Lecture. Applied Polymer Science—A Forecast. H. Mark. 9:45—7. Quality Management Systems in a Large American Company. R. A. Hovermale. 10:15—8. Patents and Intellectual Property as a Profit Base for Research. E. J. Berry. 10:35—9. Free Radical Ring-Opening Poly­ merization of 3-Methylenespirol[5,5]undeca-1,4-diene. W. J. Bailey, J. L. Chou. 11:15—10. Compatibility and Practical Prop­ erties of Polymer Blends. R. D. Deanin. 11:45—11. Asymmetric Polysulfone Hollow Fiber Membranes for Gas Spearation. A. F. Fritzche.

Section C Radisson, Gold-Century Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on New Technologies and Ma­ terials for Food Packaging Cosponsored with Division of Chemical Marketing & Eco­ nomics J. R. Overton, D. Toner, Session I J. R. Overton,

Organizers

Presiding

10:20—49. Determining Cure Extent of Coated Wood Products. E. R. Janiga. 10:45—50. CP-MAS13C NMR Spectra of Styrene-Divinylbenzene Copolymer Net­ works. M. Periyasamy, W. T. Ford, F. J. McEnroe. 11:10—51. Solid State Carbon-13 NMR Studies of Sulfur Vulcanized Elastomers. A. M. Zaper, J. L. Koenig. 11:35—52. HPLC Calibrations for Analysis of Additives in Cross-Linked Cable Insula­ tion. M. T. Baker, J. F. Johnson.

Section Β

9:00—12. Polymers in Food Packaging— Opportunities and Technical Challenges, S. K. Reddy. 9:25—13. Polymers in Food Packaging— Technological Needs. P. P. Grabowski. 9:50—14. Importance of the Glass Transi­ tion Temperature to the Interpretation of the Gas Permeability of Polymers. S. Weinhold. 10:15—15. Withdrawn. 10:40—16. Effect of Retorting on the Barrier Properties of EVOH. B. Tsai, B. J. Jenkins. 11:05—17. Matter Transfers Between Liquid Foods and Plasticized PVC Packaging. J. L. Taverdet, J. L. Vergnaud. 11:30—18. Preparation of Flexible Plasti­ cized PVC Packaging for Liquid Foods with Low Mass Transfer. J. L. Taverdet, J. M. Vergnaud.

Section D Radisson Convention Complex, Breckenridge Room (Ground Level) New Concepts in Polymeric Materials and General Papers—I: Novel Materials and Composites D. Garner,

3:50—30. Characterization of a Radiation Damaged Highly Crosslinked Polymer via Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy. C. R. Davis, J. F. Johnson, S. J. Huang. 4:15—31. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on an Epoxy Structural Adhesive. T. W. Wilson, R. E. Fornes, R. D. Gilbert, J. D. Memory. 4:40—32. Crosslinked Polyethylene Insula­ tion: Characterization of Volatiles. A. A. Mehta, S. J. Huang, J. F. Johnson.

Radisson, Denver-Spruce Room (Mezzanine Level) 1987 Award in Applied Polymer Science Symposium Honoring O. A. Battista—II R. D. Dean in,

Presiding

2:00—33. Reaction with Aerosols—A New Technique for Preparation of Monodisperse Inorganic and Polymer Colloids. E. Matijevic. 2:30—34. New Directions in Industrial Poly­ saccharides. R. L. Whistler. 2:50—35. Generation and Analysis of Poly­ mer Morphologies of High Chain Exten­ sion. R. S. Porter. 3:10—36. Reactions of Macroradicals. R. B. Seymour. 3:30—37. PAS-2 High Performance Prepreg and Composites. M. R. Lindstrom, R. W. Campbell. 4:00—38. Award Address. (ACS Award in Applied Polymer Science sponsored by Phillips Petroleum Co.) Commercializa­ tion of New Colloidal Polymer Microcrystals. O. A. Battista.

Section C

Presiding

9:00—19. Highly Conductive High Molecular Weight Poly(heteroaromatic vinylenes). K. Y. Jen, T. R. Jow, H. Echkardt, R. L. Elsenbaumer. 9:25—20. Thermal Stability of Conducting Polymers. R. L. Elsenbaumer, K. Y. Jen, L. W. Shacklette, T. R. Low, M. Mayfield. 9:50—21. Kinetics of Phase Separation of PBT/Nylon-66 Molecular Composite. H. H. Chuah, T. Kyu, T. E. Helminak. 10:15—22. Use of Sawdust as Reinforcing Fillers for Polyethylene. R. G. Raj, B. V. Kokta. 10:40—23. Interfacial Adhesion Between lonomers and Carbon Fibers. R. J. Shah, L. A. Belfiore. 11:05—24. Potential Use of Silyl Amine Polymers as Ceramic Precursors. Y. H. Mariam, K. R. W. Pemawansa, P. Abra­ hams. 11:30—25. Relative Toxicity of Poly(-CisDichloromethotrexate-Platinum II) on Nor­ mal and Cancer-Like Transformed Cells. D. Siegman, C. Carraher, A. Friend. MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Crosslinking Systems—2: Network Formation, Structure, and Degra­ dation

I. J. Goldfarb, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—26. Effect of Network Chain Length Distribution, Specifically Bimodality, on Strain-Induced Crystallization. C-C. Sun, J. E. Mark. 2:30—27. Synthesis and Characterization of Star-Branched Nylons: The Effects of Branching and Crosslinking on Polymer Properties. L. J. Mathias, A. Sikes. 2:55—28. Network Formation and Degrada­ tion in Urethane and Melamine-Formaldehyde Crosslinked Coatings. D. R. Bauer. 3:20—29. Chemical Degradation of Polyurethane Networks. J-M. Widmaier, J-P. Balmer, G. C. Meyer.

Radisson, Gold-Century Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Plasma Polymerization and Plasma Treatment of Polymers—I H. Yasuda, Organizer H. P. Schreiber, N. Morosoff, Presiding 1:55—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—39. Fourth (Plasma) State of Matter— A Materials Technology for the Future? D. T. Clark. 2:50—40. Comparison of Microwave and Lower Frequency Discharges for Plasma Polymerization. R. Claude, M. Moisan, M. R. Wertheimer. 3:15—41. Influence of Reactor Design Fac­ tor on Deposition Rate of Plasma Poly­ merization. Y-S. Yeh, l-N. Shyy, H. Yasu­ da. 3:40—42. Structure and Properties of Plas­ ma-Polymerized N-Silyl-Substituted Cyclodisilazane. A. M. Wrobel. 4:05—43. Characteristics of Ionized Cluster Deposition Polyethylene Films. K. Numata, H. Usui, I. Yamada, T. Takagi. 4:30—44. Deposition and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Films of Hexafluorobenzene and Ammonia. R. K. Sad­ hir, Z. N. Sanjana, H. E. Saunders. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Crosslinking Systems—III: Network Characterization T. Provder,

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—45. Relationships Between Cure and Properties of Thermosetting Systems. J. K. Gillham. 9:05—46. Dynamic Dielectric Analysis: Monitoring the Chemistry and Rheology During Care of Thermosets. D. Kranbuehl, S. Delos, M. Hoff, L. Weller, P. Haverty, J. Seeley. 9:30—47. Performance Characteristics of the Fluorescence Optrode Cure Sensor (FOCS). R. L. Levy, S. D. Schwab. 9:55—48. WLF Model for Conductivity Changes During Epoxy/Amine Cure. S. A. Bidstrup, N. F. Sheppard, Jr., S. D. Senturia.

Section Β Radisson, Denver-Spruce Room (Mezzanine Level) International Symposium on Adhesives, Sealants, and Coatings for Space and Harsh Environments—I: Environmental Ex­ posure

L. H. Lee, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—53. Adhesives, Sealants, and Coat­ ings for Space and Harsh Environments. L. H. Lee. 9:50—54. Plenary Lecture. Effects of Envi­ ronmental Exposure on Sorption and Transport of Penetrants in Polymeric Ma­ terials. C. E. Rogers. 10:30—55. Mechanical and Water Absorp­ tion Behaviour of Fluoroepoxy Resins. S. J. Shaw, D. A. Tod, J. R. Griffith. 11:00—56. Durability of Rubber to Metal Bonds in Marine Environments. D. A. Dillard, J. S. Thornton, F. J. Borio. 11:30—57. Sealing of Human Tubular Tis­ sues with High Alkyl Cyanoacrylate Adhe­ sive XKM-2 and Its Effects—A New Steril­ ization and Nonsurgical Technique. C-L. Ruan, J-H. Liu, Z-Y. Qin.

4:05—69. Fatigue and Energy Absorption in Some Acrylic Simultaneous Interpene­ trating Networks. T. Hur, J. A. Manson, R. W. Hertzberg. 4:35—70. Fatigue Crack Propagation in Crosslinked Poly(methyl methacrylate) and Polystyrene. J. C. Michel, J. A. Manson, S. Qureshi, J. M. Widmaier, J. S. Lin, R. W. Hertzberg.

Section Β Radisson, Denver-Spruce Room (Mezzanine Level) International Symposium on Adhesives, Sealants, and Coatings for Space—II and Harsh Environments. Stress and Interface C E . Rogers,

Presiding

Section C

Section C Radisson, Gold-Century Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Plasma Polymerization and Plasma Treatment of Polymers—III

E. W. Hellmuth, M. R. Wertheimer, Presiding

R. K. Sadhir, E. W. Hellmuth, Presiding

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Crosslinking Systems—IV: Deformation, Fatigue, and Fracture

R. A. Dickie, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—64. Deformation Kinetics of Crosslinked Amorphous Polymers. T. S. Chow. 2:05—65. Plastic Deformation in Epoxy Resins. S. M. Lee. 2:35—66. Molecular Parameters that Con­ trol the Toughness of Crosslinked Glass­ es. R. J. Morgan. 3:05—67. Linear and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Properties of a Series of Bisphenol A Ep­ oxy Resins. D. B. Curliss, J. M. Caruthers. 3:35—68. Fracto-Emission Accompanying the Deformation and Failure of CrossLinked Polymers and Interfaces. J. T. Dickinson.

2:00—77. Surface Photopolymerisation—A Potential Model for Plasma Polymerisa­ tion? H. S. Munro. 2:50—78. Solvent and Glow Discharge In­ duced Surface Wetting of Poly-(ethylene terephthalate). Y-L. Hsieh, D. Timm. 3:15—79. Plasma Treatment and Plasma Polymerization for Surface Modification of Flexible polyvinyl chloride) Sheets. Y. Iriyama, H. Yasuda. 3:40—80. Evolution of the Wettability and the Adhesion of Polymeric Materials Treated by a Non Equilibrium Plasma. J. Amouroux, F. Arefi, P. Spartacus, S. Mournet, M. Goldman. 4:05—81. Aging of Oxygen Plasma Treated Polymers. H. S. Munro, D. I. McBriar. 4:30—82. Plasma Treated Cellulose Mem­ branes: Changes in the Permeability of Creatinine and Uric Acid. C. P. Sharma, Y. Jubaira. WEDNESDAY MORNING

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2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:20—71. Plenary Lecture. BombardmentInduced Crack Initiation and Crack Growth in Polymers and Polymer Surfaces. J. T. Dickinson. 2:50—72. Fracture Behavior of Tough Ma­ trix Materials for Composites. M. Parvin, W. G. Knauss. 3:20—73. Finite Element Microscopic Stress Analysis of Filled Polymeric Composite Systems. C. T. Liu. 3:50—74. Inorganic Primers for Adhesive Bonding: A Status Report. R. A. Pike, F. P. Lamm. 4:20—75. Studies of the Bonding and Hydro­ lysis of Coupling Agents on Aluminum Surfaces by Auger Electron Spectrosco­ py. C. Q. Yang, T. W. Rusch, S. P. Clough, W. G. Fateley. 4:50—76. Use of Polymeric Coupling Agents to Investigate Metal/Thermoset Wet Ad­ hesion Durability. R. G. Schmidt, J. P. Bell.

Radisson, Gold-Century Room (Mezzamine Level) Symposium on Plasma Polymerization and Plasma Treatment of Polymers—II

9:00—58. Plasma Polymerization of Flurocarbons. R. d'Agostino. 9:50—59. Surface Modification of Polymers with Fluorine Containing Plasmas: Depo­ sition vs. Replacement Reactions. M. Klausner, I. H. Loh, R. F. Baddour, R. E. Cohen. 10:15—60. Plasma Fluorination of Polyolefins. M. Strobel, C. S. Lyons. 10:40—61. CF4 and C2F6 Plasma Fluorina­ tion of Hydrocarbon and Fluorocarbon Polymers. Y. Momose, T. Takada, S. Okazaki. 11:05—62. Effect of Pretreatment of Poly­ mer Surfaces by Plasma Polymerization Methane on CF4 Plasma Treatment of Ny­ lon and PET Films. T. Yasuda, T. Okuno, K. Yoshida, H. Yasuda. 11:30—63. Plasma Reactions of Hexafluoroacetone. M. Strobel, C. S. Lyons, P. A. Thomas, M. C. Morgen, S. Corn, G. A. Korba.

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Section A

Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Crosslinking Systems—V: Epoxy Resin Systems

S. S. Labana, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—83. Analysis of the Amine Cure of Epoxy Resins Using Model Compounds. W. X. Zukas, D. A. Dunn, M. D. Gilbert. 9:05—84. Model Compound Reaction Stud­ ies of the Dicyandiamide Cure of Epoxy Resins. M. D. Gilbert, N. S. Schneider, W. J. MacKnight. 9:35—85. Amine Curing of Epoxy Resins Derived from Ν,Ν-Diglycidylamines. K. Dusek, L. Matejka.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) February 9, 1987 C&EN

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10:05—86. Curing of Epoxy Resins II. Alkyl Substituted Aromatic Diamines. D. Sudhakar, R. F. Storey. 10:35—87. Dynamic Mechanical Spectros­ copy Studies of the Crosslinking of an Epoxy with an Amine. D. Wingard, W. Williams, C. L. Beatty. 11:05—88. Synthesis and Properties of a Phosphazene Based Epoxy Resin. M. S. Sennett. 11:35—89. Applications of Flexibilized Low Viscosity Modified Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol-A Epoxy Resin in Thermosetting Crosslinking Systems. K. L. Payne, C. K. Brown, G. M. Francis, S. Munson. Section Β Radisson, Denver-Spruce Room (Mezzanine Level) International Symposium on Adhesives, Sealants, and Coatings for Space and Harsh Environments—III: Adhesives for Harsh Environments W. D. Bascom,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—90. Plenary Lecture. Overview of Polymers for Harsh Environments: Aero­ space, Geothermal and Undersea. P. E. Cassidy. 9:50—91. Plenary Lecture. New Fluorinated Polysiloxanes. S. Boileau, B. Boutevin, Y. Pietrasanta. 10:30—92. Ultraviolet Curable Siloxane Elastomers. Y. Okamoto, D. Crossan, K. Ferrigno, S. Nakos. 10:50—93. Evaluation of Adhesively Bond­ ed Composite/Metal Bonds in Simulated Automotive Service Environments. J. W. Holubka, W. Chun. 11:20—94. High Temperature Organic Ad­ hesives—A Review. C-C. Chang. 11:50—95. Characterization of Metal-Con­ taining Polydyes for Severe Environ­ ments. C. Carraher, V. Foster, R. Linville, D. Stevenson. Section C Radisson, Gold-Century Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Plasma Polymerization and Plasma Treatment of Polymers—IV J. A. van Lier, R. K. Sadhir,

Presiding

9:00—96. Comparisons Between Atmo­ sphere Pressure and Low Pressure Plas­ ma Polymerization. J. Amouroux, F. Arefi, M. Goldman, S. Mournet, F. Rouzbehi. 9:50—97. Modification of Interface by Plas­ ma Polymerization in Graphite Fiber Rein­ forced Composites. N. H. Sung, G. Dagli, W. Yang. 10:15—98. Hard Carbon Coating by CH4 + CF4 Plasma Polymerization. K. Yanagihara, K. Numata, M. Kimura, M. Niinomi. 10:40—99. Tribological Application of Plas­ ma Polymers. D. L. Cho, H. Yasuda. 11:05-100. Dry-Developable High Sensitivity Plasma Polymerized Resist for X-Ray Lith­ ography. H. Yamada. 11:30—101. Studies on the Surface Layers of Mercurous Chloride Single Crystals. R. K. Sadhir, N. B. Singh, H. E. Saunders, R. H. Hopkins, R. Mazelsky. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Crosslinking Systems—VI: Processing and Properties I.J. Goldfarb,

Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—102. Processing of Epoxy Based Composite Structures. A. Apicella, J. Kenny, L. Nicolais. 2:15—103. Anomalous Behavior of Cured Epoxy Resins: Density at Room Tempera­ ture vs. Time and Temperature of Cure. K. P. Pang, J. K. Gillham. 2:40—104. Thermal-Stress Development in Thick Epoxy Coatings. D. King, J. P. Bell. 3:05—105. Recycle of Cured Epoxy Resins. C. Z. Tran-Bruni, R. D. Deanin.

3:30—106. Mechanical Properties of Polyurethane/Mica Composites. K. Chebab, C. L. Beatty. 3:55—107. Theoretical Description of a Rig­ id Polyester Network Formed from Covalent and Ionic Cross-Links. E. L. Rodriquez. 4:20—108. Crosslinked, Formed-in-place, Hyperfiltration Membranes. H. G. Spen­ cer, K. S. Menon, Y. Sun, D. B. McClellan Section Β Radisson, Denver-Spruce Room (Mezzanine Level) International Symposium on Adhesives, Sealants, and Coatings for Space and Harsh Environments—IV: Sealants for Harsh Environments R. M. Evans,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—109. Plenary Lecture. Effects of En­ vironment on Performance of Polysulfide Sealants. D. B. Paul. 2:50—110. Plenary Lecture. Durability of Silicone Sealants. J. M. Klosowski, M. J. Owen. 3:20—111. Depolymerization of Polysufides: The Development of Improved Chemical Desealers. W. Mazurek, D. B. Paul. 3:50—112. Rheological Properties of Block Copolymer-Resin Based Hot-Melt Seal­ ants. S. G. Chu. 4:20—113. Waterproofing and Sealants for Concrete. R. M. Evans. 4:20—114. Study and Use of Sealant on Quicksand Surface for Stabilization and Afforestation of Desert Land. J. Lu, T. Yan, Ζ. Pei, C. Lu. Section C Radisson, Gold-Century Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Plasma Polymerization and Plasma Treatment of Polymers—V M. R. Wertheimer, B. D. Ratner, Presiding 2:00—115. Application of Static Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SSIMS) Analysis to Plasma Modified Polymer Surfaces. M. C. Davies, A. Brown, D. Fakes, M. A. Khan, S. S. Davis. 2:50—116. Properties of Plasma and Plas­ ma-Deposited Films Prepared with Perfluoropropane and Ethylene Oxide. B. D. Ratner, Y. Haque. 3:15—117. Plasma Diagnostics and Struc­ ture of Plasma Polymer of Tetramethylsilane. F. Kokai, T. Kubota, M. Ichijyo, K. Wakai. 3:40—118. Hydrocarbon Plasma Polymer Crosslink Density Measurements. N. Morosoff, D. L. Patel. 4:05—119. Gas Sensor Devices Plasma-Po­ lymerized from Organotin Compounds. N. Inagaki, Y. Hashimoto. 4:30—120. Cold-Plasma Treatment/Coat­ ings for Modifying Polymer Surfaces— Commercial Outlook. F. A. Sliemers, E. J. Drauglis, U. S. Nandi. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzamine Level) Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Crosslinking Systems—VII: Interpenetrating Polymer Networks L. H. Sperling,

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—121. Reactive Plastisol as a Unique Approach for IPN: Epoxy and Polyvinyl Butyral System. S. C. Lin.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Section Β Radisson, Denver-Spruce Room (Mezzanine Level) International Symposium on Adhesives, Sealants, and Coatings for Space and Harsh Environments—V: Coatings for Cor­ rosive Environments J. W. Holubka,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—129. Plenary Lecture. Determination of the Stresses and Properties of Polymer Coatings, C. L. Bauer, M. Vratsanos, R. J. Farris. 9:50—130. Influence of Composition and Film Thickness on Antifouling Paints Bioactivity Containing Castor Oil. C. A. Giudice, B. del Amo, V. J. Rascio. 10:20—131. Corrosion Prevention in Metals Using Layered Semiconductor/Insulator Structures Forming an Interfacial Elec­ tronic Barrier. F. C. Jain, J. J. Rosato, K. S. Kalonia, V. A. Agarwala. 10:50—132. Adhesion Properties of Polyelectrolytes—Chemisorbed Zinc Phos­ phate Conversion Coatings. T. Sugama. 11:20—133. Corrosion-Induced Degrada­ tion of Amine-Cured Epoxy Coatings on Steel. T. Nguyen, E. Byrd. 11:50—134. Effects of Mechanical Defor­ mation on the Photodegradation of Acrylic-Melamine Coatings. T-L. H. Nguyen, C. E. Rogers. Section C Radisson, Gold-Century Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Plasma Polymerization and Plasma Treatment of Polymers—VI B. D. Ratner, J. A. van Lier,

Presiding

9:00—135. Surface Modification by Micro­ wave Plasma Technology. J. Kieser. 9:50—136. Glow Discharge Polymer Coated Electrodes. P. H. Wu, E. W. Hellmuth. 10:15—137. Plasma Polymerization by Combined Energy Input for Protective Coating of Metal. D. L. Cho, H. Yasuda. 10:40—138. Corrosion Protection of Cop­ per Metal Surfaces by Plasma Polymer­ ization. J. A. van Lier, R. E. Ray, Jr. 11:05—139. Thin Film Insulation of Semi­ conductor Substrates by Plasma Polymer­ ization. M. F. Nichols, A. W. Hahn. 11:30—140. Suitability of Plasma Polymer­ ised Polyacrylonitrile for Photovoltaic De­ vices. A. H. Bhuiyan, S. V. Bhoraskar. Section D Radisson Convention Complex, Breckenridge Room (Ground Level) New Concepts in Polymeric Materials-ll: Synthesis, Water Soluble Polymers, Asso­ ciative Thickeners and General J. E. Glass,

Presiding

9:00—141. Diol Functional UV Stabilizers and Their Polymerizations. S. Mitra, S. B. Mitra.

Slide viewing facilities are available for authors (see page 85 for details) 78

9:00—122. Structure and Applications of In­ terpenetrating Polymer Networks Based on Aromatic Dicyanate Esters. Β. Τ. DeBona, D. H. Wertz, D. C. Prevorsek. 9:25—123. Scanning Electronic Microscopy of Dicyanate Semi-IPNs. J. A. Feldman, S. J. Huang. 9:50—124. Synthesis and Characterization of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Net­ works of Poly(2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate) and Poly(Caprolactone). P. A. Davis, L. Nicolais, L. Ambrosio, S. J. Huang. 10:15—125. Development of Multiphase Morphology in Poly(cross-butadiene)—inter-poly(cross)-styrene) Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Small-Angle Neu­ tron Scattering. J. H. An, A. M. Fernandez, G. D. Wignall, L. H. Sperling. 10:40—126. Polyurethane-Acrylic Coat­ ings—Interpenetrating Polymer Net­ works. H. X. Xiao, K. C. Frisch, P. I. Kordomenos, R. A. Ryntz. 11:05—127. lonomer-IPN Coatings from Polyurethane and Vinyl Chloride Copoly­ mers. H. X. Xiao, K. C. Frisch, A. Patsis. 11:35—128. Miscibility Enhancement of Polymer Blends by Interacting Functional Groups. C. Beretta, R. A. Weiss.

9:25—142. Stability of Styrene-Acid Con­ taining Copolymers. D. A. Soûles, J. E. Glass. 9:50—143. Effect of Latex Surface Acids on the Performance of Associative Thickeners in Coatings Formulations. A. Karunasena, J. E. Glass. 10:15—144. Size Ratio and Other Factors Affecting the Rheology of Latex/Titanium Dioxide Slurries Thickened with Hydrophobically Modified Water-Soluble Polymers. R. H. Fernando, J. E. Glass. 10:40—145. Gamma Radiation Induced Graft Copolymerization of Water Soluble Vinyl Monomers onto Isotactic Polypropylene. B. N. Misra, I. K. Mehta, S. Chauhan, G. S. Chauhan. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Crosslinking Systems—VIM: High Performance and Novel Resin Systems L. T. Taylor,

Presiding

1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—146. Model Crosslinkable LiquidCrystalline Oligoester Diols as Coatings Binders. A. F. Dimian, F. N. Jones. 2:00—147. Synthesis of Crosslinkable Liquid-Crystalline Oligoester Diols by Direct Esterification; Use in Coatings Binders. D. Wang, F. N. Jones. 2:30—148. Melt Polymerization of the Blend Systems Consisting of Bisbenzocyclobutene (BCB) and Various Bisdienophiles. L. S. Tan, E. J. Soloski, F. E. Arnold. 3:10—149. Characterization of a Bisbenzocyclobutene High Temperature Resin and a Bisbenzocyclobutene Blended with a Compatible Bismaleimide Resin. L. R. Denny, I. J. Goldfarb, M. P. Farr. 3:30—150. Carbon 13 NMR Investigation of the Oligomerization of Bismaleimidodiphenyl Methane with Diallyl Bisphenol A. K. R. Carduner, M. S. Chattha. 4:00—151. Effect of Metal Particle Incorporation on Crosslinking Reactions and Properties of Acetylene Terminated Polyisoimide Prepolymers. R. H. Bott, L. T. Taylor, T. C. Ward. 4:30—152. Characterization of Metal Ion Modified Polyimides: Properties Before and After Extraction. J. D. Rancourt, L. S. Horning, L. T. Taylor. Section Β Radisson, Denver-Spruce Room (Mezzanine Level) International Symposium on Adhesives, Sealants, and Coatings for Space and Harsh Environments—VI: Coatings for Electronic and Optical Environments L. H. Lee,

Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:00—153. Plenary Lecture. Optical FiberCoatings. W. E. Dennis. 2:50—154. Radiation Induced Damage of Optical Coatings. J. T. Dickinson, M. K. Loudiana. 3:20—155. Stabilized Acrylic Glazings for Solar Reflectors. Η. Η. Neidlinger, P. Schissel. 3:50—156. Electroconductive Coating with Polyconjugated Systems. Z-H. Lu, J-H. Chen, Y-H. Li, Y-S. Yang. 4:20—157. Durability of the Conductive Ad­ hesive Joints. W-G. Xia, W. Lu. 4:50—Closing Remarks. Section C Radisson, Gold-Century Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Plasma Polymerization and Plasma Treatment of Polymers—VII N. Morosoff, A. S. Hoffman,

Presiding

2:00—158. Biomedical Applications of Plas­ ma Polymerization: A Tutorial Presenta­ tion. A. S. Hoffman.

2:50—159. Static Secondary Ion Mass Spec­ trometry (SSIMS) Analysis of a Plasma Modified Contact Lens Surface. M. C. Davies, D. Fakes, A. Brown, J. M. Newton. 3:15—160. Modification of Silicone Contact Lenses by Plasma Polymerization and Subsequent Plasma Treatment. C-P. Ho, H. Yasuda. 3:40—161. Blood Interaction with Gas Dis­ charge Treated Vascular Grafts. D. Kiaei, A. S. Hoffman, B. D. Ratner, T. A. Horbett, L. 0. Reynolds. 4:05—162. Blood Compatibility of Plasma Polymers. Y-S. Yeh, Y. Iriyama, H. Yasu­ da, Y. Matsuzawa, S. R. Hanson. 4:30—163. Functionalization of Polymeric Films by Plasma Polymerization of Allyl Alcohol and Allylamine. W. R. Gombotz, A. S. Hoffman.

10:15—179. Gas Separation Membranes Plasma-Polymerized from Mixtures of Silanes and Fluorocarbons. N. Inagaki. 10:40—180. Application of Plasma Poly­ merized Films to Gas Separation Mem­ branes. J. Sakata, M. Hirai, I. Tajima, M. Yamamoto. 11:05—181. Gas Permeation Properties of Plasma-Polymerized Membranes from Perfluorobenzene. T. Haraguchi, S. Ide, T. Kajiyama. 11:30—182. Effect of Operational Parame­ ters on the Gas Separation Properties of Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes Pre­ pared by Plasma Polymerization of Perfluorodimethylcyclobutane. P. W. Kra­ mer, H. Yasuda. 11:55—Concluding Remarks.

Section C Section D Radisson Convention Complex, Breckenridge Room (Ground Level) New Concepts in Polymeric Materials—III: Polymer Characterization

Radisson, Gold-Century Room (Mezzanine Level) New Concepts in Polymeric Materials—IV: Polyblends, Morphology, Mechanical Prop­ erties

T. Provder,

L. A. Belfiore,

Presiding

2:00—164. Resolution of Polymer Chains by Electron Microscopy. B. F. Howell, D. H. Reneker. 2:25—165. Thermomechanical Character­ ization of Polymers Using Piezoelectric Quartz Oscillators. M. C. Chu, C. Feger, H. M. Tong. 2:50—166. Microfabricated Structures for the Measurement of Adhesion and Me­ chanical Properties of Polymer Films. M. G. Allen, S. D. Senturia. 3:15—167. Chemiluminescence Studies of the Thermooxidation of PEEK. S. K. Brauman, J. G. Pronko. 3:40—168. Preparation of Bead Polymers Containing Substituted Vinyl Phenols and Their Application in HPLC. W. A. Rolls, Jr., J. M. J. Frechet. 4:05—169. Unfrozen Water Content in Biopolymeric Solutions. G. J. Maffia. FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Radisson, Silver Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Chemistry, Properties, and Applications of Crosslinking Systems—IX: Acrylic Systems and New Monomers J. F. Kinstle,

Presiding

9:00—183. Transient Viscoelastic Re­ sponse in Multiphase Thermoplastic Elas­ tomers. L. A. Belfiore. 9:25—184. Mechanical Properties of Seg­ mented Polyurethanes Containing Reac­ tive Diacetylene Groups in the Hard Sements. R. Agrawal, M. F. Rubner. 9:50—185. Polybenzimidazole/Polyimide Miscible Blends. S. Choe, D. J. Williams, W. J. MacKnight, F. E. Karasz. 10:15—186. Effect of Tetramethyl-Substitution in Polycarbonates and Polysulfones on the Compatibility of Blends with Polyphenylene Ethers. C. Giori, J. C. Falk, K. Khait, L. D. Moore. 10:40—187. Solubility and Diffusion of Methylene Chloride in Poly(Aryl-EtherEther-Ketone) [PEEK]. M. A. Grayson, C. J. Wolf, P. S. Pao. 11:05—188. Effects of Methylene Chloride Sorption on the Tensile and Fatigue Prop­ erties of Poly[Aryl-Ether-Ether-Ketone) [PEEK]. P. S. Pao, M. A. Grayson, C. J. Wolf.

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—170. Structure-Property Behavior of Electron Beam Cured Bis-GMA. D. Thompson, J. H. Song, G. L. Wilkes. 9:00—171. Thermal and Mechanical Analy­ sis of the Chain Crosslinking Polymeriza­ tion of Tetra-ethyleneglycol Diacrylate. J. G. Kloosterboer, G. F. C. M. Lijten. 9:30—172. Viscoelastic Behavior of Crosslinked Ethyl Acrylate. C. G. Reid, A. R. Greenberg. 10:00—173. Structure and Properties of Polydimethacrylates: Dental Applications. D. T. Turner, Z. U. Haque, S. Kalachandra, T. W. Wilson. 10:30—174. Effects of Monomer Interaction on Polymer Cure. J. A. Ors, I. M. Nunez, L. A. Falanga. 11:00—175. Amide/Blocked Aldehyde Func­ tional Monomers—Crosslinkable Sub­ strate Reactive Copolymers. R. K. Pinschmidt, Jr., G. E. Davidowich, W. F. Burgoyne, D. D. Dixon, J. E. Goldstein. 11:30—176. Amide/Blocked Aldehyde Func­ tional Monomers—Synthesis and Chem­ istry. R. K. Pinschmidt, Jr., W. F. Bur­ goyne, D. D. Dixon, J. E. Goldstein. Section Β

PROF DIVISION OF PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS A. C. Nixon, Program



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DIVISION OF SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESSES

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MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

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TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Executive Tower Inn, Beethoven Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on New Trends in Chemical Employment: Temporary, Part-Time and Other Alternative Work Schedules, cosponsored with Women Chemists Committee and Committee on Economic Status

L. L. Hutchings, Organizer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—9. Including Alternatives in Your Ca­ reer Planning: Focus on Creative Work Schedules. L. L. Hutchings. 9:30—10. Job Sharing: A New Way to Work. L. Marks. 10:00—11. Part-Time and Temporary Em­ ployment in Academia. Κ. Μ. Trahanovsky. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—12. Returning to Science—It Can Be Done. N. M. Roscher. 11:15—13. Special Employment Alterna­ tives for Chemists: A Model Study of a New Jersey ACS Section. G. C. Baumann. 11:45—Discussion. 2:00—14. Changes in Work Patterns in Sci­ ence-Based Industry: Why We Will See a Proliferation of Work Styles in the Coming Years. T. Russell. 2:30—15. Part-Timers at Standard Oil R&D: Why and How. B. J. Bulkin, J. G. Grasselli. 3:00—16. Solving Problems on the Job: Some Guidelines for Employers of Parttimers. D. S. Rothberg. 3:20—Panel Discussion. A Comparison of Part-Time and Temporary Organizations for Scientists. A. E. Pavlath, Moderator. 3:30—17. New Temporary, Permanent and Consulting Opportunities for Chemists at Lab Support. B. R. Culver. 3:45—18. Chemists Group, an Eastern ConsultingOrganization. D. J. Berets. 4:00—19. Calsec Consultants, a Western Consulting Organization. A. C. Nixon. 4:15—20. Interim Staffing: a Viable Alterna­ tive at Life Sciences. I. M. Litman. 4:30—Panel Discussion. 4:50—Closing Remarks. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

Westin, Fisher Suite (4th Floor) Small Business Opportunities in the Aero­ space Industry. M. Hardin, T. Cassidy,

Presiding

9:00—Opening Remarks. M. Hardin. 9:10—1. How To Be A Supplier to Hughes Aircraft Co. J. Kearney. 9:50—2. Role of the Small Business in the Aerospace Industry. R. Leavitt. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—3. How Morton Thiokol Utilizes Small Chemical Businesses. P. Ray. 11:20—4. Use of Ceramics in the Casting of Precision Rates for the Aerospace Indus­ try. M. McLaren, S. Uram. 2:00—5. General Dynamics Experience: Opportunities for Small Businesses With General Dynamics. E. Gray. 2:40—6. Research Opportunities for Small Businesses. C. Anderson. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—7. Contracts and Grant Opportunities for Small Businesses. M. Kilkenny. 4:10—8. New Frontiers in Aerospace: The Shape of Future Procurement Opportuni­ ties. E. McCullum. TUESDAY MORNING Westin, Fisher Suite (4th Floor) Concerns of the Independent Laboratory D. P. Stull,

Presiding

9:00—Opening Remarks. 9:10—9. Laboratory Accreditation. G. Birchtold. 9:50—10. Role of the Independent Laborato­ ry. J. O'Neal. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—11. Research Management. J. Pearce. 11:20—12. Expert Witness Opportunities for the Independent Laboratory. R. Hauser. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Chairman

Westin, Fisher Suite (4th Floor) True Stories Symposium E. W. D. Huffman, Jr.,

COSPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: Impact of the New Tax Legislation (see Division of Chemistry and the Law, M, page 46)

MONDAY MORNING Executive Tower Inn, Brahms Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Drug Testing In the Work Place, Technical, Legal and Ethical Issues.

A. S. Hoffman, H. P. Schreiber, Presiding

R. Diaz-Sprague, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00—13. Story of a Chemist and a Labora­ tory. M. L. Jacobs. 2:30—14. HCR-Finding a Niche in Biotech. R. Daughenbaugh, D. P. Stull. 3:00—15. Small Recycler Impaled by Envi­ ronmental Laws. R. G. St. Clair. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—16. Story of Rocky Mountain Analyti­ cal, M. T. Carter, O. J. Logsdon, K. A. Carlberg, T. S. Epstein. 4:15—17. Story of Anatel Instrument Corpo­ ration. C. F. Frith. 4:45—18. Story of Hach Company. C. C. Hach.

BUSINESS MEETING: Tu

Radisson, Denver-Spruce Room (Mezzanine Level) Symposium on Plasma Polymerization and Plasma Treatment of Polymers—VIII

9:00—177. Low Temperature Plasma for Membrane Preparation. P. W. Kramer, YS. Yeh, H. Yasuda. 9:50—178. Plasma Deposition of Copoly­ mers and Their Permeation Characteris­ tics. M. Sanchez, H. P. Schreiber, M. R. Wertheimer.

9:00—2. Screening Methods in Drug Test­ ing. D. Kidwell. 9:25—3. Drug Testing in Race Horses. R. Sams. 9:50—4. Drug Testing: A Cure or A Curse? A. Denio. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—5. Drug Testing: The Forensic Point of View. H. McCurdy. 10:50—6. Drug Testing in the Work Place. R. Willette. 11:15—7. Moral and Ethical Issues in Em­ ployee Drug Testing. R. Widener. 11:40—8. Economic Paradigms, Employ­ ment at Will and Drug Testing. R. DiazSprague. 12:00—Panel Discussion.

Presiding

8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—1. Validity of Drug Testing. D. Couri.

The Committee on Meetings & Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms or committee meetings

February 9, 1987 C&EN

79

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Early-Bird Discount! Register before March 20,1987 and SAVE 10% on Course Fée! REGISTER TODAY! A M E R I C A N

C H E M I C A L

S O C I E T Y

SHORT COURSES to be held in conjunction

M;

with the

ACS National Meeting April 1987 Denver, CO

•ake the most of attending the ACS National Meeting in Denver! Register for one of these intensive, results-oriented short courses that • Teach you state-of-the-art techniques • Keep you from becoming technically obsolete • Prepare you for increased responsibility • Help you perform your job better Enrollment in these highly rated courses is limited. Register today to reserve your place! Remember—if you REGISTER BEFORE MARCH 20TH, you can take 10% off the course fee!

Select from these ACS Short Courses: Chemical Engineering and Process Fundamentals for Chemists Friday-Sunday, April 3-5, 1987 Dr. Richard Griskey, Course Instructor ACS Members: $715 Nonmembers: $795

Dispersion of Fine Particles in Liquids Saturday-Sunday, April 4-5, 1987 Dr. Sydney Ross and Dr. Ian Morrison, Course Instructors ACS Members: $585 Nonmembers: $665

Environmental Analytical Chemistry Saturday-Sunday, April 4-5, 1987 Dr. Marcus Cooke, Course Director ACS Members: $585 Nonmembers: $665

Laboratory Applications of Lotus 1-2-3 and Other Software: Beyond the Basics Saturday-Sunday, April 4-5, 1987 Dr. Glenn I. Ouchi, Course Instructor ACS Members: $585 Nonmembers: $665

Laboratory Safety and Health Wednesday-Friday, April 8-10, 1987 Norman Steere and Maurice Golden, Course Instructors ACS Members: $695 Nonmembers: $775

Maintaining and Troubleshooting Chromatographic Systems Saturday-Sunday, April 4-5, 1987 Dr. M.P.T. Bradley, Course Instructor ACS Members: $585 Nonmembers: $665

Managing People: Getting Things Done Through Others Saturday-Sunday, April 4-5, 1987 James Morrison, Course Instructor ACS Members: $585 Nonmembers: $665

Molecular Biology and Recombinant DNA Technology Friday-Sunday, April 3-5, 1987 Dr. William Reznikoff and Dr. Gary Buell, Course Instructors ACS Members: $615 Nonmembers: $695 80

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Practical Medicinal Chemistry Saturday-Sunday, April 4-5, 1987 Dr. Lester Mitscher, Course Instructor ACS Members: $585 Nonmembers: $665

Quality Assurance of Chemical Measurements Saturday-Sunday, April 4-5, 1987 Dr. John K. Taylor, Course Instructor ACS Members: $585 Nonmembers: $665

Surface Science Saturday-Sunday, April 4-5, 1987 Dr. A.W. Czanderna, Course Instructor ACS Members: $585 Nonmembers: $665

For a FREE BROCHURE on all courses, use the coupon below. Or for immediate registration, CALL COLLECT 202/872-4508 and ask for Karen Mcllvaine, our Short Course Registrar. Mention Priority Code 78 BEFORE MARCH 20TH, and we'll he cenain to give you the EARLY-BIRD DISCOUNT! Yes! Please send me a free brochure describing ACS Short Courses to be held at the ACS National Meeting in Denver, CO, in April 1987. Name . Title _ Organization . Address City, State, ZIP .

Mail to: American Chemical Society, Education Division, Priority Code 78, 1155 Sixteenth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036

Expand \bur Scientific Horizons! Keep Currentpn Today's Technology!

See the newest products, services, and equipment at the

ACS EXPOSmw DENVER IN

T

he ACS Exposition in Denver will be the largest exhibition ever held at a spring national meeting. A wide variety of companies will be displaying leading-edge technology of interest to the scientific community. Currigan Hall will be brimming over with the professional tools you need to meet today's scientific challenges!

Pick up your free gift! Every visitor to the ACS Exposition receives a useful gift—with our compliments! How do you pick up your free gift? Just turn in the card included in your registration packet at the Free Gift Counter located in the exposition.

FREE WORKSHOPS!

lake a break! You'll find free refreshments every day in the exposition . . . and what a great chance to look at the incredible array of new technology only the ACS Exposition offers!

A number of exhibitors will offer free workshops in Denver. Because space is limited, attendance will be by registration only. Return the preregistration form in this issue of C&EÏÏ to ensure space in the workshops of your choice. If you're registering on-site, check in at the sponsoring company's exhibit about availability of your chosen workshop. Here's just a sampling of the many workshops offered . . . • Supercritical Fluid Chromatography • Molecular Modeling • How to Handle Chemical Structures and Data on Your P.C. • Microscale Organic Experiments

STOP BY THE ACS PRODUCTS EXHIBIT! Don't miss your chance to learn about the latest ACS Products and Services . . . you'll find discounts galore! • BOOKS—20% off every ACS book PLUS special savings on selected books each day • AUDIO COURSES—15% off all audio courses • ACS JOURNALS & MAQAZIMES-20% off new subscriptions to ACS journals and magazines • BOOK OF ABSTRACTS—A complete reference source for research presented at the Denver national Meeting • VIDEO COURSES-15% off all video courses • CHEMICAL JOURNALS ONLINE—Free hands-on demonstrations • T-SHIRTSfieACCESSORIES-Special discounts on everything in stock

Last minute travel arrangements or problems? visit the travel desk in the exposition—they'll be happy to help you!

Forget to mail those post cards? Is philately an interest? The full service U.S. Post Office in the exposition offers a complete range of postal services, including special stamps. Next door the Center for the History of Chemistry will offer a commemorative Denver Meeting postal cachet. Treat yourself to lunch! The restaurant in Currigan Hall is quick, convenient, and economical... and has a gorgeous view of the Denver area! Feeling lucky? You'll find drawing tickets in your pre-registration packet for super prizes in the daily drawing at the exposition. Remember to drop your ticket in the drawing box as you enter the exposition. Increase your chances to win—visit the exposition every day!

Currigan Hall—Denver Convention Complex Exhibit Hours Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, April 6-8—9:00 am to 5:00 pm each day Thursday, April 9—9:00 am to 1:00 pm Currigan Hall is within easy walking distance of all the downtown hotels... or use the free shuttle service on the 16th street mall! February 9, 1987 C&EN

81

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The presidential plenary session, Tuesday, April 7, entitled High-Tech Threat from Abroad: Can America Meet the Challenge?, and an ana­ lytical chemistry workshop spon­ sored by ACS Student Affiliates and ACS Career Services that is designed to stimulate interest among under­ graduates to pursue careers in ana­ lytical chemistry are two presenta­ tions of special interest at the Denver meeting. Chemical Abstracts Service will hold a workshop on its CAS Online CA file, and divisional workshops will be held on safety in the chemi­ cal laboratory (Chemical Education and Chemical Health & Safety) and on thermosets (Polymeric Materi­ als: Science & Engineering). The Denver exposition will be the largest spring exposition in ACS his­ tory, featuring more than 300 booth spaces, 16 workshops, and a new wrinkle—an ACS travel desk. The National E m p l o y m e n t Clearing House will again offer its services to both job seekers and employee seekers. A sampling of ACS Short Courses includes molecular biology and re­ combinant DNA technology, main­ taining and troubleshooting chro­ matographic systems, environmen­ tal analysis—priority pollutants, 82

February 9, 1987 C&EN

practical medicinal chemistry, and laboratory safety and health. Among the plant tours are Mar­ tin Marietta, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and So­ lar Energy Research Institute. Tours available feature the cities of Denver and Colorado Springs, the Rocky Mountains, and—for the daring— ski resorts.

Registration The deadline for advance registration for the Denver meeting is March 9. Please allow sufficient time for mail to reach us. Persons planning to attend the meeting are encouraged to register in advance, using the form on page 105. Registrations received after the dead­ line will be returned. A separate form must be provided for each registrant, including guests. Photocopies are ac­ ceptable. As an incentive to advance registra­ tion, appreciably discounted fees are in effect. The current scale of fees is shown at right. Either payment in full or autho­ rization to charge to a credit card (Amer­ ican Express, MasterCard, Visa, or Din­ ers Club/Carte Blanche only) must ac-

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company your order. Purchase orders and training requests cannot be hon­ ored. Mail completed form with payment to: American Chemical Society, Meet­ ings, P.O. Box 18598, 20th St. Station, Washington, D.C. 20036-8598. Please allow at least three weeks to process your request. A meeting badge and receipt will be mailed to the address shown on your registration form. (If a registrant's affiliation and business ad­ dress are not available, please provide a home address.) Also included will be an exposition inquiry card which can be used at all national meeting expositions. Either your business card or exposition inquiry card will be welcomed by exhib­ itors. Badge cases and booklet programs will be available in the registration areas. On-site registration facilities will be located in the Currigan Exhibition Hall, and the Marriott, ballroom prefunction area. The hours for registration will be Sunday, April 5, 2 PM to 7 PM; Monday, April 6 through Thursday, April 9, 7:30 AM to 3:30 PM; and Friday, April 10, 7:30 AM to 10 AM. One-Day-Session Tickets. $60 in ad­ vance, $70 on-site. Fill in the appropri­ ate information on the advance registra­ tion form on page 105, following the same procedure used for regular regis­ tration. Tickets will be sold in the regis­ tration areas during the hours an­ nounced above and may be converted to full registration.

Classification of registrants

MEMBERS ACS member or national affiliate Member emeritus Student member or affiliate, less than postdoctoral status VISITORS Non-U.S. resident, nonchemical scientist, or chemical technician Family of registrant NONMEMBERS U.S. resident chemical scientist Student, less than postdoctoral status ONE-DAY SESSION Regular Student EXPOSITION ONLY

Fees Advance

On-site

$100

$120

40 15

45 15

100

120

15

15

175

195

15

15

60 5

70 5

No fee

Abstracts. Abstracts will be mailed upon completion, about Feb. 27, to U.S. residents paying the additional postage fee. Receipt cards will be mailed to all other registrants ordering the abstracts, to be exchanged for books in the regis­ tration areas. Orders for abstracts only should be sent to Distribution, Room 210, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Wash­ ington, D.C. 20036, or call toll-free 1800-424-6747. Refunds. Requests for full refund of registration will be honored if received, together with badge and a copy of your receipt, by March 27. After that date, a refund of 80% of the registration fee may be obtained if your request is re­ ceived by April 30. Social event tickets may be refunded in advance if returned by March 27. After that date, refunds will be made on-site until 48 hours be­ fore the scheduled event. See Tours on page 98 for refund information on tour tickets.

Housing Room Reservations. All housing re­ quests for the official hotels at the meet­ ing should be submitted to American Chemical Society, Meetings, P.O. Box 18598, 20th St. Station, Washington, D.C. 20036-8598. Use the official hous­ ing form shown on page 86. Deadline for receipt of housing requests is March 9. Reservations received after the dead­ line cannot be processed and will be re­ turned. Reservations will be confirmed directly to the individual by ACS, indi­ cating the hotel assigned and a guaran­ teed rate. Please allow at least two weeks for processing your request. If regis­ trants are sharing a twin or double-bed­ ded room, use only one form listing both names. If the type of accommoda­ tion requested has been sold out, the next closest type will be assigned ac­ cording to your preference. Please note at least four choices when making your selection. Every attempt will be made to honor your first choice. One night's deposit is required on all rooms. Send your check directly to your assigned hotel after receiving your con­ firmation from ACS. Do not send your check to ACS. Most hotels require es­ tablishment of credit at check-in. A ma­ jor credit card is acceptable. If you do not

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Tips for a safe stay • When walking, stick to main thorough­ fares and well-lit areas. • If walking, don't wear fancy jewelry in plain sight. • Don't wear your meeting badge out­ side the hotels and convention center. • Be cognizant and alert to surround­ ings. Look alert. • When walking after dark, don't hug the buildings or cars; walk in the open or near the curb. • Carry your purse close to your body. • Don't leave valuables in your room. Get a hotel safe deposit box. • Go in numbers. Don't be a loner, par­ ticularly in the evening. • Abide by common sense: If something looks suspicious, report it and/or avoid it.

have a credit card, cash for your entire stay may be required. Changes in arrival/departure times or dates should be sent directly to the ho­ tel; cancellation before March 9 to ACS. All unassigned rooms will be released to the hotels on March 9. After that date, all correspondence concerning housing matters, including reservations, cancel­ lations, and changes, should be made directly to the hotels. A map showing hotel locations appears on page 84. Do not be disappointed; submit your hous­ ing request as early as possible. Hotel List. Area hotels not participating, as official hotels for the meeting are shown on page 87. ACS recommends that you contact them directly. Rates shown for these hotels are estimated, not guaranteed by ACS.

">r Local Arrangements ACS Hospitality Center. The ACS Colo­ rado Section extends a cordial welcome to all members and guests attending the meeting. A Hospitality Center will be operated in the Marriott, Matchless Room, hosted by section members. Tick­ ets for tours will be sold only in the Hospitality Center. Information on oth­ er sightseeing opportunities in the area will be available as well. The hours of operation will be Sunday, noon to 7 PM; and Monday through Thursday, 8 AM to 5 PM. February 9, 1987 C&EN

83

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ACS Information Center and Message Board. The center will operate in Currigan Exhibition Hall, from 2 PM to 7 PM, Sunday, April 5; 7:30 AM to 5:30 PM, Monday, April 6 through Thursday, April 9; and from 7:30 AM to noon, Fri­ day, April 10. Personal messages can be exchanged and a lost-and-found service will be provided. Mail and telegrams should be addressed in care of the hotel in which you are staying. Communica­ tions addressed in care of ACS cannot be delivered, but will be held at the Infor­ mation Center. No one will be paged in divisional meetings. ACS accepts no responsibilit/y for delivery of mail, tele­ grams, or nonemergency messages. ACS Offices. Following is a list of ACS offices at the meeting. • Books & Journals. Marriott, Pen­ rose Room, third floor. • Chemical Abstracts Service. Marri­ ott, Nat Hill Room, third floor. • Chemical & Engineering News. Marriott, Penrose Room, third floor. • Chemical Expositions. Currigan Exhibition Hall. • Employment Clearing House. Cur­ rigan Exhibition Hall. • Executive. Marriott, Gold Coin Room, lower level 1. • Finance. Currigan Exhibition Hall, The Bridge, second floor; Marriott, Cloakroom, ballroom level. • H o s p i t a l i t y Center. M a r r i o t t , Matchless Room, lower level 1. • Information Center. Currigan Ex­ hibition Hall. • Operations. Currigan Exhibition Hall, The Bridge, second floor; Marriott, Cloakroom, ballroom level; Radisson, Aspen Room, mezzanine level. • Press Room. Governors Court. Thornton Room, second floor. • Public Policy & Communications. Marriott, Silverheels Room, third floor. • Ticket Sales. Currigan Exhibition Hall, The Bridge, second floor. Attendee Locator. A file of registrants will be on display in the registration area, Currigan Exhibition Hall, where registrants can find the local addresses of colleagues attending the meeting. You are urged to visit the center and fill in the information on your card, if you have not done so in advance or if the information has changed. This informa­ tion is also helpful in case of an emer­ gency. Audiovisual Services. Audiovisual of­ fices and/or service desks, with slideviewing and loading facilities will be located as follows: • Arts Auditorium, Concession stand, second floor. • Brown Palace, Gold Room, second floor. • Executive Tower Inn, Johann Room, third floor. 84

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Hotels and rates in Denver Single Brown Palace Hotel 3

321 —17th St. 80202(303)297-3111

$80, 100

Fairmont, Board Room, ballroom level. • Holiday Inn, Service desk in lobby. • Marriott, Cloakroom, ballroom level. • Radisson, Ballroom Cloakroom, lobby level; Service desk, convention complex, terrace level. • Westin, Convention Office A, meet­ ing room level. Speakers are encouraged to visit these locations, Monday through Friday, 8 AM to 5 PM, for assistance. Conferences with ACS Staff. Discus­ sions with society staff members may be arranged through the Executive Office in the Marriott, Gold Coin Room, Sun­ day, April 5, through Thursday, April 9, 8 AM to 5 PM. Telephone for an ap­

Double

Twin

Double/ double

$100, $100, $140 125 125

Suites 1 bedroom 2 bedroom

$280, 385

$625

pointment if you would like to discuss activities of the society in any of the following areas: awards, constitution and bylaws, divisional activities, meet­ ings and expositions activities, member­ ship in ACS, nominations and elections, Petroleum Research Fund, professional training, public affairs, public relations, regional meetings, and special projects. Day Care Services. Arrangements for child care can be made directly through your hotel. Sitters also can be hired through a Denver agency, Rent-a-Mom Service (303) 671-7011. The agency strongly urges that arrangements be made in advance. ACS offers this infor­ mation for the convenience of regis­ trants, but can in no way accept respon­ sibility or liability for care provided by these services.

Single bcde

2. Continental lnn 2601 Zuni St. 80211 (303)433-6677

Double

Twin

double

42

42

42 up

37

bc, 3. Denver lnn '9 401 —17th St. 80202 (303)296-0400

1 bedroom

2 bedroom

Poster Sessions. Posters will be dis­ played for the entire morning, after­ noon, or evening of their assigned days. Authors will be with their posters dur­ ing the times indicated in the program.

SOLD OUT

abdh

4. Executive Tower lnn 1405 Curtis St. 80202 (303)571-0300 abdh

5. Fairmont Hotel 1750 WeltonSt. 80202 (303)295-1200

SOLD OUT

88, 108, 128

113, 133, 153

113, 133, 153

na

75

80

na

80 up

350, 500

285 up

7. Holiday Inn Downtownbcd 1450GlenarmPI. 80202 (303)573-1450

65

71

na

71 up

215

280

8. Marriott—City Center abdh 1701 California St. 80202 (303)297-1300

87

9. Oxford Hotel ab ' hi 1600—17th St. 80202 (303)628-5400

70

70

70

10. Radisson Hotel Denver abdh 1550 Court PI. 80110 (303)893-3333

75

90

SOLD OUT

11. Regency Hotel bcde 3900 Elati St. 80216 (303)458-0808

60

60

na

60 up

na

12. Westin Hotel Tabor Centera-b'd'h 1672 Lawrence St. 80202 (303)572-9100

88, 98

98

na

98 up

250

6. Governors Court Hotel 1776 Grant St. 80203 (303)861-2000

13. Embassy Suites Hotela'b'e'f'9 1881 Curtis St. 80202 (303)297-8888

bcdh

97

na

97 up

na

295, 310, 340, 370

370

na

225 up

430, 465, 515,565

470 700 na

300 up 350 515 na

375, 535 to 900

All-suite hotel 1-Bedroom suite_JLperson $ 89 1-Bedroom suite 2 persons $ 95 (3rd person extra $10) 2-Bedroom suite 2 persons $135 (3rd person extra $10)

Note: All rooms are subject to 11.7 % tax (subject to change), a Parking at cost (check with hotel for accessibility for other than standard autos), b Rooms for the handicapped, c Parking free (check with hotel for accessibility for other than standard autos), d Swimming pool, e Limited shuttle service, f Complimentary cocktail hour, g Complimentary breakfast, h Health club, i Antique furniture, no two rooms alike, na = not available.

In an attempt to assist those of you planning to attend the fall 1987 national meeting in New Orleans, a message board will be located in the Hospitality Center at this meeting where registrants interested in cooperative child care can exchange names. Divisional Membership. Divisional membership is evidence of your interest in that particular field of chemistry or chemical engineering and in the work of the division. Division members are granted at least one special privilege—a reduced rate on the purchase of national meeting abstracts. Most divisions offer additional services. Members of the so­ ciety may become members of one or more divisions by filling out a division­ al membership form and paying the re­ quired dues. This can be done in the

registration area, or upon request to the secretary of the division. Facilities for the Handicapped. Most fa­ cilities used for meeting functions are readily accessible. Hotels having appro­ priately designed sleeping rooms are identified on the list. There is a box on the registration form to be checked if you would like to be contacted in ad­ vance of the meeting concerning other special needs. TTY phone requests only can be made by telephoning (202) 8728733. Share-a-Room in New Orleans Pro­ gram. A bulletin board will be located in the Hospitality Center for those inter­ ested in making arrangements with an­ other member to share a room at the fall meeting in New Orleans.

Shuttle Service. Registrants wearing badges will be offered a complimentary shuttle service between 8 AM and 6 PM, Monday through Thursday, and 8 AM and noon on Friday; evening service on Wednesday only. Stops will be made at the Radisson, Westin, Marriott, and Currigan Exhibition Hall. Early morning and late afternoon service will be of­ fered between the Regency and Conti­ nental hotels and Currigan Exhibition Hall. Check the sign in your hotel lobby for the exact schedule and route infor­ mation. In addition, the city runs a com­ plimentary shuttle along the 16th Street Mall (see map). Speakers Information. Each meeting room will be equipped as follows: 2 inch X 2 inch (35 mm) slide projector, over­ head projector, screen, and lighted read­ ing desk with remote slide control and lapel microphone. Requests in writing for other special equipment must be re­ ceived by the ACS Department of Meet­ ings & Divisional Activities by March 1. Rental Car Discounts. Special discounts will be available for one week before, during, and one week after the meeting. Detailed information will be included with badges mailed to preregistrants. To obtain the special convention rates, please call: Dollar 1-800-421-6868 Hertz 1-800-654-2240 National 1-800-328-7949 No identification number is needed. Simply indicate that you are planning to attend the ACS national meeting in Denver. Air Transportation. Arrangements have been made with Delta Airlines, Northwest Airlines, and United Air­ lines for attendees to obtain discounted air fares to and from Denver. These dis­ counts are particularly advantageous for those not planning to be in Denver over a Saturday night and therefore do not qualify for published discounted fares. Tickets, which must be issued at least seven days before departure (except for United) may be obtained by providing credit card information when making reservations or subsequently through the ticket offices of the respective air­ lines, or through travel agents. Since the number of seats available on any given flight is limited, it is very important that reservations be made as early as possible. United Airlines: a 5% savings off any round-trip fares for which attendees qualify (based on normal restrictions), including first class and Ultra Saver, or a February 9, 1987 C&EN

85

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open from 8:30 AM to 11 PM, eastern time, seven days a week. Delta Airlines: a 5% savings off any Delta published round-trip fare within the continental United States and San Juan, including all promotional and deeply discounted Supersaver fares, providing all rules and conditions of the 0. P. Anderson, section chairman airfares are met, or a 40% discount on J. Κ ice, chairman, general interest program Delta's domestic system on full nondisM. Wieder, chairman, public relations counted, round-trip day-coach fares. J. Lanning, chairman, student personnel (Honolulu and Montreal also will apply, S. Atwood, chairman, expositions but with a 30% discount.) Originating travel will be allowed from April 1-10, 1987, and a maximum stay of 21 days 40% discount off normal round-trip will be permitted. Call Delta's toll-free coach fares with no restrictions (includ­ number 1-800-241-6760 (or have your ing round-trips from Honolulu and travel agent do so) and identify the ACS Canada). These discounts will apply meeting by the number D-0269. All res­ from April 1 through April 15, 1987. ervations must be made through the 800 Call United's toll-free number 1-800- number, which is open from 8 AM to 8 521-4041 [in Canada, call (800) 265-4873] PM, eastern time, seven days a week. and identify the ACS meeting by the Northwest Airlines: a 5% savings off number 7080D. All reservations must be the lowest applicable round-trip fare made through the 800 number, which is available at the time of booking, or a 30% The cooperation of the ACS Colorado Sec­ tion in handling local arrangements and or­ ganizing an excellent tour program is grate­ fully acknowledged. Through the efforts of its committees, many interesting activities have been planned.

discount from the adult coach class fare, from point of origin within the U.S. (in­ cluding Honolulu) to Denver and re­ turn. Travel will be permitted from April 1 through April 13. These dis­ counts are valid on all fares except mili­ tary and VUSA, and fares under $100 round-trip. Call Northwest tollfree at 1800-328-1111 (in Minnesota, 1-800-2721408), and identify the ACS meeting by the number 11768. All reservations must be made through the 800 number, which is open from 8 AM to 8 PM, cen­ tral time, Monday through Friday. Ground Transportation. Downtown Denver is 20 minutes from Stapleton In­ ternational Airport. Cab fares are about $12. Public bus service operates be­ tween 5 AM and 10 PM, every 30 min­ utes, from the lower level, south end of the luggage area. The fare is 70 cents one way at rush hour, 35 cents off-peak. The bus information center is opposite door 10 at the airport.

Use this form only for ACS participating housing/session hotels. Please read the information regarding room reservations before completing this form. DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT AT ACS: MARCH 9. REQUESTS RECEIVED AFTER THIS DATE CANNOT BE PROCESSED. Mail to American Chemical Society, Meetings, P.O. Box 18598, 20th St. Station, Washington, D.C. 20036-8598. Hotels: Indicate below order of hotel preference (choice 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th) -Marriott—City Center

.Brown Palace Hotel -Continental Inn SOLD OUT Denver Inn Embassy Suites Hotel

-Fairmont Hotel

-Oxford Hotel

-Governors Court Hotel

-Radisson Hotel Denver

-Holiday Inn Downtown

-Regency Hotel

SOLD OUT Executive Tower Inn

-Westin Hotel Tabor Center

Indicate rate preference 1st_

. 2nd-

.3rd-

. 4th_

Check one: If my preferred rate is not available, I am more concerned with location.

, rate_

Room(s) will be occupied by: (PLEASE PRINT) Name(s)_ Mail confirmation to: Name AddressCity

. State-

Telephone: Home (_ Arrival day and date.

.ZIP-

. Country. Office (_

_Telex_

-Number of nights-

-Single (1 person)

-Twin (2 persons, 2 beds)

-Suite, 1 bedroom (1 or 2 persons)

-Double (2 persons, 1 bed)

-Double/double (2 double beds)

.Suite, 2 bedroom (2 or more persons)

One night's deposit must be sent to your assigned hotel, or your reservations will not be held. IMPORTANT: Changes in arrival and departure time or date should be made directly to the hotel. After March 9 all housing matters should be directed to the hotel. The name of each hotel guest must be listed for doubles/twins. Reservations cannot be made unless two names are given. Room assignments will be made in the order received. Incomplete information will result in a delay in processing your request.

86

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Within Denver itself, the RTD Public Bus Service operates daily, with limited runs on weekends. Most buses are equipped for the mobility impaired. The mile-long 16th Street Mall, a tree-lined pedestrian path filled with department stores, shops, restaurants, and featuring 12 fountains, provides a free shuttle bus service. For further information contact RTD at (303) 778-6000. Tourist Information. The Denver Met­ ro Convention & Visitors Bureau may be contacted at (303) 892-1505 for general visitor information.

America Meet the Challenge?, 5:30 PM to 7 PM, Fairmont, Imperial Ballroom. ACS Alumni Hour, 6 PM to 8 PM, Fair­ mont, Grand Ballroom. Analytical Chemistry Workshop, 9 AM to 5 PM, Radisson, Beverly Room. Spon­ sored by the ACS Student Affiliates and ACS Career Services, this workshop is designed to stimulate interest in under­ graduates in the pursuit of careers in analytical chemistry. Roles of analytical chemists will be discussed, and prob­ lems of real-life situations addressed and worked through. All students wel­ come.

Event participation is open to all reg­ istrants. Ticket prices are shown or events coded as follows: NT—sponsored, no ticket required; L or D—included in price of meal; Ρ—partially subsidized; COD—cash bar; or M—by divisional membership (available at the door). SATURDAY, APRIL 4

Reception, 6:30 PM Divisional Officers Group, Westin, Con­ tinental Ballroom C. NT Dinner, 7:30 PM 101 Divisional Officers Group, Westin, Continental Ballroom C. $27

Region I Councilors Caucus, 4:30 PM to 6:30 PM, Fairmont, Vista Room. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8

Special Events SATURDAY, APRIL 4

ACS Mixer, 9 PM to 11 PM, Radisson, Grand Ballroom. (See Social Events for ticket information.)

Division Officers Caucus, 1:30 PM to 5 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salon B.

Public Relations Workshop. 2 PM to 4 PM, Radisson, Capitol Room. Open to all interested members.

SUNDAY, APRIL 5

FRIDAY, APRIL 10

Middle Atlantic Regional Councilors Caucus, 5 PM to 7 PM, Marriott, Denver Ballroom 4. New Councilor Orientation, 4:30 PM to 6 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salon E.

CAS Online CA File for Chemists Workshop, 9 AM to 4 PM, for chemists and others interested in learning how to use on-line searching. For more details and fee information, contact the CAS workshop coordinator at 1-800-8486538, ext. 2557.

Region II Councilors Caucus, 5 PM to 6 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salon J.

Region V Councilors Caucus, 7 PM to 8 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salons C & D. Sunday Afternoon with Science, 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salon F. M. La ng and D. L. Showalter will per­ form their colorful chemical demonstra­ tions and prove there is fun and excite­ ment in learning about chemistry. Western Regional Councilors Caucus, 8 PM to 10 PM, Marriott, Denver Ball­ room 3. MONDAY, APRIL 6

ACS Award Banquet, 6 PM to 10 PM, Fairmont, Imperial Ballroom. (See Social Events for details and ticket informa­ tion.) TUESDAY, APRIL 7

ACS Presidential Plenary Session, High-Tech Threat from Abroad: Can

Social Events The following schedule of social events has been arranged'for the spring nation­ al meeting. When purchase of tickets is necessary, the event has been numbered to assist in ticket ordering. Tickets should be purchased as early as possible in the registration area. The final deadline for the sale of tick­ ets will be 48 hours before the event, after which time only a few tickets may be available at the door of the event. Refunds of social event tickets may be obtained in advance if tickets are re­ turned to ACS by March 27. On-site, re­ funds may be obtained in the registra­ tion ticket area(s) until 48 hours before the scheduled event. Should a last-minute emergency dic­ tate against event participation, the reg­ istration ticket cashier will attempt to resell your ticket for you.

Reception, 5 PM Younger Chemists Committee, Chemi­ cal Career Series Preview, Marriott, Col­ orado Salon F. NT Social Hour, 5 PM Division of Chemical Education, Open House, Executive Tower Inn, Division Hospitality Suite. NT Social Hour, 6 PM Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Organometallic Subdivision, Radisson, Majestic Ballroom. COD Social Hour, 8 PM Division of Organic Chemistry, Poster Session, Currigan Exhibition Hall, Up­ per Lobby. Ρ

Social Hour, 9 PM Division of Medicinal Chemistry, Exec­ utive Tower Inn, Symphony Ballroom. NT

Nonparticipating hotels Hotel

Rates

Burnsley Hotel 1000 Grant St.

$95-115

80203 (303)830-1000 (all suites) Cambridge Club 1560 Sherman St.

89-109

80203 (303)831-1252 (all suites) Residence Inn 277 Zumi St.

70-90

80211 (303)458-5318 (all suites) YMCA 16th & Lincoln

16.30-21.25

80202 (303)861-8300 Note: Prices shown are not guaranteed by ACS.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

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Reception, 8:30 PM Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Hospitality, Radisson, Silver Room. NT

Region IV Councilors Caucus, 6 PM to 8 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salon A.

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Social Hour, 11:30 AM Division of Polymeric Materials: Sci­ ence & Engineering, Award, Radisson, Vail Room. COD

Social Hour, 11:45 AM Women Chemists, Radisson, Vail Room. COD

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Luncheons, 12:30 PM 102 Board Committee on Corporation Associates, honoring R. B. Morin, 1987 recipient of Creative Invention Award, Fairmont, Pavilion Room. $15 103 Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Award, Radis­ son, Vail Room. $14 Reception, 4 PM Student Affiliates, 50th Anniversary Celebration, Executive Tower Inn, Sym­ phony Ballroom. NT Social Hour, 5 PM Division of Environmental Chemistry, Poster Session, Fairmont, Grand Ball­ room. Ρ Social Hour, 5:30 PM Divisions of Inorganic Chemistry, Poly­ mer Chemistry, and Polymeric Materi­ als: Science & Engineering, Internation­ al Symposium on Inorganic Polymers, Radisson, Convention Lobby. COD Reception, 6 PM Division of Agricultural & Food Chem­ istry, honoring symposia chairmen, Brown Palace, Central City Room. M

Reception, Noon Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Murphree Award honoring W. M. H. Sachtler, Radisson, Savoy Room. NT Social Hour, Noon Grady-Stack Award, honoring A. Rossiter Jr., Governors Court, Tabor Room. COD Luncheons, Noon 106 Division of Chemical Information, Westin, Lawrence Β Room. $17 107 Division of Fuel Chemistry, Marri­ ott, Denver Ballroom 1. $17 108 Division of The History of Chemis­ try, Dexter Award, Holiday Inn City Center, Gold Nugget Room. $12 Luncheon, 12:15 PM 109 Women Chemists, Radisson, Vail Room. $12 Luncheons, 12:30 PM 110 Division of Industrial & Engineer­ ing Chemistry, Awards, Radisson, Ma­ jestic Lounge. $14 111 Grady-Stack Award honoring A. Rossiter Jr., Governors Court, Tabor Room. $13 Reception, 4 PM Local Section Officers and Tour Speak­ ers, Brown Palace, Georgetown-Silver Plume Room. NT

Receptions, 5 PM Yale Chemists Association, Fairmont, Directors Room. NT Division of Chemical Information, Wes­ tin, Lawrence Β Room. NT Social Hour, 5 PM University of Wisconsin-Madison, Fair­ mont, Royal Room. COD Reception, 5:30 PM Division of Chemical Health & Safety, Wine Tasting, Metropolitan State Col­ lege, Interfaith Center, Auraria Campus (souvenir wine glass included; non­ smoking event). M or $5 (at door) Social Hours, 5:30 PM Association of Harvard Chemists, Holi­ day Inn City Center, Silver Plume Room. COD Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry, Symposium on Modifications and Ap­ plications of Industrial Polysaccharides, Poster Session, Brown Palace, Ballroom Foyer. Ρ Division of Colloid & Surface Chemis­ try, Marriott, Colorado Salon C. Ρ Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Poster Session, Currigan Exhibition Hall, Up­ per Lobby. Ρ University of Illinois, Radisson, Color­ ado Room. COD University of Michigan, Holiday Inn City Center, Gold Nugget Room. Ρ Reception, 6 PM Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Den­ ver Petroleum Club, 38th Floor, Front Range Room, 3700 Anaconda Tower, 555—17th St. NT

Meeting Event, 6 PM Reception honoring 1987 ACS award re­ cipients, Fairmont, Imperial Foyer. COD Dinner, 6:30 PM 104 Division of Chemical Health & Safe­ ty, The Buckhorn Exchange, 1000 Osage St. $25 Social Hour, 7:30 PM Division of Physical Chemistry, Poster Session, Westin, Continental Ballroom C. COD Dinner, 7:30 PM 105 Dinner honoring 1987 ACS award recipients, Fairmont, Imperial Ballroom. $45 Reception, 8:30 PM Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, honoring symposia chair­ men and speakers, Radisson, Silver Room. NT Denver, the mile-high 88

February 9, 1987 C&EN

city, lies at the edge of the Rocky

Mountains

Social Hours, 6 PM ACS Alumni Hour, Fairmont, Grand Ballroom. COD Participants: Cornell University Duke University Florida State University Illinois Institute of Technology Indiana University Iowa State University Johns Hopkins University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Michigan State University New York University Pacific Northwest universities (Univer­ sity of Idaho, Oregon State Universi­ ty, University of Oregon, Washington State University, University of Wash­ ington) Princeton University Purdue University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Stanford University State University of New York, Buffalo University of California, Berkeley/Los Angeles University of Colorado University of Massachusetts University of Minnesota University of Notre Dame University of Texas, Austin University of Toledo Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University Division of Agrochemicals, Brown Pal­ ace, Ballroom Α. Ρ Division of Analytical Chemistry, Brown Palace, Stratton-Tabor Room. COD Texas A&M University and University of Texas, Austin, Fairmont, Pavilion Room. COD University of Maryland, Radisson, W. J. Bailey Suite. NT University of Rochester, Executive Tow­ er Inn, Zephyr Room. COD Social Hours, 6:30 PM Division of Chemical Education, Den­ ver Athletic Club, 1325 Glenarm Place. COD Division of Environmental Chemistry, Denver Petroleum Club, 37th Floor, Bluebell 1 Room, 3700 Anaconda Tower, 555—17th St. COD Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Tech­ nology, Holiday Inn City Center, Crip­ ple Creek Room. Ρ Reception, 7 PM Board Committee on Corporation Asso­ ciates, 35th Birthday Celebration, Fair­ mont, Far East Room. NT Social Hour, 7 PM Division of Geochemistry, Colorado Salon D.

Marriott, COD

Dinners, 7 PM 112 Division of Analytical Chemistry, Brown Palace, Central City Room. $25 113 Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Denver Petroleum Club, 38th Floor, Front Range Room, 3700 Anaconda Tower, 555-17th St. $25 Social Hour, 7:30 PM Division of Physical Chemistry, Poster Session, Westin, Continental Ballroom C. Ρ Dinners, 7:30 PM 114 Division of Chemical Education, Denver Athletic Club, 1325 Glenarm PL $21 115 Division of Environmental Chemis­ try, Denver Petroleum Club, 37th Floor, Bluebell 1 Room, 3700 Anaconda Tower, 555-17th St. $27 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8 Social Hour, Noon Division of Colloid & Surface Chemis­ try, Marriott, Denver Ballroom 1. COD Luncheon, 12:30 PM 116 Division of Colloid & Surface Chem­ istry, Marriott, Denver Ballroom 1. $18 Social Hour, 5:30 PM Divisions of Polymer Chemistry and Polymeric Materials: Science & Engi­ neering, Radisson, Assembly Rooms 2 & 3. COD Social Hours, 6:30 PM Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry, Claude S. Hudson Award, Wellshire Inn, 3333 South Colorado Blvd. (bus de­ parts in front of the Brown Palace at 6 PM). COD Division of Polymer Chemistry, A w a r d s , Radisson, D e n v e r - S p r u c e Room. COD Dinners, 7:30 PM 117 Division of Carbohydrate Chemis­ try, Claude S. Hudson Award, Wellshire Inn, 3333 South Colorado Blvd. (bus de­ parts in front of the Brown Palace at 6 PM). $30 118 Division of Polymer Chemistry, Awards, Radisson, Silver Room. $28 Meeting Event, 9 PM 119 ACS Mixer, Radisson, Grand Ball­ room. Admission by badge Nonregistrants: $3.00 FRIDAY, APRIL 10 Luncheon, Noon 120 Division of Chemical Education, High School-College Interface, Arts Auditorium, Room 1A. $10

8 Exposition & Workshops If you don't complement your atten­ dance at technical sessions with at least one trip through the ACS national expo­ sition, you will miss one of the most interesting and convenient ways to keep abreast of the latest technology. Not only has the exposition grown tre­ mendously, it has become much more diversified, offering a range of equip­ ment and services to appeal to a wide audience. Be sure to come by the Denver Convention Complex (Currigan Exhibi­ tion Hall) and take a look at the largest national spring exposition in ACS histo­ ry—75 booths larger than the previous spring show last year in New York. About 300 booth spaces, occupied by 175 or so companies and organizations, will display everything from instruments and books to computers (hardware and software) and lab furniture, offering in­ formation on employment opportuni­ ties to the latest in chromatographic and lab equipment. Each exhibiting organi­ zation will have expert personnel on hand to give demonstrations and/or dis­ cuss your needs and interests. Admis­ sion to the exposition is complimen­ tary. In addition to the comprehensive display of products and services of inter­ est to the scientific community, there will be free refreshments, giveaways, and drawings for prizes. All attendees will receive a free ACS souvenir. The exposition will be open Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, April 6-8, from 9 AM to 5 PM, and Thursday, April 9, from 9 AM to 1 PM. A full restaurant and lounge will be available on the ex­ hibit floor. Exposition Inquiry Card. To gain en­ trance to the exhibit hall, and for use in making inquiries about exhibitors' products and services, an embossed plastic card will be sent to all meeting preregistrants along with their meeting badge. On-site attendees may obtain their plastic badge (Exposition Inquiry Card) at the Exhibit Registration Desk in the Denver Convention Complex. ACS Travel Desk. ACS members will be delighted to learn that the ACS Travel Office will have a service desk on the exposition floor in Denver. Our travel professional can save you time and frus­ tration by helping to arrange or change travel plans, obtain boarding passes or seat assignments, or plan your dream vacation. Get acquainted with the types of services we offer members, without charge. February 9, 1987 C&EN

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Commemorative Postal Cachet/Postal Substation. The sixth in a series of phil­ atelic covers featuring ACS presidents will be available for sale at the Center for History of Chemistry booth. Spon­ sored by the ACS Division of The Histo­ ry of Chemistry, this sixth cachet will feature Charles F. Chandler, ACS presi­ dent in 1881 and 1889. A temporary postal substation will be set up in the exposition area. A special ACS postal cancellation will be available for those interested in the philatelic dating of this commemorative envelope. Mail orders will be accepted; price and ordering in­ formation can be obtained by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to John Sharkey, Chemistry Department, Pace Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10038. Deadline for receipt of mail orders is March 30.

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Exhibitors Bold numbers at end of lines are booth numbers Academic Press, Orlando, Fla. 32887. Texts, refer­ ences, and journals are displayed in a variety of areas of chemistry. Information on the new Encyclo­ pedia of Physical Science and Technology is avail­ able. Many new books such as "Introduction to Biomolecular Energetics, " "Symmetry in Bonding and Spectra, " and the new volume of "HPLC: Advances and Perspectives ' ' are featured. 121 Ace Glass, 1430 N.W. Blvd., Vineland, N.J. 08360. New microscale spinning band column plus addition­ al items for fractional distillations, new programable PID temperature controller, larger and smaller size pilot plant equipment. 300, 302 ACS Division of Small Chemical Businesses, P.O. Box 23214, Columbus, Ohio 43223. Four companies from the division will be exhibiting. 205 ACS Member Insurance Plans, Board of Trustees, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Group insurance benefits sponsored by the Board of Trustees, group insurance plans for ACS members including: term life, hospital indemnity, AD&D, longterm disability income, tax-deferred annuity, and indi­ vidual retirement account (IRA). 207, 209 ACS Products & Services, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Books and journals pub­ lished by ACS will be on display, as will ACS sports­ wear, accessories, and gifts. Hands-on demonstra­ tions at ACS Journals On-line booth showing 18 ACS journals available in full text at the touch of a key. ACS audio and video courses will be on display at the continuing education booth. 613,615,617, 619, 621, 623, 625, 627, 629 A&D Engineering, 1555 McCandless Dr., Milpitas, Calif. 95035. Full line of electronic analytical and precision balances from a semimicro 0.01-mg to a heavy capacity 60-kg balance for laboratory and industrial use. All balances incorporate digital cali­ bration, computer interface capability, and clear, easy-to-read display. 440 Aldrich Chemical, P.O. Box 355, Milwaukee, Wis. 53201. Organic and inorganic chemicals, biochemicals, stains and dyes, deuterated, spectrophotomet­ ry, HPLC and anhydrous solvents, reagents for hydroboration, organometallic reagents, catalysts, ad­ sorption media, precious metal salts, pure elements, gases, chemical standards kits, laboratory equip­ ment, Sigma-Aldrich Library of Chemical Safety Data. Demonstration of WIMP, a computer program for dra wing chemical structures. 557 Alfa Products, Morton Thiokol, 152 Andover St., Danvers, Mass. 01923. More than 11,000 products to meet the needs of the research community. Organics, inorganics, catalysts, pure metals and alloys, research-grade gases, analytical standards, elec­ tronic-grade chemicals and materials, and high-puri­ ty ceramics are presented in the company's catalog. Visit our booth and enter contest for valuable prizes. 432, 434 90

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Exposition workshops In conjunction with the ACS exposition, a number of participating exhibitors will con­ duct personalized workshops covering their areas of instrumentation, data search tech­ niques, and the like. Because of space limita­ tions, attendance will be by registration only, even though these workshops are being held without charge by the sponsoring compa­ nies. Please use the preregistration form on page 91 to ensure space in the workshop(s) of your choice. Should you only be able to register on-site, please check in with the appropriate sponsoring company at its booth(s) to inquire about availability of your chosen workshop. Booth numbers are indi­ cated after each exhibitor listing in this pro­ gram. Because of the timely and interesting topics of these workshops, they will fill up quickly and early registration is encouraged. All workshops will be held in the Execu­ tive Tower Inn, across the street from the Convention Complex.

MONDAY, APRIL 6 1. Supercritical Fluid Chromatography: Principles and Selected Applications Sponsor: Lee Scientific Instructors: Dale Felix, Bruce Richter 9 AM; repeated at 10:30 AM, 1:30 and 3:30 PM Tower Room Capillary supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is receiving significant attention from analytical chemists. Are the claims for SFC justified; does SFC really combine the best features of GC and LC? These and other questions are explored, presenting both prin­ ciples and demonstrative application exam­ ples of this new separations technology.

2. TOPKAT—Using Structure-Activity Pre­ diction of Toxicity in the Development and Evaluation of Chemical Structures Sponsor: Health Designs Inc. Instructors: Kurt Enslein, Michael Tomb, Benjamin Blake 10 AM to 4 PM Blue Room TOPKAT is a personal computer-based soft­ ware package designed for prediction of the probability of carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity, as well as the value of the rat oral LD 50 , and skin and eye irritation scores from chemical structure. Workshop will illustrate the function of TOPKAT and its uses in the chemical development process, from specification of structures, through the examination of congeners, metabolites, and intermediates. Also, it will demonstrate how use of TOPKAT can result in better costeffective utilization of research time and ex­ penditures.

3. Molecular Modeling Sponsor: Evans & Sutherland Instructors: Dharmajyoti Bhaumik, Richard Fisher, Eric Swanson 10 AM to 5 PM Sebastian Bach Room Sessions will use high-performance interac­ tive graphics systems and modern molecular modeling software. Specific topics include small molecule modeling and drug design, and synthetic polymer modeling.

4. Users Group Meeting and Workshop Sponsor: Biosym Technologies Instructor: Russ Athay 6 to 8 PM Sebastian Bach Room An opportunity for users to get together for discussion, demonstrations, etc.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7 5 . . . . And You Don't Have To Know a Thing About Computers Sponsor: American Chemical Society Instructors: Raefette Helton, George Griffith 10:45 to 11:30 AM; repeated at 1:30 to 2:15 PM Tower Room Designed to familiarize nonsearchers with the basics of on-line chemical information retrieval. This brief introduction to Chemical Journals Online, a new full-text database group from STN International, explains prac­ tical applications and system features. No computer or on-line experience is neces­ sary.

6. Sorbent Extraction: Advances in the Technology of Sample Preparation Sponsor: Jones Chromatography USA Inc. Instructors: Barbara Tippins (Analytichem) and KC Van Home (Jones Chromatography) 9 AM to 5 PM Blue Room An overview of bonded silica sorbent prod­ ucts for sample preparation and chemical purification. Sorbent extraction theory as ap­ plied to sample preparation in pharmaceuti­ cal, environmental, food, clinical, and bio­ technology analyses will be discussed using specific applications and demonstrations. Optimum approaches to developing new methods and troubleshooting problems will be covered in detail.

7. How To Handle Chemical Structures and Data on Your Laboratory Personal Comput­ er Sponsor: Molecular Design Ltd. Instructors: Donna del Rey, Samia Morgan 9:30 AM to noon Sebastian Bach Room Focusing on applications and problem solv­ ing using ChemBase on IBM personal com­ puters. Attendees will learn to draw, store,

retrieve, arid manipulate chemical structures and data. Substructure and data searching will be covered, and the use of logical opera­ tors in handling data will be introduced. At­ tendees will generate customized forms to display their results. No prior experience is needed.

8. How To Determine the Status of U.S. Patents Sponsor: Research Publications Instructor: Charles J. Merek 2 to 4 PM Sebastian Bach Room The Patent Status File tracks all postissue actions from 1969 which affect the status of U.S. patents, including expired patents, term extended, reissue, re-examinations and much more. LITALERT is an on-line litigation alert service for information on patent and trademark infringement suits recently filed in the U.S. district courts.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8 9 And You Don't Have To Know a Thing About Computers Sponsor: American Chemical Society Instructors: Raefette Helton, George Griffith 10:45 to 11:30 AM Tower Room See workshop 5 for details.

10. Customizing Molecular Modeling for In­ dividual Research Needs: New Directions in Software Design and Architecture Sponsor: Tripos Associates Inc. Instructor: John McAlister 3 to 5 PM Tower Room Open architecture, user-definable dictio­ naries, menu- and command-driven opera­ tion, time-saving conformational analysis for both small and macro molecules, easy porta­ bility and integration: features now available which make computer modeling a promising tool for a wide variety of chemical research applications. Workshop will explore the phi­ losophy and structure which underlies Tripos' new product line, and will discuss the prom­ ise of these and other recent concepts.

11. Microscale Organic Experiments— Techniques and Apparatus Sponsor: D. C. Heath & Co. Instructor: Kenneth Williamson 10 to 11 AM; repeated at 2 to 3 PM Blue Room The author of a new microscale organic lab manual will talk about his experiences of running a microscale lab at Mt. Holyoke and Dartmouth colleges. He will have videos, glassware, and apparatus, and will schedule adequate time for informal discussion.

12. New PC Tools for Chemical Report Preparation Sponsor: Molecular Design Ltd. Instructors: Peter E. Cohan, Donna del Rey 8:30 AM to noon Sebastian Bach Room Participants will explore the use of new per­ sonal computer software to create presenta­ tion quality reports, papers, and other chemi­ cal documents. Drawing chemical structures, preparing flow-charts and diagrams, using special font characters and associated word processing will be covered. Printers and out­ put quality also will be discussed. 13. Dynamic Mechanical and Dielectric Measurements of Polymers Sponsor: Polymer Laboratories Inc. Instructors: John Richmond and Polymer Labs staff 10 AM to noon Gold Room A discussion of the theory and use of the DMTA and DETA techniques will be present­ ed in lecture format. Practical problems will be dealt with by equipment use as required. 14. IC/HPLC of Nonchromophoric Com­ pounds Sponsor: Dionex Corp. Instructor: Steve Stone 1 to 3 PM Gold Room Discussion will center on various ways of analyzing nonchromophoric compounds by IC/HPLC techniques. A review of the typical detection and separation schemes used in IC/HPLC will be followed by numerous real world applications. Application topics that will be discussed are biological, chemical/ petrochemical, and environmental. The de­ termination of simple sugars and complex carbohydrates derived from glycoproteins, amino acids, amino glycoside, organic acids, and transition metals.

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15. Search Chemical Information on Dialog Sponsor: Dialog Information Services Inc. Instructors: Charles Sullivan and Mary Ann Palma 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM Assembly Room Introduction to Dialog's Chemical Information System. Will include the basic commands needed to search any Dialog database. A discussion of how chemical information is searched and which unique system features can be used to retrieve information in a costeffective manner. Workshop includes lec­ ture, discussion, demonstration, and handson time. Morning session will discuss the basic search features of Dialog and how chemical information is organized on Dialog; will also introduce techniques used when searching for the identity of a chemical sub­ stance. Afternoon session will continue dis­ cussion on chemical substance identity, but will extend to Dialog's unique system fea­ tures such as component information and cross-file searching techniques. Even a nov­ ice who is familiar with chemical information and not Dialog will benefit. Excellent refresh­ er for more experienced users. Workshop will conclude with hands-on terminal practice and access to the Dialog on-tap training data­ bases.

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16. Unique EDXRF Technique for Determin­ ing Inorganics in Polymers Sponsor: Kevex Corp. Instructor: Jim Bogert 2 to 4 PM Sebastian Bach Room Technique exploits analyte peak to second­ ary target Compton Scatter ratioing to elimi­ nate the need for molding polymer chips prior to analysis, thereby bringing process control analysis near stream and saving sample preparation time. Sensitivity of elemental de­ termination also will be discussed.

PREREGISTRATION

EXPOSITION WORKSHOPS Denver, April 6-8 Course(s) desired No. Title

NameAddress.

Advance registration will be passed along to sponsoring companies and will ensure a space for you in the workshop(s) of your choice. On-site registration should be done at the appropriate company's booth. Return this form to ACS Expositions, 1155—16th St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Deadline for advance registration is March 25.

February 9. 1987 C&EN

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Allyn & Bacon, 7 Wells Ave., Newton, Mass. 02159. Leading college chemistry textbooks like Gillespie's "Chemistry, " a text that for the first time allows you to integrate descriptive chemistry into teaching, and the classic best-selling "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison & Boyd {spring 1987) in a full-color fifth edition. 137,139 American Tokyo Kasei, 9211 North Harborgate St., Portland, Ore. 97203. Research organic chemicals—reagents for environmental analysis, also, GC, HPLC, TLC; indicators; spectrophotometric and chelating reagents; spectrograde solvents; intermediates; biochemicals and fine chemicals. Custom and bulk synthesis capabilities available. Free catalog listing more than 12,000 products. Prompt delivery from Portland distribution center. 415 American Water Works Association, 6666 West Quincy Ave., Denver, Colo. 80235. Information concerning AWWA's 300 best-selling publications. AWWA standards, manuals, reference books, and training materials of interest to ACS Exposition attendees. Membership information and applications will be available as well as samples of A WWA periodicals. 255 Atlas Minerals and Chemicals, P.O. Box 0038, Mertztown, Pa. 19539. Bekaplast linings for concrete protection that are engineered to solve chemical waste problems, providing fool-proof containment for underground vessels, tanks, trenches, pits, and manholes. In addition, corrosion resistant floor toppings, coatings, and resin linings. 637 J. T. Baker Chemical Co., 222 Red School La., Phillipsburg, N.J. 08865. "Bakeranalyzed" laboratory chemicals and reagents featuring the Saf-T-Data labeling system; Bakerbond HPLC columns and column packings; flash chromatography kits and sorbents. 333, 335 Benjamin/Cummings Publishing, 2727 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, Calif. 94025. Leading publisher of life science and chemistry books, featuring the new fourth edition of "University Chemistry" by Mahan and Myers, ' 'Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ' ' by Yoder and Schaeffer, ' 'Chemical Investigations" by Konigsberg Kerner, and "NMR of Paramagnetic Molecules in Biological Systems" by Bertini/ Lucchinat. 120 Berghof/America, 27 Main St., Raymond, N.H. 03077. Complete line of Teflon products available for research and industry. Beakers, flasks, bottles, vats, fluid-flow systems for pipe and/or tubing, valves, fittings, acid purifying and distillation systems. Teflon lined or solid Teflon high-pressure reactors from 10 mL to 4000 mL, pressures up to 2900 psi, temperatures from —250 to 250 °C. Custom fabrication available. 513 Bethlehem Apparatus, 890 Front St. Hellertown, Pa. 18055. General-purpose lab saw, laboratory cutoff saw, glass-working equipment including glass-working kits, gas/oxy torches, bench burner, glass lathes tools, wet cutoff saws, glass strain-detecting polariscopes, mercury cleaning and recovery service, Mercury Vacupick, prime virgin source VTD mercury. 308 Biodesign, 199 South Los Robles, Pasadena, Calif. 91101. Demonstration of interactive molecular modeling and simulation software for use in drug design, polymer and materials applications. The focus will be on low-cost computer hardware environments, such as IBM-PC, Tektronix, Sun-3, DEC/GPX, and Alliant. Display of Interactive Molecular Dynamics simulations can be demonstrated for chemical systems specified by attendees. 327, 329 Bio-Rad, Digilab division, 237 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02139. Digilab Model FTS 40 research-sensitive FTIR spectrometer. 521 Biosym Technologies, 9605 Scranton Rd., San Diego, Calif. 92121. Two flexible, easy-to-use computer modeling software programs: Insight, a graphics tool for building, manipulating and evaluating molecules; and Discover, a molecular mechanics and dynamics program. 254, 256 Bomem, 625 Rue Marais, Vanier, Que., Canada G1M 2Y2. Introducing industrial-grade FTIR—the Michelson 100. This new ruggedized FTIR is designed to be used in a factory environment while having state-ofthe-art performance at a price comparable to disper92

February 9. 1987 C&EN

sive IR. This breakthrough has been achieved with a unique interferometer design that is insensitive to external vibrations and ambient temperature changes. Industrial FTIR is controlled by an IBM-PC or compatible FTIR. 635 B/R Instrument, P.O. Box 7, Pasadena, Md. 21122. Displaying complete line of spinning band distillation systems. Featuring B/R fully automatic unit with fraction collector and B/R 800 micro unit. Stop by booth or call 1-800-922-9206 for more information. 402 Brooks/Cole Publishing, c/o 10 Davis Dr., Belmont, Calif. 94002. College texts including recently published titles; Fessenden & Fessenden "Organic Chemistry" {3rd éd.); Hein, "Foundations of College Chemistry" {6th éd.); McMurry, "Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry"; and Manahan, "Quantitative Chemical Analysis. " 126 Brownlee Labs, 2045 Martin Ave., Santa Clara, Calif. 95050. Supercritical fluid chromatography, SFC systems one and two will be shown. Micro fluid delivery systems, MicroGradient and MicroFeed Pumps provide low flow rates and high pressure delivery. Also shown are columns for HPLC. 512,514,516 Cahn Instruments, 16207 South Carmenita Rd., Cerritos, Calif. 90701. TGA featuring IBM-based control[ and data analysis, high sensitivity and automated gas' handling. Dynamic surface force analyzer featuring high-resolution surface wettability and contact angle measurement. Vacuum recording balances for recording weight changes of 0.1 μ g. New remote con­ trol microbalance with 0.1-μς sensitivity, 3.5-g ca­ pacity. 1'oploading analytical balances with 50-, 100-, and 200-g capacities. 532, 534 Captair D. F. S., 1 Elm Square, Rte. 114, North Andover, Mass. 01845. Ductless portable fume hoods. 426, 428 Center for History of Chemistry, 215 South 34th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. Opportunity to create and use archives, exhibits, and oral history to record achievements of chemists, chemical engineers, and chemical process industries. Copies ofCHOC News and descriptions of present and future programs available along with HIST commemorative postal cachets. 443 C-Graph Software, P.O. Box 5641, Austin, Tex. 78763. ChemCad molecular modeling package for IBM-PC, AT, and compatibles. ChemCad's graphic software allows user to design and view molecules with up to 500 atoms. Structures can be rotated, zoomed, or panned and printed on an IBM graphic printer or HP plotter. Included in the package is MM2, a molecular mechanics program, and MNDO, a semiempirical quantum program. ChemCad comes in versions for the color graphics adapter or EGA graphics cards. 447, 449 Chapman & Hall/Methuen, 29 West 35th St., New York, N.Y. 10001. Introducing CODA, microcomput­ er package for statistical analysis of compositional data. Heilbron Online, new properties database; and PC-ISP data analysis software designed for scientific research, laboratory data analysis, teaching, or busl· ness will also be displayed. "Dictionary of Organic Compounds" and "Dictionary of Organometallic Compounds" will be displayed. Also professional, reference, and textbooks in chemistry, biochemistry, and chemical engineering. 112 Chemical Abstracts Service, P.O. Box 3012, Colum­ bus, Ohio 43210. CAS Online is the chemical data­ base produced by Chemical Abstracts Service {CAS) and distributed through STN International. The CAS Registry File offers substance searching of more than 8 million substance records and more than 12 million substance names. Bibliographic searching of CA abstract text for more than 6 million documents is available in the CA file. 620, 622, 624 Chemical Design Ltd., 200 Rte. 17 South, Mahwah, N.J. 07430. Exhibiting Chem-X family of advanced, interactive, flexible computer-modeling software products for studying 3-dimensional structure, shape, and electronic properties of small molecules, peptides, proteins, polymers, catalysts, and inorgan­ ic compounds. Latest developments in supercom­ puters will be shown. 355, 357,454, 456 Chemical Education Resources, P.O. Box 357, Pal­ myra, Pa. 17078. Publishers of "Modular Laboratory

Program in Chemistry" and other materials for learn­ ing chemistry in the laboratory. 114 Chemical Waste Management, Field Services South, 2864 Business Park Dr., Memphis, Tenn. 38118. Display of packaging removal and disposal of waste found in typical labs, such as R&D, quality control, and analytical; video cassette demonstrating waste disposal methods; brochures illustrating waste disposal methods and sites. 541 Chemsyn Science Laboratories, 13605 West 96th Terr., Lenexa, Kan. 66215. Part of Eagle-Picher In­ dustries, dedicated to challenge of synthesizing spe­ ciality organics, both isotopically and unlabeled com­ pounds. New catalog describing various products and services. 450 Chemtex, 1920 Calle Bogota, Rowland Heights, Calif. 91748. International-based company empha­ sizing computer software packages for laboratory instruments automation, data automation, and office automation works. We can design the most powerful and effective software packages for your needs. 601,603 Colorado Chemical Specialties, 4880 Robb St., Wheat Ridge, Colo. 80033. Featuring liquidpolybutadiene resins and derivatives used commercially as epoxy hardeners, thermoplastic plasticizers, adhesives, sealants, specialty coatings, rubber vulcaniza­ tion accelerators, laminating resins, electrical pot­ ting compounds and cross I inking resins for rubber and plastics. 451 COMPress, P.O. Box 102, Wentworth, N.H. 03282. Educational software for use on IBM and Apple com­ puters at high school and college levels. 128 Coors Analytical Laboratory, division of Adolph Coors Co., 17750 West 32nd Ave., Golden, Colo. 80401. Analytical testing services, including NMR, FTIR, GC-MS, XRF, XRD, optical emission, GC, HPLC, particle analysis, FTNIR, ICP. 241, 243 Coulometrics, 4630 Indiana St., Golden, Colo. 80403. Carbon and sulfur analysis instrumentation utilizing coulometric detection for solids, liquids, sludges, and others {i.e., geological, marine, phar­ maceutical, petroleum, chemical, etc.). Features RS232/parallel interfaces for compatibility to com­ puter uses. 408 Crystalytics, 1701 Pleasant Hill Rd., Lincoln, Neb. 68523. High-quality and confidential x-ray crystallographic structural services for small molecules as well as proteins and other biological macromolecules at affordable rates. Services range from crys­ tal mounting, diffraction data collection, and molecu­ lar model building to complete crystal structure de­ termination and refinement. 406 Derwent, 6845 Elm St., McLean, Va. 22101. Provid­ ing comprehensive patents and literature alerting and retrieval services, both printer and on-line— notably Central Patents Index covering patents from 30 countries and all chemically oriented technol­ ogies, Chemical Reaction Documentation Service, Biotechnology Abstracts, and the Ringdoc, Vetdoc, and Pestdoc services covering pharmaceuticals, veterinary, and agrochemical journal literature, re­ spectively. 413 Dialog Information Services, 3460 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, Calif. 94304. Dialog offers low-cost, rapid, on-line access to data on more than 7 million sub­ stances. Bibliographic and full text references in­ clude journals, patents, papers, and chemical dictio­ naries. Free sample searches. 212, 214 Dionex Corp., 1228 Titan Way, Sunnyvale, Calif. 94086. Series 2000 ion chromatographs for deter­ mining inorganic and organic ions, transition metals, and amino acids in virtually any type of sample. With the selection of appropriate detector and column combinations, these modular systems can be cus­ tomized to meet specific analysis needs. 233 Dynamic Solutions Corp., 2355 Portola Rd., Ventu­ ra, Calif. 93003. New Maxima chromatography soft­ ware version 2; Maxima chromatography data pro­ cessing workstation for PC networks; Maxima Plus 700 turnkey workstation; and Maxima chromatogra­ phy interface. 640

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CURRIGAN EXHIBITION HALL EG&G Princeton Applied Research, Electrochemi­ cal Instruments division, CN 5206, Princeton, N.J. 08543. Electrochemical instrumentation for chemi­ cal analysis via voltammetry and electrochemical detection for HPLC. 340 Elsevier Science Publishing, 52 Vanderbilt Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. Wide range of publications in the chemical sciences including: "Optimization of Chromatographic Selectivity" by P. Schoenmakers, "The Unitary Group in Quantum Chemistry" by F. A. Matsen and R. Pauncz, "Fluctuations, Diffusion and Spin Relaxation " by R. Lenk, ''Chemometrics " by D. L. Massart et al., the journal Heterocycles, the first issue of Catalysis Today and "The Egg, " a technical editing and desktop publishing program. 226, 228 Encyclopaedia Britannica USA, 1325 South Colora­ do Blvd., Denver, Colo. 80222. Displaying new "En­ cyclopaedia Britannica," "Great Books of the West­ ern World," "Comptons Encyclopaedia," plus a complete line of educational accessories. 105 Engelhard, 70 Wood Ave. South, CN 770, Iselin, N.J. 08830. Engelhard precious metal catalysts are used to synthesize fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals and purify chemical process effluent streams. The catalysts have high specific activity and high selec­ tivity towards desired products. Expert consultation on stock and custom catalysts produced, supplied, and reclaimed will be available. 221 Enraf-Nonius Service Corp., 390 Central Ave., Bo­ hemia, N.Y. 11716. Complete range of fine equip­ ment for x-ray diffraction. E-N CAD4 diffractometers and SDP systems are the most popular powerful structure determination tools. 220 Environmental Resource Associates, 4955 Yarrow St., Arvada, Colo. 80002. Exhibiting full line of ana­ lytical quality control samples. The QC samples are prepared for use by environmental, wastewater, and drinking water laboratories. ERA also has a full line of ICP accessories. 639 Evans & Sutherland Computer Corp., 580 Arapeen Dr., Salt Lake City, Utah 84108. State-of-the-art, high-performance, 3-D interactive computer graph­

ics terminals combined with user-friendly molecular software, providing integrated solutions to today's research problems. Application areas which are supported include drug design, polymer chemistry, protein engineering, and crystallography. 455, 457, 554, 556 Finnigan MAT, 355 River Oaks Pkwy., San Jose, Calif. 95134. Model 5100 SP GC/MS system is a research-grade mass spectrometer with exchange­ able ion volumes for CI and El operation. Model of ion source and mass analyzer. Incos 50, high-perfor­ mance benchtop quadrupole mass spectrometer. 400 Fluid Metering, 29 Orchard St., Oyster Bay, N.Y. 11771. Valve less metering pumps and dispensers— all-new "QD" Line from FMI offers flow ranges from 0 to 2000 m I/minute, and models QC216 and Pip Micro TT-petter deliver dispense volumes of 2 μι. to 1.28 mL per shot. FMI's valveless, low-dead-volume, poston design provides repeat accuracy of 0.1%, pressure ranges to 100 psig and standard wetted surfaces of ceramic and fluorocarbon. Synchronous, AC, DC, and X-Proof motor drives available. Ideal for lab or industrial applications involving solutions, sus­ pensions, slurries, and gases. 433 Fluka Chemical, 980 South Second St., Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 11779. Complete line of chemicals and supplies for the research community. Expanded 1986-87 catalog with over 1000 pages listing over 11,000 items including organics and inorganics, biochemicals, stains and dyes, equipment and supplies, also complete line of HPLC, spectrophometric, and deuterated solvents. Many new brochures will be displayed. Stop by for a copy of our new Swiss calendar. 321 W. H. Freeman & Co., 41 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10010. Full range of textbooks and manuals in chemistry, including such distinguished texts as P. W. Atkins' "Physical Chemistry," McQuarrie & Rock's "General Chemistry," Daniel Harris' "Quanti­ tative Chemical Analysis," and Peter Vollhardt's "Organic Chemistry" (coming this winter). Examine these fine texts as well as the acclaimed "Scientific American Library," and Linus Pauling's bestseller, ' 'How To Live Longer and Feel Better. " 141,143

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GFS Chemicals, P.O. Box 23214, Columbus, Ohio 43223. Double-distilled acids—originally developed for analysis of the moon rocks, these acids are processed under stringent clean room conditions and sealed in presoaked Teflon bottles to ensure very highest purity available. High-purity reagents—elec­ tronic chemicals, ultrapure metals and salts {to 99.999%). Primary standards, rare-earth chemicals, standard solutions, process chemicals, mercury . salts, silver compounds. 203 Haake Buchler Instruments, 244 Saddle River Rd., Saddle Brook, N.J. 07662. Will display electrophore­ sis equipment, chromatography equipment, as well as rotary evaporators, microcentrifuge, and Haake circulators and baths. 501 Hach, P.O. Box 389, Loveland, Colo. 80539. Hach offers a variety of analytical products, including in­ struments such as spectrophotometers, gas chromatographs, pH meters, ion-selective electrodes, and superior chemical reagents and ultrapure chemi­ cal standards. 528 Hampden Data Services, Abingdon Rd., Clifton Hampden, Abingdon, Oxon, England 0X14, 3EF. PSIDOM software range allows chemists to combine chemical structure diagrams with text to produce reports, scientific papers, safety, marketing materi­ al, and slides. Using simple electronic card indexes or more complex desktop databases they also can conduct searches that combine structural concepts with text and/or data concepts. 439 Hanson Lab Furniture Industries, 814 Mitchell Rd., Newbury Park, Calif. 91320. Laboratory planning, laboratory design, laboratory furniture—metal cabi­ nets, epoxy counter tops, fume hoods, solvent stor­ age cabinets, wall units, sinks, fixtures, and all ac­ cessories. 605 Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1250 Sixth Ave., San Diego, Calif. 92101. College-level chemistry text­ books and accompanying ancillaries. 123 Harper & Row Publishing, 10 East 53rd St., New York, N.Y. 10022. Exhibiting fine selection of text­ books including Laidler: "Chemical Kinetics, " Saier: February 9, 1987 C&EN

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"Enzymes in Metabolic Pathways, " Potts: "Quantitative Analysis: Theory and Practice, ' ' and Lowry/Richardson: "Mechanism and Theory in Organic Chemistry" 3rd ed. See these and other quality texts in chemistry and speak to our representatives. 122 Hawk Scientific Systems, P.O. Box 316, Bloomington, N.J. 07403. Microcomputer software {IBM PC and HP 150) for chemical laboratories including Molecular Presentation Graphics for drawing structures and DATALYST, a personal database for replacing chemical index card filing systems. 343 Health Designs, 183 East Main St., Rochester, N.Y. 14604. Hands-on demonstrations of TOPKAT, personal-computer software for estimation of toxicity end points, including carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproductive effects, rabbit skin and eye irritation, and rat oral LD50. HDl will also demonstrate TOPNOTCH, a powerful substructural search program. 546, 548 D. C. Heath & Co., 125 Spring St., Lexington, Mass. 02173. Textbooks for college-level courses, include Zumdahl, "Chemistry"; Holtzclaw et al., "General Chemistry and College Chemistry with Qualitative Analysis"; and Ege, "Organic Chemistry. " Information about new 1987 publications, including Fieser/ Williamson, "Organic Experiments," 6th éd., and Linstromberg, "Organic Chemistry," 6th éd., will be available. 125 Hewlett-Packard, P.O. Box 10301, Palo Alto, Calif. 94303. Exhibiting systems for gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, UV/Vis spectrophotometry, GC/MS, lab information management and lab automation. 347,349,351,353 Houghton Mifflin, 1 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 02108. Superior quality college chemistry textbooks and computer-assisted instruction. 129 l-CHEM Research, 23787-F Eichler St., Hayward, Calif. 94545. Complete line of sample bottles, jars, and vials supplied with Teflon-lined closures attached and available chemically precleaned to exact EPA protocols, custom cleaned to customer specifications. Extensive experience in providing support to major sampling projects. Can ship to any location, including 24-hour emergency shipments. 639 ICON Services, 19 Ox Bow La., Summit, N.J. 07901. Comprehensive range of stable isotope compounds that can be utilized in most areas of chemistry. Labeled compounds include deuterium, carbon-12, carbon-13, nitrogen-14, -15; oxygen-16, -17, -18; sulfur-34, -36; chlorine -35, -37; bromine-79, -81; noble gas isotopes; and multiply labeled compounds. Technical staff will be available for consultation on products, new compounds, and custom synthesis work. 306 Innovative Technology, 205 Willow St., South Hamilton, Mass. 01982. Will exhibit MB-1500 Glove Box and Gas Purification System. Including H20 and 02 analyzers, microprocessor control, lock chamber, miniantechamber. All digital safety regulation system with no moving parts. Purifier, vacuum pump, and all other components are integrated into one compact module. 506, 508 Institute for Scientific Information, 3501 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. ISI Current Awareness Services feature Current Contents series of weekly curent awareness publications, and The Genuine Article, ISI's document delivery service. Chemical information division's Index Chemicus Online and full line of organic chemistry information services in print and microform, including Current Chemical Reactions. New publication from index products division, Index to Scientific Book Contents, the first multidiscl· plinary index providing chapter-level access to mul· tiauthored scientific books. 307, 309 Instruments for Research & Industry, 108 Franklin Ave., Cheltenham, Pa. 19012. Therm-O-Watch versatile controller; lead donut-weights for lab apparatus, a glove bag {inflatable); disposable dry chamber; water flow units for monitoring the flow of cooling water, lab-guard curved lead-based safety shield; portable, easy-to-use Handy-Cab hood; flask support for round-bottom flasks. 301 International Crystal Labs, 11 Eire St., Garfield, N.J. 07026. IR-UV-Vis crystals, cells, and accessories for dispersive and FTIR spectroscopy. Polished and un94

February 9, 1987 C&EN

polished crystal optics, ATR plates and custom optics. ICL offers a cell reconditioning and crystal repolishing service for all types of cells and crystals. 424

ylchlorosilane and tert-butyldiphenylchlorosilane. Custom synthesis of fine organic compounds requiring pyrophoric chemicals for their synthesis. 247

Johnson Matthey, 4 Malin Rd., Malvern, Pa. 19355. 533

Little, Brown & Co., 34 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 02108. Stop by booth to see what we have available for 1987. Displaying new text by Kenneth Rubinson, ' 'Chemical Analysis. "Also available for examination is Joseph H. Noggle's "Physical Chemistry. " 124

Jones Chromatography USA, P.O. Box 620999, Littleton, Colo. 80162. HPLC columns, column heaters, cartridge columns, wide-pore and chiral columns, preparative columns, Bond-Elut extraction columns, Hamilton syringes and PRP columns, LDC HPLC systems and components, Rheodyne valves, cleanscreen drug-screening cartridges, J& W capillary col· umns, Regis chemicals and reagents, chromatography hardware and fittings. 517 Kevex, 1101 Chess Dr., Foster City, Calif. 94404. Xray energy spectroscopy systems for bulk and micro laboratory samples and multipurpose laboratory instrumentation. 529

Macmillan Publishing, College division, 866 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022. Textbooks in all areas of chemistry, from the introductory to the advanced levels, for all classroom needs. 155, 157 Malvern Instruments, 200 Turnpike Rd., Southborough, Mass. 01772. Particle-size analyzers for dry powders, liquid sprays, particles in suspension, and zeta potential. 543

Kimble division, Owens Illinois, P.O. Box 261, Vineland, N.J. 08360. DELTAWARE—premium line of specialty labware including filtration membranes and glassware. Line of disposable plain and screw-cap centrifuge tubes. Broad offering of containers and accessories for science and industry. High-quality reusable glassware. 628

Mattson Instruments, 1001 Fourier Ct., Madison, Wis. 53717. Polaris/ICON FTIR system for undergraduate teaching, analytical chemistry, and research in vibrational spectroscopy. Polaris/ICON systems can use any "AT"-level MS/DOS~based computer to support ICON software, including spectral library search and quantitation. Polaris spectrometer provides high resolution, large-experimentsized sample compartment, and allows system expansion. 453

Kontes Glass, P.O. Box 729, Vineland, N.J. 08360. Recent new products for chemists and life sciences, HPLC solvent handling systems, microfiltration glassware and membranes, complete line of chromatography columns including economy and disposable types; TLC and accessories; microsample handling and storage vials and accessories; microscale sample preparation apparatus; airless apparatus for the manipulation of air-sensitive compounds; solvent repurification apparatus; and new automatic water still. 632

McGraw-Hill Book, College division, 1221 Ave. of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10020. Sound and complete chemistry curriculum in 1987. List features Carey, "Organic Chemistry"; Solomon, "General Organic & Biological Chemistry"; Kroschwitz-Winokur, ' 'Chemistry: a First Course, ' ' 2nd ed. ; Pine, ' Organic Chemistry, " 5th ed.; Durst-Gokel, "Experimental Organic Chemistry," 2nd ed.; West, "Essentials of Quantitative Analysis ''; and Braun, ''Instrumental Analysis. " 101, 103

Lab-Line Instruments, 15th & Bloomingdale Ave., Melrose Park, III. 60160. Introducing new moisture determination oven and new line of thermal heating mantles {5-year warranty) and versatile multimixer with 10 interchangeable attachments. Also on display will be ovens, stirrers, explosion-proof refrigerators, Teflon-coated LED water bath, incubators, and shakers. 232

Mettler Instrument, P.O. Box 71, Hightstown, N.J. 08520. Laboratory precision and analytical bal· ances; statistical quality control systems; controlling and weighing systems; counting systems; automatic tablet weighers; benchtop, portable, and lab density meters; automatic titrators; thermal analysis systems; reaction calorimeters. 614, 616

Lab Support, 20301 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, Calif. 91364. Technical personnel on permanent, project, contract, or temporary basis. All levels of experience available—technicians, instrument operators, lab supervisors, technical management, specialists, and consultants. Lab support CareerNet is a clearinghouse for employment opportunities. To tie into CareerNet, simply send résumés to Lab Support. 350,352 LabX System, 1 Elm Square, Rte. 114, North Andover, Mass. 01845. Modular laboratory technical furniture. 427,429 Lachat Instruments, 10500 North Port Washington Rd., Mequon, Wis. 53092. QuikChem automated ion analyzer determines up to four analytes simultaneously from ppb to percents in waters, soils, plants, feeds, fertilizers, and foodstuffs. Analyzer features random-access sampling, fast startup and shutdown, high sample throughput, short analysis times, and rapid method switching. The data system automates calibration, data reduction, quality monitoring, and report generation. 407 Lee Scientific, 4426 South Century Dr., Salt Lake City, Utah 84123. Supercritical fluid chromatograph Model 602, a complete system for analysis of high molecular weight, polar and thermally labile compounds; introducing the Lee Scientific gas chromatograph and multielement detector. 304

Molecular Design, 2132 Farallon Dr., San Leandro, Calif. 94577. Will demonstrate chemist's productivity tools; REACCS, for reaction information management; MACCS-II, for chemical information management; and CHEMLAB-II for molecular modeling {mainframe/minicomputer software). Chemist's Personal Software Series programs for project-size database management, report writing, and communl· cations {PC family software) will also be demonstrated. 313, 315, 317, 412, 414, 416 Molecular Structure, 3304 Longmire Dr., College Station, Tex. 77840. North American representative for Rigaku R-Axis area detectors and single-crystal AFC diffractometers, offering TEXRAY VAX computer systems for single crystal x-ray diffraction with the new TEXSAN crystallographic software services for single crystals and proteins, including crystal growth, data collection, and structure solution. 246, 248 National Bureau of Standards, Office of Standard Reference Data, Physics Bldg., Gaithersburg, Md. 28099. NBS standard reference data program devel· ops and disseminates databases of critically evaluated physical, chemical, and materials properties of substances. These databases are available through NBS and private publications, on magnetic tape, and from on-line retrieval systems. 328 National Bureau of Standards, Office of Standard Reference Materials, Chemistry Bldg., Gaithersburg, Md. 20899. Standard reference materials are wellcharacterized materials certified for chemical composition or for a particular physical property, to be used to calibrate or evaluate measuring instruments, methods, or systems. 332, 334

Lewis Publishers, 121 South Main St., Chelsea, Mich. 48118. Science and environmental books cover water and wastewater, toxic and hazardous waste, National Conference on Chemical Technician Affiligroundwater, and other vital topics in the environates (NCCTA), 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, mental field. 116 D.C. 20036. Display of NCCTA and Technician Affiliate Group activities, brochures, and information on Lithium Corp. of America, 449 North Cox Rd., Gastowhy and how to form a Technician Affiliate Group in nia, N.C. 28054. Manufacturers of lithium and mag- your area. 547 nesium organometallics, including lithium diisopropylamide, various alkyllithiums, dibutylmagnesium, Nicolet Analytical Instruments, 5225 Verona Rd., magnesium alkoxides in hydrocarbon solution, and Madison, Wis. 53711..' Will display FT infrared specsilane blocking group precursors, XerX-butyldimeth- trometer systems, analytical x-ray instruments, and

the FTMS-2000 mass spectrometer. Instrument operations will focus on new Nicolet technology and application techniques for the research lab, as well as a broad range of industrial applications. 322, 324, 326

Pergamon products deal with research of permanent interest, analytical and/or experimental. We welcome the opportunity to meet and discuss with attendees our current titles, as well as needs for future publication. 201

Ohaus Scale, 29 Hanover Rd., Florham Park, NJ. 07932. Electronic and mechanical balances/scales, calibration masses. 216

Perkin-Elmer, 761 Main Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 06859. Presenting ICP, ICP-MS, flame, graphite furnace, and Zeeman graphite furnace A A; FTIR and emission IR; diode array UV and LC detectors, highresolution UV/Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometers; capillary, headspace, and packed-column GC, GC-MS; HPLC and biotechnology analytical systems; thermal and elemental analyzers. Also LIMS, chromatography, and lab computers and laboratory robotics systems for all techniques. 420, 421, 422, 423

Olympus, 800 Airport Blvd., Burlingame, Calif. 94010. Leading manufacturer of microscopes in fully automated photomicroscopy, Koehler illumination, polarizing scopes, Nomarski differential contrasting; bright field/dark field observation, phase contrasting, and fluorescence work. Olympus offers state-of-theart microscopes designed for fatigue-free individual or group observations. 626 Oneida Research Services, 1 Halsey Rd., Whitesboro, N.Y. 13492. Services in chemical structure analysis and quantitative elemental microanalysis. Techniques employed involve mass spectrometry {GC/MS/MS, Thermospray LC/MS/MS); x-ray diffraction {single crystal, powde^, x-ray fluoresence; and C, H, N, O, S combustion analysis. 338 ORBIT Search Service, 2525 Colorado Ave., Santa Monica, Calif. 90406. Specialized on-line service for patents, chemistry, engineering, and energy information—presents its latest system and database enhancements. Highlights include new files, merged files, further standardization in chemical and patents databases, system enhancements, and demonstrations of CROSSFILE search techniques for search savings and effectiveness. 215,217 Orion Research, 529 Main St., Boston, Mass. 02129. New line of combination pH electrodes and reference electrodes with significant design improvement for better electrode performance and longer life. ORION 960 Autochemistry System that expands and enhances measurement by electrode. A wide range of portable and bench-top pH and ion-selective meters, ion-selective electrodes, pH electrodes, reference electrodes, and solutions for fast, accurate, and cost-effective chemical measurement. 602 Oxford University Press, 200 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10016. Fifth edition of Wells: "Structural Inorganic Chemistry, " Sposito: "The Surface Chemistry of Soils; ' ' Gray and Gubbins: "Theory of Molecular Fluids, " the second edition of Atkins: "Molecular Quantum Mechanics, " Wilson: "Electron Correlation in Molecules, " Wayne: "Chemistry of Atmospheres, " Gasser: "Introduction to Chemisorption by Metals," and other books of interest to chemists. 151 Pacific Scientific, Instrument division, 2431 Linden La., Silver Spring, Md. 20910. Will display full range of scanning NIRS composition analyzers, including 6250 Research Spectrophotometer and Compscan 7000S Spectrophotometer. Color Machine array spectrophotometer will also be featured. 604 Parr Instrument, 211—53rd St., Moline, III. 61265. New reactor designs and new 4840 Series temperature controllers. Microwave digestion bomb for speeding sample preparation and sulfur analyzer compatible with existing calorimetry products suitable for solid and liquid samples. 303,305 Peregrine Falcon, 2330 Marinship Way, Sausalito, Calif. 94965. The EGG is a formula editor, word processor, symbol manipulator, and formatter that runs on the IBM-PC/XT/AT, and cloves. Accompanying database ChemLibrary contains 500 preformed organic chemical structures and 100 building blocks for making or altering structures. Easiest system available for producing a fine-appearing chemical manuscript. 242 PergaBase, 1340 Old Chain Bridge Rd., McLean, Va. 22101. ChemQuest is an on-line database of 54 chemical suppliers from around the world. Search options include structure and substructure, as well as the CAS Registry Number, molecular formula, and compound description. After you have found the chemicals you need, use Chemorder to order on-line. 446, 448 Pergamon Press, Fairview Park, Maxwell House, Elmsford, N.Y. 10523. Books and international journals covering the entire spectrum of chemistry and related areas. The products provide a central source of information for exchange of basic concepts and ideas in this subject area between research workers and applied chemists located throughout the world.

Petrarch Systems, 2731 Bartram Rd., Bristol, Pa. 19007. Manufacturers of specialty si lanes and silicones for use as synthons, blocking agents, reactive monomers, surface treatments, coupling agents, coatings, analytical standards, functional fluids, and prepolymers. 442 Pittsburgh Conference & Exposition on Analytical Chemistry & Applied Spectroscopy. 12 Federal Dr., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15235. Advertising the 1988 Pittsburgh Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, La., Feb. 22-27, 1988. This 39th annual meeting will provide the finest state-of-the-art update in the world in the methodology and instrumentation of analytical chemistry and applied spectroscopy in 1988. 323, 325 Plenum Publishing, 233 Spring St., New York, N.Y. 10013. Featured titles include Wilson, "Chemistry by Computer"; Huxtable, "Biochemistry of Sulfur"; Twigg, "Mechanisms of Inorganic and Organometal· lic Reactions"; Matijevic, "Surface and Colloid Science"; Ladik, "Quantum Theory of Polymers as Solids"; Berliner and Reuben, "Biological Magnetic Resonance"; Russ, "Practical Stereology"; Carey & Sundberg, "Advanced Organic Chemistry, " 2nd éd., parts A and Β. 133,135 Polygen, 100—Fifth Ave., Waltham, Mass. 02154. Leading supplier of molecular modeling, mechanics, dynamics, and technical information management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical industries operating in U.S., Europe, and Japan. 436, 438 Polymer Laboratories, 160 Old Farm Rd., Amherst, Mass. 01002. Dynamic mechanical and dielectric thermal analyzers measure relaxation data over sev­ en-decade frequency range, and miniature materials tester. Polymeric high-performance GPC and HPLC columns and a new range of affinity and ion-ex­ change columns for synthetic and biomacromolecules plus a wide range of polymer standard refer­ ence materials. 520 Porton Products, 5445 Balboa Blvd., Encino, Calif. 91316. Introducing new gas-phase protein/peptide sequencer. Porton's proprietary integrated reagent delivery system eliminates most external tubing and vacuum assist and allows high-sensitivity sequenc­ ing using lower reagent volumes. Advanced software allows easy and versatile user control over all se­ quencing parameters. Come by booth for a demon­ stration. 503, 505, 507 Prentice-Hall, Rte. 9W, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. 07632. Current college textbooks and professional reference materials in chemistry field. 127 Quantachrome, 6 Aerial Way, Syosset, N.Y. 11791. Particle size analyzers, gas pycnometers, surface area analyzers, automated sorption analyzers, mer­ cury porosimeters. 502,504 Questel, 5201 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, Va. 22041. DARC system for both on-line and in-house (DARC-RMS), a highly sophisticated reaction storage and retrieval software, allows identification of reac­ tions by reactant, product solvent, catalyst, reagent, reaction conditions, or yield. DARC-RMS will be used to demonstrate Fieser and Fieser's "Reagents for Organic Synthesis," published by John Wiley & Sons. On-line searching of files such as CAS, WPI/L, Merck, Medline, and others. 409 Radian, 8501 Mo-Pac Blvd., Austin, Tex. 78766. Will be exhibiting custom chemical services including organic chemical synthesis, drugs of abuse, analyti­ cal standards, and analytical services for the phar­ maceutical industry. 612

Radiometer America, 811 Sharon Dr., Westlake, Ohio 44145. Showing lines ofpH, ion, and conductiv­ ity meters, plus TitraLab, the total titration laboratory. 417 Rainin Instrument, Mack Rd., Woburn, Mass. 01801. HPLC instruments and supplies and microliter liquid measurement systems, including isocratic and com­ puterized gradient HPLC, fully automated preparative HPLC, microsorb analytical HPLC columns, dynamax preparative HPLC columns, Rainin rabbit HPLC pumps, injectors, detectors, recorders integrators, syringes, high- and low-pressure HPLC valves and fittings, and pi pets. 337 Random House, 201 East 50th St., New York, N.Y. 10022. College-level textbooks, instructor materials, ancillaries, and software. 136 Reliance Glass works, 17 Gateway Rd., Bensenville, III. 60106. Micro Chem-Sets, a new and unique ml· croscale glassware kit for easier and more costeffective experimentation by organic chemistry stu­ dents. Also glassware and equipment for chromatog­ raphy, distillation, environmental, sample handling, and general laboratory applications. 346, 348 Research Publications, 12 Lunar Dr., Woodbridge, Conn. 06525. Research Publications and Rapid Pat­ ent Service of Research Publications provide onestop shopping for all patent needs on microfilm or paper, including U.S. and international patent docu­ mentation, patent and trademark searches, transla­ tions, custom patent profile subscriptions, and file histories; the world's news publications on micro­ film; and technical directories. 342 Sadtler Research Laboratories, 3316 Spring Garden St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. Digital libraries and search databases for IBM-PC and FTIR data systems. Also printed format and microform. Libraries of infra­ red, BC NMR, ultraviolet, Raman, fluorescence, cap­ illary GC retention index library and search database, molecular structure, molecular formula database, chemical physical properties, chemical name search. More than 100,000 compounds. 405 Safe-Lab, P.O. Box 1290, Santee, Calif. 92071. Will exhibit line of scientific glassware and laboratory apparatus, all featuring Saf-T-Line threaded ground joints and safety extracting nuts. Included products are Roto-Ware Vapor Ducts, Safe-Frit Funnels with removable stem, 14/20 Chemistry Kits, glass and Teflon adapters, including the Adapt-A-Port Kit, and condensers with detachable hose connections. 401,403 Saunders College Publishing, 383 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. Chemistry publisher presents premier chemistry list in 1986-87 for all undergradu­ ate college needs. 113, 115, 117 Scholium International, 265 Great Neck Rd., Great Neck, N.Y. 11021. Representing exclusively the DECHEMA Chemistry Data Series, which covers the physical and thermodynamic property data of chemi­ cal compounds and mixtures, the main purpose be­ ing to provide chemists and engineers with data for process design and development. Complete series on display. 138 Scientific Polymer Products, 6265 Dean Pkwy., On­ tario, N.Y. 14519. In addition to product displays, free catalogs containing an expanded listing of research monomers, polymers, plasticizers, and GPC stan­ dards will be available. 106 SCM Specialty Chemicals, P.O. Box 1466, Gaines­ ville, Fla. 32602. Catalogs for research chemicals, organofluorine, organosilicon compounds, derivatizing agents, mass spectroscopy standards, crown ethers terpenes. 320 Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, 7102 Riverwood Dr., Columbia, Md. 21046. HPLC systems and com­ ponents including new electrochemical, refractive index, fluorescence detectors, and stand-alone autosampler; GC systems, data processors for chroma­ tography with IBM-PC data link; TLC/gel densitome­ ters; spectrophotometers including UV-Vis, A A, fluo­ rescence; analytical balances. 249, 251, 253 SoftShell, 88 Fox Chapel Rd., Henrietta, N.Y. 14467. Marketing software for organic chemists to integrate February 9, 1987 C&EN

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structures with word-processing documents on the Macintosh computer, personal databases incorpo­ rating organic structural diagrams, and source code for state-of-the-art chemical structure handling on mini- and mainframe computers, including a license for use within custom or commercial applications. 607

Vacuum/Atmospheres, 4652 West Rosecrans Ave., Hawthorne, Calif. 90250. Glove box and gas purification system MO-40- 1H. Including integrated vacuum pump, filter column, auto regeneration, and moisture and oxygen analyzers. System maintains 1-ppm level of both moisture and oxygen in inert gas atmosphere. 600

Spectra-Tech, 652 Glenbrook Rd., Stamford, Conn. 06906. Full line of "Leading Edge" IR/FTIR sampling accessories, including extensive line of FTIR micro­ scopes: the IR-PLAN-Visible/lnfrared Microscopes for high-performance infrared microspectrometry and the SPECTRA-SCOPE-in-compartment infrared microscope accessory. Also, the CIRCLEliquid sampling accessory, the COLLECTOR-diffuse reflectance accessory, and the SPECTRA-BENCHmicrosampling accessory. 341

Varian Instrument Group, 220 Humbolt Ct., Sunnyvale, Calif. 94089. Exhibiting state-of-the-art in liquid and gas chromatography, atomic absorption, and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. 536, 538, 540, 542

Springer-Verlag New York, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10010. Publisher dedicated to scientific community, distributor of'Beilstein Handbook of Or­ ganic Chemistry' ' and ' ' Gmelin Handbook of Inorgan­ ic Chemistry." Free copies of quality journals. 147, 149

VisAid Devices, 857 Mulvey Ave., Winnipeg, Man., Canada R3M 1G6. "Handbook of Test Questions" {4 vols: General, Organic, Biochem, Organic/Biochem); lecturers' reference books for teaching; molecular models for DNA and proteins; metabolic pathway chart ''Human Biochemistry and Disease. " 118

Sprouse Scientific Systems, 19 East Central Ave., Paoli, Pa. 19301. Software for analytical chemistry; spectroscopy software for IBM-PC/XT/A Τ and com­ patibles; IR library search software for personal computers, minicomputers, and mainframes; com­ munications software for digital data transfer be­ tween analytical instruments and stand-alone com­ puters; condensed-phase and vapor-phase FTIR ref­ erence libraries; search libraries for most FTIR ins truments; eus torn software development. 641

VNU Science Press BV, P.O. Box 2073, GB Utrecht, the Netherlands. International publisher offers new journals, including the Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology and New Polymeric Materials. We also copublish Hungarian Journal of Industrial Chemistry and Acta Chimica Sinica. 152

Sun Brokers, P.O. Box 2230, Wilmington, N.C. 28402. Chromatography vials, volumetric glassware in hard-to-find sizes, quartzware, Teflonware, safety coated glassware. 312,314 TCI Software Research, 1190-B Foster Rd., Las Cruces, N.M. 88001. T3 is a revolutionary scientific word-processing system for scientists, chemists, mathematicians, physicists, engineers, linguists, lawyers, doctors, and other professionals who need special symbols or characters. With T3, subscripts, superscripts, and complex expressions are typed in a simple and straightforward way. The user can de­ fine and use his or her own characters. 425 Technical Database Services, 10 Columbus Circle, New York, N.Y. 10019. Numerical on-line services: Envirofate, reliable numeric and bibliographic infor­ mation on how a chemical will behave once it is released into the environment. Chemest, rapid estl· mation of 11 physical and environmental properties of organic compounds. Log Ρ Database, partition coefficients, and related substituent parameters. TRC Vapor Pressure Datafile, experimental and cal­ culated data on vapor pressure and normal boiling points. Physical Property Data Service, an integrated package for pure components and mixtures. 229 Tripos Associates, 6548 Clayton Rd., St. Louis, Mo. 63117. From Alchemy for the IBM-PC, to Sybyl for small molecule and Mendyl for macromolecules, Tri­ pos products are flexible, integrated tools the user can customize. Sybyl/Mendyl feature user-modifi­ able dictionaries {also in Alchemy) and powerful mo­ lecular feature selection (either menu- or commanddriven), on the PS300/VAX VMS or Silicon Graphics IRIS Workstation/UNIX system. 257, 354, 356 University Science Books, 20 Edgehill Rd., Mill Val­ ley, Calif. 94941. Just published: Collman, Hegedus, Norton & Finke, "P. & A. of Organotransition Metal Chemistry, " 2nd éd.; Kegley-Pinhas, "Organometallic Problems"; Angelici, "Synthesis and Technique in Inorganic Chemistry"; and Siegman, "Lasers." Examination copies on display at booth. 148 U.S. Analytical instruments, 1511 Industrial Rd., San Carlos, Calif. 94070. Available for rent, GC, LC, UV/ Vis, fluorescence, AA, IR, and FTIR instrumentation from manufacturers such as Perkin-Elmer, HewlettPackard, Varian, and Waters. We offer immediate delivery from our inventory with flexible rental terms from one month to five years. 435 U.S. Postal Substation

441

UVP, 5100 Walnut Grove Ave., San Gabriel, Calif. 91778. Manufacturer of ultraviolet light sources and equipment since 1932. Product applications include special development work for photochemical and chemistry reactors. 452 96

February 9, 1987 C&EN

VCH Publishers, 220 East 23rd St., New York, N.Y. 10010. Publisher of high-quality scientific books, reference books, and journals. Among them are Ull· mann's "Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry" and Angewandte Chemie. 107, 109

tering from microliter liquid samples to produce absolute molecular weights and sizes—without resorting to standards. On-screen Zimm plots also will be shown in real time. 522 ΧΡΟ Corp., 640 East Main St., Lancaster, Tex. 75146. Companies engaged in broad spectrum of hazardous materials management will be represent­ ed. Up-to-date information will be available on gov­ ernment regulations and their effects on the chemi­ cal industry. 646, 647, 648, 649, 650, 651 Yamato USA, 1955 Shermer Ave., Northbrook, III. 60062. Laboratory spray dryers, electronic top-load­ ing balances, thermoelement-controlled water circu­ lators, infrared image furnace, muffle furnace, water stills, and purification systems, microprocessor con­ trolled rotary evaporators {1 and 10 L). 500 Zymark Corp., Zymark Center, Hopkinton, Mass. 01748. Exhibiting new PyTechnology laboratory ro­ botics system. PyTechnology provides a rapid means to configure the Zymate laboratory robotics system for automated sample preparation applications. It provides the hardware and software to automate lab operations such as weighing, pipeting, dilution, filtra­ tion, or centrifugation. It also relieves technical staff from repetitive work and produces more precise reliable data by consistently utilizing optimum lab techniques. 250,252

VWR Scientific, 3700 Havana, Denver, Colo. 80239. Scientific lab supplies including EM, J. T. Baker Chemicals, Sheldon/VWR brand constant-temperature products, Kewaunee lab furniture, chromatography supplies, high-purity reagents, Edwards' vacuum pumps. 336, 339 Waters Chromatography division, Millipore Corp., 34 Maple St., Milford, Mass. 01757. Delta Prep 3000 preparative chromatography system and 990 photodiode array detector. Waters Delta Prep 3000 system allows methods development for HPLC with small quantities of sample, performs large-scale purification and isolation, and checks quality of purified fractions. Waters 990 photodiode array detector continuously monitors and acquires all UV/Vis wavelengths in a single HPLC analysis, providing complete spectral information about sample and allowing users to quickly retrieve and interpret data for qualitative and quantitative assessment. Personal computer-based detector features menu-driven format, allowing users to set up detection parameters and manipulate postrun data with preprogramed software routines. 642 West Publishing, 50 West Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul, Minn. 55164. Exhibiting "Chemistry for Today: General, Organic, and Biological" by Seager and Slabaugh. This 1987, two-semester introductory text for allied health students emphasizes the positive and practical aspects of chemistry, with real-life applications. Also exhibiting "Introduction to Chemistry, " a 1986 one-semester text for nonmajors by Martha Gilleland. 153 Whatman, 9 Bridewell PL, Clifton, N.J. 07014. Full line of products available for use in chromatographic separation and routine laboratory filtration. In addition, new products to include Partisphere line extensions, encapsulated filters, and additions to the growing line of Whatman-branded instrumentation products will be exhibited. 606, 608 John Wiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158. Wide range of texts and references in all branches of chemistry, as well as samples of chemistry-related journals. On-line database products, including the "Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology," 3rd éd., and the " Encyclopedia of Polymer Science and Engineering," 2nd éd., will be displayed. 200, 202, 204, 206, 208 Wilmad Glass, Rte. 40 & Oak Rd., Buena, N.J. 08310. Supplies and accessories for NMR: EPR, IR, and UV spectroscopy including sampling accessories and cells, recording charts, chemicals. Gas chromatographic accessories such as columns, syringes, chemical standards, etc. Also precision glass and quartz parts. 316 Wyatt Technology, 820 East Haley St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 93130. DAWN laser light scattering photometers for GPC and other macromolecular characterizations will be displayed. Proprietary software, to be demonstrated, collects the multiangle light scat-

The awards reception, dinner, and gen­ eral meeting will be held the evening of Monday, April 6, in the Imperial Ball­ room of the Fairmont Hotel—reception 6 PM, dinner 7:30 PM, general meeting 8:30 PM. There will be additional seat­ ing for those wishing to attend only the general meeting. At the general meet­ ing, John D. Roberts, 1987 Priestley Medalist, will deliver his award address, "Priestley and me." (See Social Events for ticket information.) Award Addresses ACS Award for Computers in Chemis­ try sponsored by Digital Equipment Corp. received by W. Todd Wipke. Ad­ dress to be presented before Division of Computers in Chemistry, Tuesday, April 7, 11:15 AM (see page 49). ACS Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technol­ ogy sponsored by Air Products & Chemicals Inc. received by Joseph C. Arcos. Address to be presented before Division of Environmental Chemistry, Tuesday, April 7, 8:45 AM (see page 50). ACS Award for Creative Invention sponsored by Corporation Associates received by Robert B. Morin. Address to be presented before Division of Medici­ nal Chemistry, Wednesday, April 8, 2 PM (see page 64). ACS Award for Creative Work in Syn­ thetic Organic Chemistry sponsored

by Aldrich Chemical Co. received by Harry Wasserman. Address to be pre­ sented before Division of Organic Chemistry, Tuesday, April 7, 11 AM (see page 67).

Foundation received by K. Peter C. Vollhardt. Address to be presented be­ fore Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, April 6, 11:05 AM (see page 58).

Garvan Medal sponsored by Olin Corp. received by Janet G. Osteryoung. Address to be presented before Division of Analytical Chemistry, Wednesday, April 8,11:55 AM (see page 39).

ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Mallinckrodt Inc. received by Duward F. Shriver. Ad­ dress to be presented before Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, April 6, 10:05 AM (see page 57).

ACS Award in Petroleum Chemistry sponsored by Amoco Foundation re­ ceived by W. Keith Hall. Address to be presented before Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Wednesday, April 8,11 AM (see page 70).

James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public received by Al Rossiter Jr. at lun­ cheon on Tuesday, April 7 (see Social Events for ticket information).

ACS Award for Nuclear Chemistry sponsored by Amersham Corp. re­ ceived by Ellis P. Steinberg. Address to be presented before Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, Monday, April 6, 9:05 AM (see page 64). ACS Award for Research at Under­ graduate Institutions sponsored by Re­ search Corp. received by Harold W. Heine. Address to be presented before Division of Organic Chemistry, Wednesday, April 8,4 PM (see page 68).

ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry sponsored by Mobil Chemical Co. re­ ceived by V. T. Stannett. Address to be presented before Division of Polymer Chemistry, Monday, April 6, 4 PM (see page 74). ACS Award in Pure Chemistry spon­ sored by Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity received by George McLendon. Address to be presented before Division of Inor­ ganic Chemistry, Tuesday, April 7, 9 AM (see page 58).

ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry sponsored by Fisher Scientific Co. re­ ceived by Gary M. Hieftje. Address to be presented before Division of Analytical Chemistry, Monday, April 6, 9:10 AM (see page 38).

ACS Award in Separations Science and Technology sponsored by Rohm & Haas Co. received by Friedrich G. Helfferich. Address to be presented before Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Tuesday, April 7,8:50 AM (see page 56).

ACS Award in Applied Polymer Sci­ ence sponsored by Phillips Petroleum Co. received by O. A. Battista. Address to be presented before Division of Poly­ meric Materials: Science & Engineering, Monday, April 6, 4 PM (see page 77).

ACS Award in the Chemistry of Con­ temporary Technological Problems sponsored by Mobay Chemical Corp. received by William Bartok. Address to be presented before Division of Envi­ ronmental Chemistry, Tuesday, April 7, 9 AM (seepage 51).

ACS Award in Chemical Education sponsored by Union Carbide Corp. re­ ceived by Linus Pauling. Address to be presented before Division of Chemical Education, Tuesday, April 7,11 AM (see page 44). ACS Award in Chromatography spon­ sored by SUPELCO Inc. received by Charles H. Lochmuller. Address to be presented before Division of Analytical Chemistry/ Wednesday, April 8, 4:15 PM (see page 39). ACS Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry sponsored by Kendall Co. received by John T. Yates. Address to be presented before Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Tuesday, April 7, 4 PM (see page 47). ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Monsanto Co. received by Stephen J. Lippard. Address to be presented before Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, April 6, 9:05 AM (see page 57). ACS Award in Organometallic Chem­ istry sponsored by Dow Chemical Co.

Earle B. Barnes Award for Leadership in Chemical Research Management sponsored by Dow Chemical Co. re­ ceived by Malcolm E. Pruitt. Address to be presented before Division of Indus­ trial & Engineering Chemistry, Tues­ day, April 7,10:30 AM (see page 56). James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching sponsored by Ethyl Corp. received by Mary C. Johnson. Address to be presented before Division of Chemical Education, Tues­ day, April 7,10:05 AM (see page 44).

The Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Essential Oils and Relat­ ed Products sponsored by Fritzsche Dodge & Olcott Inc. received by Wolf­ gang Oppolzer. Address to be presented before Division of Organic Chemistry, Wednesday, April 8, 11 AM (see page 68). Joel Henry Hildebrand Award in the Theoretical and Experimental Chemis­ try of Liquids sponsored by Shell Companies Foundation Inc. received by Stuart A. Rice. Address to be present­ ed before Division of Physical Chemis­ try, Monday, April 6, 8:30 AM (see page 71). Claude S. Hudson Award in Carbohy­ drate Chemistry sponsored by Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories and Kelco, divisions of Merck & Co. received by Stephen J. Angyal. Address to be presented before Division of Car­ bohydrate Chemistry, Tuesday, April 7, 2 PM (see page 41). E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry sponsored by Exxon Research & Engineering Co. received by Wolfgang M. H. Sachtler. Address to be presented before Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Monday, April 6,11 AM (see page 56). Nobel Laureate Signature Award for Graduate Education in Chemistry sponsored by J. T. Baker Chemical Co. received by Mark D. Hollingsworth and J. Michael McBride. Address to be pre­ sented before Division of Organic Chemistry, Wednesday, April 8, 4 PM (see page 68).

The Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry sponsored by E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. received by Harry G. Drickamer. Address to be presented be­ fore Division of Physical Chemistry, Monday, April 6, 9 AM (see page 71).

The James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry sponsored by the Northeastern Section, ACS re­ ceived by Paul von R. Schleyer. Address to be presented before Division of Or­ ganic Chemistry, Monday, April 6,4 PM (see page 67).

The Frank H. Field and Joe L. Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry sponsored by Extrel Corp. received by J. H. Beynon. Address to be presented before Division of Analytical Chemistry, Monday, April 6, 4:45 PM (see page 38).

Henry H. Storch Award in Fuel Chem­ istry sponsored by Exxon Research & Engineering Co. received by Leon M. Stock. Address to be presented before Division of Fuel Chemistry, Tuesday, April 7,11 AM (see page 53). February 9, 1987 C&EN

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On Your Own. As one of the nation's premier year-round tourist destinations, Colorado and Denver abound with in­ teresting things for the visitor to do and see. Extensive information regarding sightseeing, mountain ski areas, enter­ tainment, shopping, and dining can be found at the Hospitality Center, located in the Matchless Room of the Denver Marriott. Maps and directions for do-ityourself walking tours to points of in­ terest near downtown Denver also will be available. Suggestions for enjoyable trips to the mountains will be provided for those with cars. Climate/What To Wear. Whether plan­ ning to do sightseeing on your own or as a member of one of the group tours list­ ed below, you need to be aware of some facts about Colorado weather, especially if you are going to the mountains. In early April the average daily maximum temperature in Denver is 58 °F, the av­ erage minimum is 32 °F, and there is a 68% chance of sunshine. Temperatures in the mountains, however, are normal­ ly 10 to 15 degrees colder than in Den­ ver, and there is a significantly greater chance of precipitation. If you are going to the mountains you will need warm clothing. Several layers of lighter garments are preferable to one heavy one; this allows you to shed layers as the day warms up. Warm footwear and gloves are highly desirable. Because of the high altitude, bright sunshine, and snow, sunglasses are also recom­ mended. In the mountains, casual cloth­ ing is acceptable anywhere at any time. In the mountains, however, the weather can be highly variable, with bright sunshine giving way in the space of several hours to a snow shower, fol­ lowed by equally rapid clearing. Dress­ ing appropriately for the mountains and the weather will enhance the pleasure of your trip. Group Tours. The national meeting committee of the Colorado Section has scheduled the following events for your enjoyment. Tours are limited to meeting registrants and their immediate fam­ ilies. To order tickets, please use the reg­ istration form on page 105. Tickets or­ dered as part of preregistration will be mailed with badges. Tours will be can­ celed if there is insufficient preregistra­ tion to meet required minimums, so please make your tour reservation(s) be­ fore coming to Denver. Advance regis­ tration is required for most tours scheduled for Sunday, Monday, or 98

February 9, 1987 C&EN

Tuesday. Based on availability, tour tickets may be purchased on-site for Wednesday and Thursday tours at the Hospitality Center, Denver Marriott, Matchless Room. All tours depart from the Denver Mar­ riott, California Street entrance, and do not include lunch or other meals in the ticket prices except where indicated. Handicapped persons who need assis­ tance with tours should so indicate on the registration form. Refunds of tour tickets may be ob­ tained in advance if tickets are returned to ACS by March 27. On-site, refunds may be obtained in the Hospitality Cen­ ter until 48 hours before the scheduled tour. Should a last-minute emergency dictate against your tour participation, the Hospitality Center staff will attempt to resell your ticket for you.

SUNDAY, APRIL 5 GP-1. 1 PM to 3 PM. Walking Tour, Downtown Denver. Become acquaint­ ed with some of the more interesting locations for shopping, dining, and en­ tertainment in downtown Denver. Tour heads down the 16th Street Mall, past the Tabor Center, to historic Larimer Square, with a variety of boutiques, spe­ cialty shops, restaurants, jazz clubs, and art and antique galleries. Then on to the Tivoli, a renovated and remodeled brewery that is now an entertainment, dining, shopping center. Cost: $5.00. GP-2. 3 PM to 5 PM. Walking Tour, Downtown Denver. Same as Tour GP-1, except that time of departure is 3 PM. Cost: $5.00. GP-3. 1 PM to 5 PM. Museum of Natu­ ral History/IMAX Theater. Denver's Museum of Natural History contains wildlife dioramas, outstanding mineral collections, American Indian artifacts, and a comprehensive collection of pre­ historic fossil remains. After the muse­ um, on to IMAX Theater where images explode on a movie screen 41/? stories tall and 61/? stories wide, and a six-channel sound system that creates a "surround" sound effect. Advance registration re­ quired. Cost: $17 (includes admission to both the museum and IMAX Theater).

MONDAY, APRIL 6 GP-4. 9 AM to 5 PM. Day in Vail. See some of Colorado's breathtaking high country, at one of America's premier re­ sorts, where you will have several hours on your own for lunch and shopping. Advance registration required. (Lunch not included.)'Cost: $21. GP-5. 9 AM to 4 PM. Springs Fling. Travel to Colorado Springs to visit the U.S. Air Force Academy, the Garden of the Gods at the foot of Pikes Peak, and

Broadmoor Hotel. Advance registration required. (Lunch not included in the tick­ et price, on your own in old Colorado City.) Cost: $18. GP-6. 9 AM to noon. Huffman Laboratories/Coulometrics. Huffman Labora­ tories is known for its analytical services in organic microanalysis, coal analysis, water and soil analyses, and RCRA test­ ing. Coulometrics, whose specialty is carbon determination, has introduced a wide variety of modular analytical sys­ tems using the CO coulometer, and has recently developed a sulfur coulometer and total sulfur apparatus. Advance regis­ tration required. Cost: $9.00. GP-7.1 PM to 6 PM. Adolph Coors Co. Tour the world's single largest brewery to see how one of Colorado's most fam­ ous exports is made. The tour concludes with a chance to sample some of the product. (Because this is a special VIP tour of Coors and is much more exten­ sive and quite different from the regular short tours conducted for the general public, only 30 persons can be accom­ modated. Long pants and closed-toe shoes required.) Advance registration re­ quired. Cost: $10. TUESDAY, APRIL 7 GP-8. 7 AM to 7 PM. A Day on the Slopes (Keystone). Ski at Keystone, only 75 miles from Denver. Continental breakfast served en route to and wine and cheese from the ski area. (Includes transportation, refreshments, and $21 day lift-ticket.) Equipment rental if needed at ski area for $14. Participants will be asked to sign a waiver of liabil­ ity. Advance registration required. Cost: $41. GP-9. 9 AM to 4 PM. Central City/ Georgetown. Historic mining towns of Central City and Georgetown when gold and silver were king in Colorado. Lunch on your own in Georgetown (cost of lunch not included in ticket price). Advance registration required. Cost: $17. GP-10. 9 AM to noon. Denver City: Old and New. Trip includes views of mod­ ern Denver's landmarks, including the Civic Center, the Mint, the Art Museum, the Center for the Performing Arts, and guided tours of Colorado's Capitol and State Museum, where the story of Indi­ ans, gold miners, cowboys, gunslingers, etc., unfolds. Advance registration re­ quired. (Admission to State Museum in­ cluded.) Cost: $12. GP-11.1 PM to 5:45 PM. National Cen­ ter for Atmospheric Research. NCAR's Mesa Laboratory facility in Boulder houses some of the nation's leading re­ search on problems of the atmosphere, including atmospheric chemistry. Ad­ vance registration required. Cost: $9.00.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8 GP-12. 9 AM to 5 PM. Boulder/Estes Park/Rocky Mountain National Park. The tour takes a scenic route to Estes Park and Rocky Mountain, National Park (RMNP) by way of Boulder and Lyons, including lunch at Black Bear Inn. In Estes Park you will tour the Visi­ tor Center of RMNP and have an oppor­ tunity to experience the park's scenic magnificence. (Temperature in the park will be 10 to 15 degrees colder than it is in Denver, so dress accordingly.) Cost (including lunch): $30. GP-13. 9 AM to noon. Historic Homes of Denver. Ninth Street Historic Park lets you see an entire block of residential Denver dating back to the 1870s. A visit to Molly Brown House, Victorian home of the "Unsinkable" Molly Brown, pro­ vides glimpses of the flamboyant life style of one of Colorado's most colorful personalities. Also visit the GrantHumphrey's Mansion, a turn-of-thecentury Beaux-Arts mansion that com­ mands a magnificent view of the Rock­ ies. Cost (including admission to both the Molly Brown House and GrantHumphrey's Mansion): $15. GP-14.1 PM to 5 PM. Martin Marietta. The tour will include visits to the facili­ ty where Titan launch vehicles are man­ ufactured, and to the company museum, which contains mockups and models of spacecraft. Cost $9.00 (Please bring proof of U.S. citizenship.) GP-15. 5:30 PM to 11:15 PM. Evening at Heritage Square. Recapture the nostal­ gia of Colorado's "Gold Rush" era with an evening in Heritage Square, an artful recreation of a typical 1880s Colorado town, then on to dinner at the Opera House followed by an evening of come­ dy consisting of an old-fashioned melo­ drama and vaudeville. Cost (includes tickets for dinner and the show): $31.

GP-18.1 PM to 5 PM. Solar Energy Re­ search Institute (SERI) and U.S. Geo­ logical Survey Labs. After a 20-minute overview of SERI programs, the tour will move to its field test laboratory. Next, the group will visit the new ana­ lytical chemistry facility of the geo­ chemistry branch of the U.S. Geological Survey, with a variety of interesting in­ strumentation. Cost: $9.00.

An ACS National Employment Clearing House (NECH) will be available to ACS members and student affiliates at the Denver meeting. It will be located in Currigan Exhibition Hall and will be in operation Monday through Thursday, April 6-9, from 8 AM to 5 PM. Candidates' deadline to register will be 5 PM Tuesday, April 7. Thus, candi­ dates are urged to submit completed NECH forms to the national office in advance of the meeting, no later than March 13. To further assist in early reg­ istration, NECH will be open Sunday/ April 5, from 2:30 PM to 7 PM. Records of candidates who register on Sunday and records received in advance from candidates who complete registration requirements on Sunday will be on file for employers to review when NECH opens officially Monday, April 6, at 8 AM. Records received in advance will not be placed on file to be reviewed un­ til the candidate reports in Denver and completes final registration require­

ments. When requesting forms from NECH, please specify the Denver meet­ ing as these differ from the year-round clearinghouse forms. The meeting registration fee may be waived for an unemployed member to use NECH. For an advance waiver, for­ ward the preregistration form from this issue with your request to the ACS Em­ ployment Aids Office. At the meeting, come to the NECH Staff Office in Curri­ gan Exhibition Hall. Employers' representatives are en­ couraged to submit forms to the national office in advance. You may register or check in beginning Sunday, April 5, from 2:30 PM to 7 PM. Early registration will allow you to post openings and to have your registration on file so you may begin reviewing candidates' rec­ ords and scheduling interviews prompt­ ly Monday morning (April 6). Representatives who wish to post a notice may obtain standard forms in ad­ vance. A separate form should be sub­ mitted for each posting and must be in triplicate. To assure early posting, forms should be returned to the national office no later than March 13. The forms may be delivered to NECH during the meet­ ing. Openings will be posted just as soon as possible, but because of the volume received on-site, there will be certain delays. All completed forms must com­ ply with all federal regulations on job discrimination in employment or they will not be accepted. Recent users will receive a mailing containing the NECH forms. If you have not made use of the service recently, request forms from the ACS Employment Aids Office. The "positions available" area will open as early as possible Monday, April 6, so candidates may review the open­ ings posted. Any member registered for the meeting may review the openings.

THURSDAY, APRIL 9 GP-16. 7 AM to 6 PM. A Day on the Slopes (Loveland Basin). Skiing at Loveland Basin. Continental breakfast served en route to and wine and cheese from the ski area. (Includes transporta­ tion, refreshments, and $12 day lift tick­ et.) Full ski equipment rental, if needed, at ski area, for $12. Participants will be asked to sign a waiver of liability. Cost: $32. GP-17. 10 AM to 3 PM. Foothills Fan­ dango. Visits to spectacular Red Rocks Park, Buffalo Bill's grave and museum on the summit of Lookout Mountain, the Geology Museum of Colorado School of Mines, and Adolph Coors Brewery. Lunch (cost not included in ticket price) at El Rancho, overlooking the Continental Divide. Cost: $12.

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February 9, 1987 C&EN

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However, if you are not registered with NECH, it is your responsibility to contact the employer representative by mail. Employer representatives are encouraged to submit a descriptive brochure or annual report on their company. This will be retained in a file for interested candidates to review. There are two types of user fees for employer representatives in addition to the meeting registration fee: a $25 minimum fee to any representative registered; and, for full utilization of the service, $75 industrial, government, other; $30 academia; $150 agencies/management consulting firms. The full utilization fee includes unlimited posting of openings, reviewing records of candidates, scheduling interviews, use of the interview area, etc. For employers who are unable to attend the Denver NECH, but have an opening(s) to post, the fee is $25 per listing (maximum charge $100). If you do not plan to attend, be certain this is noted on your returned forms so that interested candidates may write you directly. Single copies of candidates' summary form (ACS standard form) will be provided at 50 cents per copy. Orders for complete sets ($100 per set) will be taken during the meeting from registered employer representatives. Orders for complete sets from companies not registered with NECH will be accepted for 30 days following the meeting at $150 per set. Personal résumés of candidates, if submitted, will be on file for review. Both candidates and employer representatives must be registered and in attendance at the meeting to use the NECH facilities. One-day-session tickets do not entitle registrants to use NECH. Request all forms from the ACS Employment Aids Office, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036.

Council, board meetings The ACS Council meeting will begin at 8 AM, Wednesday, April 8, in the Fairmont, Imperial Ballroom. It will be preceded by a continental breakfast for councilors beginning at 7:15 AM. Councilors are asked to check in beginning at 7 AM and proceed to the breakfast area, keeping in mind that the meeting starts promptly at 8 AM. Space will be available for ACS members and nonmembers to observe the council in action. It is hoped that many will take advantage of this opportunity to learn firsthand of the society's operations. Alternate councilors and division and local section officers are particularly urged to attend. The ACS Board of Directors meeting, open to members who wish to observe, will be in the Marriott, Denver Ballroom 3, from 10 AM to noon, and from 1:30 PM to 4 PM, on Sunday, April 5.

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February 9, 1987 C&EN

CHEMICAL SAFETY Stanley H. Pine, chairman; Department of Chemistry, California State University, Los Angeles, Calif. 90032 Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 9 AM to noon, Westin, Daniels Room

The open committee sessions listed below give ACS members a chance to express their views on various issues of importance to the society before these issues are acted on by the board or council. Members are urged to examine the agenda and make known any opinions or ideas they may have. If you cannot attend the particular sessions involved, write the officers listed or ask someone attending the session to speak in your behalf. Most executive sessions are open to councilors. For further information, contact the officers listed.

1. Reports of chairman and staff liaison. 2. Subcommittee reports on ACS safety activities; on A/V course for high school teachers; on guidelines for authors of laboratory manuals; on fume hoods; on local section safety information; on safety films; on safety manual for small chemical businesses; and on coordination with other safety groups. 3. New business.

BUDGET & FINANCE Paul H. L. Walter, chairman; Department of Chemistry, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866

COMMITTEES Joan E. Shields, chairman; Quantachrome Corp., 6 Aerial Way, Syosset, N.Y.11791

Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Saturday, April 4, 8 AM-4:30 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salon F

Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 11 AM to noon, Marriott, Denver Ballroom 2

1. Report of Treasurer. 2. Report of Committee on Investments. 3. Report of Director, Financial Operations: a. 1986 performance report. b. 1988 dues escalator. 4. Reports of subcommittees on DuesRelated Activities; on Self-Sustaining Activities; and on Indirect Cost Centers. 5. Financial impact of petitions to amend ACS constitution and bylaws. CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE Clayton F. Callis, chairman; 2 Holiday La., St. Louis, Mo. 63131

1. Same as executive session. Executive Session

1. Report from executive session. 2. Review of petition for action, ' O t h e r Committees of the Council/' 3. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Reports of subcommittees on Joint Board-Council Committee Operation, on Chairmen's Caucus at National Meetings, and on Noncouncilor Involvement on ACS Committees. 2. Review of procedures for election to the Committee on Science. 3. Preparation of recommendations for 1987 committee chairmanships.

Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 3-4 PM, Marriott, Denver Ballroom 5

CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS James A. Walsh, chairman; Department of Chemistry, John Carroll University, University Heights, Cleveland, Ohio 44118

1. Items from executive session. 2. Software for U.S. Patent Trademark Office. 3. New service plans. 4. Open discussion.

Open Meeting A Sunday, April 5, 9:30 AM-12:30 PM and 1:30 PM-5 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salon A

Executive Session 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Financial matters. Contracts status. New venture status. Experimental arrangements. Long-term building needs. Numeric data program. Pricing strategy.

Open Meeting Β Wednesday, April 8, 1-5 PM, Fairmont, Vista Room See Executive Session listing. Society members, particularly petitioners, are invited to consult with the committee on matters likely to come up in the council meeting.

Executive Session 1. Review of petitions to amend the so­ ciety's constitution and/or bylaws for action by council at the Denver meeting: a. "Other" council committees. b. Terms of councilors. c. National affiliation requirements and subscription privilege. 2. Review of petitions to amend the so­ ciety's constitution and/or bylaws for consideration only by council at the Den­ ver meeting: d. Resolution of election appeals. 3. Report of ad hoc Joint Subcommittee on Divisional Membership Count. 4. Proposed amendments to local sec­ tion and division bylaws. 5. New and/or other business. COPYRIGHTS Dorit L. Noether, chairman; 20 Greenbriar Dr., Summit, N.J. 07901 Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 1-2 PM, Fairmont, State Room 1. Panel discussion on downloading. 2. Report from executive session.

1. Goals and objectives for the commit­ tee. 2. Role of divisions within ACS. 3. Discussion of problem divisions. 4. Programing at international meet­ ings. 5. Division membership count, and the ACS financial and councilor allocations. 6. Reports from subcommittees on An­ nual Report Review, on Constitution & Bylaws, on Division Formation & Co­ alescence, and on Long-Range Plan­ ning. 7. Other business.

ECONOMIC STATUS Valerie D. Kuck, chairman; AT&T Bell Laboratories, Room 7D-213, 600 Moun­ tain Ave., Murray Hill, N.J. 07974 Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 9 AM to noon, Fairmont, Gold Room The open meeting will overlap most of the executive session. Visitors are en­ couraged to offer suggestions for im­ proving the economic status of chem­ ists.

Executive Session

Executive Session

1. ACS P r o f e s s i o n a l E m p l o y m e n t Guidelines—update. 2. Fall 1987 symposium on intellectual property rights. 3. Committee membership. 4. Downloading session at open meet­ ing. 5. Current news ideas.

1. Chairman's report. 2. Staff report. 3. Reports of subcommittees on De­ mand, on Interprofessional Relations, on New Ventures, on Personal Policies, on Quality, on Supply, and on Surveys. 4. Other business.

COUNCIL POLICY Arno Heyn, vice chairman, 21 Alexan­ der Rd., Newton Highlands, Mass. 02161 Open Meeting Tuesday, April 7, 9:30 AM-4:30 PM, Marriott, Denver Ballrooms 5 & 6 1. Report of interim actions. 2. Reports of officers. 3. Report of CPC vice chairman. 4. Reports of subcommittees. 5. Divisor for local section councilor de­ termination. 6. Schedule of business sessions, fall 1987. 7. Reports of committees. 8. Review of council agenda. 9. Old and new business. DIVISIONAL ACTIVITIES Tomlinson Fort Jr., chairman; California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Calif. 93407 Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Sunday, April 5, 11 AM-5 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salon G

EDUCATION Ronald D. Archer, chairman; Depart­ ment of Chemistry, University of Mas­ sachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 01003 Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 3-4 PM, Marriott, Denver Ballroom 6 As below, plus items from the floor. Executive Session 1. Precollege: career services; CHEM MATTERS; ChemCom; Chemistry Olympiad; high school chemistry; prehigh school science; and Project SEED. 2. College/university: academic/indus­ trial education; consultants service; im­ plementation of two-year college con­ ference recommendations; chemistry for nonscience students; and student af­ filiates. 3. Continuing education programs; au­ dio, computer, short, teleconference, and video courses. 4. Miscellaneous: Eminent Chemists; "Tomorrow" Report, recommendations for implementation.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT William Beranek Jr., chairman; 6615 Sunset La., Indianapolis, Ind. 46260

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Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. Subcommittee and task force reports on agrochemicals, on air, on environ­ mental monitoring and analysis, on sol­ id/hazardous waste management, Task Force on RCRA, on toxicology and risk assessment, and on water. 3. Other business. INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES Helen M. Free, chairman; Ames divi­ sion, Miles Laboratories, P.O. Box 70, Elkhart, Ind. 46516 Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 2-5 PM, Brown Palace, Stratton-Tabor Room 1. Seminars in Africa and Asia on CHEMRAWN recommendations. 2. Possibly enlarged ACS role in cases of violations of scientific freedom of chemists in other countries. 3. Status of ACS Project Bookshare. 4. IUPACs international chemical plant safety initiative. 5. Status of exchange programs with China, India, and the U.S.S.R. 6. Cooperation with European chemical societies to improve public understand­ ing of chemistry.

LOCAL SECTION ACTIVITIES Robert L. Soulen, chairman; 1600 Prince St., No. 209, Alexandria, Va. 22314 Open Meeting Tuesday, April 7, 3-4 PM, Brown Palace, Stratton-Tabor Room 1. Report from executive session. 2. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Reports by committee chairman and staff liaison. 2. Reports from subcommittees on An­ nual Reports Review, on Finances, on Local Section Development, and on So­ ciety Issues. 3. Report from the ad hoc task forces on Host Local Sections/National Meetings, and on National Chemistry Day. February 9, 1987 C&EN

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MEETINGS & EXPOSITIONS John A. Whittle, chairman; Chemistry Department, Lamar University, P.O. Box 10022, Beaumont, Tex. 77710

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1. Report from executive session. 2. Reports from subcommittees on Fi­ nance, on Expositions, on Site Selection and Review, on Regional Meetings, and on Meeting Arrangements. 3. Fall 1995 and 1997 dates and sites. 4. Goals and objectives and long-range planning. 5. Petition on honoraria for presenta­ tions at meetings. 6. Request for reduced registration fees for retired members. 7. Topics from the floor. MEMBERSHIP AFFAIRS James G. Bennett Jr., chairman; General Electric Co., Selkirk, N.Y. 12158 Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 4-5 PM, Fairmont, Vista Room 1. Report on executive session. 2. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Bylaw amendments for council ac­ tion and consideration. 2. Programs for retired members. 3. Promotion and retention activities. 4. Membership programs and services. Entire executive session open to coun­ cilors. NOMENCLATURE Kurt L. Loening, chairman; Chemical Abstracts Service, P.O. Box 3012, Colum­ bus, Ohio 43210 Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 2-4 PM, Fairmont, Royal Room 1. Status report on current work of IUPAC Nomenclature Commissions. 2. N o m e n c l a t u r e assistance — b r i n g your problems. 3. Topics from the floor.

1. Review of petition for consideration, "Resolution of Election Appeals." 2. Review of petition for action, "Terms of Councilors." 3. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Consideration of issues arising from the late date of the spring meeting in Toronto. 2. Consideration of council introduc­ tions of candidates for elected commit­ tees. 3. Preparation of slates (1988-90 term) for Committee on Committees and Council Policy Committee. PATENTS & RELATED MATTERS J. Wade Van Valkenburg, chairman; 494 Curfew St., St. Paul, Minn. 55104 Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 4:30-5:30 PM, Fairmont, State Room

1. Summary report of executive session. 2. Summary report on Professional Em­ ployment Guidelines revision. 3. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Reports of subcommittees on Mem­ ber Assistance, on Professional Stan­ dards & Ethics, on Employment Aids, on Local Section Liaison, on Government Chemists Liaison, and on Employment Problems of Experienced Chemists. 2. Revision of Professional Employ­ ment Guidelines. 3. Other old and new business. PROJECT SEED Jeannette Ε. Brown, chairman; Merck & Co. Inc., P.O. Box 2000, Rahway, N.J. 07065 Open Meeting Tuesday, April 7, 10-11 AM, Fairmont, Royal Room

Same as below plus any related topics. Executive Session 1. Awards: (a) National Inventors Hall of Fame; (b) National Technology Med­ al; and (c) ACS Member Award. 2. Education. 3. Legislation and regulation. 4. Long-range planning. 5. Technology development. PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS PLANNING & COORDINATING (PROPPACC) Donald L. Kiser, chairman; Grain Pro­ cessing Corp., P.O. Box 349, Muscatine, Iowa 52761 Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Tuesday, April 7, 7:30-9:30 AM, Fairmont, State Room 1. Review of PROPPACC charter. 2. Symposia scheduled and planned. 3. Reports on committee and division activities. 4. Long-range planning. 5. Topics from the floor. PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS Esther A. H. Hopkins, chairman; 1550 Worcester Rd., Unit 524W, Framingham, Mass. 01701 Open Meeting A Sunday, April 5, 3-5 PM, Marriott, Colorado Salon Β

1. Report from executive session. 2. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. Reports of subcommittees on Fi­ nance, on Public Relations, on Policy & Practices, on Programs, and on 20th An­ niversary. 3. Liaison reports. 4. Report on funding. C Student C f u r l û n f survey c n r i / û i r report. rûr\i PUBLICATIONS Barbara G. Wood, chairman; Research Library Manager, Rohm & Haas Co., P.O. Box 718, Bristol, Pa. 19007 Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 4-5 PM, Marriott, Denver Ballroom 5 1. Election of vice chairman. 2. Report of C&EN Publishing Board. 3. ACS publications strategic issues. 4. 1988 subscription prices; adoption of tentative list. 5. Business plan for proposed ACS journal in materials science. 6. Status of Energy & Fuels and Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. 7. Manuscripts in machine-readable form. 8. Reports from liaisons to other committees.

NOMINATIONS & ELECTIONS Elliot S. Pierce, chairman; 10705 Bruns­ wick Ave., Kensington, Md. 20895

Report and discussion of committee de­ liberations on Professional Employ­ ment Guidelines revision.

SCIENCE Paul G. Gassman, chairman; Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 55455

Open Meeting Monday, April 6, 4-5 PM, Marriott, Denver Ballroom 2

Open Meeting Β Monday, April 6, 4:30-5:30 PM, Fairmont, Royal Room

Open Meeting Sunday, April 5, 8 AM to noon, Fairmont, Far East Room

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February 9, 1987 C&EN

1. Chairman's report. 2. Task Force on Scientific Numerical Data. 3. Task Force on Opportunities in Chemistry: a. Pedagogical symposia. b. Media interaction—SWAT team. c. Posh-Ph.D. education and utiliza­ tion. d. Electrochemistry and ACS. e. A joint ACS-ASBC meeting in 1995. 4. Area budgeting. 5. Presidential Young Investigators ses­ sions. 6. Federal funding for chemistry. TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES Roger F. Bartholomew, chairman; Cor­ ning Glass Works, Sullivan Park FR-3, Corning, N.Y. 14831 Open Meeting Tuesday, April 7, 4:10-4:30 PM, Executive Tower Inn, Assembly Room

Open Meeting Tuesday, April 7, 4-5 PM, Arts Auditorium, Room 2G 1. Introduction of members and proj­ ects. 2. Report from executive session. 3. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Denver national meeting and council matters. 2. Project reports on newsletter, on ca­ reer forum and emerging technologies symposia, on local section activities, on slide/tape chemical career series, and on roadshows. 3. Reports of liaisons to other commit­ tees. 4. New business/projects. 5. Viewing of first four slide/tape chemical career series modules.

1. Report on executive session. 2. Leadership training program. 3. Chem-tech videotape and career bro­ chure. 4. Report of Committee on Education Conference. 5. Comments from visitors. Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. National Conference of Chemical Technician Affiliates report. 3. Reports from subcommittees on Sym­ posia, on Awards, on Leadership, on Education, and on Finance. 4. Relationship of CTA and NCCTA. 5. Liability insurance. 6. Reports of liaisons to and from other committees. WOMEN CHEMISTS Margaret A. Cavanaugh, chairman; De­ partment of Chemistry, Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame, Ind. 46556 Open Meeting Sunday, April 5, 7:30-8:30 PM, Fairmont, Florentine Room 1. Reports from executive session on symposia, on regional meetings, on lo­ cal section women chemists committees, on newsletter, on employment referral, on Ph.D. and B.S./M.S. faculty surveys, and on directions of WCC programs for women. 2. Topics from the floor. YOUNGER CHEMISTS Alan C. Wilson, chairman; Bausch & Lomb, Professional Products Division, 1400 North Goodman, Rochester, N.Y. 14692

ACS Short Courses To obtain complete information on the ACS Short Courses listed below, write or call: Department of Educational Ma­ terials, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036, (202) 872-4508. A detailed catalog will be mailed as soon as it is available. Chemical Engineering and Process Fundamentals for Chemi&ts. April 3 5. Molecular Biology and Recombinant DNA Technology. April 3-5. Laboratory Applications of Lotus 1-2-3 and Other Software: Beyond the Ba­ sics. April 4-5. Dispersion of Fine Particles in Liquids. April 4-5. Maintaining and Troubleshooting Chromatographic Systems. April 4 5. Quality Assurance of Chemical Mea­ surements. April 4-5. Surface Science. April 4-5. Environmental Analysis —Priority Pollutants. April 4-5. Managing People: Getting Things Done Through Others. April 4-5. Practical Medicinal Chemistry. April 4-5. Laboratory Safety and Health. April 810.

Division Workshops Safety in the Chemical Laboratory, sponsored by the divisions of Chemical Education and Chemical Health & Safe­

ty, Tuesday, April 7, early evening. Con­ tact: Jim Kaufman, Curry College, Mil­ ton, Mass. 02186. (617) 333-0500, ext. 220. Thermosets, sponsored by the Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engi­ neering, Saturday and Sunday, April 45, all day. Contact: Sandy Labana, Ford Scientific Laboratories, P.O. Box 20^3, Dearborn, Mich. 48121 (313) 594-7740.

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Preprints of the following divisions' technical sessions may be purchased at the entrance to their meeting rooms or ordered by mail. Environmental Chemistry C. Ellen Gonter National Sanitation Foundation P.O. Box 1468 Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106 (313)769-8010

Vol. 27 No. 1,$7.00a

Fuel Chemistry Karl S. Vorres Director of Publications Chemistry Div., Bldg. 211 Argonne National Lab Argonne, III. 60439 (312)972-2000

Vol. 32 No. 1,2 $10 each

Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering Inc. American Chemical Society Distribution Office 1155—16th St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 872-4364 Petroleum Chemistry Inc. Marvin L. Deviney Business Manager Ashland Chemical Co. Ventures R&D Div. Box 2219 Columbus, Ohio 43216 (614)889-3985 Polymer Chemistry Inc. Frederick Dammont Circulation Manager Division of Polymer Chemistry P.O. Box 20453 Newark, N.J. 07101 (201)482-5744

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Vol. 56 $22.50b

Vol. 32 No. 1,2 $10 each Outside U.S. $11 each

Vol. 28 No. 1, $25a

a Payment with order, b For members of the division, no charge except dues for divisional membership ($10 mem­ ber, $12 affiliate member, $5.00 student member). For li­ braries and others who are not affiliates or members, prices are as follows: Vol. 38-43, $8.00 in U.S. and Canada, $9.95 export; Vol. 44, 45, $10 in U.S. and Canada, $12.95 export; Vol. 46-53, $15 in U.S. and Canada, $17.95 export; Vol. 54, $22.50 in U.S. and Canada, $27 export. Standing orders are available. Prepaid orders do not incur handling charges; individuals must submit payment with order. Note: Vol. 48 is out of print.

February 9, 1987 C&EN

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surer, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture-ARS-SRRC, P.O. Box 19687, New Orleans, La. 70179.

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Division of Chemical Education Inc. S. Kirschner, chairman; J. W. Moore, secretary, Dept. of Chemistry, Eastern Michigan Uni­ versity, Ypsilanti, Mich. 48197.

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Mary L. Good, president Gordon L. Nelson, president-elect George C. Pimentel, immediate past-presi­ dent John Κ Crum, executive director Rodney N. Hader, secretary Brian A. Bernstein, treasurer

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DIVISION OFFICERS Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. J. P. Zikakis, chairman; C. J. Mussinan, secre­ tary-treasurer, R&D International Flavors & Fragrances, 1515 Hwy. 36, Union Beach, N.J. 07735. Division of Agrochemicals. J. N. Seiber, chairman; J. E. Chambers, secretary, Dept. of Biological Sciences, P.O. Drawer GY, Missis­ sippi State University, Mississippi State, Miss. 39762. Division of Analytical Chemistry. M. A. Kaiser, chairman; L. N. Klatt, secretary, P.O. Box X, Oak Ridge National Lab, Bldg. 4500S, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37831-6142. Division of Biological Chemistry. S. J. Benkovic, chairman, J. Peisach, secretary, Dept. of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave., Bronx, N.Y. 10461. Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry. D. C Baker, chairman; E. S. Hawkins, secretary, Warner-Lambert/Parke Davis, Pharmaceuti­ cal Research, Dept. of Chemistry, 2800 Plym­ outh Rd., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106-1047. Cellulose, Paper & Textile Division. D. N. S. Hon, chairman, N. Bertoniere, secretary-trea­

Division of Chemical Health & Safety. L. J. Nicholls, chairman; Ε. Ν. Garcia, secretary, Dept. of Chemistry, California State Univer­ sity, Dominguez Hills, Carson, Calif. 90747. Division of Chemical Information. A. P. Moffett, chairman; B. Lawlor, secretary, Insti­ tute for Scientific Information, 3501 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. Division of Chemical Marketing & Eco­ nomics. P. A. C. Cook, chairman; E. S. Mi­ chaels, secretary, Stauffer Chemical Co., Nyala Farm Rd., Westport, Conn. 06881. Division of Chemistry & the Law. C. K. Bjork, chairman; R. A. Dabek, secretary, Procter & Gamble Co., Winston Hill Techni­ cal Center, 6071 Center Hill Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio 45224. Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry. A. T. Bell, chairman; M. E. Labib, secretary, RCA David Sarnoff Research Center, P.O. Box 432, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Division of Computers in Chemistry. A. L. Smith, chairman; C. Shelley, secretary, 88 Fox Chapel Rd., Henrietta, N.Y. 14467. Division of Environmental Chemistry. J. D. Johnson, chairman; G. E. Bellen, secretary, National Sanitation Foundation, P.O. Box 1468, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106. Division of Fertilizer & Soil Chemistry. J. D. Jernigan, chairman; M. M. Handley, secre­ tary-treasurer, International Minerals & Chemical Corp., 421 East Hawley St., Mundelein, 111. 60060. Division of Fluorine Chemistry. R. E. Noftle, chairman; J. L. Adcock, secretary-treasur­ er, Dept. of Chemistry, University of Tennes­ see, Knoxville, Term.' 37996-1600.

Division of Fuel Chemistry. T. Ratcliffe, chairman; R. E. Botto, secretary, Argonne Na­ tional Lab, 9700 South Cass Ave., Bldg. 200, Argonne, 111. 60439. Division of Geochemistry Inc., R. H. Filby, chairman; J. D. Reed, secretary, Arco Oil & Gas Co. 2300 West Piano Pkwy., PRC-G203, Piano, Tex. 75075. Division of The History of Chemistry. R. H. Goldsmith, chairman; W. B. Jensen, secre­ tary-treasurer, University of Cincinnati, Cin­ cinnati, Ohio 45221. Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Inc. J. L. Massingill, chairman; M. J. Cravey, secretary, Texas A&M University, Marine Sciences Dept., P.O. Box 1675, Pelican Island Campus, Galveston, Tex. 77553. Division of Inorganic Chemistry. M. H. Chisholm, chairman; G. L. Geoffroy, secre­ tary, Dept. of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, 152 Davey Lab, University Park, Pa. 16802. Division of Medicinal Chemistry. P. S. An­ derson, chairman; W. T. Comer, secretary, Bristol-Meyers Co., 345 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10154. Division of Microbial & Biochemical Tech­ nology. H. M. Koplove, chairman; A. Bose, secretary-treasurer, Pfizer Central Research, Eastern Point Rd., Groton, Conn. 06340. Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technol­ ogy. E. K. Hulet, chairman; P. E. Haustein, secretary, Chemistry Dept., Bldg. 555A, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, N.Y. 11973. Division of Organic Chemistry. C. R. John­ son, chairman; J. J. Gajewski, secretary-trea­ surer, Dept. of Chemistry, Indiana Universi­ ty, Bloomington, Ind. 47405. Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc. R. W. Johnson, chairman; J. F. Brazdil, secretary, Standard Oil Research Center, 4440 Warrensville Center Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44128. Division of Physical Chemistry. C. S. Parmenter, chairman; Ε. Μ. Eyring, secretarytreasurer, Dept. of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112. Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc. R. K. Eby, chairman; A. B. Salamone, secretary, Rochal Industries Inc., 32 Tioga Way, Marblehead, Mass. 01945. Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering Inc. R. A. Dickie, chairman; M. H. Jaffe, secretary, Celanese Research Co., 86 Morris Ave., Summit, N.J. 07901. Division of Professional Relations. J. A. Jackson, chairman; P. A. Rebers, secretary, National Animal Disease Center, P.O. Box 70, Ames, Iowa 50010. Rubber Division Inc. T. Jones, chairman; J. W. Messner, secretary, Witco Corp., Concarb Div., 3090 West Market St., Suite 128, Akron, Ohio 44313.

City's unusual art museum has fortresslike 104

February 9, 1987 C&EN

walls

Division of Small Chemical Businesses. E. N. Mimnaugh, chairman; A. C. Nielsen, sec­ retary, 250 South Sheridan Rd., Lake Forest 111. 60045.

Advance registration—193rd ACS National Meeting April 5-10, 1987

Denver, Colo. PLEASE ALLOW SUFFICIENT TIME FOR YOUR MAIL TO REACH US. Deadline for receipt of registration: March 9 Deadline for requests for full refunds: March 27 Deadline for requests for partial refunds: April 30

Mail this form with payment to: American Chemical Society, Meetings, P.O. Box 18598 20th St. Station Washington, D.C. 20036-8598

Make check payable to: ACS or American Chemical Society Please submit a separate form for each registrant. D Dr.

D Mr.

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D Ms.

D Mrs.

Surname

M.I.

First or Nickname

$8

Name for badge Affiliation Street address City, State ZIP, Country Telephone (office, home) Days at meeting:

1

DSu 2 DMo 3 DTu 4 DWe 5 DTh 6 DFr

Type of affiliation:

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D Please check here if you need special services for the handicapped. We will contact you prior to the meeting. Address during meeting Which division's program influenced you to attend: most

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FEES: Registration—check one only 1 D Member @ $100 2 D National affiliate @ $100 3 D Nonmember: U.S. resident chemical scientist @ $175 4 D Member emeritus @ $40 5 D Visitor: non-U.S. resident or nonchemical scientist or chemical technician @ $100 6 D Visitor: family of registrant @ $15 7 D Student: less than postdoctoral status, member or nonmember @ $15 8 D One day @ $60 D Mo 3 D Tu 4 D We 5 D Th 6 D Fr 9 D One-day student @ 5.00 FEES: Event tickets Event No. No. tickets

Registration fee $_ Total

Ticket total $_ FEES: Abstracts Sets at $38 nonmember Sets at $28_member Sets at $26_member of_

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