1977 ACS National Meeting - American Chemical Society


Polymer Chemistry Inc,, will be held in the Palmer House. The symposium sponsored jointly with the Division of. Chemical Education Inc., will take pla...
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News

1977 ACS National Meeting August 28-September 2 Chicago, the convention capital of the U.S., will again host an ACS national meeting August 28-September 2,1977. T h e 174th Annual Meeting of the American Chemical Society will feature technical sessions and professional and social activities t h a t will att r a c t more t h a n 8 000 attendees. In all, 28 of the Society's 29 divisions and six committees will participate in the five days of technical sessions. T h e technical program will include over 1500 papers to be presented in about 220 planned symposia. T h e Analytical Chemistry Division will hold 16 half-day sessions at which over 100 papers will be presented. These sessions are composed of four symposia of 12 sessions and 4 general sessions. Among the symposia topics are high-resolution gas chromatography, ultratrace metal analysis in biological sciences and environment, the analytical approach in problem solving, and forensic chemistry. Of these, the first two topics with 29 and 21 presentations each at four respective sessions seem to dominate the technical program of the Division. This emphasis is probably a reflection of the current interest in these areas. T h e general sessions will cover general analytical chemistry topics in two sessions and electrochemistry and chromatography in one session each. In addition to these programs for

which the Analytical Division is the primary sponsor, the Division will participate in two symposia sponsored by the Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc.: novel instrumental methods for probing polymer structures (four sessions) and chromatography of polymers (three sessions). T h e Analytical Division will also participate in a symposium on the present status of the teaching of analytical chemistry (two sessions) sponsored by the Division of Chemical Education Inc. Other programs of interest to analytical chemists are those sponsored by the Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry, the Division of Chemical Health & Safety (probationary), and the Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry. T h e programs of these divisions contain presentations on applications of various analytical techniques to the elucidation of food and beverage constituents or to the monitoring of toxic substances. In addition, the Division of Fuel Chemistry will hold a symposium on new techniques in coal analysis, and the Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology will also hold a symposium on nuclear spectroscopy. All sessions sponsored by the Analytical Chemistry Division and those jointly sponsored with the Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc., will be held in the Palmer House. T h e symposium

sponsored jointly with the Division of Chemical Education Inc., will take place in the Pick-Congress Hotel which is only four blocks away from the Palmer House. T h e Analytical Division social hour will be held on Tuesday, August 30, from 6:00 p.m. in t h e Water Tower Place, Pearson Room, 175 East Chestn u t Street. T h e division dinner and business meeting will follow beginning a t 6:45 and 7:45 p.m., respectively. T h e ACS Chemical Exposition will be held in the Palmer House, Upper Exhibit Hall (fourth floor), Monday, August 29 through Thursday, September 1. It will include exhibits of the latest chemical instruments, publications, and services and will be sponsored by ACS and the Chicago Section. Several ACS courses given in conjunction with the meeting prior to Monday will be of interest to analytical chemists also. For more information, see page 804 A. T h e detailed technical program given below includes all the Analytical Chemistry sessions and those cosponsored by the Division. Preregistration forms and housing information are contained in Chem. Eng. News, J u n e 13,1977. T h e complete technical program for the meeting appears in Chem. Eng. News, July 25,1977.

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, VOL. 49, NO. 9, AUGUST 1977 · 783 A

News DIVISION OF ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY J. W. Miller, Chairman F. A. Guthrie, Secretary MONDAY

SECTION C

MORNING SECTION A

Palmer House, Wabash Parlor (3rd Floor) Symposium on High Resolution Gas Chromatography: Columns and Analyses S. P. Cram, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Capillary Gas Chromatogra­ phy: A Story of Success in Modern Analytical Chemistry. M. Novotny. 10:00—2. High Resolution Separa­ tions with Metal & Glass Large Bore Open Tubular Columns. R. Teranishi, R. A. Flath, T. R. Mon. 10:20—3. Characteristics and Perfor­ mance of High Resolution Glass Capillary GC Systems. S. P. Cram, F. J. Yang. 10:40—4. Twenty Years of Open T u ­ bular (Capillary) Columns—An Overview. L. S. Ettre. 11:00—5. Developments in P L O T Column Technology. J. G. Nikelly, P. C. Uden, D. E. Henderson. 11:20—6. High Resolution Columns in Gas Chromatography. W. B e r t s c h , E. L. Anderson, M. Moskot. 11:40—7. High Efficiency GC Col­ umns. J. Clemons, H. M c N a i r . SECTION Β

Palmer House, Parlor Β (6th Floor) Symposium on Ultratrace Metal Analysis in Biological Sciences and Environment T. H. Risby, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—8. Trace Element Analysis in Nutrition Research. W. Mertz. 9:55—9. Simultaneous Multi-element Analysis of Biologically Related Samples with a R F - I C P . Advan­ tages and Limitations. F. N. Abercrombie, M. D. Silvester, R. B. Cruz. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—10. Health Implications of Trace Metals in the Environment. K. Bridbord. 11:10—11. T h e Analysis of Molybde­ num in Biological Materials. G. E. Bentley, L. Markowitz, R. R. Meglen. 11:30—12. Analysis for Size-Fraction­ ated Airborne Particulate M a t t e r for Metals by Atomic Absorption 784 A ·

Spectroscopy and Neutron Activa­ tion Analysis. G. J. Rosenberger, W. D . Smith, W. W. Miller, T. H. Risby. Symposium on Novel Instrumental Methods for Probing Polymer Structures Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc. (see page 795 A) MONDAY

AFTERNOON SECTION A

Palmer House, Wabash Parlor (3rd Floor) Symposium on High Resolution Gas Chromatography: Columns and Analyses L. E t t r e , Presiding 2:00—13. High Resolution Gas Chro­ matographic Determination of Or­ ganic Compounds in Ozonized Wastewater. R. E. Sievers, R. H. Shapiro, H. F. Walton, G. A. Eiceman, R. M. Barkley. 2:20—14. Analyses of Textile Effluent and Tobacco Smoke Condensate Samples by Glass Capillary G C / MS/COM. M. Gordon. 2:40—15. High Performance GC— Aspects of Column Design and Se­ lection. J. R. Jeffs. 3:00—16. Glass Capillary GC-MS Analysis of Organics in Drinking Water Concentrates and Advanced Waste T r e a t m e n t Concentrates. D . C. K. Lin, B. A. Petersen, R. G. Melton, W. E. Coleman. 3:20—17. Applications of Dexsil and Other P L O T GC Columns to Metal Compound Separations and Pyrolysis. P. C. Uden, F. P. DiSanzo, D. E. Henderson, R. J. Lloyd, T. Tetu. 3:40—18. Indirect Evidence of Im­ printing of Hepatic Enzyme Sys­ tems in the H u m a n Using High Resolution Glass Capillary Gas Chromatography. C. D . Pfaffenberger. 4:00—19. Simultaneous Determina­ tion of Multiple Testicular Steroids Utilizing High Resolution Glass Capillary Gas Chromatography. R. H. Wohleb, L. L. Hilton, M. J. Free. SECTION Β

Palmer House, Parlor Β (6th Floor) Symposium on Ultratrace Metal Analysis in Biological Sciences and Environment T . H. Risby, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—20. Collection and Analysis of

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, VOL. 4 9 , NO. 9, AUGUST

1977

Airborne Metallic Elements. R. Thompson. 2:45—21. Ultratrace Quantities of Heteropolycyclic Aromatic Com­ pounds in the Environment. G. R. Dubay, R. A. Hites. 3:05—22. Multi-element Character­ ization of Airborne Particulate Dis­ persal P a t t e r n s — t h e New Instru­ mental Technique. F. N. Abercrombie, M. D. Silvester, A. Mur­ ray. 3:25—23. Ultra-trace Analysis of Metals in Biological Systems. A. V. Colucci, W. S. Simmons. 4:20—24. Application of Stable-Isotropically Labelled Organics in Analysis of Environmental Samples Water and Air. P a r t I. H. G. N o w icki, R. F. Devine, C. A. Kieda. SECTION C

Symposium on Novel Instrumental Methods for Probing Polymer Structures Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 795 A)

TUESDAY

MORNING SECTION A

Palmer House, Wabash Parlor (3rd Floor) Symposium on High Resolution Gas Chromatography: Techniques S. P. Cram, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—25. Analysis of Complex N a t u ­ ral Samples by High Resolution Gas Chromatography. W. E. Reed, D . H. Stuermer. 10:00—26. Fractionation and Charac­ terization of Petroleum Cycloalkanes. J. S. Warner, D . C. K. Lin. 10:20—27. A Method for Isolation, Identification and Comparison of Tobacco Essential Oil Components. R. A. Lloyd, J r . 10:40—28. Closed-Loop Headspace Sampling. C. R. Green, F. A. Thome. 11:00—29. Photoionization Detection in a High Resolution Glass Capil­ lary System. W. G / J e n n i n g s . 11:20—30. Application of High Reso­ lution Capillary Columns to Com­ plex Mixtures. M. J. Hartigan, B. Welton. 11:40—31. Moment Theory of GasSolid Chromatography. B. J. McCoy, R. G. Carbonell. SECTION Β

Palmer House, Parlor Β (6th Floor) Symposium on Ultratrace Metal Analysis in Biological Sciences and Environment T. H. Risby, Presiding

News 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—32. Trace Metal Measurements in Assessing Human Disease Pro­ cesses. M. A. Evenson. 9:45—33. Metal Carcinogenesis in Tissue Culture. M. Costa. 10:25—Intermission. 10:40—34. Future Analytical Re­ quirements for the Determination of Trace and Ultratrace Levels of Metals in Bioenvironmental Sys­ tems. G. B. Morgan, E. W. Bretthauer. 11:20—35. Simultaneous Determina­ tion of Trace Elements in Urine by Inductively Coupled Plasma— Atomic Emission Spectrometry. W. J. Haas, Jr., V. A. Fassel, R. N. Kniseley, W. L. Sutherland. 11:40—36. Isotope Dilution GCMS for Quantitative Organic Trace Analysis. Β. Ν. Colby. SECTION C

Palmer House, Parlor F (6th Floor) General

J. D. Carr, Presiding 9:00—37. Opto-Acoustic Spectrosco­ py with a Pulsed Dye Laser. R. W. Shaw. 9:20—38. Results of Multicomponent Fluorescence Studies Using the Video Fluorometer. D. W. Johnson, C.-N. Ho, J. B. Callis, G. D. Christian. 9:40—39. Determination of Submicrogram Quantities of Arsenic and Methylarsenicals in Water by Arsine Generation Followed by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorp­ tion Spectrometry. A. U. Shaikh, D. E. Tallman. 10:00—40. Determination of Some Trace Metals in Biological Excreta by Atomic Absorption Spectrosco­ py. G. W. C. Hung. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—41. Lightly Sulfonated Porous Polymers for Gas-Solid Chromatog­ raphy. R. F. Hirsch, R. J. Gaydosh. 11:00—42. Critical Study of Temper­ ature Effects in Stopped-Flow Mix­ ing Systems. F. J. Holler, C. G. Enke, S. R. Crouch. 11:20—43. Acidity and Complexation Behavior of Phosphonoacetic Acid. P.-H. C. Heubel, A. I. Popov. 11:40—44. Reaction Kinetics of Ferrate(VI) Ion with One-Carbon Com­ pounds. J. D. Carr, A. R. Tabatabai, C. C. Greenwalt. SECTION D

Symposium on Novel Instrumental Methods for Probing Polymer Structures Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 795 A)

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A

Palmer House, Wabash Parlor (3rd Floor) Symposium on High Resolution Gas Chromatography: Techniques R. A. Lloyd, Presiding 2:00—45. Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography. Selected Applica­ tions. E. L. Anderson, M. M. Thomason, W. Bertsch. 2:20—46. Analysis of Organic Con­ taminants in Surface Water Using High Resolution Gas Chromatogra­ phy and Selective Detectors. T. A. liooney, R. R. Freeman. 2:40—47. Comparison of the GC De­ tectors in Their Usefulness, Suit­ ability, Sensitivity, and Selectivity in Glass Capillary Gas Chromatog­ raphy. F. J. Yang, S. P. Cram, E. Freitas. 3:00—48. Detailed Analysis of Shale Oil Using Specific Detectors. C. E. Kennard, S. M. Sonchik, M. P. T. Bradley. 3:20—49. Investigation of Trace Or­ ganic Components in Chlorinated Natural Waters Using Glass WCOT Columns. R. M. Bean, P. W. Ryan, R. G. Riley. 3:40—50. Glass Capillary Gas Chro­ matography and Computerized Mass Spectrometry in Complex Mixture Analyses. J. Meili, F. C. Walls, R. McPherron, A. L. Burlingame. 4:00—51. A Dual GC-MS Interface for Packed and Capillary Columns. J. C. Cook, Jr., R. M. Milberg, L. Brayton. 4:20—52. High Resolution Gas Chro­ matography/Mass Spectrometry. W. A. Wolstenholme, U. Rapp, H. Kaufmann. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour. Water Tower Place, Pearson Room, 175 East Chestnut St. 6:45—Divisional Dinner/Theatre. Water Tower Place, Pearson Room, 175 East Chestnut St. 7:45—Divisional Business Meeting. Water Tower Place, 175 East Chest­ nut St. SECTION Β

Palmer House, Parlor Β (6th Floor)

Symposium on Ultratrace Metal Analysis in Biological Sciences and Environment T. H. Risby, Presiding 2:00—Introduction. 2:05—53. Zinc Biochemistry of Nor­ mal and Abnormal Growth Pro­ cesses. D. S. Auld. 2:45—54. A Modified Standard Addi­ tion Method for Determining Cad-

786 A · ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, VOL. 49, NO. 9, AUGUST 1977

mium, Lead, Copper and Iron in Sea Water Samples by Atomic Ab­ sorption Spectroscopy. C. P. Weisel, S. R. Piotrowicz, R. A. D u c e , J. L. Fasching. 3:05—55. Ultratrace Determination of Sulfur Hexafluoride and Perfluorocarbons for Atmospheric Tracing. R. N . Dietz, E. A. Cote, R. W. Goodrich. 3:25—Intermission. 3:40—56. Sources of Environmentally I m p o r t a n t Metals in the Atmo­ sphere. R. E. Lee, Jr., F. V. Duffield. 4:20—57. Saturated Non-Resonant Emission Spectroscopy for Atomic Detection. J. A. Gelbwachs, C. F. Klein, J. E. Wessel. 4:40—58. Trace Metal Uptake in Ba­ cillus Subtilis 168. J. J. Dulka, P. E. Kolenbrander, T. H. Risby. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location). 6:45—Divisional Dinner/Theatre (see Section A for location). 7:45—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location). SECTION c

Palmer House, Parlor F (6th Floor) General: Electrochemistry A. I. Popov, Presiding 2:00—59. Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence of t-Stilbene Deriva­ tives. J. R. Wilson, S-M. Park. 2:20—60. Electrochemical Studies of Dimethyl Benz(a)pyrenes. S-M. Park, J. J. Michnovicz. 2:40—61. Complexation of Monova­ lent Cations by the Antibiotic Ionophore Monensin. J. G. Hoogerheide, A. I. Popov. 3:00—62. T h e Effect of Slow TwoElectron Transfers and Disproportionation on Cyclic Voltammograms. M. D. Ryan. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—63. Potential Dependence of the Transfer Coefficient in the Elec­ trochemical Reduction of tert-Nit r o b u t a n e and Interpretation Ac­ cording to Marcus Theory of Elec­ tron Transfer Reactions. D. A. Corrigan, D. H. Evans. 4:00—64. A Comparison of Differen­ tial Pulse Polarographic and Gas Chromatographic Methods for the Analysis of N-nitrosodiethanolamine in Synthetic Cutting Fluids. M. R. Smyth, P. G. Rowley, J. G. Osteryoung. 4:20—65. Amperometric Determina­ tion of Polyhydroxy Compounds by Means of Metal Oxide Electrodes. K. G. Schick, C. O. Huber. 4:40—66. T h e Application of TwinElectrode Thin-Layer Voltammetry for the Elimination of Intermetallic

News Compound Interferences in Strip­ ping Voltammetry. Ε. Ε. Brooks, W. R. Heineman, D. A. Roston. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location). 6:45—Divisional Dinner/Theatre (see Section A for location). 7:45—Divisional Business Meeting (see Section A for location). SECTION D

Symposium on Novel Instrumental Methods for Probing Polymer Structures Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 796 A) WEDNESDAY

MORNING SECTION A

Palmer House, Wabash Parlor (3rd Floor) Symposium on Problem Solving: The Analytical Approach

J. T. Vanderberg, Presiding

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1977

9:00—67. The Analytical Approach. C. A. Lucchesi. 9:15—68. Analytical Problem Solving: Academia's Challenge, Industry's Opportunity. J. G. Grasselli. 9:50—Intermission. 10:05—69. An Analysis of the Indus­ trial Analytical Chemist. J. E. Bur­ roughs. 10:40—70. Chemical Detectives, The FDA. C. Meloan. 11:15—71. Practical Solutions to Cir­ cuit Board Production Problems Via Chemical Analysis. J. W. Mitchell, J. E. Riley. SECTION Β

Palmer House, Parlor Β (6th Floor)

General: Chromatography P. C. Uden, Presiding 9:00—72. A General Metal Ion LC Detector Using a Copper(II)-Selec­ tive Electrode. R. C. Dorey, P. W. Carr. 9:20—73. Metal Specific Detection in GC and HPLC with Interfaced DC Plasma Emission Spectrometry. P. C. Uden, R. M. Barnes, I. E. Bigley, W. G. Elliott, R. J. Lloyd, B. D. Quimby. 9:40—74. A Novel Two-proton Detec­ tor for Liquid Chromatography. E. S. Yeung, M. J. Sepaniak. 10:00—75. Silver Nitrate-High Per­ formance Liquid Chromatography of Fatty Methyl Esters. C. R. Scholfield. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—76. Quantitative Stripping of Low Molecular Weight Compounds from a Flowing Air Stream of Po­ rous Polymers and Related Absor­ bents. R. J. Sydor, C-H. Chu, D. J. Pietrzyk.

News 10:50—77. Chemically Modified Sur­ faces for Normal Phase Chromatog­ raphy. R. K. Gilpin, W. R. Sisco. 11:10—78. The Effect of Crown Ethers on the Ion Exchange Behav­ ior of Selected Mono and Divalent Cations II. W. H. Delphin, E. P. Horwitz. 11:30—79. Rapid Liquid Chromato­ graphic Assay of Chloroaniline Iso­ mers. L. Kesner, S. M. Vratsanos. 11:40—80. Differential Temperature Programmed Gas Chromatography. R. Rowan, Jr. SECTION C

Symposium on Chromatography of Polymers Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 796 A) WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A

Palmer House, Wabash Parlor (3rd Floor) Symposium on Problem Solving: The Analytical Approach D. G. Anderson, Presiding 2:00—81. Problem Solving with Sur­ face Analysis. W. M. Riggs.

2:34—82. Water Quality Monitoring— Some Hows and Whys. J. H. Wiersma. 3:10—Intermission. 3:25—83. Analytical Chemists at the Launch Pad. H. D. Bennett. 4:00—84. The Use of H.P.L.C. to Es­ tablish the Optimum Purification Procedure for a Dye Used in Electrophoretic Imaging Devices. T. I. Martin, P. Macbeth. SECTION Β

Palmer House, Parlor Β (6th Floor) General C. L. Wilkins, Presiding 2:00—85. Clinical Profiling with an Ammonia Gas Electrode Based on an Internal Monovalent Cation Glass Electrode. R. G. Wawro, J. G. Montalvo, Jr. 2:20—86. Demonstration of Cocaine Metabolite in Human Urine by Thin Layer Chromatography. A. E. Finkler. 2:40—87. A Stopped-Flow Clinical Analyzer Which Uses Immobilized Enzyme Reaction Loops. M. D. Jo­ seph, D. J. Kasprzak, S. R. Crouch. 3:00—88. A New Enzymatic Method

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PERKIN ELMER CIRCLE 167 O N READER SERVICE CARD 7 9 0 A • ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, VOL. 4 9 , NO. 9, AUGUST 1977

for Measuring Blood Alcohol. F. S. Cheng, G. D. Christian. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—89. Structural Changes of the Chemical Constituents of Petrole­ um During Biodégradation. D. M. Jewell, L. Petrakis, J. D. Walker. 4:00—90. Simultaneous Quantitative Analysis of Prostaglandin F l i ( and F 2 a by Mass Fragmentography. A. Ferretti, V. P. Flanagan. 4:20—91. The Use of Histograms for Feature Selection in Carbon NMR Pattern Recognition. T. R. Brunner, C. L. Wilkins. 4:40—92. A General Instrumental Method for the Measurement of Mercury Vapour in Workroom, Stack and Adjacent Atmospheres. G. F. Dowd, J. C. Hilborn. SECTION C

Symposium on Chromatography of Polymers Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 796 A)

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A

Palmer House, Wabash Parlor (3rd Floor) Symposium on Forensic Chemistry M. J. Camp, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—93. The Môssbauer Spectrometry in the Forensic Characterization of Paint. F. E. Klink, J. D. Nicol, J. H. Liu, G. V. Smith, M. Saporoschenko. 9:25—94. X-ray Microanalysis of Physical Evidence. R. C. Briner, C. R. Longwell, D. E. Smith, T. C. Holt. 9:45—95. Identification and Differentiation of Raw Micro Marihuana Sample by Standard and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometric Techniques. M. P. Fitzgerald, J. H. Liu, J. D. Nicol, G. V. Smith, R. D. Cole. 10:05—96. Forensic Characterization of Commercial Bond Papers. L. A. Wolfe, C. L. Baskin. 10:25—97. Development of Methods for the Analysis of Some Food Products in Customs Laboratories. M. J. Prager, M. A. Miskiewicz. 10:45—98. The Effect of Environmental Factors on Genetic Markers in Human Bloodstains. H. C. Lee, R. E. Gaensslen, P. R. DeForest, D. Crim. 11:05—99. Identification of Some Positional and Chemical Analogues of Methaqualone. S. A. Angelos, T. A. Dal Cason, O. Washington.

News SECTION Β

SECTION Β

Symposium on Chromatography of Polymers Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 796 A) SECTION C

Symposium on the Present Status of the Teaching of Analytical Chemistry Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 794 A) THURSDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A

Palmer House, Wabash Parlor (3rd Floor) Symposium on Forensic Chemistry H. C. Lee, Presiding 2:00—100. The Crystal and Molecular Structure of Two Forensically Im­ portant Substances. D. Canfield, J. C. Barrick, M. J. Camp, B. C. Giessen. 2:20—101. Genetic Markers in Semen: Quantitative Analysis of Po­ lymorphic Proteins. G. F. Sensabaugh, Ε. Τ. Blake. 2:40—102. Review of LEAA—AERO­ SPACE Gunshot Residue Detection Program. G. M. Wolten. 794 A ·

Symposium on the Present Status of the Teaching of Analytical Chemistry Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 794 A) General 3:40—103. Computer Controlled Spectropolarimetry. V. C. Zadnik, J. L. Scott, R. M. Megargle, Κ. Η. Pearson. 4:00—104. Computer Controlled Spectropolarimetric Titrimetry. J. L. Scott, V. C. Zadnik, R. M. Me­ gargle, Κ. Η. Pearson. 4:20—105. Determination of Ionic Species in Engine Coolants by Ion Chromatograph. E. Chladek, L. C. Westwood.

DIVISION OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION, INC. R. W. Ramette, Chairman J. A. Young, Secretary THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Pick Congress, Gold Room (2nd Floor South)

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, VOL. 4 9 , NO. 9, AUGUST

1977

Symposium on the Present Status of the Teaching of Analytical Chemistry Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry T . R. Williams, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—45. Analytical Chemistry in an Integrated Laboratory Sequence. K. E. Dolbow. 9:40—46. Analytical Chemistry at a Community College: A Balance of Wet Chemical Methods and Instru­ mental Analysis. J. M. Hayes. 10:10—47. The Sophomore Level An­ alytical Laboratory for Non-Majors. R. A. Pacer. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—48. The Analytical Textbook Situation: Can a Textbook Present Analytical Chemistry as It Really Is? R. H. Bromund, T. R. Wil­ liams. 11:20—49. Industrial Expectations of the Recent Graduate in Analytical Chemistry. J. C. Abbott. 11:50—Concluding Remarks. 2:00—50. The Graduate Level Ana­ lytical Chemistry Teaching Pro­ gram at the University of Massa­ chusetts. R. M. Barnes, D. J. Curran, J. E. Roberts, S. Siggia, P. C. Uden.

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News 2:30—51. The Making of the Analytical Chemist—1977. Conflicts in Graduate Education. L. R. Faulkner. 3:00—Panel Discussion on the Teaching of Analytical Chemistry. R. Large, Chairman, L. R. Faulkner, P. C. Uden, J. G. Grasselli, J. C. Abbott. 4:30—Concluding Remarks.

DIVISION OF POLYMER CHEMISTRY, INC. V. T. Stannett, Chairman E. J. Vandenberg, Secretary MONDAY

MORNING

Palmer House, P.D.R. # 1 4 (Club Floor) Symposium on Novel Instrumental Methods for Probing Polymer Structures Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry A. N. Gent, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—7. Noise Phenomena Associated with Flow and Thermal Transitions in Polymeric Systems. C. Klason, J. Kubât. 9:30—Discussion.

9:40—8. Acoustic Emission of Crazing Polymers. A. Peterlin. 10:00—Discussion. 10:10—9. The Nanotensilometer—An Accurate, Sensitive Tensile Test Instrument. C. G. Andeen, R. W. Hoffman. 10:30—Discussion. 10:40—10. An Apparatus and Method for Measurement of Nonlinear Viscoelastic Properties of Polymers in Cyclic Deformation under a Relatively Large Strain Amplitude. Y. D. Kwon, R. K. Sharma, D. C. Prevorsek. 11:00—Discussion. 11:10—11. Stress Mass Spectrometry of Polymeric Materials. M. A. Grayson, C. J. Wolf. 11:30—Discussion. MONDAY

AFTERNOON

Palmer House, P.D.R. # 1 4 (Club Floor) Symposium on Novel Instrumental Methods for Probing Polymer Structures Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry A. M. Jamieson, Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—25. The Characterization of Or-

ganic Polymers Via Pyrolysis-IR. W. L. Truett. 2:30—Discussion. 2:40—26. Thermal Degradation Mechanisms and Structural Differentiation of Polymers by PyrolysisMass Spectrometry. M. Przybylski, I. Luderwald, H. Ringsdorf. 3:00—Discussion. 3:10—27. Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Chemisorbed Substances. H. T. Chu, Ν. Κ. Eib, Α. Ν. Gent, P. N. Henriksen. 3:30—Discussion. 3:40—28. A Molecular Probe of Me­ chanical Transitions. J. L. Koenig, W. W. Hart. 4:00—Discussion. 4:10—29. ESC A Characterization of Structure and Bonding in Polymers. D. W. Dwight, J. E. McGrath, J. P. Wightman. 4:30—Discussion. TUESDAY

MORNING

Palmer House, P.D.R. # 1 4 (Club Floor) Symposium on Novel Instrumental Methods for Probing Polymer Structures Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry M . L i t t , Presiding

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, VOL. 49, NO. 9, AUGUST 1977 · 795 A

News 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—45. Certain Aspects of the Dy­ namics of Polymers Studied by Neutron Transmission. L. A. Vinhas. 9:30—Discussion. 9:40—46. Small Angle Neutron Scat­ tering of High Polymers. J. S. King, R. Ullman. 10:00—Discussion. 10:10—47. Brillouin Scattering from Polymers. G. D. Patterson. 10:30—Discussion. 10:40—48. Characterization of Poly­ mer Structure in Solution by Quasielastic Light Scattering Techniques. A. M. Jamieson. 11:00—Discussion. 11:10—49. Studies of Polymer Dy­ namics by Multipass Fabray Perot Spectroscopy (MPFPS). S. M. Lindsay, I. W. Shepherd. 11:30—Discussion. TUESDAY AFTERNOON Palmer House, P.D.R. # 1 4 (Club Floor) Symposium on Novel Instrumental Methods for Probing Polymer Structures Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry W. L. Truett, Presiding

GPC in Polymer Analysis. D. D. Bly. 10:00—70. Separation of Polymers by Field-Flow Fractionation (One Phase Chromatography). J. C. Giddings, M. N. Myers, G-C. Lin, S. L. Brimhall, M. Martin, L. K. Smith. 10:30—71. Crystallizability Distributions in Polymers: A New Analytical Technique. L. Wild, T. Ryle. 10:55—72. Application of the Plasma Chromatograph to Polystyrene. M. Dole, C. V. Gupta, L. L. Mack, K. Nakamae. 11:25—73. An Overview of Gas-Chromatographic Applications to Analysis of Polymer Microstructure. S. A. Liebman. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Palmer House, P.D.R. # 1 8 (Club Floor) Symposium on Chromatography of Polymers Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry J. Harmon, Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—64. Ion Recombination Lumi­ nescence of Heterogeneous Polymer Systems. G. G. A. Bohm, K. R. Lucas. 2:30—Discussion. 2:40—65. Study of Polymer Struc­ tures and Motions by ElectronElectron Double Resonance. J. C. W. Chien, H. Yang. 3:00—Discussion. 3:10—66. Structural Analysis by Dif­ fusion Measurements. Κ. Τ. Chaing, M / V. Sefton. 3:30—Discussion. 3:40—67. Use of Môssbauer Spectroscopy in Ion Containing Polymers. C. T. Meyer, M. H. Pineri. 4:00—Discussion. 4:10—68. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of Crystalline Isotropic Polypropylene. D. G. H. Ballard, J. Schelten, G. W. Longman. 4:30—Discussion.

2:00—79. Solute-Gel Interactions in G P C with Organic Eluents. J. V. Dawkins. 2:35—80. Particle Porosimetry by Inverse Gel Permeation Chromatography. D. H. Freeman, I. C. Poinescu. 3:05—81. Recent Advances in Aqueous Gel Permeation Chromatography. A. R. Cooper, D. S. Van Derveer. 3:35—82. Some Applications of Modern GPC and Comparison with Liquid Chromatography. A. Revillon. 4:05—83. Multidetector System for Gel Permeation Chromatography. Z. Grubisic-Gallot, H. Benoit. 4:35—84. GPC Analysis of a Branched Condensation Polymer Incorporating Radiolabeled Branching Agent or Terminator. S. deKeczer, P. L. Dubin, R. Hale, M. Kronstadt, A. R. Read. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour (Joint with Cellulose, Paper and Textile Division and Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry). Palmer House, State Ballroom (4th floor).

WEDNESDAY MORNING Palmer House, P.D.R. # 1 8 (Club Floor) Symposium on Chromatography of Polymers Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry E. Drott, Presiding

THURSDAY MORNING Palmer House, P.D.R. # 1 8 (Club Floor) Symposium on Chromatography of Polymers Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry M. Ezrin, Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—69. Modern High-Performance

9:00—90. Standardization of GPC Techniques. D . D. Bly, J. V.

796 A · ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, VOL. 49, NO. 9, AUGUST 1977

D a w k i n s , E. E. Drott, R. F. Kratz, A. Revillon. 9:40—91. Numerical T r e a t m e n t of Gel Permeation Chromatography Data. A. R. Cooper, D. P. Matzinger. 10:00—92. Influence of Li-Br on the Exclusion Chromatography of Poly(N-vinylacetamide) on Silanized Porous Glass in D M F . P. L. Dubin, V. P. Miller. 10:30—93. Gel Chromatographic Studies on Degradation Reactions in Bisphenol A Polymers. Κ. Β. Abbâs. 11:00—94. m-Cresol as a Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) Solvent. H. L. Browning, Jr., J. R. Overton. 11:30—95. High Performance GPC with Silica Microspheres. J. V. Dawkins, G. Yeadon.

Royal Honor for Australian Scientist Alan Walsh, widely known to analytical chemists for his invention of the atomic absorption spectrophotometer, was recently honored by Queen Elizabeth II of England, who is also Queen of Australia, by being created a Knight Bachelor, one of 38, at the Birthday Celebration and Jubilee.

Sir Alan

Walsh

Sir Alan, a native of Lancashire, England, was educated at the University of Manchester. After receiving a Master of Science Degree in x-ray crystallography, he joined the British Non-Ferrous Metals Research Association as a spectroscopist in 1939 and while there, he developed and patented a multi-purpose source unit for emission spectroscopy t h a t is still being manufactured commercially. In 1947 he went to Australia to join the Chemical Physics Section of the Division of Industrial Chemistry of the Council for Scientific Industrial Research. There he began fundamental studies on emission methods of spectrochemical analysis, but at the