209th ACS National Meeting - C&EN Global Enterprise (ACS


At the spring national meeting in Anaheim, Calif., 28 of the society's divisions, four ... Symposium topics will range from historical to current—a ...
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PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

209th ACS National Meeting April 2-6,1995

Anaheim Technical Program Summary

42

General Program

54

Registration

54

Housing

55

Travel

55

Local Arrangements

55

Special Events

59

Social Events

60

Awards

61

Workshops

63

Exposition

65

Tours

65

Employment Services

67

Committee Agenda

68

Short Courses

71

ACS Officers

72

Preprints

72

A t the spring national meeting in I^L Anaheim, Calif., 28 of the sociJ L m . ety's divisions, four committees, and two secretariats will participate in more than 600 technical sessions. More than 5,000 papers will be presented. Symposium topics will range from historical to current—a session on tracing chemistry's roots will have five sponsors, and seven sponsors will jointly consider the effects of the national political agenda on chemistry. Other topics that will be discussed are commercialization of biotechnology (Biotechnology Secretariat), advanced polymer-based composites (Macromolecular Secretariat), light-activated pesticides (Agrochemicals), molecular modeling for the bench chemist (Chemical Information and Computers in Chemistry), friction and lubrication on the molecular scale (Colloid & Surface Chemistry), and step-

growth polymerization (Polymer Chemistry and Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering). Programming for this meeting begins on Sunday, April 2, and continues through Thursday, April 6; no sessions or events are scheduled for Fridav. The presidential plenary session, sponsored jointly bv the presidents of ACS and the Royal Society o\ Chemistry, entitled "International Research—the U.S.-U.K. Model," will begin late Sunday afternoon. Twelve divisions will participate in Sci-Mix, which will be held on Monday evening. And 45 ACS national awards will be presented at the awards banquet on Tuesday night. Full details on the technical sessions and a listing of the exposition exhibitors and workshops will be published in the March 6 issue oi C&E\. lAM'ARY 30, 1WC&IA

41

Technical Program Summary PLEN ACS/RSC Presidential Plenary B. M. Rushton, ACS President H. Purnell, RSC President Anaheim Marriott

S M T W T

International research: the U.S.-U.K. model

E

affiliates chapter poster sessions will present more than 250 papers. Technical symposia will cover the nature of environmental chemistry and chemistry of earthquakes. Other activities will include workshops on doing demonstrations for elementary students, beginning a career in chemistry, preparing for graduate school, and making effective oral presentations (sponsored by 3M). A general interactive session will focus on how to develop and implement successful student affiliates chapter activities, and the student affiliates chapter breakout discussions will address issues of leadership development and the role of the faculty adviser. A kick-off social for students and mentors will be held on Saturday evening. An undergraduate hospitality center will be open Sunday through Tuesday.

HIGHLIGHTS: See box on page 61 for details.

wcc Women Chemists Committee J. E. Puskas, Program Chairman

COMSCI

S M T W T

Convention Center

Women's contributions to chemistry & chemical engineering

Anaheim Marriott

S M T W T

Chemistry & the national agenda**

D

Chemistry's roots* (ANYL, CHED, HIST, SOCED)

P

HIGHLIGHTS: Recent discussions of "changing times for chemical research" have many academia and industry chemists confused about how their research interests and expertise fit into this so-called new paradigm. Chemists in every sector—academia, industry, and government—will find the perspectives offered by speakers in a symposium on chemistry and the national agenda provocative, challenging, and informative.

YCC Y o u n g e r Chemists Committee S. Pugh, Program Chairman

Society Committee o n Education W. Henry, Program Chairman Anaheim Marriott

S M T W T

Graduate school reality check* (YCC)

A

Chemistry's roots* (ANYL, CHED, COMSCI, HIST)

P

S M T W T

Graduate school reality check**

A

Media perceptions of chemistry A

Eminent scientist lecture for undergraduate students

P A

HIGHLIGHTS: ACS Corporation Associates (CA) will cosponsor a careers in industry panel discussion and the second annual student affiliates awards program and reception, where undergraduate students can interact with chemical professionals. Harry B. Gray, California Institute of Technology, will be featured in the undergaduates' eminent scientist lecture. He will conduct an informal discussion with students over lunch before presenting his lecture. The undergraduate research and student JANUARY 30, 1995 C&EN

Disneyland Hotel

Perspectives on mentoring**

What is environmental chemistry?

42

D

HIGHLIGHTS: The program will highlight contributions by outstanding women scientists and technical managers from industry and academia (M. Frize, University of New Brunswick; D. Crans, Colorado State University; M. Julian, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University; E. Reichmanis, AT&T Bell Labs; B. Gunesin, Dutoit/Gunesin Consulting; L. Gilliom, Sandia National Labs; J. Giordan, Henkel Corp; H. Free, ACS; J. Puskas, Polysar/Bayer). The contributions (including a paper by science historian S. Brush, University of Maryland) will be published in a free booklet. The symposium also will provide an opportunity for women in technical fields to network. Drop-in posters are welcome.

SOCED

Chemistry of earthquakes: student guide

A

Perspectives on mentoring* (YCC)

Committee on Science J. E. Rogers Jr., Program Chairman

A A

HIGHLIGHTS: A symposium on perspectives on mentoring will provide an overview of trends in the mentoring experiences of minorities, women, and academic proteges and mentors. Personal experiences of industrial and academic mentors will be discussed. Media perceptions of chemistry will be the focus of a session that will look at how chemists and journalists can work together to contribute to the public's scientific understanding. Scientists and journalists will discuss their experiences and opinions on how chemists, chemicals, and chemistry are portrayed and viewed in the media. A symposium on graduate school will feature a panel of graduate students who will discuss life in graduate school, including how to make decisions about advisers, research topics, and teaching loads. The panelists will engage in an interactive session with current undergraduates.

H

trial technology: composite fabrication; tougheners and adhesives; fiber-matrix interphase design; nanocomposites, molecular composites, and long-fiber reinforced composites; composites containing cellulosics or lignocellulosics; and biodegradable composites.

TEC

Biotechnology Secretariat S. P. Shoemaker,

J. W. Finley, Program

Chairmen

AGFD

Disneyland Hotel

s

U.S. food & agriculture

A

Bioprocesses: monitoring & control**

P

Biopolymers as advanced materials* (CARB, PMSE)

P D A

M T W T

Division o f Agricultural & Food Chemistry D. J. Armstrong,

Program

Chairman

Agriculture & food biotechnology: legal issues**

D

Disneyland Hotel

S M T W T

Immunochemical detection of residues in foods**

D A

General papers

A

Agriculture as a renewable source of raw materials**

D D

Natural toxins

D D

Protein & secondary metabolite recovery**

P

Graduate candidate papers

P

Poster session: residues in foods**

P

Nutrition under extreme stress

D

Poster session

P

D

Biomolecular sensing for process control**

1

Production of renewable fuels**

A

Sci-Mix

E

Membrane-based bioseparation**

A

Immunochemical detection of residues in foods* (BTEC)

D A

Fermentation of agricultural residues**

P

Poster session: natural toxins

A

Computational methods & natural polymers**

P

Commercializing agriproduct technologies* (CHAL)

D

Veterinary drug residues in foods

D D

Agriculture as a renewable source of raw materials* (BTEC)

D D

Fumonisins in food

D D D

Poster session: residues in foods* (BTEC)

P

HIGHLIGHTS: This symposia cluster will include an opening session on the role of biotechnology in the future of U.S. food and agriculture. Sessions covering fundamental and applied aspects of biotechnology in food and agriculture will follow. Program highlights will include a plenary session; case studies of commercialization of biotechnology in food products; state-of-the-art immunochemical methods for detecting residues, natural toxins, and mycotoxins; applications of chemical biotechnology to increase the diversity and use of agricultural commodities; the use of enzymes and microbial systems to improve economics and make viable the commercialization of clean-burning liquid fuels from agricultural commodities and waste materials; and developments in fermentation processes, biosensors, and product recovery.

MACR

D

Chemical changes of heated muscle foods

HIGHLIGHTS: The graduate candidate symposium will present research by this year's finalists. Nutritional requirements and metabolic changes will be discussed in relation to extremely stressful activities such as mountaineering. The chemistry and biochemistry of natural toxins will be featured in a symposium discussing fumonisins. Other symposia will examine the analytical challenges of detecting veterinary drug residues in foods and will discuss chemical changes in heated muscle foods. The division will follow the meeting theme by participating in the Biotechnology Secretariat and cosponsoring a symposium on the legal and regulatory landscape in commercializing agriproduct technologies.

Macromolecular Secretariat J. Riffle, Program

Chairman

Convention Center

S M T W T

Composite fabrication**

P

Cellulosic & lignocellulosic composites**

A

Tougheners & adhesives**

P

AGRO Division o f Agrochemicals B. Cross, Program

Chairman

Novel composite concepts**

A

Disneyland Hotel

S M T W T

Biocomposites**

P

Agrochemical metabolism

D

Polymer matrix composites: interfaces**

D

HIGHLIGHTS: Three divisions will contribute to this program's coverage of polymerbased composites, which will focus on scientific topics critical to indus-

*Cosponsored symposium, primary organizer(s) shown in parentheses. "Primary organizer, cosponsored symposium. A = AM P = PM D = AM/PM E = EVE DE = AM/PM/EVE PE = PM/EVE

JANUARY 30, 1995 C&EN 43

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

Disneyland Hotel

S M T W T

Convention Center

Herbicide metabolites in surface & groundwater* (ENVR)

D D

Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

D

Light-activated pesticides

0

Size-exclusion chromatography: detector-focused approaches

P A

D

A

S M T W T

International award for agrochemicals research

D

Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry applications

~

Synthesis, chemistry of new & potential agrochemicals

D

Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of proteins

P

Sci-Mix

E

Size-exclusion chromatography of porous materials

P

ACS award for creative invention symposium

A

GLPs: a paradox

P D D

Biomarkers for agrochemicals & toxic substances

P D D

Young scientists recognition award symposium

P A

Poster session: general

HIGHLIGHTS: The program will feature three award symposia. The American Cyanamid International Award for research in agrochemicals will be presented to Mohyee Eldefrawi at a symposium on pesticide mechanisms and detection at the molecular level. The creative invention symposium will honor Marinus Los for his discovery of imidazolinone herbicides, and the annual Young Scientist Award symposium will include a paper by the awardee, Dean R. Riechers. Light-activated pesticides will be the topic for one symposium, and another on biomarkers in exposure assessments of agricultural chemicals will explore their applications and limitations. A symposium on good laboratory practices will explore the validation process for equipment and will conclude with a workshop on validation. Ongoing symposia on synthesis and metabolism of agrochemicals will round out the program.

HIGHLIGHTS: Six award-winning scientists will be honored in symposia: Sanford Asher (Division Award in Spectrochemical Analysis), Alan Marshall and Mel Comisarow (ACS Field & Franklin Award in Mass Spectrometry), Harry Pardue (ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry), Joe Sherma (ACS Award for Research at an Undergraduate Institution), and Klaus Unger (ACS Award in Chromatography). Their award addresses will be featured in a single awards symposium on Monday. Additional symposia will focus on bioapplications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, broad applications of size-exclusion chromatography, guidance for starting and funding a small business, and analytical research by outstanding graduate students. A poster session arfd mixer on Sunday evening will feature general papers.

nTOH Division o f Biochemical Technology M. Betenbaugh,

ANYL

Program

Chairman

Disneyland Hotel

S M T W T

Biological separations

A

Cell culture technology

D

Biocatalysis & protein engineering

P

Bioprocesses: monitoring & control* (BTEC)

P

Division o f Analytical Chemistry H. N. Blount III, Program

Chairman

Convention Center

S M T W T

ACS award in chromatography

A

Archaeological chemistry* (CHED, HIST)

A D P 0

Tissue engineering & cell therapy

D

Manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals

D

Pharmaceuticals from plant cell culture

A

Challenges & needs in biotechnology

D

Molecular-level bioremediation

P

Protein & secondary metabolite recovery* (BTEC)

P

Poster session: advances in biotechnology

F

The national agenda* (COLL, COMSCI, INOR, ORGN, PHYS) D New voices at the frontiers

D

ACS award for research at an undergraduate institution

P

Chemistry's roots* (CHED, COMSCI, HIST, SOCED)

P

Poster session & social hour

E

Traditional & nontraditional vaccine production Award symposium

D

Small business interface

P

ACS award in analytical chemistry

D

Field & Franklin award for achievement in mass spectrometry

D

Frontiers in spectrochemical analysis: award symposium

Biocatalysis of nonprotein specialty chemicals

D

Biomolecular sensing for process control* (BTEC)

D

Integrated bioseparation processes

P

Folding & posttranslational processing in vitro & in vivo

A

Fungal biotechnology & genetic engineering

A

a Production of renewable fuels* (BTEC) Membrane-based bioseparation* (BTEC)

*Cosponsored symposium, primary organizer(s) shown in parentheses. "Primary organizer, cosponsored symposium. A = AM P = PM D = AM/PM E = EVE DE = AM/PM/EVE PE = PM/EVE

44

JANUARY 30, 1995 C&EN

Degradation of proteins during bioprocessing Microbial expression systems

P

S M T W T

Disneyland Hotel

P

Fermentation of agricultural residues* (BTEC)

HIGHLIGHTS: A diverse program will emphasize the scientific and technological issues involved with implementing biochemistry, biology, and biochemical technology. Sessions will be devoted to upstream and downstream processing issues in biotechnology. In addition, Philip Sharp, Nobel Laureate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the President's Committee on Science & Technology, will present the David Perlman Memorial Lecture, "Cell Biology & Biotechnology," on Monday. Harvey Blanch of the University of California, Berkeley, will provide the Marvin Johnson Award address on Tuesday. A symposium that will include prominent industrial speakers will address challenges in commercializing biotechnology. Another session will address folding and posttranslational processing in vitro and in vivo. A poster session will be featured on Tuesday evening along with a social hour. The division is also cosponsoring sessions in the Biotechnology Secretariat.

Convention Center

S M T W T

Composite fabrication* (MACR, PMSE, POLY)

-

Polysaccharides: characterization & applications

P D A

Cellulosic & lignocellulosic composites* (MACR, PMSE, POLY)

A

Payen award symposium

D D

Tougheners & adhesives* (MACR, PMSE, POLY)

P

Novel composite concepts* (MACR, PMSE, POLY)

A

Biocomposites* (MACR, PMSE, POLY)

P

Thermosetting & cross-linking systems in fibrous materials

D

Materials & chemicals from fossil fuels & biomass* (FUEL)

D

Polymer matrix composites* (MACR, PMSE, POLY)

D

Cyclodextrins & their derivatives

D D

-

Computational methods & natural polymers* (BTEC)

CARB Division o f Carbohydrate Chemistry A. D. French, Program

Chairman

Convention Center

S M T W T

Synthesis of nucleotides & nucleosides

A

HIGHLIGHTS: A wide-ranging program will feature major symposia on biomass thermochemistry and pyrolysis (including the Anselme Payen Award symposium honoring G. N. Richards, along with a tutorial); on polysaccharides in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food products; on networkforming adhesive systems useful in the textile, paper, and wood industry; and on cyclodextrin chemistry including synthesis of derivatives, binding and catalytical characteristics, rotaxanes, drug and flavor delivery, and chemosensors. Symposia jointly sponsored with the Fuel and Carbohydrate Chemistry Divisions and with the Macromolecular Secretariat focus on renewable and biodegradable chemicals and materials in emerging industrial markets.

D P

Conformational analysis* (COMP) Tutorial: rapid carbohydrate structural analysis

P

Biopolymers as advanced materials* (BTEC, PMSE)

F D A

CHED

New Text

D

Hudson award symposium Chemistry of therapeutic oligomers

D

General papers

P

Poster session: new carbohydrate chemistry

E

Division o f Chemical Education I n c . A. M. Wilson, Program

Thiosugars: chemistry & biological importance

D

Carbohydrate conformation: experiment & calculation**

P

HIGHLIGHTS: Tomoya Ogawa, winner of the Claude S. Hudson Award, will be honored with a symposium followed by a banquet. A free tutorial will be held on advances in rapid carbohydrate structural analysis, and symposia will focus on chemistry of therapeutic oligomers, thiosugars, and conformational analysis.

EMI Cellulose, Paper & Textile Division W. G. Glasser, Program

Chairman

Convention Center Tutorial: pyrolysis chemistry & biomass combustion

P

S M T W T

Chairman

Convention Center

S M T W T

High school program

A

Archaeological chemistry* (ANYL, HIST)

A D P D

Chemistry's roots** Poster session

P

General papers

D

A

Award symposium

-

Alternative assessment in chemistry courses

A

Wanted: faculty with training & experience

D

Symposium honoring M. Cavanaugh

P

Poster session: student affiliates

F

Poster session: undergraduate research

P

To teach, to publish, perhaps to perish

P

Chemical educators & disability service personnel

A

Integrating computers into undergrad chemistry

D

JANUARY 30, 1995 C&EN 45

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

S M T W T

Convention Center

Convention Center

S M T W T P

Education for a diverse student body

P

Information retrieval for chemical synthesis

NSF-catalyzed curriculum development

P

Molecular modeling for the noncomputational chemist**

A

Chemistry technology & chemistry curricula

A

Business information sources for chemical managers

P

Nontraditional general chemistry course

A

Molecular modeling for the bench chemist* (COMP)

P D A

Legacy of Linus Pauling (PM at Caltech)

D

Academic research libraries

A

General organic chemistry

P

Library of the future

P

Molecular modeling education

P D

Biomolecular information databases

A

Biomedical information resources

P

Precollege analytical chemistry

D

HIGHLIGHTS: An early program highlight will be a pedagogical symposium on tracing chemistry's roots; international speakers will provide their perspective of the linkages between archaeology and chemistry. The Conant Award winner address will be part of the session for high school teachers. Pimentel Award winner, Ernest L. Eliel, will be featured in a symposium on study abroad for chemistry majors. Margaret A. Cavanaugh will be honored for receiving the ACS Award for Encouraging Women into Careers in the Chemical Sciences in a symposium. Another symposium will consider research programs in chemical education. Demonstrations and presentations will cover ways to integrate computers into the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. The Americans with Disabilities Act will be the topic of a symposium on aspects of the law and ways for chemical educators to comply with its provisions. The division honors the legacy of Linus Pauling with an all-day symposium. Additional symposia will highlight organic chemistry, experiments and projects, diversity of the student body, new strategies for chemical education, chemistry technology and chemistry curricula, molecular modeling, and precollege analytical chemistry.

HIGHLIGHTS: The broad spectrum of chemical information will be highlighted in symposia. Techniques and available resources for the retrieval of information required for the synthesis of chemical entities and discussions on the pros and cons of using molecular modeling by noncomputational chemists will be featured in two symposia. The, requirements of electronic notebook systems for collaboration in science will be reviewed by experts from various disciplines. Two symposia are dedicated to the needs of chemistry libraries. The effects of a rapidly changing information world on research libraries and their future requirements will be discussed. Available resources for biomedical information and the status quo and the future of biomolecular information databases will be the focus of two related sessions. Resources of chemical business information for research scientists and managers and techniques to extract the data will be covered in a symposium preceding the Chemical Abstracts Service Committee open meeting.

TECH

CHAS

Division o f Chemical Technicians

Division o f Chemical H e a l t h & Safety G. H. Wahl, Program

M. Carrier, Program

Chairman S M T W T

Anaheim Hilton Certification of chemical safety professionals: yes or no?

P

General papers

A

Safety issues at small colleges

P

Sci-Mix

E

Safety videos

P

CINF Division o f Chemical I n f o r m a t i o n G. Grethe, Program

Chairman

Convention Center

S M T W T

Electronic notebooks, collaborative systems in R&D**

A

46

JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

Chairman

Disneyland Hotel

S M T W T

Technician of the year award: key to other opportunities

A

Environmental & general chemistry

P

Nontraditional roles of a technician

A

Poster session (Convention Center)

P

Technician recruiters' panel

P

Workshop: high-performance liquid chromatography

A

Workshop: building high-performance teams

P

HIGHLIGHTS: Three symposia will be presented and will feature nontraditional roles of a technician, the Technician of the Year Award as a key to other opportunities, and environmental issues. A keynote address will be given on Tuesday morning by Donna Friedman, St. Louis Community College, and Naomi Williams will be the keynote speaker at the award symposium and the Technician of the Year dinner on Monday evening. Two workshops will be offered during this meeting; one will focus on high-performance liquid chromatography, and a second will cover building high-performance teams. Both workshops are free; however, registration is requested because of limited space. Call (304) 757-9304 to register. A Technician Recruiters' Panel will be cosponsored by the ACS Office of Professional Services. For additional information see the box on page 67.

S M T W T

Inn at the Park

CHAL

P

Catalysis: solid superacid catalysis

D

Surface science of catalysis

Division o f Chemistry &. T h e Law I n c . A 0. Robertson,

Program

Chairman

Anaheim Hilton

S M T W T

What happens in a lawsuit: filing to trial

A

Mock trial

P

Nonlaboratory careers in chemistry & general

D

Small chemical business survival kit* (BMGT, l&EC, SCHB)

D

Agricultural & food biotechnology: legal issues* (BTEC)

D D

Commercializing agriproduct technologies**

HIGHLIGHTS: The important steps from the time of filing to trial in a lawsuit involving scientific issues will be presented in a symposium that will open the program. A mock trial will demonstrate the importance of chemistry and the role of chemists as expert witnesses. A symposium on nonlaboratory careers that interface chemistry with law or with regulatory agencies will include chemist lawyers in tort and criminal cases. Patents, licenses, technology transfer, and regulatory matters will be discussed in a symposium cosponsored with the Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. A symposium covering similar topics but oriented toward biotechnology applications will be presented as part of the Biotechnology Secretariat. In addition, legal matters of interest to entrepreneurs and small companies will be covered in a symposium cosponsored with the Division of Small Chemical Businesses.

HIGHLIGHTS: A symposium on molecular processes at solid surfaces will assess current understanding of the surface chemical bond and will include perspectives on why molecules bond as they do. Another symposium will address the design, fabrication, properties, and operational aspects of chemically sensitive interfaces that will be central in next-generation chemical sensors. A pedagogical symposium on surfactants and association colloids will honor Stig Friberg and will focus on applications of commercial importance. Plenary award addresses by W. Henry Weinberg, Thomas Engel, Mark Barteau, and George W. Scherer will be part of the program. A symposium series entitled "New Concepts in Surface Science" will be inaugurated with a program focused on the behavior of nonthermally accommodated species on surfaces. The symposium on surface science of catalysis will feature processes occurring during heterogeneous catalysis, focusing on a molecular level understanding of catalytic reactions, and a related symposium will focus on issues relating to the cause oi superaciditv. A symposium on molecular tribology will bring together scientists who have an interest in understanding the phenomena of friction, lubrication, and wear at the atomic and molecular level. The fundamental properties of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric, nematic, and polymeric liquid crystals will be considered in the context of their role in technological applications. The poster session will include four awards for best student papers.

COMP Division o f Computers i n Chemistry G. R. Famini, Program

COLL

Chairman

w

Convention Center

S M T

Electronic notebooks, collaborative systems in R&D* (CINF)

A

Combinatorial synthesis**

A A

Conformational analysis**

D D P

Density functional theory in chemistry* (PHYS)

D D

A D'

Density functional theory in chemistry**

P A

P

Parallel computing & computational chemistry

P P

T

Division o f Colloid & Surface Chemistry J. E. Crowell, Program

Chairman

Inn at the Park

S M T W T

The national agenda* (ANYL, COMSCI, INOR, ORGN, PHYS) D Surfactants & association colloids: honoring S. E. Friberg

D

Metal-metal bonding: clusters to surfaces* (PHYS)

D D

Molecular processes at solid surfaces

D D A

Surface & colloid chemistry of advanced materials

D D A A

Colloidal particles: surface modification & particle stability

P D

Hot atom chemistry on surfaces**

A D D

Molecular scale understanding of friction & lubrication

A D D

Microscopies & imaging* (PHYS)

A D D

Plenary award symposium

P

Poster session

E

Ferroelectric & antiferroelectric liquids

Molecular modeling for the noncomputational chemist* (CINF)

A

Molecular modeling for the bench chemist**

P D A

Sci-Mix

E

Computers in chemistry award symposium

A

Metal-metal bonding: clusters to surfaces* (PHYS)

A

Genetic algorithms in chemistry

P P

Poster session: general

E

Artificial intelligence in chemistry

A D

Carbohydrate conformation: experiment & calculation* (CARB)

P D

General papers

P P

D D

*Cosponsored symposium, primary organizer(s) shown in parentheses. **Primary organizer, cosponsored symposium. A = AM P = PM D = AM/PM E = EVE DE = AM/PM/EVE PE = PM/EVE

Data flow programming & molecular visualization

D

HIGHLIGHTS: The program will feature topical symposia covering many aspects of the use of computers in chemistry. Of special interest will be the ComJANUARY 30, 1995 C&EN 47

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM puters in Chemistry Award symposium honoring Peter Kollman. Sym­ posia will focus on applications in organic chemistry and in physical chemistry, help for the chemist interested in molecular modeling, and new methods.

ENVR

conversion, and the synthesis of alcohols and oxygenates. A related sym­ posium will consider synthesis and characterization of ultrafine particle catalysts. Continuing activity in investigating the conversion of fossil fuel and biomass resources to added-value products in the form of materials and chemicals will be represented. Many presentations on the new topic of coprocessing of coal with waste materials will reflect rapid growth of research interest in the coupling of coal utilization with initiatives to re­ solve environmental problems. The Storch Award symposium will recog­ nize Don McMillen's contributions to understanding the mechanisms of hydrogen transfer processes in coal liquefaction.

Division o f Environmental Chemistry I n c . M. M. Walker, Program

'η DitlH

Chairman

Anaheim Marriott

S M T W

Cloud & aerosol atmospheric chemistry

D

Herbicide metabolites in surface & groundwater**

D D

Transport of metals in the environment* (GEOC)

P D

T

Division o f Geochemistry I n c . R. H. Byrne, Program

Urban atmospheric chemistry

D D

Chemical-biological processes & remediation of contaminants

P D

Sci-Mix

E

Chairman

Anaheim Marriott

S M T W T

Transport of metals in the environment**

P D

Generation, stability of oil & gas**

P

D

A

E

Sci-Mix P D D

Colloidal & interfacial phenomena in aquatic environments Contaminant remediation with zero-valent metals

D D

Poster session

E

Controls on mineral growth & dissolution kinetics

A D

Poster session: mineral growth & dissolution kinetics

P

Trace metals & organic ligands in natural waters

HIGHLIGHTS: Topics that will be covered include chemistry of herbicide metabolites in surface and groundwater, colloidal and interfacial phenomena in aquatic environments, contaminant remediation with zero-valent metals, and ur­ ban atmospheric chemistry. A symposium on the influence of coupled chemical-biological processes on contaminant fate and transport will in­ clude the ACS Creative Advances in Environmental Science & Technolo­ gy Award address by D. Bedard.

SJEE

D

HIGHLIGHTS: A symposium on mineral growth and dissolution kinetics will include invited discussions of the influence of microbes and plants on mineral growth and dissolution. Contributed sessions will describe the influ­ ence of surface structure, redox equilibria, chemical affinity, and micro­ bial respiration on mineral behavior. A symposium on interactions of trace metals with organic ligands will involve descriptions of complexation behavior, methylation, colloidal interactions, adsorption, and ac­ quisition by cells. Stability and genesis of oil and gas will be discussed in a symposium devoted to assessment of process models, key vari­ ables, and analytical tools central to improved descriptions of oil and gas geochemistry. A symposium on environmental metal transport will describe laboratory and field observations in the context of system physics, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics.

Division o f Fuel Chemistry F. Derbyshire,

Program

Chairman

Anaheim Marriott

S M T W T

Co-utilization of coal & waste material

P D

Synthesis gas chemistry Generation, stability of oil & gas* (GEOC)

p

ΠΤΕί

D A

Division o f t h e H i s t o r y o f Chemistry

D A

M. D. Saltzman,

Storch award symposium

A

General papers

P

Program

Chairman

Convention Center

S M T W T

Archaeological chemistry**

A

Materials & chemicals synthesis from fossil fuels & biomass**

D

Chemistry's roots* (ANYL, CHED, COMSCI, SOCED)

P

Advanced power generation

P

General papers

Ultrafine particle catalysis

D

HIGHLIGHTS: A featured symposium will reflect ongoing interest in synthesis gas chemistry, the traditional field of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, natural gas 48 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

D P D

A

HIGHLIGHTS: A six-session symposium dedicated to recent advances in archaeological chemistry will feature the following themes: fibers and textiles, connec­ tive bone and tissue and DNA, peopling of the New World, analysis of organic materials, and new techniques for inorganic materials.

I&EC

Anaheim Hilton & Convention Center

S M T W T

Metal carboxylates

P P P A

Photochemistry & radiation chemistry

P P

Division o f I n d u s t r i a l &. E n g i n e e r i n g Chemistry I n c .

Poster session: organometallic chemistry

E

W. W. Schulz, Program R. C. Gatrone, Program

Poster session: main-group & materials chemistry

Chairman Secretary

Quality Hotel

S M T W T

Nitration

D A A A

Liquid membrane separations

D D P

Poster session

E

-

Ruthenium charge-transfer complexes

A A

Award symposium

P P D

Organometallic chemistry & catalysis in water Materials chemistry

D

Small chemical business survival kit* (BMGT, CHAL, SCHB)

D

Sci-Mix

E

UJ

Murphree award symposium

Sci-Mix

ACS award in industrial chemistry symposium

D

Poster session: key to productivity in the '90s

E

ACS award in separations symposium

A

ACS award in materials symposium

D D

Ion exchange for lanthanide-actinide separations

HIGHLIGHTS: Symposia will examine the chemistry of nitration and lanthanide sep­ aration by ion exchange and liquid membranes. Four ACS award sym­ posia will be included in the program: the Murphree Award, the Award in Industrial Chemistry, the Award in the Chemistry of Mate­ rials, and the Award in Separations Science & Technology.

EC 3

Metal-oxo chemistry

A

Mechanistic metal-CO chemistry

A

Inorganic & organometallic reaction mechanisms

F

Poster session: solid-state & transition-metal chemistry

E

Poster session: bioinorganic & metal carboxylate chemistry

E

Porphyrins & copper blue proteins

P

Clusters

P

Metal hydrides

A

General solid-state chemistry

A

Main-group chemistry

A

General transition-metal chemistry

P

Classical complexes

P

General biochemistry

P

HIGHLIGHTS: The varied program will include a two-session award symposium as well as two topical award symposia. Other symposia will focus on metal carboxylate proteins and synthetic models, photochemistry and radiation chemistry in the study of electron transfer, organometallic chemistry and catalysis of water, naked main-group chemistry, and materials chemistry. General sessions will cover main-group, transition-metal, organometallic, metal hydride, cluster, and bioinor­ ganic chemistry. Two poster sessions will round out the program.

D i v i s i o n o f I n o r g a n i c Chemistry I n c . T. E. Bitterwolf, Program

Aqueous & biphasic catalysis

D

Chairman

Anaheim Hilton & Convention Center

S M T W T

Early transition-metal chemistry

A

Tutorial: metal carboxylate proteins & synthetic models

A

Tutorial: study of electron transfer

A

Group 13 and 14 chemistry

A

General organometallic chemistry

A

ΕΗΠ I

The national agenda* (ANYL, COLL, COMSCI, ORGN, PHYS) D Carbenes, carbynes, and radicals

P

Functional selectivity via inorganic chemistry

P

Naked main-group chemistry

P

D i v i s i o n o f M e d i c i n a l Chemistry J. A. Bristol, Program

Chairman S M T W T

Anaheim Hilton D

General papers E

Poster session & social hour

*Cosponsored symposium, primary organizer(s) shown in parentheses. "Primary organizer, cosponsored symposium. A = AM P = PM D = AM/PM E = EVE DE = AM/PM/EVE PE = PM/EVE

Polyamines

A

Understanding opioid analgesia & drug addiction

P

Tyrosine kinase inhibitors

A

JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

49

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

ORGN

S M T W T

Anaheim Hilton

P

New therapies for the management of septic shock Drug resistance & prospects for circumvention

A

Poster session (Convention Center)

D

Division o f Organic Chemistry

Increasing natural diversity

P

D. J. Pasto, Program

Chairman

Awards symposium

A

Anaheim Hilton

S M T W T

Cysteine proteases & inhibitors

P

Combinatorial synthesis* (COMP)

A A

Transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions

A A P

Physical organic chemistry

A

General organic reactions

A

The national agenda* (ANYL, COLL, COMSCI, INOR, PHYS)

D

Natural product synthesis

P

Physical & organometallic chemistry

P

Combinatorial synthesis

P P

Poster session

E

HIGHLIGHTS: Polyamines will be featured in a symposium describing polyamines and agents that affect polyamine metabolism as therapies for cancer and proliferative diseases. Another symposium on opioid analgesia and drug addiction will emphasize new insights to this classic mechanism. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors will be covered in a symposium describing cellular signaling mechanisms as novel targets for drug discovery. A symposium has been organized on new therapies for the management of septic shock, which during the last year has been the subject of several failed clinical trials. A symposium will focus on increasing natural diversity and another, on drug resistance and intervention, will include new approaches to the therapy of resistant pathogens. A symposium will feature cysteine proteases and inhibitors. At the awards symposium, the E. B. Herschberg Award and the Ralph F. Hirschmann Award in Peptide Chemistry will be presented.

NUCL Division o f Nuclear Chemistry & Technology P. A. Baisden, Program

A P

ACS award symposium

A

Environmentally benign chemistry

A

Bioorganic chemistry

A

Norris award symposium

P

Molecular recognition & related areas

P

Organic synthesis

P

Sci-Mix

E

A

Award for synthetic organic chemistry symposium

A

Heterocyclic chemistry

A

Chairman

Anaheim Marriott

S M T W T

Catalyzed reactions

A

ACS award in nuclear chemistry symposium

D D D

ACS award in pure chemistry symposium

P

Advances in accelerator mass spectrometry

P D D A

Natural products synthesis

P

Sci-Mix

E

Guenther award symposium

Environmental f-element chemistry

D D

Metal-catalyzed reactions

Radionuclide determination: ICP-MS

P D

General organic chemistry (Convention Center)

HIGHLIGHTS: The ACS Award in Nuclear Chemistry symposum will honor the work of Joseph B. Natowitz and will feature presentations on the production, characterization, and modes of deexcitation of hot nuclei formed in heavy-ion reactions. Topical symposia on accelerator mass spectrometry, the use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for measuring long-lived radionuclides, and the environmental behavior of the f-elements (including a discussion of the causes and results of activities in the former Soviet Union such as the Tomsk-7 explosion that released f-elements into the environment) will be additional components of this interdisciplinary and international program.

*Cosponsored symposium, primary organizer(s) shown in parentheses. "Primary organizer, cosponsored symposium. A = AM P = PM D = AM/PM E = EVE DE = AM/PM/EVE PE = PM/EVE

50 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

A

Poster session: bioorganic & organic synthesis Bader award symposium Enantio- & stereoselective reactions General synthesis

D

Poster session: organic, synthesis (Convention Center) Organoboron & silicon chemistry

A

Bioorganic & related chemistry

P

HIGHLIGHTS: Award symposia in the program will include: ACS Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences (Henry C. McBay); James Flack Norris Award (William P. Jencks); ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry (Larry E. Overman); ACS Award in Pure Chemistry (Reza Ghadiri); Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Natural Products (Jon C Clardy); and Alfred Bader Award in Bioinorganic or Bioorganic Chemistry (Stephen J. Benkovic). Other special symposia will focus on combinatorial synthesis, transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, and envi-

ronmentally benign chemistry. Contributed sessions will focus on bioorganic chemistry, organic synthesis, organometallic chemistry, and molecular recognition; three poster sessions will be held.

Hot atom chemistry on surfaces* (COLL)

A D D

Award symposium

P

HIGHLIGHTS: The program will feature vibrant areas of research in physical chemistry and will elucidate their relevance and importance to other areas of chemistry. In each symposium, presentations will be made by senior as well as junior researchers and will focus both on current methodological advances and on the chemical problems that these methods can be applied to. Symposium topics will include physical chemistry of proteins, density functional theory in chemistry, physical chemistry of polymers and complex liquids, microscopies and imaging, and metalmetal bonding.

PETR Division o f Petroleum Chemistry I n c . J. G. Reynolds, Program

Chairman

Anaheim Marriott

S M T W T

Tutorial: catalysts as advanced materials

A

Synthesis of zeolites: microporous solids

D D D D A

Catalyst preparation: advanced techniques

P D D

Molecular thermodynamics for petroleum technology

POLY

D

Catalytic inorganic membranes

D

Catalyst & materials characterization

P

Division o f Polymer Chemistry Inc. W. J. Brittain, Program

HIGHLIGHTS: A symposium on catalysts as advanced materials will include five tutorial talks on recent advances in microporous and mesoporous synthesis techniques, modern techniques for structural and chemical characterization, and design of coupled reaction-separation systems. Advanced techniques in catalyst preparation will be the focus of a symposium that will include discussion of novel methods for fabrication, structures, and properties, including nanostructured and highpurity catalysts. A session on new techniques of catalyst and material characterization will focus on methods—including NMR, neutron scattering, holography, and microwave—and materials such as supported metals and diamond thin films. Catalytic inorganic membranes will be covered in a symposium that will consider fabrication and applications such as dehydrogenation, coupling, and gas separations. The third international symposium on the synthesis of zeolites, expended layered compounds, and other microporous solids and the division award symposium (John M. Prausnitz) will be held.

PHYS Division o f Physical Chemistry M. Ratner, Program

Chairman

Inn at the Park

S M T W T

Inn at the Park

S M T W T

| The national agenda* (ANYL, COLL, COMSCI, INOR, ORGN) D Physical chemistry of proteins

D D

Metal-metal bonding: clusters to surfaces**

D D A

Density functional theory in chemistry**

D D

Manipulating molecules with fields

P D A D D

Density functional theory in chemistry* (COMP)

P A

Chairman

Convention Center

S M T W T

Special topics: polymer synthesis

A

Interfaces & surfaces in the rheology of polymers

D D

Polymer surface modifications for biomedical applications

D D

Composite fabrication* (CELL, MACR, PMSE)

P

Advances in crystalline polymers

P D D

Poster session: polymer characterization & synthesis

E

P A

Cellulosic & lignocellulosic composites* (CELL, MACR, PMSE)

A

Marvel award symposium

D

Tougheners & adhesives* (CELL, MACR, PMSE)

P

A

ACS polymer chemistry award symposium

A

Novel composite concepts* (CELL, MACR, PMSE)

A

Physical chemistry of polymers & complex liquids* (PHYS)

A D D

Synthesis of well-defined macromolecules for assembly

D D A

Computer modeling of polymers in the solid state

D D D

Biocomposites* (CELL, MACR, PMSE)

P

Step-growth polymerization**

P D D

Poster session* (PMSE)

E

Poster session

E

Polymer matrix composites* (CELL, MACR, PMSE) Special topics: polymer characterization

D P

A D

P

Physical chemistry of polymers & complex liquids**

A D D

Microscopies & imaging**

A D D

HIGHLIGHTS: A multidisciplinary program will present recent advances in polymer synthesis and characterization, the role of surfaces in rheological and biomedical applications, computer modeling of polymers, innovative processing techniques, and new industrial applications. A symposium on the synthesis of well-defined macromolecules will bring together organic chemists, biochemists, polymer chemists, and materials scientists to describe recent advances in approaches to novel molecular arJANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 51

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM chitectures. A symposium on recent developments in step-growth polymerization and polymers will focus on the underlying synthetic aspects as applied to new polymer structures and architectures. Two symposia will cover new applications and studies of polymer surfaces and interfaces; one will focus on polymer surface modification for biomedical applications, and the other will consider interfaces and surfaces in the rheology of polymers. A symposium on computer modeling of polymers in the solid state will target specific classes of polymers (crystalline, liquid crystalline, biological, disordered) and also will describe computational modeling techniques from ab initio to force-field methods. A symposium on advances in crystalline polymers will describe the latest developments in structure and morphology of polymers. The program will be highlighted by the ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry symposium honoring Robert Grubbs and will include talks on transition-metal polymer chemistry. In addition, the program will include the Carl Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award symposium honoring Krzysztof Matyjaszewski. Several cosponsored symposia will be presented.

tonic, optoelectronic, and magnetic applications. Polymeric materials for imaging technologies, the topic of another symposium, will address the role of specialty polymers in a wide range of imaging systems. A symposium on polymers for microelectronics will feature fundamental concepts and stabilization of resists, polyimide synthesis and photochemistry, and high-stability, low-dielectric polymers. The biopolymers as advanced materials symposium will feature synthesis, structure, properties, and utilization of environmentally friendly biopolymers. Another symposium, on processing-structure-property relationships in liquid crystalline polymers, will emphasize recent advances in the synthesis, structure, rheology, processing performance, and application of these materials. In-line sensors for polymeric processes will be the focus of papers that will examine the chemical and physical properties of in situ polymeric processes by using fiber-optic-assisted instrumentation. Other symposia will cover microwave processing of polymers and UV curing of coatings. The ACS Award in Applied Polymer Science symposium will honor J. Kennedy for his work in cationic polymerization, and the Cooperative Research Award symposium will celebrate F. Stehling's, C. S. Speed's, and L. Mandelkern's industrial-academic collaborations in polyolefins. Participation in the Macromolecular Secretariat will round out the program.

rarera PROF

Division o f Polymeric Materials: Science SL Engineering Inc. D. N. Schulz, P. Edelman, Program

Chairmen

Division o f Professional Relations Convention Center

S M T W T

In-line sensors for polymeric processes

D

Polymeric materials for imaging technologies

D A

Microwave processing of polymers

C A

Composite fabrication* (CELL, MACR, POLY) Biopolymers as advanced materials**

S M T

w

T

1

Sci-Mix

HIGHLIGHTS: On Monday, the Henry Hill Award will be presented to John Connolly and Stanley Kirschner at a reception.

D t-

Cooperative research award symposium

A

Cellulosic & lignocellulosic composites* (CELL, MACR, POLY)

A

Tougheners & adhesives* (CELL, MACR, POLY)

P

Applied polymer science award symposium

P D

Polymers for microelectronics

P D D

New concepts & general papers

P

SCHB D

Novel composite concepts* (CELL, MACR, POLY)

A

Polymeric & organic materials

D D D

Biocomposites* (CELL, MACR, POLY)

P

Division o f Small Chemical Businesses N. H. Giragosian,

Program

Chairman

Quality Hotel

S M T W T

Small chemical business survival kit** D

Liquid crystalline polymers Step-growth polymerization* (POLY)

P

Poster session**

E

c

Polymer matrix composites* (CELL, MACR, POLY)

D

Ultraviolet curing of coatings

D

Sci-Mix

D

E

Women in chemistry

1

True stories of small chemical businesses**

P



HIGHLIGHTS: The program will feature both topical and award symposia. The symposium on polymeric and organic materials will cover conductive and light-emitting materials, piezoelectric and ferroelectric compositions, and liquid crystalline compounds, as well as optical materials for pho-

52 JANUARY 30, 1995 C&EN

Chairman

Disneyland Hotel

P

T. J. Kucera, Program

'Cosponsored symposium, primary organizer(s) shown in parentheses. "Primary organizer, cosponsored symposium. A = AM P = PM D = AM/PM E = EVE DE = AM/PM/EVE PE = PM/EVE

m

BY BECOMING A MEMBER OF ONE OR MORE OF THE 33 ACS TECHNICAL DIVISIONS YOU CAN RECEIVE: • TIMELY INFORMATION IN AREAS OF SPECIAL INTEREST,

wmmk ΙΟΙΝ ONE OR MORE OF THE 33 ACS TECHNICAL DIVISIONS AND RECEIVE 3 3 % OFF THE NONMEWBER

Î S S « I THE BOOK OF NATIONAL



NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES,



CONTINUING EDUCATION,



DIVISION NEWSLETTERS/PREPRINTS/REPRINTS/ MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORIES,



OPPORTUNITIES TO PRESENT PAPERS AT NATIONAL AND DIVISIONAL MEETINGS,



ADVANCE NOTICE OF UPCOMING EVENTS, AND MORE

MEETING ABSTRACTS.

TO JOIN, CIRCLE THE DIVISION NAME AND MEMBERSHIP RATE BELOW. DIVISIONS

MEMBER $

STUDENT $

5 8 10

2 3 5 5 6 5 7 0 3 5 2 2.50 3 4 n/a 12 5 6

Agricultural & Food Agrochemicals Analytical Biochemical Technology Biological Business Development & Management Carbohydrate Cellulose, Paper & Textile Chemical Education Chemical Health & Safety Chemical Information Chemical Technicians Chemistry and the Law Colloid and Surface Computers in Chemistry Environmental Fertilizer and Soil Fluorine Fuel Geochemistry History of Chemistry Industrial & Engineering Inorganic Medicinal Nuclear Chemistry & Technology Organic Petroleum Physical Polymer Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering Professional Relations Rubber Small Chemical Businesses

1

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7 12 5 8 17(2)

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NAME (FIRST, LAST, INITIAL)

ADDRESS (AFFILIATION)

STREET

CITY, STATE, ZIP

COUNTRY, POSTAL CODE

Telephone (W) (H) ACS Membership Number Total $ . Please check one: Q Check enclosed a

Visa/Mastercard



American Express

D Card number Expiration date: Mail to American Chemical Society, Member and Subscriber Services, Dept. L-0011, Columbus, Ohio 43268-0011 Or CALL TOLL FREE (800) 333-9511 (1) add $5.00 for overseas postage (2) add $3.00 for overseas postage (3) add $10.00 for overseas postage (4) add $8.00 for overseas postage

Badge cases and booklet programs will be available in the registration area. On-site registration facilities will be located in the Convention Center. The hours for registration will be Saturday, April 1, 3 to 6 PM; Sunday, April 2, 7:30 AM to 7 PM; Monday, April 3, through Wednesday, April 5, 7:30 AM to 3 PM; and Thursday, April 6, 7:30 to 10:30 AM. One-Day-Session Tickets. $100 in advance, $135 on site. Fill in the appropriate information on the advance registration form on page 73, following the same procedure used for regular registration. Tickets will be sold in the registration area during the hours announced above and may be converted to full registration. Abstracts. Abstracts will be mailed upon completion, about March 20, to U.S. residents paying the additional postage fee. If a United Parcel Service address (street address) is not provided for the shipment of the abstract book, receipt prior to the meeting is not guaranteed. Receipt cards will be mailed to all other registrants ordering the abstracts, to be exchanged for books in the registration area. Orders for abstracts only should be sent to ACS Distribution, Room 210, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036, or call (800) 227-5558.

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim REGISTRATION The deadline for advance registration for the Anaheim meeting is March 3. The registration form can be found on page 73. Please allow at least 10 days for your registration to reach ACS. Registrations received after the deadline will be returned. A separate form must be provided for each registrant, including guests. Registration payment should not be combined with any other payment— meeting registration has a separate mailing address. As an incentive to advance registration, appreciably discounted fees are in effect. The current scale of fees is shown at right. Either payment in full or authorization to charge a credit card (American Express, MasterCard, VISA, or Diners Club) must accompany your order. Purchase orders and training requests will not be honored. Mail completed form with payment to: American Chemical Society, Meetings, P.O. Box 18598, 20th St. Station, Washington, D.C. 20036-8598. Please allow at least three weeks to process your request. The meeting badge and receipt will be mailed to all registrants, including those residing outside 54 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

the U.S., at the address shown on the registration form. (If a registrant's affiliation and business address are not available, please provide home address). NonU.S. registrants should include payment to cover any bank costs charged to ACS. Please make payment in U.S. dollars. Badge replacement facilities will be in the registration area on Saturday, April 1, 3 to 6 PM; Sunday, April 2, 7:30 AM to 7 PM; Monday, April 3, through Wednesday, April 5, 7:30 AM to 5 PM; and Thursday, April 6, 7:30 to 10:30 AM.

Classification of registrant

MEMBER ACS member or national affiliate Member emeritus/retired Student member or affiliate, less than postdoctoral status 50-year member Unemployed (NECH waiver) VISITOR Non-U.S. resident or nonchemical scientist or chemical technician Guest of registrant

Fee Advance On site

Refunds. Requests for full refund of registration will be honored if received, together with badge and a copy of the receipt, by March 17. After that date, a refund of 80% of the registration fee may be obtained if the request is received by April 14. Refund requests received after April 14 will not be honored. Social events tickets may be refunded in advance if received at ACS by March 17. After that date, refunds will be made on site until 48 hours before the scheduled event. See Tours on page 65 about refunds on tour tickets.

PlflQQifiratinn OlClddllll/ClllUI 1

Fee Advance On site

of registrant

$190

$225

85 15

120 15

No fee No fee No fee No fee

NONMEMBER Chemical scientist eligible for $285 membership in the society who is a U.S. resident 15 Student, less than postdoctoral status ONE-DAY SESSION 100 Adult 5 Student Precollege teacher 5

$320

15

135 5 5

EXPOSITION ONLY 190

225

15

15

Adult Student na = not available.

na na

25 5

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim HOUSING Room Reservations. Mail the housing form (see page 58) for the official hotels listed on page 56, to ACS, Meetings Department, P.O. Box 18598,20th St. Station, Washington, D.C. 20036-8598. Reservations at the ACS rate cannot be made directly with the hotels and cannot be made by telephone. Requests may be faxed to (202) 872-4081, but please do not send a second copy by regular mail, since this will result in duplicate reservations. (Because of the large volume, we are unable to confirm receipt of faxes.) Use a separate form for each room requested. Registrants sharing a doublebedded room should use one form listing the names of all occupants. Reservations will be processed on a first-come, firstserved basis only. Please note at least four choices when making your selection. If all the hotels you've requested are sold out, the next available hotel will be assigned according to your location and rate preference. Deadline for receipt of all housing transactions is March 3. Reservations will be acknowledged directly to the individual listed on the reservation form, indicating the assigned hotel, rate, and room guarantee information. Please allow at least 10 business days for processing a request. Requests received after the deadline will be returned. Occasionally, housing requests are sent but not received by ACS. You may confirm your reservation two weeks after sending it by calling the ACS Housing Bureau. Sometimes, ACS acknowledgments are mailed but are never received by the guest. Please do not assume you were assigned any of your hotel choices. If you do not receive an acknowledgment in the mail approximately three weeks after sending your housing form, you should call the ACS Housing Bureau at (202) 872-6008 and confirm your hotel assignment. Housing applies to March 29 through April 7 only. If you wish to extend your stay beyond the time of the meeting (arriving before March 29, departing after April 7), you must make reservations for the additional nights directly with your assigned hotel. Accommodations are available for guests with disabilities. If you require special accommodations because of a disability, please mark the appropriate box on your housing form. Do not send a check to ACS. If you provide a credit card number, it will be forwarded to the hotel to guarantee your reservation. If you do not provide a credit card number, you will need to guarantee your room directly to your assigned hotel within 10 days of the date on your

ACS housing acknowledgment. If you do not have a credit card, payment for your entire stay may be required upon checkin. Failure to guarantee your reservation directly with your assigned hotel can result in cancellation of your room reservation. Some hotels may elect to charge a one night's deposit on your credit card upon receipt of your reservation rather than wait until you arrive. Don't be a no show. Failure to cancel a guaranteed reservation can result in a one night's charge to your credit card by the hotel. Changes in arrival /departure dates or cancellations by March 3 should be faxed or mailed to ACS. After March 3, all correspondence concerning housing matters, including cancellations and changes, should be made directly with the hotel. A map indicating hotel locations appears on page 56. Hotel codes, names, addresses, ACS guaranteed rates, and other hotel information are also on page 56. Be sure to provide all the information requested on the ACS housing form. All hotels on the ACS housing list that are not within walking distance of the Convention Center will have access to a complimentary shuttle, Sunday through Thursday.

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim TRAVEL

209th ACS National Meeting

ANAHEIM

Tips for a safe stay • When walking, stick to main thoroughfares and well-lit areas. • If walking, don't wear fancy jewelry in plain sight. • Don't wear your meeting badge outside the hotels. • Be cognizant and alert to surroundings. Look alert. • When walking after dark, don't hug the buildings or cars; walk in the open or near the curb. • Carry your purse close to your body. • Don't leave valuables in your room. Get a hotel safe deposit box. • Travel in groups. Don't be a loner, particularly in the evening. • Abide by common sense: If something looks suspicious, report it and/or avoid it

L li

fe Special Savings by Plane. American, Delta, and USAir are the official airline cocarriers. Attendees can get substantial savings on airfares from these carriers through special discounts which include: • A 5% discount off applicable first class and the lowest applicable coach round-trip fares. • A 10% discount off applicable unrestricted coach fares. In addition, Delta and USAir are offering special zone fares that are less than the unrestricted fares and do not require a Saturday night stay, and American will waive the Saturday night stay requirement with an additional $100 fee. To make your reservation, contact the airlines directly or use your personal travel agent. Refer to the file numbers below: American (800) 433-1790 7 AM to midnight, EST Star File No. S-9900 Delta (800) 241-6760 8 AM to 11 PM, EST File No. N0800 USAir (800) 334-9644 8 AM to 9 PM, EST Gold File No. 38540144

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim

I LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS I

ACS Hospitality Center. The Orange County Section welcomes visitors and invites meeting participants to visit the Hospitality Center, located in the Anaheim Hilton. Volunteers will be happy to answer any questions on the Anaheim area and provide information on local restaurants, points of interest, transportation, tips on shopping, or just some friendly conversation. Tickets for ACSorganized tours will be sold from 2 to 6 PM on Saturday, April 1; and 8:30 AM to 5 PM, Sunday, April 2, through Thursday, April 6. Information and Message Center. The Information Center will be located in the Convention Center and will be open Saturday, April 1, 3 to 6 PM; Sunday, April 2, 7:30 AM to 7 PM; Monday, April 3, through Thursday, April 6, 7:30 AM to 6 PM. Personal messages may be exchanged and lost-and-found service will be provided. Mail and telegrams should be addressed in care of your hotel. Communications addressed to the society will be held at the Information Center. No one will be paged in meeting sessions. The society cannot accept responsibility for the delivery of mail or nonemergency messages. JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 55

PRELIMINARY

PROGRAM Member Resource Center. Plan to visit the Member Resource Center during the meeting. The center is available to all attendees—members and nonmembers— to acquaint you with the society. Information about ACS services, activities, and products will be on continuous display throughout the meeting. The Member Resource Center will be located in the registration area in the Convention Center. It will be staffed by ACS personnel who will be available to answer questions about the displayed material during the regular meeting hours: Saturday, April 1, 3 to 6 PM; Sunday, April 2, 7:30 AM to 7 PM; and Monday, April 3, through Thursday, April 6, 7:30 AM to 5 PM. Staff members will be available to accept applications from attendees who wish to join the society or reinstate their membership. Nonmembers who submit an application for membership can register for the meeting at member rates and will be permitted to participate in the National Employment Clearing House, which will be located in the Terrazzo Room/Exhibit Hall of the Disneyland Hotel. Staff from the ACS Member Insurance Office will also be available to discuss insurance plans and investment opportunities for ACS members such as group term life, accidental death and dismemberment, hospital indemnity and disability income protection, as well as tax-deferred annuities and individual retirement accounts (IRAs). Direct telephone service will be available at the booth Monday through Thurs-

Lewis St.

Map of hotel and Convention Center locations in Anaheim

Freedman Way

O A

Katella Ave.

Orangewood Ave.

>

CO

CD

CD

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m Chapman Ave.

Hotels in Anaheim Codehotel

Single

1 Anaheim Plaza d

Double 3

Additional person

Suites

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$75

$75

$10

$175 up

Yes

Free

No

Yes

Yes

No

Outdoor

Yes

67

67

5

145 up

Yes

Free

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Outdoor

Yes

3 Disneyland Hotel

120

120

20

400 up

Yes

$10

No

Yes

Yes

$3.00/day Outdoor

Yes

4 Anaheim Hilton

135

150

20

700 up

No

6.00-8.00

No

Yes

Yes

10/day

In/outdoor

Yes

2 Conestoga

5 Holiday Inn Maingate

82

82

0

175 up

No

Free

No

Yes

Yes

No

Outdoor

Yes

6 Inn at the Park

95

107

0

235 up

No

6.00-8.00

No

Yes

Yes

Comp

Outdoor

Yes

7 Anaheim Marriott

125

140

15

600 up

No

6.00-12

No

Yes

Yes

Comp

In/outdoor

Yes

8 Pan Pacific

110

110

10

200 up

Yes

7.00-10

No

Yes

Yes

No

Outdoor

Yes

9 Quality Hotel

89,99

89.99

10

na

No

4.00

No

Yes

Yes

No

Outdoor

Yes

62

62

0

na

Yes

Free

No

Yes

Yes

No

Outdoor

Yes

10 Ramada Maingate d

Note: The rates listed above do not include the current 13% room and occupancy tax per room per night, which is subject to change, a Double/double (2 beds) rates are calculated by adding the additional person charge to the double rate for each guest over two persons, b Hotels that are not a direct ACS shuttle stop are within close walking distance of a property that is a direct stop, c Parking rates are per day and can change without notice, d Recommended for students. na = not available.

Key:

go

A

= Parking

W

= Health club or fitness room B

= Direct ACS shuttle stop

56 JANUARY 30, 1995 C&EN

(§E?b , ^ T I ,

6.

=

Complimentary full or continental breakfast

= Room service = Accessible rooms for persons with disabilities

ll ^ s ^

= Cafe and/or restaurant = Swimr ning pool

Comp = Complimentary

day to the ACS Member & Subscriber Services Department in Columbus, Ohio, from 7:30 AM to 3 PM and to the Member Insurance Plan Administrator's Office from 9 AM to 4 PM. If you have questions about your membership record (for example, member election date, subscriptions) or your insurance coverage, stop by and a staff member will be happy to assist you. Schedule a visit to the Member Resource Center during the Anaheim meeting to meet with staff members and browse through the ACS information on display. ACS Offices. Following is a list of ACS offices and their locations at the meeting. • Operations. Convention Center. • Operations. Anaheim Hilton. • Operations. Anaheim Marriott. • Operations. Disneyland Hotel. • Information and Message Center. Convention Center. • Hospitality Center. Anaheim Hilton. • Chemical Abstracts Service. Anaheim Hilton. • Chemical & Engineering News. Anaheim Hilton. • ACS Exposition. Convention Center. • National Employment Clearing House. Disneyland Hotel. • Executive Director. Anaheim Hilton. • Finance. Convention Center. • Government Relations & Science Policy. Anaheim Hilton. • Press Room. Pan Pacific. • Publications. Anaheim Hilton. • Ticket Control Office. Anaheim Hilton. Attendee Locator. Computer terminals will be located in the registration area of the Convention Center. ACS staff will be available to assist attendees with locating colleagues and in updating personal data. Please update your records if any information has changed sinced you submitted your registration form. This information will be extremely helpful in the event of an emergency.

would like to discuss activities of the society in any of the following areas: awards, constitution and bylaws, divisional activities, local section activities, meetings and expositions, membership in ACS, nominations and elections, ACSPetroleum Research Fund, professional relations, professional training, public affairs, public relations, regional meetings, and other special projects. ACS Division Membership. Divisional membership is evidence of your interest in that particular field of chemistry or chemical engineering and in the work of the division. Division members are granted at least one special privilege—a reduced rate on the purchase of meeting abstracts. Most divisions offer a number of additional services. ACS members may become members of one or more divisions by filling out a divisional membership form and paying the required dues. This can be done in the registration area at the meeting, or upon request to the secretary of the division. Day Care Services. A list of child care facilities may be available from your hotel. Contact the concierge desk for assistance. Facilities for People with Disabilities. ACS is committed to making the meeting accessible to all people. We realize some may have special requirements, such as interpreters for the hearing impaired and shuttle vehicles with lifts. We will do our best to accommodate everyone. Most facilities used for meeting functions are readily accessible. Hotels having appropriately designed sleeping rooms are so identified. Registrants requiring sign language interpreting can submit their request by using the telecommunications

relay service to call the Meetings Department at (202) 872-8069. [If you do not know the TDD relay number for your area, you can call the Federal Communications Commission at (202) 632-6999 (TDD).] When submitting your request for services, be prepared to furnish the following information: Your name, address, telephone number, fax number, the type of interpreting needed, and the day, date, time, and location of the sessions you will be attending. Please call no less than four weeks before the meeting since ACS cannot accommodate last-minute requests for interpreters. You will receive written confirmation of your request. If you must cancel, please notify the Meetings Department immediately. There is a box on the registration form to be checked if you would like to be contacted in advance of the meeting concerning other special needs. Access (door-to-door service) is also available for the disabled at $1.70 per person, one way. For more information concerning Access, call (714) 636-7433, ext. 3601. If you have special needs during the meeting, contact the nearest ACS Operations Office. Speakers Information. Each meeting room will be equipped as follows: 2-inch x 2-inch (35-mm) slide projector, overhead projector, screen, and lighted podium with remote slide control and lapel microphone. To request other special equipment, contact the nearest ACS Operations Office during the meeting. Speakers must register for the meeting unless otherwise notified. Poster Sessions. The poster board size is 4 feet high by 6 feet wide. Authors are responsible for mounting their material prior to the opening of the poster session.

Audiovisual Services. Offices a n d / o r service desks with slide-viewing facilities will be available in all meeting locations. Carousels will be available for loan to speakers wishing to load their slides prior to their sessions. These audiovisual service locations will be open Sunday, April 2, through Thursday, April 6, from 8 AM to 5 PM: • Convention Center. • Anaheim Hilton. • Anaheim Marriott. • Disneyland Hotel. • Quality Hotel. • Inn at the Park. Conferences with ACS Staff. Discussions with society staff members may be arranged through the ACS Executive Office in the Hilton, Sunday, April 2, through Thursday, April 6, 8 AM to 5 PM. Telephone for an appointment if you

2 s

c

Mission San Juan Capistrano is a graceful reminder of the area's long history. JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 57

HOUSING FORM

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim, Calif., April 2 - 6 , 1 9 9 5

Deadline for receipt at ACS: March 3,1995

Use this form only for ACS participating hotels. Reservations CANNOT be made by telephone, but can be faxed to (202) 872-4081 or mailed to ACS Meetings, P.O. Box 18598, 20th St. Station, Washington, D.C. 20036-8598. Please DO NOT mail AND fax as this will result in duplicate reservations. Owing to the large volume of reservations received each day, we are unable to confirm receipt of faxes. Mail Acknowledgment to:

Surname



Name Organization/department Address



City, State Country Telephone



Office

M.I.

First Name

ZIP Fax

.. HOTELS: List hotel code number and name in order of preference below:

Home

,

i

1ST CHOICE-HOTEL CODE & NAME

3RD CHOICE-HOTEL CODE & NAME

2ND CHOICE-HOTEL CODE & NAME

4TH CHOICE-HOTEL CODE & NAME

\~ Single (1 bed) • Double (2 persons,1 bed) • Double/double (2 beds) • Suite, 1 bedroom • Suite, 2 bedroom ARRIVAL DAY AND DATE:

NUMBER OF NIGHTS:

Please print ALL names (including your own) to occupy room below. Use a separate form for EACH room: Number of persons in room: Adults Children ADULTS:

Surname

First Name

M.I

Name(s)

CHILDREN (must include age): First Name

Age

First Name

Age

Name(s) •

Check here if you require any special accommodations due to a disability. If so, please specify:



Nonsmoking room (if available)

Special request:

HOTEL PREFERENCE BASED PRIMARILY ON:



Rate



Location

PAYMENT: DO NOT SEND A CHECK TO ACS FOR THIS RESERVATION All hotels require either a credit card number or advance payment to hold your reservation. You must guarantee this reservation within 10 days of the date indicated on your ACS Housing Acknowledgment directly to your assigned hotel. Failure to do so can result in its cancellation. If you wish to have ACS forward your credit card number directly to your assigned hotel to guarantee your reservation, please provide: •

MasterCard

• Visa

• American Express

• Diners Club

Expiration Date

CREDIT CARD NUMBER CARDHOLDER NAME (Please print):. CHANGES in arrival and departure should be mailed or faxed directly to the ACS Housing Bureau by March 3. After March 3, all housing matters should be directed to your assigned hotel. The name of each hotel guest must be listed. Room assignments will be made in the order received. Incomplete information will result in a delay in processing your request. Please read the housing information before completing this form.

58 JANUARY 30, 1995 C&EN

Boards should be ready one hour prior to the start time of the session for authors to mount their papers. Authors are responsible for removing their material immediately after the close of the session. ACS cannot assume responsibility for materials beyond those time limits. Posters will be displayed for the entire morning, afternoon, or evening of their assigned days. Authors will be with them at the time indicated in the technical program. Shuttle Service. Some hotels are within walking distance of the Convention Center, but a complimentary shuttle service will be offered: Sunday, 7 AM to 11 PM; Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, 7 AM to 11 PM; and Thursday, 7 AM to 6:30 PM. Buses will run approximately every 15 minutes; traffic may delay certain routes during rush hours. Service will be 20 to 30 minutes between 9:30 AM and 4 PM. The drop off and boarding locations at the Convention Center will be at the front entrance. Route I—to Convention Center Disneyland Hotel Pan Pacific Route II—to Convention Center Anaheim Plaza Ramada Maingate Conestoga Rental Car Discounts. Special car rental discounts will be available from Hertz, National, and Dollar for one week before, during, and one week after the meeting. Advance reservations are recommended and minimum rental age of 25 may apply. Hertz. Meeting rates are guaranteed and are subject to car availability. Call the Hertz Meeting Sales Desk (telephone number listed below) to obtain the special rates and identify the ACS Hertz CV# 9520. National. To apply for special weekly and daily meeting rates, book your reservations through the National Reservations Desk (telephone number listed below) and identify the ACS National Recap# 6402704. Dollar. To obtain special meeting rates, call the Dollar Reservations Desk (telephone number listed below) and identify the ACS ID Code AC1005.

located approximately 30 miles or 50 minutes from Anaheim. All major and international carriers fly into LAX at scheduled times. Taxi rides are approximately $58 one way. Bus service to and from the airport is provided by Airport Coach for the following prices: adult one way $14, adult round-trip $22; children one way $8 and round-trip $14. Airport Cruiser (The Big Silver Bus) also provides bus service to and from the airport. The adult prices are the same as Airport Coach, children's prices are $7 one way and $12 round-trip. Shuttle service to and from the airport is provided by SuperShuttle for $10 one way. John Wayne/Orange County Airport is located 16 miles or approximately 25 minutes from Anaheim. Taxi fares are approximately $25 one way. Bus service to and from the airport is provided by Airport Coach for the following prices: adult one way $10, adult round-trip $16; children one way $7 and round-trip $12. Shuttle service to and from the airport is provided by SuperShuttle for $10 one way. Ontario Airport is located 27 miles or approximately 45 minutes from the Anaheim area. Taxi fares are approximately $62 one way. Bus service to and from the airport is provided by Airport Coach for the same rates as those listed for Los Angeles International Airport. Long Beach Airport is located 20 miles or approximately 30 minutes from Anaheim. Taxi fares are approximately $27 one way. For more information on airport shuttle service call: Airport Coach (714) 938-8900 Airport Cruiser (714) 761-3345 SuperShuttle (714) 517-6611

(800) 654-2240 (CV# 9520) (800)227-7368 (Recap# 6402704) (800) 800-4000 (ID Code AC1005)

Anaheim Stadium, the closest Amtrak station, is located only 1 mile from the Anaheim Convention Center. For more information, call (800) USA-RAIL or (714) 385-1448. Taxi fares are based on zones, with extra charges for additional passengers and rush-hour travel. Public transportation is provided by the Orange County Transit Authority (OCTA), which operates buses daily throughout Orange County. Regular fare is $1.00; senior and disabled fares are 45 cents during peak hours, 15 cents all other times. Transfers are available at no charge. You must have exact change. Access (door-to-door service) is also available for senior citizens and the disabled at $1.70 per person, one way. For more information concerning Access, call (714) 636-7433, ext. 3601.

Ground Transportation. Anaheim is readily accessible via four airports and Amtrak. The major international gateway into Southern California is the Los Angeles International Airport. Los Angeles International Airport is

Tourist Information. For general tourist information in and around Anaheim, call the Visitor Information Line at (714) 6358900 from 9 AM to 5 PM, Pacific time, Monday through Saturday, excluding major holidays.

Hertz National Dollar

j\ Jj

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim

J£>, ^ I SPEC1AL EVENTS

J

SATURDAY, APRIL 1 Divisional Officers Caucus, 1:30 to 5 PM, Anaheim Hilton. SUNDAY, APRIL 2 Presidential Plenary, 4:30 to 7:30 PM, International Research—The U.S.-U.K. Model, Anaheim Marriott. See box on page 61 for details. Region II Councilors Caucus, 5 to 6 PM, Anaheim Hilton. Western Regional Councilors Caucus, 5 to 6:30 PM, Anaheim Hilton. Middle Atlantic Regional Councilors Caucus, 5 to 7 PM, Anaheim Hilton. Region IV Councilors Caucus, 5:30 to 7 PM, Anaheim Hilton. Region V Councilors Caucus, 6 to 7 PM, Anaheim Hilton. MONDAY, APRIL 3 Younger Chemists Committee Reception, 5 to 6:30 PM, Disneyland Hotel.

Nonparticipating hotels Single/ double

Hotel Anaheim International Inn 2060 South Harbor Blvd. Anaheim, Calif. 92802 (714)971-9393 fax:(714)971-2706

$55/55

Best Western Raffles Inn & Suites 2040 South Harbor Blvd. Anaheim, Calif. 92802 (714)750-6100 fax:(714)740-0639

59/59

Jolly Roger 640 West Katella Ave. Anaheim, Calif. 92802 (714)772-7621 fax: (714) 772-2308

55/55

Howard Johnson 1380 South Harbor Blvd. Anaheim, Calif. 92802 (714)776-6120 fax:(714)533-3578

55/55

Note: The hotels listed above are not part of the official ACS housing block. Reservations need to be made directly with these hotels, but you should ask for the ACS rate. These hotels are not on the ACS shuttle route, but they are within walking distance of the Convention Center. ...J JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 59

PRELIMINARY

PROGRAM

Sci-Mix, an interdivisional poster session/ Reception, 7 PM mixer, 8 to 10:30 PM, Disneyland Hotel. Undergraduate Student Kickoff, Disneyland NT See technical program summary for partic- Hotel. ipating divisions. SUNDAY, APRIL 2

TUESDAY, APRIL 4

Meeting Event, 4:30 PM ACS Local Section Officers and Tour Presidential Plenary, Anaheim Marriott. NT Speakers Reception, 4 to 6 PM, Inn at the Social Hour, 4:45 PM Park. Committee on Science, Anaheim Marriott. P Exhibitor's Bash, 4:30 to 6:30 PM, ConSocial Hours, 5 PM vention Center. Division of Chemical Education, Poster SesCOD Region I Councilors Caucus, 5:30 to 7 sion, Convention Center* PM, Anaheim Hilton. Division of Polymer Chemistry, Poster Session, COD ACS Awards Reception, 6:30 PM; dinner, Anaheim Marriott. 7:30 PM; general meeting, 8:30 PM, Ana- Social Hour, 5:30 PM heim Marriott. Division of Biochemical Technology, Disneyland Hotel. P WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5 Reception, 6 PM ACS Alumni Hour, 6 to 7:30 PM, Ana- Division of Chemical Information, Welcoming heim Marriott. Reception, Anaheim Marriott. NT

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim SOCIAL EVENTS

The following schedule of social events has been arranged for the spring national meeting. When purchase of tickets is necessary, the event has been numbered to assist in ticket ordering. Social event tickets may be ordered using the advance registration form. Based on availability, tickets may be purchased on site in the registration area. The final deadline for advance ticket sales is March 3 and on site will be 48 hours before the event, after which time only a few tickets may be available at the door of the event. Refunds of social event tickets may be obtained in advance if tickets are returned to ACS by March 17. On site, refunds may be obtained in the registration ticket area until 48 hours before the scheduled event. Should a last-minute emergency dictate against event participation, the registration ticket cashier will attempt to resell your ticket for you. Event participation is open to all interested registrants. Ticket prices are shown or events coded as follows: NT—sponsored, no ticket required; L or D—included in price of meal; P—partially subsidized; COD—cash bar; or M—by divisional or section membership (frequently available at the door of the event).

Social Hour, 6 PM Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. NT Reception, 6:15 PM Student Affiliates, Awards Program, Holiday Inn. NT Social Hour, 6:30 PM Division of Chemical Technicians, Peppers, 12361 Chapman Ave., Garden Grove. COD

Reception, 6 PM Divisional Officers Group, Disneyland Hotel. NT Dinner, 7 PM 101 Divisional Officers Group, Disneyland Hotel. $31 60 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

Luncheon, 12:15 PM 104 ACS Corporation Associates, Creative Invention Award, honoring M. Los, Anaheim Hilton. $35 Social Hour, 12:15 PM Division of Chemical Health & Safety, La Plaza Restaurant, Anaheim Marriott. COD Lunch, 12:30 PM 105 Division of Chemical Health & Safety, La Plaza Restaurant, Anaheim Marriott $13 Receptions, 5 PM Division of Professional Relations, Inn at the Park. NT Research Corporation, ACS Award for Research at an Undergraduate Institution, honoring J. Sherma, Anaheim Marriott. NT Younger Chemists Committee, Disneyland Hotel. NT Social Hour, 5 PM Division of the History of Chemistry, Anaheim Marriott. P Reception, 5:30 PM International Activities Committee, honoring overseas registrants, Anaheim Hilton. NT Receptions, 6 PM Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry, Disneyland Hotel. M

Social Hour, 7 PM Division of Analytical Chemistry, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. NT

Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry, Anaheim Marriott. P

Social Hours, 7:30 PM Division of Medicinal Chemistry, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. NT

Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Cooperative Research Award, honoring L. Mandelkern, C. S. Speed, and F. Stehling, Anaheim Marriott. NT

Division of Organic Chemistry, Poster Session, Convention Center. P Dinner, 7:30 PM 102 Division of Chemical Technicians, Peppers, 12361 Chapman Avenue, Garden Grove. $25 Social Hour, 8:30 PM Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. NT

MONDAY, APRIL 3 Breakfast, 7:30 AM 103 Women Chemists in Industry, Anaheim Hilton. $17 Reception, 11:30 AM ACS Corporation Associates, Creative Invention Award, honoring M. Los, Anaheim Hilton. L

Sci-Mix SATURDAY, APRIL 1

Luncheon, noon Informal Discussion with an Eminent Scientist, Holiday Inn. NT

The very successful Sci-Mix event will be held Monday, April 3, from 8 to 10:30 PM in the Disneyland Hotel. Twelve divisions will participate in this 11th Sci-Mix event

Social Hours, 6 PM Division of Chemical Technicians, National Chemical Technician of the Year Award, Disneyland Hotel. COD University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry Alumni, Holiday Inn. P Social Hour, 6:30 PM Division of Analytical Chemistry, Antonello Ristorante, 1611 Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana. COD Dinners, 7 PM 106 Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry, Anaheim Marriott. $35 107 Division of Chemical Technicians, National Chemical Technician of the Year Award, Disneyland Hotel. $29 Dinner, 7:30 PM 108 Division of Analytical Chemistry, Antonello Ristorante, 1611 Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana. $35 Meeting Event, 8 PM Sci-Mix, Interdivisional, Poster Session/Mixer, Disneyland Hotel. NT

TUESDAY, APRIL 4 Breakfast, 7:45 AM Cornell University, Quality Hotel.

NT

Reception, 11:30 A M Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Annual Awards, Anaheim Marriott. COD Reception, 11:45 A M Women Chemists Committee, Anaheim Hilton. COD Social Hours, n o o n Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Holiday Inn. COD Grady-Stack Award, honoring I. Amato, Pan Pacific. L Luncheons, n o o n 109 Division of Chemical Information, Holiday Inn. $16 110 Division of the History of Chemistry, Anaheim Marriott. $20 111 Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Annual Awards, Anaheim Marriott. $28 Luncheon, 12:15 PM 112 Women Chemists Committee, Anaheim Hilton. $23 Luncheons, 12:30 PM 113 Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Holiday Inn. $15 114 Grady-Stack Award, honoring I. Amato, Pan Pacific. $20 115 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Department of Chemistry Alumni, Anaheim Plaza. $15 Social Hour, 3 PM Division of Environmental Chemistry, Anaheim Marriott. NT Reception, 4 PM Local Section Officers & Tour Speakers, Inn at the Park. NT Social Hour, 4 PM Division of Geochemistry, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. NT

Division of Environmental Chemistry, Cattleman's Wharf, 1160 West Ball Rd. COD Reception, 6:30 PM Division of Petroleum Chemistry joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry, Disneyland Hotel. D Social Hours, 6:30 PM Cellulose, Paper & Textile Division, Anselme Payen Award, honoring G. N. Richards, Quality Hotel. COD Division of Chemical Technicians, Cattleman's Wharf, 1160 West Ball Rd. COD Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. NT Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, Anaheim Marriott. P Meeting Event, 6:30 PM 116 Reception honoring 1995 ACS award recipients, Anaheim Marriott. $10 Social Hour, 7 PM Division of Computers in Chemistry, Poster Session, Convention Center. NT Dinners, 7 PM 117 Chinese American Chemical Society, Chu's Wok Inn, 13053 Chapman Ave., Orange. $25 118 Division of Environmental Chemistry, Cattleman's Wharf, 1160 West Ball Rd. $35 Dinners, 7:30 PM 119 Cellulose, Paper & Textile Division, Anselme Payen Award, honoring G. N. Richards, Quality Hotel. $25

Division of Polymer Chemistry joint with Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. COD University of Massachusetts, joint Chemistry/ Polymer Science & Engineering Departments, Quality Hotel. COD Social Hours, 6 PM Division of Agrochemicals, Disneyland Hotel. M Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. NT

Social Hour, 6:30 PM Division of Polymer Chemistry, Awards, The Catch, 1929 South State College Blvd. COD

Dinner, 7:30 PM 123 Division of Polymer Chemistry, Awards, The Catch, 1929 South State CoUege Blvd. $40

124 Division of Chemical Education, Fullerton Marriott, 2701 East Nutwood Ave., Fullerton. $35

Meeting Event, 8:30 PM Ceremony honoring 1995 ACS award recipients, Anaheim Marriott. NT

Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry, Poster Session, Convention Center. NT

Society of Columbia Chemists, Anaheim Marriott. NT

121 Division of Petroleum Chemistry joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry, Disneyland Hotel. $35

Social Hours, 5 PM Chinese American Chemical Society, Conestoga Hotel. NT

Social Hours, 5:30 PM Division of Biochemical Technology, Poster Session, Disneyland Hotel. P

University of Minnesota University of Notre Dame Yale Chemists' Association

Social Hour, 7 PM Division of Physical Chemistry, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. COD

NT

Iranian Chemist Group of ACS, Conestoga Hotel. NT

International Research—The U.S.U.K. Model, sponsored jointly by Brian M. Rushton, president, American Chemical Society, and Howard Purnell, president, Royal Society of Chemistry, Sunday, April 2, 4:30 to 7:30 PM, Anaheim Marriott. With introductory remarks by Rushton, this plenary session will consist of three distinguished American and British chemists discussing the scientific and nonscientific benefits of training and working on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Purnell will provide closing remarks. The session will be preceded by English tea and American cookies.

120 Division of Chemical Technicians, Celebration Dinner, Cattleman's Wharf, 1160 West BaU Rd. $25

Meeting Event, 7:30 PM 122 Dinner honoring 1995 ACS award recipients, Anaheim Marriott. $55

Reception, 4:30 PM Exhibitor's Bash, Convention Center.

Presidential plenary session

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5 Luncheon, noon Alpha Chi Sigma, La Plaza Restaurant, Anaheim Marriott. Details available at the fraternity table at the Convention Center. COD Social Hour, 5 PM Division of Environmental Chemistry, Poster Session, Anaheim Marriott. NT Social Hours, 6 PM Alumni Hour, Anaheim Marriott.

COD

Participants: Brigham Young University & Talmage Society Duke University Ohio State University Polytechnic University, Brooklyn Stanford University University of California, Santa Barbara University of Michigan

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim ^

AWARDS The a w a r d s reception, dinner, a n d general meeting will be held the evening of Tuesday, April 4, in the Anaheim Marriott—reception, 6:30 P M ; d i n n e r , 7:30 PM; a n d general meeting, 8:30 PM. There will b e additional seating for those wishing to attend only the general meeting. At the general meeting, Derek H. R. Barton, 1995 Priestley Medalist, will deliver his a w a r d address. (See Social Events for ticket information.) ACS Award for Computers in Chemistry, s p o n s o r e d b y Digital E q u i p m e n t Corp., received b y Peter A. Kollman. Address to be presented before Division of C o m p u t e r s in Chemistry, Tuesday AM. ACS Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science & Technology, sponsored b y Air Products & Chemicals JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 61

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM Inc., received by Donna L. Bedard. Address to be presented before Division of Environmental Chemistry, Tuesday AM.

received by Thomas Engel. Address to be presented before Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Tuesday PM.

ACS Award for Creative Invention, sponsored by Corporation Associates, received by Marinus Los. Address to be presented before Agrochemicals Division, Tuesday AM.

ACS Award in Industrial Chemistry, sponsored by Akzo Nobel Chemicals Inc., received by Lynn H. Slaugh. Address to be presented before Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Tuesday AM.

ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, sponsored by Aldrich Chemical Co., received by Larry E. Overman. Address to be presented before Division of Organic Chemistry, Tuesday AM.

ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry, sponsored by Monsanto Co., received by Guido Pez. Address to be presented before Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Monday AM.

ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, sponsored by Mallinckrodt Specialty Chemicals Co., received by Marcetta Y. Darensbourg. Address to be presented before Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Tuesday AM. ACS Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences, sponsored by the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation Inc., received by Henry C. McBay. Address to be presented before Division of Organic Chemistry, Monday AM. ACS Award for Encouraging Women into Careers in the Chemical Sciences, sponsored by the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation Inc., received by Margaret A. Cavanaugh. Address to be presented before Division of Chemical Education, Monday PM.

ACS Award in Organometallic Chemistry, sponsored by Dow Chemical Co. Foundation, received by Jack Halpern. Address to be presented before Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Monday AM. ACS Award in Petroleum Chemistry, received by John M. Prausnitz. Address to be presented before Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Tuesday AM. ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry, sponsored by Mobil Chemical Co., received by Robert H. Grubbs. Address to be presented before Division of Polymer Chemistry, Tuesday AM. ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, sponsored by Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity, received by Reza Ghadiri. Address to be presented before Division of Organic Chemistry, Tuesday PM.

ACS Award for Nuclear Chemistry, received by Joseph B. Natowitz. Address to be presented before Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Tuesday AM.

ACS Award in Separations Science & Technology, sponsored by Rohm and Haas Co., received by Georges Belfort. Address to be presented before Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Thursday AM.

ACS Award for Research at an Undergraduate Institution, sponsored by Research Corp., received by Joseph Sherma. Address to be presented before Division of Analytical Chemistry, Monday PM.

ACS Award in the Chemistry of Materials, sponsored by DuPont, received by George H. Beall. Address to be presented before Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Wednesday AM & PM.

ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry, sponsored by Fisher Scientific Co., received by Harry L. Pardue. Address to be presented before Division of Analytical Chemistry, Tuesday AM.

ACS Award in Theoretical Chemistry, sponsored by IBM Corp., received by Bruce J. Berne. Address to be presented before Division of Physical Chemistry, Tuesday PM.

ACS Award in Applied Polymer Science, sponsored by Phillips Petroleum Co., received by Joseph P. Kennedy. Address to be presented before Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Monday PM. ACS Award in Chromatography, sponsored by SUPELCO Inc., received by Klaus K. Unger. Address to be presented before Division of Analytical Chemistry, Sunday AM. ACS Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry, sponsored by Procter & Gamble Co., 62 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

Arthur W. Adamson Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Surface Chemistry, sponsored by Occi-

The cooperation of the Orange County Section in handling local arrangements is gratefully acknowledged. Through the efforts of its committees, many interesting activities have been planned. Leo Stemler, chairman (1994) Richard Deming, chairman (1995)

dental Petroleum Corp., received by W. Henry Weinberg. Address to be presented before Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Tuesday PM. Alfred Bader Award in Bioinorganic or Bioorganic Chemistry, received by Stephen J. Benkovic. Address to be presented before Division of Organic Chemistry, Wednesday PM. Earle B. Barnes Award for Leadership in Chemical Research Management, sponsored by Dow Chemical Co., received by Leo Manzer.. Address to be presented before Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Tuesday AM. James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching, sponsored by Albemarle Corp., received by Robert J. Lewis. Address to be presented before Division of Chemical Education, Sunday AM. Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry, sponsored by DuPont, received by John C. Tully. Address to be presented before Division of Physical Chemistry, Tuesday PM. Frank H. Field & Joe L. Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry, sponsored by Extrel FTMS Inc., received by Melvin B. Comisarow and Alan G. Marshall. Addresses to be presented before Division of Analytical Chemistry, Tuesday PM. Francis P. Garvan-John M. Olin Medal, sponsored by Olin Corp., Angelica M. Stacy. Address to be presented before Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Tuesday AM. James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public, received by Ivan Amato. Address to be presented at the luncheon, see Social Events listing, Tuesday PM. Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Natural Products, sponsored by Givaudan-Roure, received by Jon C. Clardy. Address to be presented before Division of Organic Chemistry, Wednesday AM. E. B. Hershberg Award for Important Discoveries in Medicinally Active Substances, sponsored by Schering-Plough Corp., received by Paul S. Anderson. Address to be presented before Division of Medicinal Chemistry, Thursday AM. Joel Henry Hildebrand Award in the Theoretical & Experimental Chemistry of Liquids, sponsored by Exxon Research & Engineering Co. and Exxon Chemical Co., received by Michael E. Fisher. Address to be presented before Division of Physical Chemistry, Tuesday PM. Ralph F. Hirschmann Award in Peptide Chemistry, sponsored by Merck Research Laboratories, received by Shumpei Sakakibara. Address to be presented before Division of Medicinal Chemistry, Thursday AM.

Gaude S. Hudson Award in Carbohydrate Chemistry, received by Tomoya Ogawa. Address to be presented before Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry, Monday AM & PM.

April 1,1 to 5 PM, Anaheim Marriott. This workshop will cover free-radical and cationic methods in the photo curing of coatings. Contact Charles Hoyle, University of Southern Mississippi, Box 10076, Hattiesburg, Miss. 39406; (601) 266-4868.

Ralph K. Her Award in the Chemistry of Colloidal Materials, sponsored by DuPont, received by George W. Scherer. Ad- OTHER ACS WORKSHOPS dress to be presented before Division of Science with a Scientist (sponsored by the Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Tuesday PM. Office of Public Outreach), Saturday, April 1, 8:30 AM to 5 PM, Anaheim Hilton. Ipatieff Prize, received by Mark Barteau. Learn exciting techniques for sharing sciAddress to be presented before Division of ence with elementary school children and Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Tuesday PM. more about the new Kids & Chemistry program. All participants will receive a E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial & manual of ideas and activities to use in Engineering Chemistry, sponsored by their communities. Contact Cathi Buzalsky Exxon Research & Engineering Co. and at (800) 227-5558, press zero and ask for Exxon Chemical Co., received by Charles extension 6016, call directly at (202) 872A. Eckert. Address to be presented before 6016, or by e-mail at [email protected] Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Monday AM & PM. Preparing for Radio and Television Interviews (sponsored by ACS Media RelaNobel Laureate Signature Award for tions), Saturday, April 1, 3 to 6 PM; SunGraduate Education in Chemistry, spon- day, April 2, 8:30 to 11:30 AM. Videosored by J. T. Baker Inc., received by Min- taped practice interviews may also be haeng Cho and Graham R. Fleming. Ad- scheduled. Preregistration is required by dress to be presented before Division of March 24. Call (800) 227-5558 and press 5 Physical Chemistry, Tuesday PM. then 3, call directly at (202) 872-4371, or send your name, address, and phone James Flack Norris Award in Physical number to ACS, Media Relations, 1155— Organic Chemistry, sponsored by the 16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Northeastern Section, ACS, received by William P. Jencks. Address to be presented How To Use ACS Career Services to Your before Division of Organic Chemistry, Advantage, Saturday, April 1, 5:30 to 6:45 Monday PM. PM, Disneyland Hotel. This workshop will explain to undergraduates how to effecCharles Lathrop Parsons Award, received tively use ACS Career Service programs, by Alfred Bader. Address to be presented such as the mock interview sessions, reat Board of Directors reception and dinner, sume review discussions, and National Saturday PM. Employment Clearing House. For more information, contact John Sophos at (800) George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education, sponsored by Union Carbide 227-5558, press zero and ask for extension Corp., received by Ernest L. Eliel. Ad- 6209, or call directly at (202) 872-6209. dress to be presented before Division of Chemical Education, Monday PM. Henry H. Storch Award in Fuel Chemistry, sponsored by Exxon Research & Engineering Co., received by Donald F. McMillen. Address to be presented before Division of Fuel Chemistry, Tuesday AM.

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim WORKSHOPS

Interactive Problem-Solving Session on Successful Student Affiliates Chapter Activities, Sunday, April 2, 10 AM to noon, Convention Center. This popular session depends on undergraduate participants who will identify obstacles that they have encountered in achieving the year-round goals and objectives of their student affiliates chapters, as well as the strategies for overcoming these barriers. In addition, the session will address the development of an effective chapter, community service activities, and ways of obtaining funds. For more information, contact Ji-Won Kim at (800) 227-5558, press zero and ask for extension 6176, or call directly at (202) 872-6176.

ACS DIVISIONAL WORKSHOP Student Affiliates Chapter Breakout The following division-sponsored work- Group Discussions, Sunday, April 2, 1:30 shop will be given at the meeting. Con- to 3 PM, Convention Center. Participants tact the individual named below for reg- will brainstorm to identify discussion topics such as leadership development and istration and fee information. the role of the faculty adviser. Breakout Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineer- discussion groups will be formed, and ing, UV Curing of Coatings, Saturday, each group will focus on a chosen topic.

Undergraduate students and faculty advisers are encouraged to participate in the discussion and share their experiences, concerns, and success stories. For more information, contact Ji-Won Kim at (800) 2275558, press zero and ask for extension 6176, or caU directly at (202) 872-6176. Graduate School Preparation Seminar, Sunday, April 2, 3:15 to 4:15 PM, Convention Center. George Pfeffer, University of Nebraska, Omaha, will discuss everything you ever wanted to know about graduate schools in the chemical sciences—how to get in, how to stay in, and how to get out. For more information, contact Ji-Won Kim at (800) 227-5558, press zero and ask for extension 6176, or call directly at (202) 8726176. How To Do Hands-on Science Activities with Elementary School Students, Sunday, April 2, 3:15 to 4:15 PM, Convention Center. The workshop will focus on how student affiliates and their mentors can use WonderScience activities in local community outreach programs. WonderScience is an eight-page, full-color magazine containing hands-on physical science activities for adults and children to do together. Published since 1986, WonderScience has been used in schools, homes, colleges, museums, and community groups as a key resource for elementary science investigations. Participants in this workshop will take part in a series of activities from the magazine and will be provided with sample copies. Preregistration is required. Contact Robin Lindsey at (800) 2275558, press zero and ask for extension 4480, or call directly at (202) 872-4480. Careers in Industry Panel Discussion (sponsored by ACS Corporation Associates and the Society Committee on Education), Sunday, April 2, 4:30 to 6 PM, Convention Center. A panel of industry chemists will discuss everything undergraduates want to know about diverse aspects of careers in industry. Panelists will provide short presentations followed by audience questions in this interactive session. For more information, contact John Higuchi at (800) 227-5558, press zero and ask for extension 6166, or call directly at (202) 872-6166. Basic Estate Planning (sponsored by the Development Office), Monday, April 3, and Tuesday, April 4, 8:30 to 10:30 AM and 1:30-3:30 PM, Anaheim Hilton. This workshop discusses how to avoid probate and minimize estate taxes, how to avoid conflicts with terms of contracts and a will, and how to maintain control and confidentiality of your estate. To attend this workshop, contact Jennifer D'Elia at (800) 2275558, press zero and ask for extension 4094, or caU directly at (202) 872-4094. Workshop for Minority ACS Members (sponsored by the ACS Committee on JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 63

PRELIMINARY

PROGRAM

Minority Affairs), Monday, April 3, 9 AM to noon, Anaheim Marriott. This workshop will help minority members understand ACS operations and how they can play an effective role in the society. For more information on attending this workshop, contact Yvonne D. Curry at (800) 227-5558, press zero and ask for extension 6240, or call directly at (202) 872-6240. Retirement Plan Assets and the Impact of Income Taxes to Heirs: Estate Taxes and Maybe Excise Taxes—Will Anything Be Left? (sponsored by the Development Office), Monday, April 3, 5 to 7 PM, Anaheim Hilton. To attend this workshop, contact Jennifer D'Elia at (800) 227-5558, press zero and ask for extension 4094, or call directly at (202) 872-4094. How To Present Effective Oral Presentations, Tuesday, April 4, 9 AM to noon, Holiday Inn. This workshop on developing and making an effective oral presentation is a must for undergraduates preparing to enter the workplace. A representative from 3M Co. will walk through successful techniques for preparing for general technical presentations. Examples of useful presentation materials and methods of oral communication delivery will be examined. For more information, contact John Higuchi at (800) 227-5558, press zero and ask for extension 6166, or call directly at (202) 872-6166. Help Plan Future Undergraduate Activities at ACS National Meetings, Tuesday, April 4,12:15 to 1:30 PM, Inn at the Park. Undergraduate students are encouraged to make a difference by meeting with the ACS Task Force on Undergraduate Programming at National Meetings to evaluate the undergraduate events in Anaheim. The task force is seeking suggestions for future n a t i o n a l m e e t i n g programs and students who want to get involved in the planning of these activities. For more information, contact John Higuchi at (800) 227-5558, press zero and ask for extension 6166, or call directly at (202) 872-6166. How To Jump Start Your Career, Tuesday, April 4, 2 to 5 PM, Holiday Inn. The workshop will provide undergraduate students an opportunity to assess their own values system and communication styles, which are important insights for career development. The workshop also focuses on skills to develop strategies in building effective relationships with supervisors and coworkers and in achieving personal career goals and objectives. Information on job market trends, career patterns, and organizational dynamics focusing on politics, process, and structure will be presented. Preregistration is required. Contact John Higuchi at (800) 227-5558, press zero and ask for extension 6166, or call directly at (202) 872-6166. 64 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

SUV INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOPS The following workshops will be offered by Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS). Preregistration is required. For more information, contact the workshop assistant at Chemical Abstracts Service, P.O. Box 3012, Columbus, Ohio 43210; (800) 8486538, ext. 3549; or STNmail: WRKSHPC; or fax: (614) 447-3713. STN User Meeting. Sunday, April 2,9 AM to 4 PM. This workshop will cover strategies for searching STN International, an information network of more than 180 databases. Sessions will be geared toward both STN users and experienced on-line users who want to learn more about searching STN. The workshop will also include a help desk area and several roundtable discussions on STN Express, future STN system enhancements, and solving difficult search problems. Chemistry from CAS. Monday, April 3,1 to, 4 PM; Tuesday, April 4, 1 to 4 PM; Wednesday, April 5, 1 to 4 PM. Sessions will present how the CAS files work together to cover the world's chemical literature back to 1957. Participants will learn search strategies for conducting text and chemical substance searches to take advantage of file features and indexes. Prerequisite: STN Basics or equivalent online experience. Introduction to On-line Searching for Chemists: Part I. Monday, April 3, 9 AM to noon; Tuesday, April 4, 9 AM to noon; Wednesday, April 5, 9 AM to noon. This workshop will focus on using the basic command language of STN in the REGISTRY and CA files. Attendees will learn to use chemical names and molecular formulas to find references to and preparations of chemical substances of interest. This workshop is designed for the scientist who is new to on-line searching on STN. Introduction to On-line Searching for Chemists: Part II. Monday, April 3,1 to 4 PM; Tuesday, April 4,1 to 4 PM; Wednesday, April 5,1 to 4 PM. The session, a continuation of Part I, covers how to find references to subjects of interest and work written by a particular author or done by a specific organization. Prerequisite: Introduction to On-line Searching for Chemists: Parti. Patents on STN. Wednesday, April 5, 1 to 4 PM; Thursday, April 6, 1 to 4 PM. Participants will learn about the patent files on STN and when to use which file. Attendees will use STNindex to identify which files have information related to a subject and SmartSELECT to perform one-step cross-file searching. The workshop is designed for experienced on-line searchers who are new to patent searching. Prerequisite: STN Commands or equivalent experience.

REGISTRY File Dictionary Searching: Chemical Names. Tuesday, April 4, 9 AM to noon. This session describes how to locate substance information using virtually any chemical name segment. Participants will learn how to search REGISTRY using chemical names, name segments, and trade names that precisely fit their search requirements. Prerequisite: STN Basics. REGISTRY File Dictionary Searching: Molecular Formulas. Tuesday, April 4,1 to 4 PM. This workshop demonstrates how to use molecular formula information to pinpoint substances of interest. Prerequisite: STN Basics. Regulatory Compliance Information on STN. Thursday, April 6, 9 AM to noon. Attendees will learn how to find regulatory compliance information that applies to specific chemical substances using the REGISTRY and CHEMLIST files as well as how to retrieve regulatory information that applies to general chemical subjects in bibliographic files such as CIN and CA. Prerequisite: STN Basics or equivalent on-line experience. Searching CASREACT with STN Express (CASREACT). Wednesday, April 5, 9 AM to noon, 1 to 4 PM. This session provides an introduction to the information in CASREACT—the reaction database produced by CAS. Participants will conduct structure-based reaction searches using substructure searching techniques and the reaction-specific precision tools SITE and MAP. Prerequisite: Structures/Express. STN Basics. Monday, April 3, 9 AM to noon; Tuesday, April 4, 9 AM to noon; Wednesday, April 5, 9 AM to noon. This workshop will focus on use of the basic command language of STN to search bibliographic files on STN. Attendees will learn to perform simple keyword searches and to use on-line tools to increase search recall. The workshop is designed for the searcher who is new to on-line searching and wants to learn how to search document-based files. STN Commands. Monday, April 3, 9 AM to noon; Wednesday, April 5, 9 AM to noon. Participants will learn to use STNindex, multifile searching, and duplicate detection to effectively search more than one file, and to use SELECT and SmartSELECT to analyze search results. This workshop is appropriate for the experienced on-line searcher who is new to STN or for the STN searcher who has completed STN Basics. Structure Searching with STN Express. Monday, April 3, 9 AM to 4 PM; Tuesday, April 4, 9 AM to 4 PM; Thursday, April 6, 9 AM to 4 PM. Workshop attendees will learn how to find substance information quickly and accurately in the REGISTRY file using a structure diagram as the search

term, how to build structure diagrams using STN Express software, and how to find both specific and general classes of chemical substances and references to those substances. This workshop is designed for the searcher who is new to on-line searching and wants to learn techniques to search substance-based files.

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim

«wiii Admission to the exposition is complimentary for all national meeting registrants. While planning your schedule in Anaheim, reserve some time to visit the ACS National Exposition. In addition to functioning as a showcase for the most up-to-date scientific products and services, the exposition serves as a valuable source of continuing education for national meeting attendees. Located in Halls A and B of the Convention Center, the exposition will be open Monday, April 3, 9 AM to 5 PM; Tuesday, April 4, 9 AM to 6:30 PM; and Wednesday, April 5,9 AM to 4 PM. The exposition will consist of about 390 booths, representing close to 235 companies and organizations displaying everything from instruments and books to computer hardware and scientific software. Also displayed will be chromatographic and lab equipment, furniture, and safety equipment. Each exhibiting organization will have technical personnel present to give demonstrations, answer questions, and discuss your needs and interests. Exposition Reception. Please plan to attend a complimentary reception inside the exhibit hall from 4:30 to 6:30 PM on Tuesday, April 4. Beer, snacks, sodas, and other refreshments will be served. Prize and Souvenir Booths. In addition to the comprehensive display of products and services of interest to the scientific community, there will be several drawings for prizes and a free ACS souvenir for all visitors to the exposition. Use your badge, which will be included with registration materials, to enter each day for a prize drawing and to receive a complimentary ACS souvenir. Admission Requirements. Although admission to the exposition is complimentary for all meeting registrants, a badge is required to enter the exhibit hall. Badges will be mailed to all preregistrants; onsite registrants can obtain a badge in the main registration area of the Convention Center. Those not registering for the meeting, but interested in visiting the exhibits, can obtain an exhibits-only badge for $25.

Students with school identification will be charged $5.00. There will be no preregistration for exhibits-only attendees; exhibits-only badges can be purchased in the main registration area of the Convention Center.

the Hospitality Center, located in the Anaheim Hilton, until 48 hours before the scheduled tour. Should a last-minute emergency dictate against your tour participation, the Hospitality Center staff will attempt to resell your ticket for you.

Exposition Workshops. A series of free exposition workshops will be conducted in Anaheim and will cover a variety of topics. Workshops will be held Monday through Wednesday, April 3 through 5, in the Convention Center. Workshop topics, sponsors, and advance registration forms will be published in the final program. Attendance will be limited to workshop registrants.

Disneyland. Arrangements have been made to provide Convention Passport tickets to Disneyland at a discount rate. The regular one-day admission price is $33 for adults and $25 for children (3-11 years). Tickets may be ordered on the registration form for $25 per adult or cMd or may be purchased on site in either the registration area or the Hospitality Center. The tickets can be used any day from Sunday, April 2, through Saturday, April 8. Because a limited number of tickets are available, advance ticket purchase is recommended. Transportation is not included. Complimentary shuttle service is available from most hotels and motels to the Main Street entrance. Check with hotel front desk for schedule information.

Commemorative Postal Cachet/Postal Substation. The 20th in a series of philatelic covers featuring ACS presidents will be available for sale at the Chemical Heritage Foundation booth 555. Sponsored by the ACS Division of the History of Chemistry, this cachet will feature Frank W. Clarke, ACS president in 1901. A temporary postal station, as well as a special ACS postal cancellation commemorating the 209th national meeting, have been requested for use on the commemorative envelope. Mail orders for these envelopes will be accepted if postmarked by March 27. Order forms may be obtained by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to John Sharkey, Chemistry Department, Pace University, Pace Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10038. Those who ordered an envelope from the previous meeting will automatically receive a new order form.

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim

mil The following ACS organized tours have been planned for registrants. Because most tours require advance purchase of tickets, you must use the registration form to order your tickets. Disabled registrants needing assistance with tours should so indicate on the registration form, and staff will then contact them concerning arrangements needed. Based on availability, tickets may be purchased on site only in the Hospitality Center, located at the Anaheim Hilton. Buses for all tours will depart from the Anaheim Hilton. ACS tours will be canceled if there is insufficient registration to meet the required minimums. Registrants affected will be notified. Participation in these tours is limited to those registered for the meeting. Refunds of ACS tour tickets may be obtained in advance if tickets are returned to ACS by March 17. On site, refunds may be obtained only in

SUNDAY, APRIL 2 GP-1. 10 AM to 3 PM. Orange County Highlights. On this tour, visitors will trace the development of Orange County, with its beaches, shops, restaurants, and cultural attractions. A guide will relate the story of the Crystal Cathedral, which has been completely paid for by donations, and the history of the Irvine Co. as the tour passes sports and cultural sites such as Arrowhead Arena, Angel Stadium, and the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The tour continues with a drive up the coast and a stop at Roger's Gardens, a 7.5-acre botanical garden where bulbs and flowers are in full-colored, beautiful bloom. The last stop is for upscale shopping and lunch on your own at Fashion Island, overlooking Newport Harbor. Cost: $18 (advance registration required). GP-2.1:30 to 5:30 PM. Richard Nixon Library. This site—the first presidential center on the West Coast—is on 9 acres just 15 minutes from Anaheim. The museum includes a 52,000-sq-ft main gallery and archives, the 37th President's birthplace home with many original furnishings, a 75-seat amphitheater, a 30- x 120foot reflecting pool, citrus groves, and the first lady's garden. The library is the final resting place of Richard and Pat Nixon; it also features video displays, exhibits, memorabilia, and a motion picture on Nixon's public and private life presented in a 293-seat theater. Cost: $20 (advance registration required). MONDAY, APRIL 3 GP-3. 9 AM to 2 PM. Best of Newport. This tour includes a narrated cruise through Newport Harbor with its view of magnificent homes and yachts of the rich JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 65

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM and famous as well as beaches and islands where many movies have been filmed. Then, tour Roger's Gardens, a 7.5acre botanical garden and showplace that is internationally recognized for its use of colorful and unique plant combinations. Find antiques, unusual artwork, gift and decorating ideas, and gardening books. The next stop is Fashion Island—home to open-air courtyards and covered paseos, boutiques, department stores, and a cornucopia of culinary delights. Cost: $22. GP-4. 9:30 AM to 3 PM. San Juan Capistrano & Laguna. En route to San Juan Capistrano, guides will provide narrative on the colorful history of Orange County. After a stop at historic mission San Juan Capistrano, visitors can explore the restored garden and the mission museum. Tour the historic downtown area and enjoy shopping and lunch on your own before the tour continues on to Laguna Beach with its French Riviera-like setting for shopping and browsing. Guides will be happy to advise on the best places to find unique handmade creations. Cost: $21. GP-5.10 AM to 4 PM. Highlights of Los Angeles. This tour includes the bustling downtown area, with the Civic Center, Music Center Complex, and Olvera Street, the founding site of the City of Angels. Then, explore Hollywood—stroll along the sidewalk where stars engraved with the names of more than 1,850 celebrities are embedded and visit Mann's Chinese Theatre. Drive down Melrose Avenue, visit Beverly Hills, and browse along Rodeo Drive. Then lunch on your own at Farmer's Market—an international bazaar of arts, crafts, gifts, and foods. The tour concludes with a drive by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art complex and adjacent La Brea Tar Pits. Cost: $19. GP-6.12:30 to 4:30 PM. Water Factory 21. Water Factory 21, in Fountain Valley, Calif., is a wastewater recycling project that processes secondary treated water from the sanitation districts so that it meets drinking water requirements. The project was built in the early 1970s to provide a source of water for the Talbert Barrier, a seawater intrusion barrier. The barrier protects a groundwater basin that provides two million people with 75% of their water needs. After the tour of Water Factory 21, a presentation will be made by chemists from Orange County Water District's state-certified lab. Cost $15 (limited to 25 registrants). TUESDAY, APRIL 4 GP-7. 9 AM to 3 PM. J. Paul Getty Museum. Drive along scenic coastline to the J. Paul Getty Museum's cliffside location in Malibu. The museum houses collections of Greek and Roman antiquities; pre-20th-century European paintings, 66 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

drawings, sculptures, illuminated manuscripts, and decorative arts; and 19th- and 20th-century European and American photographs. The building is a replica of an ancient Roman villa, and the grounds include trees, flowers, and bronze statues appropriate for that era. After the museum, continue on to Santa Monica to the Third Street Promenade, a pedestrian mall lined with shops, clubs, restaurants, and movie theaters. Cost: $21. GP-8. 9:30 AM to 2:30 PM. Arts & Antiques in Laguna. Laguna Beach, a prominent art colony, is an ideal place for shopping and browsing among boutiques, galleries, little theaters, and coffee houses. A guide will take visitors on a tour of the art galleries that will include a presentation by one of the artists or gallery owners. Lunch at Las Brisas, overlooking the Laguna Beach coastline, is included. Cost: $36. GP-9A. 10 AM to 5 PM. Universal Studios Tour. This tour takes visitors behind the scenes of this 420-acre movie studio, with its outdoor sets for motion pictures and TV shows. Experience special effects such as a flash flood, the parting of the Red Sea, a collapsing bridge, and a glacial avalanche. The newest attraction, "Back to the-Future," is a state-of-the-art ride that creates a total sensory impact experience akin to a flying roller coaster. Explore the Entertainment Center and watch one of a wide range of stage shows based on movies and TV shows. Visitors will have time to stroll along "Citywalk," which features more than 40 unique shops, restaurants, and clubs. Cost: $46 (adults). GP-9C. 10 AM to 5 PM. Universal Studios Tour. See GP-9A for details. Cost: $38 (children 3-11 years old). GP-10. 1 to 4:30 PM. Allergan Optical. The tour of Allergan's research and development center will trace the path of pharmaceutical development. Included will be the laboratories for drug discovery, safety evaluation and biological sciences, preformulation and formulation, and analytical development. The $40 million R&D center, officially opened in June 1993, roughly doubled the amount of space available for Allergan's research activities. Irvine, Calif.-based Allergan is a global provider of specialty therapeutic products. Cost: $15 (limited to 60 registrants). GP-11. 6 to 11 PM. Sunset Harbor Cruise. In Newport Beach, visitors will board a party boat and enjoy a narrated cruise through Newport Harbor, viewing the homes and yachts of the many celebrities and industrialists who live in the bayfront communities of Balboa, Lido, and Linda Islands. The cruise boat will drop visitors at The Cannery—a dockside restaurant that was once a working fish

cannery. A full dinner, including dessert, will be served. Cost: $47 (advance registration required). WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5 GP-12A. 9:30 AM to 2:30 PM. Bowers Museum. Historic Orange County will be explored through a visit to the Bowers Museum, which is dedicated to the preservation, study, and exhibition of fine arts of indigenous peoples. Focusing on the artwork of Pre-Columbian, Oceanic, Native American, and Pacific Rim cultures, the collections are irreplaceable windows into past and present civilizations. The tour includes a catered luncheon. Cost: $39 (adults, advance registration required). GP-12C. 9:30 AM to 2:30 PM. Bowers Museum. See GP12-A for details. Cost: $35 (children 5-12 years old, advance registration required). GP-13.12:15 to 5:30 PM. Huntington Library. Pasadena was once a resort for East Coast millionaires, and their sprawling mansions line the route that visitors will follow to the Huntington Museum, Gardens, and Library, situated on a 200acre estate with rural and formal gardens. The museum's art gallery is noted for its 18th-century British art collection that includes Sir Thomas Lawrence's "Pinkie" and Gainsborough's "Blue Boy." And the Huntington Library houses rare books and manuscripts. Among the exhibits are a 1475 Gutenberg Bible, a first folio of William Shakespeare's plays, and Benjamin Franklin's handwritten autobiography. The tour will include a special English tea in the Huntington Library Tea Room. Cost: $38. GP-14. 1 to 5 PM. Victorian Woman. At the Discovery Museum of Orange County, visitors can view "The Victorian Woman," an overview of the period from 1890 to 1915—including social customs, morals, manners, and fashion. The hands-on historical museum lets visitors experience what life was like at the turn of the century; it is housed in the restored Kellogg House. The 4-acre grounds include sycamore trees, a rose garden, herb bed, and citrus grove. The program will be accompanied by a tea consisting of a variety of finger sandwiches, fresh scones, and pastries, along with a variety of teas. Cost: $35. GP-15. 2-5 PM. South Coast Air Quality Management District. The district monitors air quality, develops regulations to reduce smog, and educates the public about the effects of air pollution. This tour of the district's "green" building— designed to be environmentally friendly— includes the air-quality laboratory, library, and conference center, and also the district's fleet of alternative-fuel vehicles and their varied refueling stations and the mobile test vehicles used to analyze

stationary sources of pollution in the field. Cost: $15 (limited to 35 registrants). GP-16A. 5 to 10 PM. Wizardz. Discover Los Angeles' newest magic club and dinner theater. Wizardz Dinner Theater is a two-level indoor attraction featuring entertainment, shopping, and dining. It is located along the streets of Universal Studio's latest attraction, "Citywalk," which features shops, restaurants, and clubs. Visitors will have time, before and after the dinner show (dinner included), to stroll and browse around the area. In the Theater of Illuzionz, magicians perform amazing tricks. A laser show creates glittering planets, stars, and moons throughout the theater. And the Wizardz Wizard will appear (and disappear) right before your eyes. Cost: $48 (adults, advance registration required). GP-16C 5 to 10 PM. Wizardz. See GP16A for details. Cost: $37 (children 12 years old & younger, advance registration required).

THURSDAY, APRIL 6 GP-17. 9:30 AM to 2:30 PM. Orange County Yesterday & Today. This tour reveals the rich cultural heritage of Anaheim and its surrounding communities and will highlight the steel-and-concrete Orange County of today, with its Angel Stadium, Arrowhead Arena, and Crystal Cathedral. A guide will trace the development of Orange County from the days of Spanish land grants and Mexican ranchos. Stops include historic Orange Courthouse and Old Town Orange, with its more than 100 antique shops and selection of small restaurants in which to enjoy lunch on your own. Cost: $19. GP-18.9:30 AM to 12:30 PM. Richard Nixon Library. See GP-2 for details. Cost: $20.

i^

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

The ACS Department of Career Services will operate a National Employment Clearing House (NECH) in the Terrazzo Room/Exhibit Hall of the Disneyland Hotel from Sunday, April 2, through Thursday, April 6. NECH offers employers and candidates the opportunity to conduct job interviews on site during the course of the meeting. Everyone participating on site at NECH must be registered for the meeting before NECH registration can be activated Candidate Registration. Three registration options are available for candidates:

Professional development workshops and programs Preregistration for the following ACS Career Services workshop is required by March 24: • Effective Job Searching and Career Transitioning, Sunday, April 2, and Monday, April 3, 8 AM to noon, Disneyland Hotel. Major components of finding a job and changing careers are presented in this four-hour workshop: career skills and values clarification, resume preparation, interviewing skills, and transitioning processes. Fee: $25.

This program provides individual halfhour appointments with a career consultant for the purpose of reviewing your resume and discussing your career options. Bring a copy of your resume. • Recruiters Panel, Tuesday, April 4,12:30 to 2 PM, Disneyland Hotel. Representatives from four small businesses (specialty chemical, pharmaceutical, environmental, and analytical lab) will discuss employment trends and recruitment and hiring practices of chemists.

To register for the above workshop, send a check payable to the American Chemical Society with your name, address, and phone number and indicate which day you wish to attend the workshop to Karen Dyson, Department of Career Services, American Chemical Society, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036 by March 24.

The following programs are cosponsored with the Department of Career Services: • How To Jump Start Your Career (cosponsored with the Society Committee on Education), Tuesday, April 4, 2 to 5 PM, Disneyland Hotel. Provides undergraduates an opportunity to assess their values, communication styles, and skills applicable to the workplace. Information on job market trends, career patterns, and organizational dynamics will be presented. Preregistration is required. Call the Student Affiliates Program at (202) 872-4480. • Technician Recruiters' Panel (cosponsored with the Division of Chemical Technicians). Tuesday, April 4, 2:15 to 4 PM, Disneyland Hotel. Recruiters from different areas of industry will discuss what they look for in technician candidates during recruitment, factors that influence hiring, and employment trends for technicians in their industries.

The following three programs do not require preregistration. Participants in the Mock Interview and Resume Review sessions may sign up for individual appointments at each program location: • Mock Interview Sessions, Sunday, April 2, student affiliates only (undergraduates), and Monday, April 3, through Wednesday, April 5, all members, 8:30 AM to 5 PM, Disneyland Hotel, Terrazzo Room/Exhibit Hall. Sessions give the chemist an opportunity to videotape a practice interview and receive immediate feedback on how to improve interviewing skills. Bring a copy of your resume. The process takes about 45 minutes. • Resume Review and Career Assistance, Sunday, April 2, through Wednesday, April 5, 9 AM to 5 PM, Disneyland Hotel, Terrazzo Room/Exhibit Hall.

preregistration, on-site registration, or off-site registration. Preregistration. Candidates are encouraged to preregister to avoid waiting in long registration lines at the meeting. To preregister, contact the Department of Career Services [call (800) 227-5558 and press 9, 1, 3 or e-mail [email protected]] no later than Wednesday, March 1, and request NECH registration forms. Once the forms have been received, carefully read all of the directions, complete the forms (please type them), and return the forms with five copies of a resume, not exceeding two single-side pages, no later than Friday, March 10. Any forms received after March 10 will be returned for on-site registration. Candidates who preregister will receive a confirmation notice, including an NECH registration number and other pertinent information, prior to the meeting.

For information on specific locations of all workshops and programs, see the final meeting program. If you have questions, call ACS Career Services at (800) 227-5558.

On-site registration. Candidates may register for NECH on site. Those planning on registering on site may request NECH registration forms until Friday, March 17. NECH registration forms may also be obtained and completed on site. After registering for the meeting and receiving a badge, candidates should proceed to the on-site registration form pickup counter in the NECH area to begin the NECH registration process. Five copies of a resume, not exceeding two single-side pages, must be submitted with the NECH registration forms. On-site registration closes at 1 PM on Tuesday, April 4. No candidate registrations will be accepted after 1 PM on Tuesday. Off-site registration. Candidates unable to attend the meeting may still submit NECH registration forms and resumes for employer consideration. To register as an off-site candidate, contact JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 67

PRELIMINARY

PROGRAM

the Department of Career Services [call (800) 227-5558 and press 9, 1, 3 or e-mail [email protected]] no later than Wednesday, March 1, and request NECH registration forms. Once the forms have been received, carefully read all of the directions, complete the forms (please type them), and return the forms with five copies of a resume, not exceeding two single-side pages, by Friday, March 10. NECH registration forms received after March 10 will not be processed. Candidates registering for the off-site option will receive a confirmation notice prior to the meeting. Registration Fee Waivers. Unemployed ACS members registering for NECH may register for the meeting free of charge. Please use the meeting registration form found on page 73 and check registration option 8. Unemployed members may also register free of charge on site using the standard meeting registration form. Only unemployed members using NECH are entitled to this waiver. Students and postdoctoral appointees are not eligible for waivers. Employer Registration. All employers participating on site at NECH must first be registered for the meeting and be wearing a meeting badge when checking in at NECH. Meeting registration may be done either in advance (use the meeting registration form found on page 73 or on site. Employers who are not ACS members should register as visitors (option 5.) Meeting registration forms should be submitted directly to the ACS Meetings Department as indicated and fees must be paid at the time of meeting registration. There are two NECH registration options available to employers: full service and minimum service. To obtain NECH employer registration forms, contact the Department of Career Services [call (800) 227-5558 and press 9, 1, 3 or e-mail [email protected]] no later than Friday, March 17. The full-service option enables employers who are on site at NECH to interview as many candidates as time and interest permit. Employers registering for the full-service option may post an unlimited number of positions for candidate review, will have unlimited access to all candidate files registered with NECH, may schedule interviews at will, and will be provided with NECH interview space. A limited number of 8- x 10-foot private interview offices are made available by request for an additional fee. Full-service employers may register for NECH either in advance or on site; however, those registering in advance will receive a discount. All advance full-service employer registrations must be received no later than Friday, March 24. Any registrations received after March 24 will be processed and 68 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

charged as on-site registrations. All NECH fees are invoiced within 30 days following the meeting. The minimum-service option has two components. The first is for employers who will not be attending the meeting. These employers may post as many positions as they wish in absentia for candidates to review. Interested candidates will then contact employers as directed on the position-available form. Resumes and messages left for absentee employers at the NECH employer message center will be forwarded following the meeting. A complete set of candidate summary forms is available to absentee employers for an additional fee. All minimumservice registrations for absentee employers must be received no later than Friday, March 24. Positions received after March 24 cannot be guaranteed to be posted at NECH. Once on site, NECH staff will not accept any absentee registrations by express mail or fax. The second component is for employers who will be in attendance at the meeting but will have limited time to devote to NECH. These employers may also post positions as absentee employers, but have the ability to review candidate files at will for future contact. This component allows employers registered for the minimum-service option who are on site to review candidate files whether or not they post positions. Minimum-service employers reviewing candidate files may not send messages through the NECH message system, nor may they schedule and hold interviews in any part of the NECH area. They may, however, receive any messages left for them in the employer center. Any minimum-service employer wishing to upgrade to the full-service option may do so at the employer registration counter. All NECH fees are invoiced within 30 days following the meeting. Important Registration Note. The general meeting registration area in the Convention Center closes at 3 PM, Monday through Wednesday. Candidates and employers wishing to register for NECH after 3 PM may do so contingent on meeting registration being completed immediately the following morning (NECH staff will issue a temporary badge). Candidates will not be permitted to register for NECH after 1 PM on Tuesday, April 4. Candidate and Employer Orientation Schedules. Orientation programs will be held for both candidates and employers. All candidates and new employers are urged to attend. Candidate orientation sessions will.be held on Sunday, April 2, from 3 to 4 PM, 4:30 to 5:30 PM, and 6 to 7 PM; and on Monday, April 3, from 9 to 10 AM. Employer orientation sessions will be held on Sunday, April 2, from 5 to

6 PM, and on Monday, April 3, from 9 to 10 AM. NECH Hours of Operation. Sunday, April 2, 1 to 7 PM (registration only); Monday, April 3, through Wednesday, April 5, 8 AM to 6 PM; and Thursday, April 6,8 AM to 2 PM. Interviewing will conclude at 5 PM, Monday through Wednesday, and at 2 PM on Thursday.

J / J J

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209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim

1 COMMITTEE AGHJPT'JJ

The open committee sessions listed below give ACS members a chance to express their views on issues under consideration before these issues are acted on by the board or the council, or to bring up other subjects that deserve attention. Members are urged to examine the agenda and make known any opinions or ideas they may have. If you cannot attend the particular sessions involved, write the officers listed or ask someone attending the session to speak in your behalf. Most executive sessions are open to councilors. For further information, contact the officers listed. BUDGET & FINANCE Joan E. Shields, chairman; Department of Chemistry, Long Island University, C. W. Post Campus, Brookville, N.Y. 11548 Open Meeting Saturday, April 1, 8:30 AM-3 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Report of chairman. 2. Report of treasurer. 3. Report of chief financial officer: a. 1994 budgetary performance. b. 1996 dues escalator. 4. Report from Subcommittee on Financial Impact of Constitution & Bylaw Changes. Executive Session 1. Reports from other committees.

CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE James G. Bennett Jr., chairman; Plastics Department, General Electric Co., Noryl Ave., Selkirk, N.Y. 12158 Open Meeting (Joint with Division of Chemical Information) Monday, April 3, 4:15-5:30 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Review of executive session. 2. CAS Governing Board report. 3. Status of CAS activities. Executive Session 1. CAS Governing Board report. 2. Report on academic program. 3. Status of CAS activities.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

CHEMICAL SAFETY William H. Breazeale Jr., chairman; Department of Chemistry & Physics, Francis Marion College, Florence, S.C. 29501 Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Monday, April 3, 8:30 AM to noon Anaheim Hilton 1. Reports of chairman and staff liaison. 2. Report of ACS safety and health coordinator. 3. Reports of subcommittees including those on Household Chemicals, on High and Pre-High School Safety, on Facilities, on Regulation & Public Affairs, on Safety & Academic Chemistry Laboratories, and on Local Section Safety Information. 4. Report of the Task Force on the Certification of Chemical Hygiene Officers. 5. New business.

CHEMISTS WITH DISABILITIES H. David Wohlers, chairman; Department of Science, Northeast Missouri State University, Kirksville, Mo. 63501

Council, board meetings The ACS Board of Directors meeting, open to members who wish to observe, will be held in the Anaheim Hilton, from 10:30 AM to noon, and from 1:30 to 4:30 PM on Sunday, April 2. The ACS Council meeting will begin at 8 AM, Wednesday, April 5, in the Anaheim Marriott. It will be preceded by a continental breakfast for councilors beginning at 7:15 AM. Councilors are asked to check in beginning at 7 AM and proceed to the breakfast area, keeping in mind that the meeting starts promptly at 8 AM. Space will be available for ACS members and nonmembers to observe the council in action. It is hoped that many will take advantage of this opportunity to learn firsthand of the society's operations. Alternative councilors and division and local section officers are particularly urged to attend.

Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Monday, April 3, 8:30 AM-4 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Update on NAS Science Education Standards Project. 2. Future symposia at ACS national meetings. Constitution and/or Bylaws for CONSIDER3. Reports from liaisons. ATION by Council in Anaheim: 4. Other business and topics from the floor. a. Dues waiver for unemployed members— 5. Sourcebook of Adaptive Strategies proposal. Bylaw XII, Sec. 3, new (i). b. Dues discount for members with family COMMITTEES responsibilities—Bylaw XII, Sec. 3, new (j). Donald E. Jones, chairman; 1229 Woods Rd., 2. First review of guidelines for amending bylaws of International Chemical Sciences Chapters. Westminster, Md. 21157 3. Proposed amendments to local section and Open Meeting division bylaws. Monday, April 3,11 AM to noon 4. New and/or other business. Anaheim Hilton 1. Report from executive session. COPYRIGHTS 2. Topics from the floor. Helen A. Lawlor, chairman; Institute for ScienExecutive Session tific Information, 3501 Market St., Philadel1. Sunset reviews of several committees. phia, Pa. 19104 2. Review of Younger Chemists Committee Open Meeting age requirement. Monday, April 3,1:30-2 PM 3. Increasing minority participation in goverAnaheim Hilton nance. 4. Codification of ACS governance committees. 1. Report from executive session. 5. Public outreach in the governance structure. 2. Comments from the floor. 6. The information superhighway. Executive Session 7. Preparation of recommendations for 1996 1. ACS Copyright Status Form. committee chairmanships. 2. Report on electronic preprints. 3. Amending committee's charter to include CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS information policy. 4. 1995-96 educational plans. Charles F. Rowell, chairman; Department of Chemistry, Stop 9B, U.S. Naval Academy, An- 5. Miscellaneous updates. napolis, Md. 21401-1398 Combined Open Meeting A and Executive Session Sunday, April 2, 8 AM-5 PM Anaheim Hilton As below.

CORPORATION ASSOCIATES C. Gordon McCarty, chairman; Research Adviser/Manager, Miles Inc., Mobay Rd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15205-1241

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Open Meeting Monday, April 3, 8:30 AM-4:30 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Report of the committee chairman. 2. Reports of Subcommittees on a. Awards. b. Communications. c. Education. d. Finance & Grants. e. Programs. 3. Report of board liaison.. 4. Report of staff liaison. 5. Report from Board Task Force on Industry Affairs. 6. Discussion of recommendations from 1994 Presidential Colloquium and Board Retreat on Minority Affairs. 7. Open discussion and new business.

DIVISIONAL ACTIVITIES Robert A. Pett, chairman; Ford Research Laboratory, MD 3198 SRL, P.O. Box 2053, Dearborn, Mich. 48121-2053 Open Breakfast Meeting Saturday, April 1, 8-9 AM Anaheim Hilton 1. Member concerns. 2. Task force liaison. 3. New agenda items for afternoon session. Executive Session 1. Subcommittee sessions: Long-Range Planning, Annual Report, Divisional Status, Constitution & Bylaws. 2. Executive assistance to division officers. Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Sunday, April 2,1-5 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Subcommittee reports continued. 2. Petitions for action. 3. New business.

ECONOMIC & PROFESSIONAL AFFAIRS Edward S. Kostiner, chairman; Department of Chemistry, U-60, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Conn. 06269-3060

COUNCIL POLICY Stephen A. Rodemeyer, vice chairman; Department of Chemistry, California State University, Fresno, Calif. 93740-0070

Open Meeting Tuesday, April 4, 9:30 AM to noon Open Meeting B Anaheim Hilton Wednesday, April 5,1-5 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Reports of officers. 1. Review of petitions to amend the Society's 2. Report of CPC vice chairman.

Reports of subcommittees. Schedule of business sessions, fall 1995. Reports of committees. Review of Council agenda. Old and new business.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Sunday, April 2,1-5 PM Anaheim Hilton Committee accomplishments and objectives. Federal Policy Agenda on Employment. Review of surveys. Approval of career consultant candidates. Update on employment terminations. Review of Trade Secrets revision outline. Review of NECH guidelines. JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 69

PRELIMINARY

PROGRAM

EDUCATION Stanley H. Pine, chairman; Department of Chemistry, California State University, Los Angeles, Calif. 90032 Open Meeting Monday, April 3, 3-4 PM Anaheim Hilton As below, plus items from the floor. Executive Session 1. Precollege: CHEM MATTERS; Chemistry Olympiad; high school chemistry; pre-high school science; and Project SEED. 2. College/university: college chemistry consultants service; two-year college chemistry; chemistry for nonscience students; and student affiliates. 3. Continuing education programs: short and media courses. 4. Miscellaneous.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT Allan M. Ford, chairman; Lamar University, P.O. Box 10613, Beaumont, Texas 77710 Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Sunday, April 1, 7:30-10 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Chairman's report. 2. Liaison's report. 3. Reports of Subcommittees on Pollution Prevention, of Environmental Monitoring, of Toxicology and Risk Assessment, and of Air/ Water/Waste. 4. Task Force reports on Laboratory Waste Management, on Occupational Health & Safety, on Environmental Research, and on TSCA.

INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES

Busy Newport Harbor serves picturesque beachfront communities. MEETINGS & EXPOSITIONS Janan M. Hayes, chairman; Merced College, 3600 M St., Merced, Calif. 95348 Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Sunday, April 2,1:30-5 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Chairman's report. 2. Reports of Subcommittees on Site Selection, on Regional Meetings, on Expositions, on National/International Meeting Review, on Finance, and on Meeting Arrangements. 3. Other old and new business.

Edwin D. Becker, chairman; National Institutes of Health, Bldg. 5, Room 124, Bethesda, Md. 20892-0001

MEMBERSHIP AFFAIRS

Open Meeting Saturday, April 1,1-5 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Reports of subcommittees and task forces on International Chemical Education, on ACS Project Bookshare, on Scientific Freedom & Human Rights, on Chemical Instrumentation, on International Policy & Planning, on Africa Programs, on International Meetings & Communications, and on Central & Eastern Europe. 2. Other old and new business.

Open Meeting Monday, April 3, 4-5 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Report on executive session. 2. Topics from the floor. (Comments from members concerning their expectations for the society are especially welcome.)

LOCAL SECTION ACTIVITIES James D. Burke, chairman; Rohm and Haas Co., 727 Norristown Rd., Spring House, Pa. 19477 Open Meeting Tuesday, April 4, 3-4 PM Inn at the Park 1. Report from executive session. 2. Idea exchange—local sections helping each other. 3. Mentoring and career development programs. Executive Session 1. Reports by committee chairman and staff liaison. 2. Reports by subcommittee chairmen. 3. Petitions for Council consideration. 4. Committee liaison reports. 70 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

George F. Palladino, chairman; Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 231 South 34th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104-6323

Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. Discussion of petitions for Council consideration. 3. Discussion of membership development issues: recruitment, retention, membership categories/dues, member services. 4. Report on the college science newspaper— Reaction Times. 5. Liaison reports.

MINORITY AFFAIRS Carlos G. Gutierrez, chairman; Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, California State University, Los Angeles, Cailf. 90032-8202 Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Tuesday, April 4, 8 AM to noon Anaheim Hilton

1. Report from the meeting of the Advisory Panel on Minority Affairs and on the staff Internal Coordinating Committee on Minority Affairs. 2. The ACS Scholars program—a program report. 3. Report from the subcommittees—Board Retreat on Minority Affairs. 4. Workshops for minority members at the ACS meeting. 5. Report on recommendations on diversity from the president's colloquium. 6. Interactions with other societies: Report on efforts with AISES, NOBCChE, SACNAS, and NACME. 7. Report from the Award Nomination Committee. 8. Cooperative efforts with INROADS. 9. Increasing minority participation in ACS governance. 10. 1995 National Chemistry Week activities. 11. Local section and division activities.

NOMENCLATURE John A. Secrist II, chairman; Southern Research Institute, P.O. Box 55305, Birmingham, Ala. 35255-5305 Open Meeting Monday, April 3, 2-4 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Algorithmic generation of chemical names. 2. Other topics according to the interests of those attending.

NOMINATIONS & ELECTIONS John B. Sharkey, chairman; Department of Chemistry, Pace University, 1 Pace Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10038 Open Meeting Monday, April 3, 4-5 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Report on executive session. 2. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Increasing member participation in elections. 2. Increasing minority and industrial representation in governance.

3. Proposed modification of Bylaw V, Manner of Elections. 4. Preparation of slates for Council Policy Committee (1996-98) and for Committee on Committees (1996-98).

ments in Science & Technology, on Research & Its Funding, on Internationalization of Science, and on Science Communications. 3. Old and new business.

TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES PATENTS & RELATED MATTERS Bobby A. Howell, Department of Chemistry; Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Mich. 48858 Combined Open Meeting and Executive Session Saturday, April 1, 3-6 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Reports of the chairman and staff liaison. 2. Subcommittee reports on a. Education. b. Legislation and regulations. c. Awards. d. International issues. e. Long-Range Planning and Executive Session. 3. New business.

PROJECT SEED Herbert B. Silber, chairman; Chemistry Department, San Jose State University, 1 Washington Sq., San Jose, Calif. 95192-0101 Open Meeting Monday, April 3, 4r-5 PM Anaheim Hilton

Robert J. Maleski, chairman; Tennessee Eastman Co., Bldg. 231, Kingsport, Term. 37662-5231 Open Meeting Monday, April 3, 4-5 PM Anaheim Hilton As below, plus items from the floor. Executive Session 1. Data review of voluntary industry standards project. 2. Data review of CTA survey of technicians and employers. 3. Reports of subcommittees. 4. Old and new business.

WOMEN CHEMISTS Christina C. Hendricks, chairman; Eli Lilly & Co., 307 East McCarty, Indianapolis, Ind. 46285 Open Meeting Sunday, April 2, 2-3 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Review of Executive Committee proceedings. 2. Discussion of committee structure and action plan. 3. New business from the floor.

As below. Executive Session 1. Report from staff. 2. Review of selection meeting. 3. Review of scholarship meeting. 4. Subcommittee reports from Program & Public Relations and Planning & Finance. 5. Liaison reports. 6. Old and new business.

PUBLICATIONS Joseph A. Dixon, chairman; 1224 William St., State College, Pa. 16801 Open Meeting Monday, April 3, 3-4 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Report from executive session. 2. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Election of vice chairman. 2. Report of C&EN Publishing Board. 3. Publications Division five-year forecast. 4. Status of new journals and special publications. 5. 1996 subscription prices. 6. Reports from other committees. 7. Closed executive session.

SCIENCE Eli M. Pearce, chairman; Polymer Research Institute, Polytechnic University, 6 Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11201-2907 Open Meeting Sunday, April 2, 8 AM to noon Anaheim Hilton 1. Report of Subcommittee on Pedagogical Symposia. 2. Reports of Task Forces on New Develop-

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Executive Session Chairman's report. Reports of subcommittees. Development of committee action plans. Old business. New business.

YOUNGER CHEMISTS J. Martin Scholtz, Department of Medical Biochemistry & Genetics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77484-1114 Open Meeting Sunday, April 2, 4-5 PM Anaheim Hilton 1. Reports from executive session. 2. Topics from the floor. Executive Session 1. Subcommittee reports on Communication; on Local/Regional Activities; on National Meeting Activities; and on Newsletter Activities. 2. Liaison and task force reports. 3. Old and new business.

209th ACS National Meeting

Anaheim SHORT COURSES

l

The following professional development courses will be offered in participating meeting hotels. For a descriptive catalog providing information on course content, hotel sites, tuition fees, and registration procedures, please call or write: Department of Continuing Education, American

Chemical Society, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036; (800) 227-5558 and select option 2 or (202) 872-4508. Atomic Absorption, ICP & ICP-Mass Spectrometry, April 1-2 Beyond the Basics: Chemical Engineering for Chemists, April 2-3 Building a Winning Team, March 31 Capillary Gas Chromatography, April 1-2 Catalytic Air Pollution, March 31-April 1 Chemical Engineering & Process Fundamentals for Chemists, March 30-April 1 Chemistry of the Synthesis of Peptides, March 31-April 1 Chiral Separations by Chromatography, March 31-April 1 Conflict Management Workshop, April 1 Creative Problem Solving & Innovation in R&D, March 31-April 1 Dispersion of Fine Particles in Liquids, March 31-April 1 Effective Supervision of Scientists & the Technical Staff, March 31-April 1 Emulsions & Microemulsions, March 31-April 1 Environmental Data Validation, March 31-April 1 Essentials of Process Validation, March 31 Experimental Design for Productivity & Quality in R&D, March 30-April 1 Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, March 31-April 1 Fundamentals of HPLC, March 31-April 1 Good Laboratory Practices & ISO-9000: Quality Standards for Chemical Biopharmaceuticals, April 1-2 Interpretation of Infrared Spectra, April 4-6 Interpretation of Mass Spectra, March 31-April 1 Introduction to Molecular Modeling & Computational Chemistry, April 1 Methods Development, Validation Procedures & Conformity Assessment in the Analytical Laboratory, March 31April 1 Molecular Biology & Recombinant DNA Technology, March 31-April 1 New Product Development, March 31April 1 Optimizing Quality Control of Pharmaceuticals & Biopharmaceuticals, April 1-2 Organic Chemistry of Drug Design & Drug Action, March 30-April 1 Pharmacology for Chemists, March 30April 1 Polymer Coatings, March 31-April 1 Practical Capillary Electrophoresis, March 31-April 1 Quality Assurance for Analytical Chemistry, March 31-April 1 Statistical Analysis of Laboratory Data, April 1-2 Synthetic Organic Chemistry: Modern Methods & Strategies, March 31-April 1 Technical Writing Workshop, March 3 1 April 1 Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy, April 3-5 Water & Waste Analysis by U.S. EPA Methods, April 1-2 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 71

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim ACS OFFICERS

Brian M. Rushton, president Ronald C. Breslow, president-elect Ned D. Heindel, immediate past-president Paul H. L. Walter, chairman, board of directors John K Crum, executive director D. H. Michael Bowen, secretary Brian A. Bernstein, treasurer

DIVISION OFFICERS Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry, David Armstrong, chairman; Cynthia J. Mussinan, secretary-treasurer, IFF R&D, 1515 Highway 36, Union Beach, N.J. 07735. Division of Agrochemicals, Don Baker, chairman; Terry Spittler, secretary, Cornell Analytical Laboratories, Cornell NYSAES, Geneva, N.Y. 14456. Division of Analytical Chemistry, Henry Blount, chairman; Sarah Rutan, secretary, Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Chemistry, Richmond, Va. 23284-2006. Division of Biochemical Technology, Douglas Cameron, chairman; Ronald Huss, secretary, Bio-Technical Resources, 1035 South 7th St., Monitowoc, Wis. 54220-5301. Division of Biological Chemistry, Rowena Matthews, chairman; Frank Raushel, secretary, Texas A&M University, Department of Chemistry, College Station, Texas 77843-3255. Division of Business Management & Development, Joseph Walton, chairman; Rodney Heck, secretary, Quantum Chemical Co., 11500 Northlake Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio 45249. Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry, Alan Darvill, chairman; Gregory Cote, secretary, National Center for Agricultural Utilization & Research, 1815 North University, Peoria, 111. 61604-3902. Division of Cellulose, Paper & Textile Chemistry, Tor Schulz, chairman; John Obst, secretary, USDA Forest Service, One Gifford Pinchot Dr., Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wis. 53705-2398. Division of Chemical Education, Ron Perkins, chairman; Jerry Sarquis, secretary, Miami University, Department of Chemistry, Oxford, Ohio 45056. Division of Chemical Health & Safety, George Wahl, chairman; Sung Moon, secretary, Adelphi University, Department of Chemistry, Garden City, N.Y. 11530-1299. Division of Chemical Information, Ruthann Bates, chairman; William Greaves, secretary, Amoco Corp., Mail Code 1904, P.O. Box 87703, Chicago, 111. 60680-0703.

Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Jay Benziger, chairman; Lisa Quencer, secretary, Dow Chemical Co., 1691 North Swede, Larkin Laboratory, Midland, Mich. 48674. Division of Computers in Chemistry, Douglas Smith, chairman; M. Katharine Holloway, secretary, Merck Research Laboratories, Bldg. 42-3, West Point, Pa. 19486. Division of Environmental Chemistry, Gordon Bellen, chairman; Martha Wells, secretary, Tennessee Technological University, Center for the Management, Utilization & Protection of Water Resources, Box 5033, Cookeville, Term. 38505. Division of Fertilizer & Soil Chemistry, R. Jerome Timmons, chairman; A. Michael Huey, secretary-treasurer, Applied Chemical Technology Inc., 4350 Helton Dr., Florence, Ala. 35630. Division of Fluorine Chemistry, Arthur Elliott, chairman; Suzanne Purrington, secretary, North Carolina State University, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 8204, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-8204. Division of Fuel Chemistry, Michael Serio, chairman; Mohammad Fatemi, secretary, Amoco Corp., Amoco Research Center, F-7, P.O. Box 3011, Naperville, 111. 60566.

Division of Professional Relations, Michael J. Brownfield, chairman; Elizabeth A. F. Nalley, secretary, Rte. 3, Box 176-1, Chickasha, Okla. 73018-9803. Rubber Division, John Long, chairman; J. Marshall Dean, secretary, Harwick Chemical Corp., 60 South Seiberling St., P.O. Box 9360, Akron, Ohio 44305. Division of Small Chemical Businesses, Robert A. Dollinger, chairman; Ada Nielsen, secretary, Capstone International, 546 Timber La., Lake Forest, 111. 60045.

^

209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim PREPRINTS

Division of Geochemistry, Robert Byrne, chairman; Susan Carroll, secretary, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-219, Livermore, Calif. 94551.

Preprints m a y be ordered from the addresses below or purchased at the divisions' hospitality tables near their meeting rooms.

Division of the History of Chemistry, Martin D. Saltzman, chairman; Vera Mainz, secretary, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 142B RAL Box 34-1, 600 South Matthews Ave., Urbana, 111. 61801.

Environmental Chemistry Robert W. Paddock Center for Great Lakes Studies 600 East Greenfield Ave. Milwaukee, Wis. 53204-2944 (414)382-1731 fax:(414)382-1705

Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Lawrence Casper, chairman; Nancy Jackson, secretary, Sandia National Laboratory, Division 6212, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, N.M. 87185. Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Arthur Ellis, chairman; Bruce Bursten, secretary, Ohio State University, Chemistry Department, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1173. Division of Medicinal Chemistry, James Bristol, chairman; Thomas Perun, secretary, Abbott Laboratories, Drug Design & Delivery, D-467, Bldg. AP10, One Abbott Park Rd., Abbott Park, 111. 60064-3500. Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, Patricia Baisden, chairman; Jack Kay, secretary, Drexel University, Department of Chemistry, Disque Hall, 32nd & Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104-2875. Division of Organic Chemistry, William Roush, chairman; Dennis Liotta, secretarytreasurer, Emory University, Department of Chemistry, 1515 Pierce Dr., Atlanta, Ga. 30322. Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Enrique Iglesia, chairman; Warren Bush, secretary, 11407 Valley Spring Dr., Houston, Texas 77043-4622.

Division of Chemical Technicians, Debra McCombs, chairman; Deborah Stelzner, secretary, Clorox Co., 7200 Johnson Dr., Pleasanton, Calif. 94588.

Division of Physical Chemistry, Paul Barbara, chairman; A n d r e w DePristo, secretarytreasurer, Iowa State University, Department of Chemistry, 303 Wilhelm Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011.

Division of Chemistry & the Law, James Carver, chairman; Russel Hiles, secretary, Stone & Hiles, 9440 Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills, Calif. 90210.

Division of Polymer Chemistry, William Daly, chairman; Frank Blum, secretary, University of Missouri, Rolla, Department of Chemistry, 142 Schrenk Hall, Rolla, Mo. 65401.

11 JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN

Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Elsa Reichmanis, chairman; David Lohse, secretary, Exxon Research & Engineering, Corporate Research Laboratories, Rte. 22 East, Clinton Township, Annandale, N.J. 08801.

Vol. 35 No. 1,$12a

Vol. 40 Fuel Chemistry No. 1,2 John Crelling $22.50 each Department of Geology Southern Illinois University, No. 3, 4 Carbondale $22.50 each Carbondale, 111.62901-4324 (618)453-7361 J$2.50 shipping and handling fax:(618)453-7393 Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering Inc. American Chemical Society Distribution Office 1155—16th St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 872-4363 fax: (202) 872-6067 Petroleum Chemistry Inc. Sanjay Agarwal Exxon Chemical Co. P.O. Box 536 Linden, N.J. 07036 (908) 474-3031 fax: (908) 474-2321 Polymer Chemistry Inc. Frederick Dammont Circulation Manager Division of Polymer Chemistry P.O. Box 20453 Newark, N.J. 07101 (201)482-5744

Vol. 72 $25

Vol. 40 No. 1,2,3,4 $18b

Vol. 36 No. 1 $45c Back issues, $45

a Payment with order; make check payable to Division of Environmental Chemistry, b U.S. library rate $96, foreign library rate $96 plus $8.00 shipping and handling, c Optional airmail delivery outside U.S. is $30 extra.

Advance registration--209th ACS National Meeting Anaheim, CA April 2-6, 1995 PLEASE ALLOW SUFFICIENT TIME FOR YOUR MAIL TO REAUM US. Deadline for receipt of registration: March 3 Deadline for requests for full refunds: March 17 Deadline for requests for partial refunds: April 14 REFUND REQUESTS RECEIVED AFTER APRIL 14 WILL NOT BE HONORED

Mail this form with payment to: American Chemical Society, Meetings P.O. Box 18598 20th St. Station Washington, D.C. 20036-8598

Make check payable to: ACS or American Chemical Society

PLEASE SUBMIT A SEPARATE FORM FOR EACH REGISTRANT DDr.

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• Government

• Industry

Check one of the following employment fields: • Agrochemicals/Food • Analytical Chemistry • Biochemistry/Biotechnology • Catalysis D Chemical Education D Colloid Chemistry/ Surfactants D Environmental Chemistry • Inorganic Chemistry/Materials D Nuclear/Radiochemistry D Organic Chemistry • Personal Care/Household Products D Petroleum Products • Pharmaceuticals D Physical Chemistry • Polymers/Plastics/Organic Materials D Please check here if you are disabled and require special services. We will contact you prior to the meeting. Please list ALL of the division(s) to which you belona:

I

D Please check here if you do not wish to rejceive exhibitor product offerings. FEES: Registration—check one only 1 • Member© $190 2 • National affiliate @ $190 3 • Nonmember: U.S. resident chemical scientist @ $285 4 • Member: emeritus/retired @ $85 5 • Visitor: non-U.S. resident or nonchemical scientist or chemical technician© $190 6 • Visitor: guest of registrant @ $15 Note: Separate form must be completed 7 • 50-year member (No Fee) 8 • Unemployed member (No Fee) Student: less than postdoctoral status, member or nonmember @ $15 9 • Undergraduate 10 • Graduate 11 12 13 14

One-day: D S u D M D T D W D T h • Adult @ $100 • Undergraduate student @ $5.00 • Graduate student @ $5.00 • Precollege teacher @ $5.00

FEES: Abstracts

1 FEES: Event tickets Event No. No. tickets

(3) $

Total 1 $_ $_ $_ $_ $_

Sets at $45—nonmember Sets at $35—member Sets at $30—division member division i • Will pick up at meeting. • Postage is $6.00 for the mailing of each set of books. (U.S. ONLY)

$ $_ Disneyland Passport

(3) Abstract totaM (4) Abstract postage 5

$_

(2) Ticket total $ Social Secur ty No.

TOTAL REMITTED $ (1,2,3,4)

Date of Birth (Inform ation required for Tours)

DEADLirME FOR RECEIPT

(1) Fee total $

MARCH 3

Registrations paid by credit card ONLY may be 1axed to (202) 833-7711. However, do not mail and fax; otherwise duplicate charges will occur. Paid by: D Check • American Express • >/ISA

• MasterCard • Diners Club

Expiration date

Credit card account no. Cardholder:

Signature:

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Mailing address for registration materials and abstracts. [Note: Registratic>n materials can be mailed to all registrants. Abstracts can be mailed via UPS to U.S. residents; complete address (no P.O. Box nurnbers) must be given.] • Same as above • Street City, State ZIP JANUARY 30,1995 C&EN 73