234TH ACS NATIONAL MEETING - C&EN Global Enterprise (ACS


Jul 30, 2007 - the keynote symposium to be hosted by ACS President Catherine T. (Katie) Hunt—supports the meeting's overall theme, "Biotechnology fo...
8 downloads 131 Views 108MB Size

TECHNICAL PROGRA THREE YEARS OLD The Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, with its dramatic roof, is accessible from all major highways and secondary streets.

ce

ο χ

(< ce hζ

ο ζ

ο hζ



ο ο

00

00 Χ ϋ

<

00 00

< 2

234TH ACS NATIONAL MEETING BOSTON, Aug. 19-23

HISTORICAL YET MODERN and exciting, Boston sets the scene for the American Chemical Society's 234th national meet­ ing. The ACS president, 31 technical divi­ sions, one secretariat, andfivecommit­ tees will host the original programming in 844 half-day oral sessions and 97 poster

MEETING & EXPOSITION INFORMATION ONLINE Access up-to-date meeting details and the official version of the technical program on the attendee website at chemistry.org/meetings/boston2007 This website will be updated as the meeting nears and includes Registra­ tion, Housing, Technical Programming, Exposition, Workshops, and Social & Special Events among other activities. Because some locations may change after C&EN's press time, be sure to pick up a program on-site during the meeting.

sessions. More than 9,500 papers will be presented. "Material Innovations: From Nanotech to Biotech and Beyond!"—the keynote symposium to be hosted by ACS President Catherine T. (Katie) Hunt—supports the meeting's overall theme, "Biotechnology for Health and Wellness." The symposium will featurefiveworld-renowned scientists and innovation leaders and will be followed by a panel discussion. The centenary of Chemical Abstracts Service will be marked with a presidential symposium followed by a luncheon. Two other anniversaries will be recognized with symposia cosponsored by Hunt: the 20th anniversary of National Chemistry Week and the 25th anniversary of the Division of Chemistry & the Law. Workshops covering laboratory safety, professional skills for postdocs consider­ ing academic careers, helping women chemists develop skills to communicate their achievements, and more will be open to all registrants but require separate reg­

WWW.CEN-0NLINE.ORG

f)7

JULY 30. 2007

istration and/or fees. ACS short courses, designed to improve the skills and market­ ability of chemical scientists and techniREGISTRATION CATEGORY

MEMBERS ACS member or society affiliate Postdoctoral member Emeritus or retired member 50-year member Unemployed member (Dues waiver required) Precollege teacher Graduate student One-day registrant NONMEMBERS Chemical scientist Postdoctoral scientist Visitor: Nonchemical scientist or chemical technician Precollege teacher Graduate student, less than postdoctoral One-day registrant Guest of registrant3 UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ACS student affiliate Visitor: Undergraduate student EXP0SITI0N-0NLYVISIT0RS Adult, exposition only Student, exposition only

STANDARD ON-SITE FEE

$385 385 195 No Fee No Fee 78 138 195 $675 675 385 78 320 385 35 $78 160 $35 10

a Registration is restricted to a spouse or family member of registered attendee having no affiliation with the field of chemical science and who is not eligible to become an ACS member. Only one guest registration is allowed per registering attendee, and the guest registration must be completed and paid by the registering attendee at time of original registration.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ipate: T—ticket required; NT—sponsored, no ticket required; COD—payment due based on individual consumption at event.

dans, also require separate registration and fees. The C&EN-Chemjobs Career Fair, so­ cial events, and exposition round out the meeting.

HOW TO PURCHASE TICKETS. Event tickets can be purchased through ACS Attendee Registration online until Aug. 23 or on-site from Aug. 18 to 23. Attendees REGISTRATION who purchase tickets after July 27 will need to pick up their tickets at any ACS Attendee Registration location during the EARLY REGISTRATION. Early registra­ meeting. All tickets are available on a firsttion for the national meeting closed on July come,first-soldbasis, and ticket sales for 27, and registrations or payments received specific events will close 24 hours prior to after July 27 will be processed at standard registration rates. Attendees who registered the event. Some event organizers may offer by July 27 should receive their badge creden­ a limited number of tickets for sale at the tials in the mail before the meeting. Interna­ event if they are still available. Cancella­ tions or refund requests must be made by tional registrants and early registrants who do not receive their badge credentials before Aug. 15 in accordance with the ACS Social Event Cancellation Policy at chemistry, the meeting must pick them up at ACS At­ org/meetings/national/registration. tendee Registration (Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, North Lobby) during the html. meeting. Please bringyour e-mail confirma­ tion for faster processing. SATURDAY, AUG. 18

Women Chemists Committee, Build Your Brand—Promote Yourself Workshop/ Ticket No. SE-04/$59 1:30 to 4:30 PM

Sheraton Boston, Liberty C Younger Chemists Committee Open Meeting & Reception/NT 4:30 to 6:30 PM

Marriott Copley Place, Salons A-D Presidential Reception/NT 5 to 6:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, R00111205C

BIOL Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 5to7PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2 CHED Reception Honoring the German Exchange/GSSPC/NT 5:30 to 7 PM

Seaport, Seaport Β

STANDARD & ON-SITE REGISTRATION.

Standard registration fees are in effect between July 28 and Aug. 23. Register on­ line at chemistry.org/meetings/national/ registration.html anytime before the meeting ends on the afternoon of Aug. 23. A valid membership number must be entered during registration to register as a member and receive your ACS member discount on registration fees. Attendees who register after July 27 must pick up their badge credentials at ACS Attendee Registration during the meeting. Please bringyour e-mail confirmation for faster processing. In Boston, attendees can pick up their badge credentials or complete a new reg­ istration using credit card, cash, check, or money order at ACS Attendee Registration (Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, North Lobby) on Saturday, 3 to 6 PM; Sun­ day to Wednesday, 7:30 AM to 9 PM; and Thursday, 7:30 AM to 1 PM.

SOCIAL AND SPECIAL EVENTS MANY SOCIAL and special events will be held by a variety of event organizers during the meeting. Event participation is open to all interested registrants. Some events re­ quire that a ticket be purchased in order to participate. Each of the following listings is coded to indicate what is required to partic­

CHED Social Hour & Dinner/Ticket No. SE-02/$55 6 to 9 PM

GEOC Social Hour/NT 5:30 to 7 PM

Boston Park Plaza, Plaza Ballroom

Umbria Ristorante, 295 Franklin St. SUNDAY, AUG. 19 Chemjobs Career Fair 8 AM to 5:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallC Undergraduate Students Hospitality Center/NT 8 AM to 5 PM

International Activities Committee/U.S. National Committee for International Union of Pure & Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Reception for International Reg­ istrants/NT 5:30 to 7:30 PM Sheraton Boston, Back Bay Ballroom D District II Councilor Caucus/NT 6to7PM

Sheraton Boston, Republic A

Westin Copley Place, Essex Ballroom

Middle Atlantic Councilor Caucus/NT 6to7PM

ACS Board of Directors Open Meeting/ NT 9 AM to noon

Sheraton Boston, Berkeley

Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center,

Western Councilor Caucus/NT 6to7PM

Room 210C

Sheraton Boston, Fairfax A

Chemistry in Action: Health & Wellness Community Outreach Activity for El­ ementary and Middle School Students 11 AM to 1PM

District V Councilor Caucus/NT 6 to 7 PM

Museum of Science, One Science Park

District IV Councilor Caucus/NT 6to7PM

CHED High School/College Interface Luncheon/Ticket No. SE-03/$28 Noon to 2 PM

Sheraton Boston, Fairfax Β

Seaport, Lighthouse Ballroom 1

WWW.CEN-0NLINE.ORG

6 8

JULY 30. 2007

Sheraton Boston, Republic Β

Alumni & Friends of Iowa State Univer­ sity Chemistry Social Reception/NT

wiïiï-

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM at the 234th ACS National Meeting AUGUST 19-20,2007 · BOSTON, MA · WESTIN COPLEY PLACE S U N D A Y ,

A U G U S T

Getting the Most Out of Your Undergraduate Research Experience

Undergraduate Hospitality Center 8:00 A . M . - 5 : 0 0 P.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ESSEX SOUTH/CENTER BALLROOM

12:30 P.M.-2:20 P.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ST. GEORGE A/B

Faculty AcWisore Coffee Break

K|ds

9:00 A . M . - 1 0 : 2 0 A.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ESSEX NORTH-WEST BALLROOM

&

chemistry Workshop

2:30 P.M.-3:30 P.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, AMERICA NORTH BALLROOM

Alternative Careers in Chemistry Workshop

Graduate School Reality Check Co-Sponsored by the Younger Chemists Committee 2:30 P.M.-3:50 P.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ST. GEORGE A/B

9:00 A . M . - 1 0 : 2 0 A.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ST. GEORGE A/B

Polymer Science Symposium Co-Sponsored by the Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. 10:30 A . M . - 1 2 : 0 0 NOON WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ST. GEORGE A/B Box lunches provided

M O N D A Y ,

1 9

Graduate School Recruiting Ice Cream Social 4:00 P.M.-5:30 P.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ESSEX BALLROOM

A U G U S T

2 0

Undergraduate Hospitality Center 8:00 A . M . - 5 : 0 0 P.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ESSEX SOUTH/CENTER BALLROOM

Graduate School Recruiting Breakfast 8:30 A . M . - 9 : 5 0 A.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ESSEX BALLROOM

Green Chemistry Symposium Co-Sponsored by the Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc. 10:00 A . M . - 1 1 . 3 0 A.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ST. GEORGE A/B W-4*\

Eminent Scientist Lecture & Luncheon FEATURING ROBERT W. LENZ, PH.D. "Bacterial Polyesters: Biosynthesis, Biodegradable Plastics & Biotechnology" 11:45 A . M . - 1 : 1 5 P.M. WESTIN COPLEY PLACE, ESSEX SOUTH/CENTER BALLROOM

Undergraduate Research Poster Session 2:30 P.M.-4:30 P.M. BOSTON CONVENTION AND EXPOSITION CENTER, HALL B2

Sci-Mix/Successful Student Affiliates Chapter Posters 8:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. BOSTON CONVENTION AND EXPOSITION CENTER, HAL· B2

Ail events are sponsored or co-sponsored by the Society Committee on Education Task Force on Undergraduate Programming. Chain Etta (kavery; North Cwolira/OTU Greensboro, NC; Program Chain Ping Furtan, university of Pittsburgh-TttiisvW^ Î B É ^ | i | | | For more information, contact the ACS Undergraduate Programs Office at - i i | l L 1-800-227-5558, exL4480,oratsapfogram^cs.ora gllgSe

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

6 to 7:30 PM Westin Copley Place, America North Ballroom POLY Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 6to8PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2 TECH Social Dinner/Ticket No. SE05/$60 6 to 9:30 PM Ristorante Saraceno, 286 Hanover St. CINF Welcoming Reception/NT 6:30 to 8:30 PM Seaport, Lighthouse Ballroom 1 MEDI Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 7 to 9 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2 ANYL Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 7 to 9 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2 INOR Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 7 to 10 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2 CHED Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 7:30 to 9:30 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallBz COMP Social Hour & Poster Session/ COD 7:30 to 9:30 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2 ORGN Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 8 to 10 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2

MONDAY, AUG. 2 0 Women in Industry Breakfast/Ticket No. SE-06 (regular)/$30/Ticket No. SE-07 (student)/$17 7:30 to 9:30 AM Westin Boston Waterfront, Commonwealth A/B

AGRO Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 8 to 11 AM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2

University of Massachusetts Polymer Science & Engineering Department Alumni Social/COD 5to7PM Westin Boston Waterfront, Hancock Room

Chemjobs Career Fair 8 AM to 5:30 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallC

LGBT Chemists & Allies Reception/COD 5:30 to 7 PM Seaport, Seaport C

Undergraduate Students Hospitality Center/NT 8 AM to 5 PM Westin Copley Place, Essex Ballroom ACS Exposition 9AMto5PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, Halls A 8c Bi Committee on Minority Affairs Reception & Luncheon/Ticket No. SE-08/$50 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM Sheraton Boston, Back Bay Ballroom D CINF Luncheon/ Ticket No. SE-09/$29 Noon to 1:30 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, Room 154 Purdue University Department of Chemistry Alumni Lunch/Ticket No. SE-

10/$10 Noon to 1:30 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, Room 105 CHAL Greenhouse Gas Luncheon/Ticket No. SE-ll/$40 12:15 to 1:15 PM Westin Boston Waterfront, Bullfinch Room Women Chemists Committee Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 1 to 3 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2 CHED Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 2:30 to 4:30 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2 National Science Foundation Town Hall/ NT 4 to 6:30 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, Room 105 WWW.CEN-0NLINE.ORG

HQ

JULY 30, 2007

Boston University Department of Chemistry Alumni & Friends Reception/NT 5:30 to 7:30 PM Westin Boston Waterfront, Faneuil Room Chinese American Chemical Society Dinner/Ticket No. SE-12/$28 5:30 to 7:30 PM China Pearl Restaurant, 9 Tyler St. Research Corporation & ACS/PRF Reception/NT 5:30 to 7:30 PM Marriott Copley Place, Salon A/B ORGN Tetrahedron Prize for Creativity in Organic Chemistry/NT 6 to 7:30 PM Hilton Back Bay, Westminster Room University of Michigan Alumni & Faculty Reception/NT 6 to 7:30 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, Room 261 PMSE/POLY Award Reception/NT 6 to 8 PM Westin Boston Waterfront, Commonwealth Ballroom A/B lota Sigma Pi Social Hour/NT 6to8PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, Room 251 University of Southern Mississippi Polymer Science Alumni & Friends Reception/NT 6to8PM Westin Copley Place, Adams Room COLL Open Business Meeting/Social Hour & Poster Session/COD 6 to 8 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, East Registration CARB Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Reception/Ticket No. SE-25/$50

2 3 4TH

ACS

NATIONAL

MEETING

·

BOSTON,

MA

The ACS Technical Divisions invite you to explore the wealth of multidlsciplinary programming at the 2007 Fall National Meeting. FOCUS AREAS INCLUDE:

Analytical Applications and Techniques* 69 programming sessions hosted by 8 divisions * be sure to visit the Analytical Pavilion Sponsored by C&EN on Tuesday in the Exposition Hall

Nanotechnology 129 programming sessions hosted by 13 divisions 17 divisions collaborated to design thematic programming related to BIOTECHNOLOGY FOR HEALTH & WELLNESS including

CHEMISTRY OF SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, MATERIAL INNOVATIONS, & NUTRITIONAL GENOMICS.

For additional information and complete session listings please visit:

chemistry.org/meetings/boston2007

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

HOUSING A TRANSPORTATION FOR THE BOSTON MEETING Rnd the most up-to-date hotel details, local maps, transportation advice, and Aids shuttle routes at chemistry.org/ meetlrtgs/boston2007. 6 to 9:30 PM MIT Faculty Club, 50 Memorial Dr., 6th Floor, Cambridge, MA ANYL Annual Awards Reception & Din­ ner/Ticket No. SE-13/$45 6 to 10 PM Raytheon Amphitheater, Northeastern University, 716 Columbus Ave. CINF Herman Skolnik Award Reception/ NT 6:30 to 8:30 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 211 University of Rochester Department of Chemistry Reception/COD 6:30 to 8:30 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room252A NUCL Social Hour/NT 7 to 9 PM Boston Park Plaza, Plaza Ballroom Sci-Mix Interdivisional Poster Session & Mixer/Ticket in Your Registration Cre­ dentials/Free Meet the 2008 ACS president-elect candidates 8 to 10 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2

TUESDAY, AUG. 21 University of Minnesota Alumni & Friends Breakfast/Ticket No. SE-14/$10 7:30 to 9 AM Westin Boston Waterfront, Common­ wealth Ballroom A Committee on Local Section Activities Silver Circle & Retiree Breakfast/Ticket No. SE-15/$12 7:30 to 9:30 AM Westin Copley Place, Adams & Parliament Cornell University Sponsored Break­ fast/NT

7:45 to 9 AM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 251

Division Officers Caucus/NT 3:30 to 5 PM Westin Boston Waterfront, Hancock

Chemjobs Career Fair 8 AM to 5:30 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallC

University of Pennsylvania Chemistry Alumni Social Hour/NT 4 to 6 PM Seaport, Seaport C

ACS Exposition 9AMto5PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallsA&Bi

Division Councilor Caucus/NT 5 to 6:30 PM Westin Boston Waterfront, Hancock

Women Chemists Committee Eli Lilly Travel Award Social Hour & Poster Ses­ sion/NT 11:30 AM to noon Sheraton Boston, Back Bay Ballroom D Chemical Abstracts Service 100th An­ niversary Customer Presidential Lunch­ eon/Ticket No. SE-16/$15 Noon to 1:30 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 107A/B ComSci Genetic Screening & Diagnostic Testing Luncheon/Ticket No. SE-26/ $10 Noon to 1:30 PM Sheraton Boston, Constitution A Women Chemists Committee Luncheon/ Ticket No. SE-17 (regular)/$50 & SE-18 (student)/$35 Noon to 1:30 PM Sheraton Boston, Independence Ballroom AGRO Graduate Student Luncheon/NT Noon to 1:30 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 259A COLL Luncheon/Ticket No. SE-19/$30 Noon to 2 PM Westin Boston Waterfront, Common­ wealth Ballroom A MEDI Lunch & Learn/Ticket No. SE20/$20 Noon to 2 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 253A AGFD Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT lto3PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2 WWW.CEN-0NLINE.ORG

ΠΎ

JULY 30. 2007

PROF 2007 Henry Hill Award Presenta­ tion & Reception/COD 5 to 6:30 PM Sheraton Boston, Berkeley Room University of California, Los Angeles, Chemistry & Biochemistry Social Event/ NT 5 to 7 PM Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, RoomioyB Pennsylvania State University Reception for Friends & Alumni/COD 5 to 7 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 255 District I Councilor Caucus/NT 5:30 to 7 PM Sheraton Boston, Fairfax Β A. C. Cope Award & A. C. Cope Scholar Awards/NT 5:30 to 7 PM Hilton Back Bay, Westminster Room College of New Jersey Alumni & Friends Reception/NT 5:30 to 7 PM Cactus Club, 939 Boylston St. Iranian Chemists'Association Social Hour/NT 5:30 to 7:30 PM Marriott Copley Place, Vineyard Room AGRO Social Hour/NT 6 to 8 PM Boston Park Plaza, Georgian Room

SPECIAL A SOCIAL EVWTS are contHuta^ updated ott tte^ website at chemlstiy.oiig/rneetmgs/

Women Chemists Committee 234th ACS National Meeting Augustll9-August 23, 2 0 0 7 Boston, MA

WCC GèïeUmm

itsSom

ay Faces of Chemistry: The Merck Index Women in Chemistry Award Symposium 9:15-11:40 am Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and CHED

fAnraversâmfi '

"

"' ,*$V?/;

Joint WCC/Northeastern Local Section Golf Tournament $100 per golfer or $400 per foursome Brookline Golf Club at Puttermeadows

2:00-9:00 pm Join the Women Chemists Committee (WCC) members and the Northeastern local section of the ACS (NESACS) www.nesacs.org for a scramble golf tournament! This event will aho include a hearty barbecue and an awards ceremony You may also spon­ sor a hole. All proceeds from this tour­ nament will support the WCC and NESACS programs. To register or spon­ sor a hole contact Marilou Cashman, 23 Cottage Street, Natick, MA 01760 or write [email protected]:

Many Faces of Chemistry: Merck Index Women in Chemistry Poster OTHER SYMPOSIA Session Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering 1:00-3:00 pm the Barrier From Graduate School Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and to Industry CHED

Sponsored by CHED and cosponsored

Many Faces of Chemistry: Women by WCC, BMGT, PROF, DIC, SCHB, and YCC at the Forefront Symposium 1:30-4:15 pm Connections to Germany: Cosponsored by CMA, INOR, and BIOL Research and Education Opportunities

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21

Sponsored by CHED and cosponsored by German Chemical Society, IAC, CHED International Activities Committee, ACS Northeastern Section, Graduate Student Symposium Planning Committee, SOCED, WCC, Cosponsored by IAC, CHED, PROF and YCC, and PRES BIOL

From Peptide Bond Formation to Functional Proteins: Symposium in Honor of Ada Yonath 8:15-11:00 am

WCC fCC Symposia

and Special Events ATURDAY, AUGUST 18

L

/CC Open Meeting/Reception 5:00-6:30 pm

SUNDAY, AUGUST 19 WCC Workshop "Build Your Brand—Promote Yourself!" Workshop fee: $59.00 Register via the ACS online system

1:30-4:30 pm Instructor: Dr. Judith Giordan

WCC Eli URyltareel Awaid Poster Session/Reception 11:30 am-12:00 noon WCC Luncheon [Ticketed Event) Keynote Speaker: Dr. Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel 12:00 noon-1:30 pm

The Many Faces of Chemistry: International Opportunities for Chemists

Sponsored by YCC and cosponsored by CMA and WCC

Many Faces of Chemistry: ACS Scholars'Contributions to die Chemical Sciences Sponsored by CMA and cosponsored by PROF, WCC, and YCC

Henry H. Whalen, Jr. Award for Excellence in Development and Management within the Chemical Enterprise in Honor of Cynthia Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers Maryanoff, 2007 Recipient in Chemistry Sponsored by BMGT and cosponsored 2:10-4:15 pm by WCC Cosponsored by CMA, CTA, CWD, YCC, Many Faces of Chemistry: Stories PROF, and PRES from ACS Scholars Joint Subcommittee on Diversity Sponsored by CMA and cosponsored by Reception WCC and YCC 5:00-6:30 pm Academic Employment Initiative

This half-day course will help you develop the skills for communicating your achievements and skills to pro­ mote yourself ! Learn techniques for letting your supervisor or potential employer know what you've accom­ plished. Provide you with the 5 - Step Sponsored by CMA, CTA, CWD, WCC, plan ofproven speed-networking to Sponsored by ΑΕΙ and cosponsored by showcase what you contribute and get and YCC CWD, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, attention and acknowledgement. SOCED, WCC, and PRES Wortehop participants will also receive WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22 Many Faces of Chemistry: The a light snack. Register on-line via the The ADVANCE Project Role of Two-Year Colleges in ACS on-line national meeting system Symposium Changing the Face of Chemistry or [email protected] 8:30-11:15 am Sponsored by CMA and cosponsored by Cosponsored by PROF MONDAY, AUGUST 20 WCC and YCC

WCC Women in Industry Breakfast (Ticketed Event) Topic: Many Faces of Chemistry 7:30-9:00 am

Many Faces of Chemistry: Sisters in Science 1:00 p m Sponsored by PROF

Undergraduate Chemistry for Liberal Arts Students Sponsored by CHED and cosponsored by WCC

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

Treats in the Exposition/Ticket in Your Registration Credentials/Free 10 to 11:30 AM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallsA&Bi Joint Women Chemists Committee/ Northeastern Section Golf Tournament/ Ticket No. SE-24/$100 2 to 9 PM

Brookline Golf Club at Putterham Mead­ ows, 1281 West Roxbury Pkwy. BIOL Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 5 to 7 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2 ChemLuminary Awards Reception/NT 6to8PM

Westin Copley Place, Essex Ballroom

University of New Hampshire Chemistry Alumni Gathering/COD 7:30 to 9:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2

Seaport, Seaport A CARB Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 6 to 8 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallBz COMP Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 6 to 8 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Ballroom Foyer Joint POLY/PMSE Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 6to8PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center HallB2 1

TOXI Social Hour & Poster Session & Awards/NT 6 to 10 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 204 A/B CINF Tuesday Night Reception/NT 6:30 to 8:30 PM

INOR Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 7 to 10 PM

MEDI Hall of Fame Reception/NT 5:30 to 8:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 203

l&EC Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 8 to 10 PM

TECH Awards Dinner/Ticket No. SE23/$50 6:30 to 9:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2

ENVR Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 6to8PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2

ChemLuminary Awards Ceremony/NT 8 to 10 PM

GEOC Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 6to8PM

Westin Copley Place, American Ballroom WEDNESDAY, AUG. 22

Boston Convention 8c Exhibition Center, HallB2 PHYS Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 7 to 9 PM

Chemjobs Career Fair 8 AM to 5:30 PM

ENVR Social & Dinner/Ticket No. SE-

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallC

21/$90 Khasmir Indian Restaurant, 279 Newbury St.

Union Oyster House, 41 Union St.

ORGN Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 8 to 10 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront, Common­ wealth Ballroom C

6:30 to 9 PM

BIOT Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 5:30 to 7:30 PM

PETR Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 9 to 11 AM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2 MEDI Social Hour & Poster Session/NT 7 to 9 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2

HIST Edelstein Award Dinner/Ticket No. SE-20/S45 7 to 9 PM

ACS Exposition 9AMtolPM

ORGN Social Hour & Poster Session/ NT 8 to 10 PM

Dom's Italian Restaurant, 10 Bartlette Place @ 100 Salem St.

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallsA&Bi

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, HallB2

WWW.CEN-0NLINE.ORG

ΠA

JULY 30. 2007

American Chemical Society · 234th National Meeting · Boston, MA

by the President

liMWHHÎHMI tt'JftliliMM & fVENTSl KE-^W

iBiiP

fi;j

a-

\s

^ G j m w P ,

SUNDAY, AUGUST 1 9

Connections to Germany: Research & Education Opportunities 1 : 3 0 - 5 : 0 0 PM SEAPORT, PLAZA Β Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored with German Chemical Society, ACS International Activities Committee, CHED international Activities Committee, ACS Northeastern Section, Graduate Student Symposium Planning CommÊee, S0CED, WCQ&YCC

MONDAY, AUGUST 2 0 Psthprinp Τ "Ksrtip" Hunt President,

:|;

Other Symposia of

American

Chemical

Society

e& -

Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront 1:30 - 4 : 2 0 PM WESTIN BOSTON WATERFRONT, REVERE Spormed by WCQCospormed with CMA,INOR,& BIOL

20th Anniversary of National Chemistry Week

SUNDAY, AUGUST 19 PRESIDENTIAL KEYNOTE SYMPOSIUM

100TH ANNIVERSARY PRESIDENTIAL SYMPOSIUM

Material Innovations: From Nanotech to Biotech & Beyond!

Going with the Information Flow: Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS)

1 : 0 0 - 4 : 3 0 PM BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 205 A/B

Commercializing New Science George M. Whitesides, Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Harvard

Nanotechnology: New Chemistry, New Materials, New Properties, & New Technological Capabilities Chad A. Mirkin, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern

Nanowire Nanoelectronics & the Life Sciences: From Ultrasensitive Detection To Cellular Communication Charles M. Lieber, Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Harvard

Innovation at the Intersection of Materials & Biological Chemistry David A. Tirrell, Division of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology

Opportunities for Chemists Through the National Jeremy M. Berg, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH

8:30 A M - 1 2 : 1 0 PM SEAPORT, PLAZA Β Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored with CommÊee on Technician Affairs & Committee on Minority Affairs

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21

Cosponsored with HIST, CINF, & CHED

8:30 A M - 1 2 PM BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 205 A

An Impressionistic Look at the History of CAS

PRESIDENTIAL SESSION

Celebrating a Craftsman of the Art of Understanding: Roald Hoffmann at 70 1 : 3 0 - 5 : 3 0 PM BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 205 A/B

Roald Hoffmann, A Human Catalyst Oliver Sacks, Columbia University, New York

Robert J. Massie, President CAS

Computational Chemistry: An Increasingly Important Way of Doing Chemistry

The CAS Database: Back to the Future

Odile Eisenstein, Institut Charles Gerhardt, Equipe Chimie Théorique Méthodologies et Modélisations, Université Montpellier, France

Catharina Maulbecker, Sales & Marketing, Chemical Abstracts Service

The Importance of CAS to the World's Scientists

Chains, Rings, Substituent*— Tales from the Marvelous Edifice of Modem Organic Chemistry

Hideaki Chihara, Japan Association of Internauonal Chemical Information

Henning Hopf, Institut fur Organische Chemie, Technische Universitât Braunschweig, Germany

CAS: Its Role in the History & Evolution of Scientific Information

Metacognition: A Key Tool in Developing the Art of Understanding

Bonnie Lawlor, Executive Director, National Federation of Abstracting & Information Services

Scifinden It's Part of the R&D Process Damon Ridley, University of Sydney, Australia

Presidential Reception

CAS 100th Anniversary Presidential Luncheon

5 : 0 0 - 6 : 3 0 PM

12:00 PM

BOSTON CONVENTIONS EXHIBITION CENTER, 205C

BOSTON CONVENTION α EXHIBITION CENTER

Saundra McGuire, Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

CHAL'S 25ΊΉ ANNIVERSARY SERIES

Recent Developments in Intellectual Property Law: Trademarks, Trade Secrets, & Expert Witnessing & 0 0 AM - 1 2 : 0 0 PM BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 205 C Sponsored by CHAL

CHAL'S 25TH ANNIVERSARY SERIES

Trends in Chemical & Pharma­ ceutical Patent Law Over the Past Twenty Five Years 1 : 3 0 - 4 : 5 5 PM BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, 205 C Sponsored by CHAL

Academic Employment Initiative 8 : 0 0 - 1 0 : 0 0 PM SCI MIX, EXHIBIT HALL B2 Sponsored byΑΕΙ, Cosponsored with Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, & WCC

TUESDAY, AUGUST 2 1

40 Years of Macromolecules 8 : 0 0 - 5:00 PM WESTIN BOSTON WATERFRONT, OTIS SponsoredbyPOLY,Cosponsored'withACSPublications &PMSE

Peter T.Wolczanski, Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Cornell

From Peptide Bond Formation to Functional Proteins: Symposium in Honor ofAda Yonath

Distinctly Chemical Explanations: Roald Hoffmann's Philosophy of Science

8:15-11:10 AM SHERATON BOSTON, BACK BAY Β Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by Committee on International Activities, BIOL, CHED& PROF

Consequences of Orbital Symmetry: Why Hoffmann was "Always" Right

Michael Weisberg, Department of Philosophy, University of Pennsylvania,

Tiytng To Understand, Making Bonds Roald Hoffmann, i^mmiMumibtry & Chemical Biology, Cornell

Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry 2 : 1 0 - 4 : 2 0 PM SHERATON BOSTON, BACK BAY Β Sponsored by WCC Cosponsored with Committee on Chemists with Disabilities, Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA.YCQ&PROF

MAfO TOIN T H E ACS J*ÂCS PJfÎLICATIONS

Excellence in ACTIO η New in 2007:

*ΉΑΝΟ

NANO

iNAN

LETTERS I

Editor: Paul S. Weiss

ο

£

The Pennsylvania State University

#1 in citations and impact factor

Defining the interface between nanoscience and nanotechnology ACS Nano is an international forum for the rapid dissemination of high-quality multidisciplinary research that embraces the fields of chemistry, physics, materials science, biology, and engineering. Moreover, the journal helps facilitate communication among scientists from these research communities in developing new research opportunities, advancing the field through new discoveries, and reaching out to scientists at all levels.

Pick up your FREE copy of ACS Nano at ACS Publications booth #527 Be sure to get your copy the first issue of ACS Nano at the ACS Publications booth or go to www.acsnano.org to view online at no charge. ACS Nano complements Nano Letters, the established leader in its field for rapid communication of nanoscale research.

As reported in the 2006 Thomson Scientific (ISI) Journal Citation Reports®, Nano Letters ranks #1 in impact factor (9.960) and #1 in citations (19,403) in the category of nanoscience & nanotechnology. Nano Letters remains the preeminent worldwide forum for rapid communication of nanoscale research, with an impressive time to publication — from manuscript submission to acceptance in 5 weeks. ACS Publications congratulates Co-Editors A. Paul Alivisatos, University of California, Berkeley, and Charles M. Lieber, Harvard University, for the Journal's continued success under their leadership. When it comes to nanoscience and nanotechnology, ACS leads the way

κΜί' J O I N T H E A C S ' C Y C L E OF E X C E L L E N C E contribute

publish

review

CYCLE OF E X C E L L E N C E Publish Review

Contribute http://pubs.acs.org

Meet distinguished Nobel Laureates and ACS journal Editors at ACS Publications booth #527 You are invited to attend these noteworthy events at the ACS Publications booth during the 234* ACS National Meeting in Boston:

Visit ACS Publications Booth #527

Monday, August 20th 11:00 am

Meet Roald Hoffmann, 1981 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

2:00 pm

Meet the Editor of Chemical Reviews, Josef MichI, as the journal celebrates its 100th Thematic Issue.

3:00 p m

Meet the Editor of ACS Nano, Paul S. Weiss. Pick up your free "nano" T-shirt and a copy of the inaugural issue at the booth.

Tuesday, August 21 st 12:00 pm 2:00 p m

Meet Elias J. Corey, 1990 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Meet the Editor-in-Chief of Chemistry of Materials, Leonard V. Interrante.

ACS journals surpass 1.2 million total citations in 2006 While you're at the ACS Publications booth, find out more about the 36 peer-reviewed journals of the ACS — they're more than just chemistry. ACS journals exceeded 1.2 million total citations in 2006 and rank #1 in citations or impact factor in the 7 core chemistry categories and 8 additional categories of related sciences, as reported in the 2006 Thomson Scientific (ISI) Journal Citation Reports®. For details, go to http://pubs.acs.org/acs/jrc ACS AuthorChoice Free

Access

Ms**'

ACS AuthorChoice is a new option for open access. For details go to http://pubs.acs.org/4authors/authorchoice

ACS PUBLICATIONS HIGH QUALITY. HIGH IMPACT.

Pick up your FREE commemorative posters!

3

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

RES/BIOH\A

20th Anniversary of National Chemistry

4:25 Discussion. 4:30 16. Distinctly chemical explanations: Roald Hoffmann's philosophy of science. . weisDerg 4:55 Discussion. 5:00 17. Trying to understand, making bonds. R. Hoffmann

The Many Faces of Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, and PRES

40 Years of Macromolecules Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by ACS Publications, PMSE, and PRES

Academic Employment Initiative (see ΑΕΙ, Mon)

CHAL's 25th Anniversary Series: Trends in Chemical and Pharmaceutical Patent Law Over the Past Twenty Five Years Sponsored by CHAL, Cosponsored by PRES

Connections to Germany: Research and Education Opportunities (see CHED, Sun)

Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, INOR, BIOL, and PRES

Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by Committee on Chemists with Disabilities, Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, YCC, PROF, and PRES

CHAL's 25th Anniversary Series: Recent Developments in Intellectual Property Law (see CHAL, Mon)

MONDAY EVENING

Presidential Event C. T. Hunt, ACS President, Program Chair

OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST:

CHAL's 25th Anniversary Series: Trends in Chemical and Pharmaceuti­ cal Patent Law Over the Past Twenty Five Years (see CHAL, Mon) Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers In Chemistry (see WCC, Tue) Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront (see WCC, Mon) 40 Years of Macromolecules (see POLY, Tue)

Trademarks, Trade Secrets, and Expert Witnessing Sponsored by CHAL, Cosponsored by PRES MONDAY AFTERNOON

Academic Employment Initiative Sponsored by ΑΕΙ, Cosponsored by Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, WCC, and PRES TUESDAY MORNING

SOCIAL EVENT: i:Sun SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 205 A S Material Innovations: From Nanotech to Biotech and Beyond! H. Shen and C. T. Hunt, Organizers 1:00 Introductory Remarks. C. T. Hunt, ACS President. 1:05 Introduction. H. Shen. 1:20 1. Commercializing new science. G.M.Whrtesldes 1:45 2. Nanotechnology: New chemistry, new materials, new properties, and new technological capabilities. C. A Mirkin 2:10 3. Nanowire nanoelectronics and the life sciences: From ultrasensitive detection to cellular communication. C. M. Lieber 2:35 4. Innovation at the intersection of materials and biological chemistry. D.A.Tirrell 3:00 5. Opportunities for chemists through the National Institutes of Health. J. M. Berg 3:25 Intermission. 3:30 Panel Discussion. 4:15 Concluding Remarks. C. T. Hunt, ACS Connections to Germany: Research and Education Opportunities Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by German Chemical Society, ACS International Activities Committee, CHED International Activities Committee, ACS Northeastern Section, Graduate Student Symposium Planning Committee, SOCED, WCC, YCC, and PRES MONDAY MORNING 20th Anniversary of National Chemistry The Many Faces of Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, and PRES CHAL's 25th Anniversary Series: Recent Developments in Intellectual Property Law

Biotechnology of Health and Wellness J. Finley, L. McQuire, and H. Shen, Program Chairs

Section A BCEC 205 A/B Going With the Information Flow: Chemical Abstracts Service 100th Anniversary Presidential Symposium Cosponsored by HIST, CINF, and CHED

20th Anniversary of National Chemis­ try Week (see CHED, Mon)

BIOHW

J. E. Mears and E. Shivery, Organizers M. V. Oma, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. M. V. Orna. 8:35 6. An impressionistic look at the history ofCAS. R.J.Masste 9:10 7. The CAS database: Back to the future. C. Maulbecker 9:45 8. The importance of CAS to the world's scientists. H. Chihara 10:20 9. Chemical Abstracts service: Its role in the history and evolution of scientific information. B. Lawtor 10:55 10. SciFinden Ifs part of the R&D process. D. Ridley 11:30 Concluding Remarks: C. T. Hunt, ACS President. 40 Years of Macromolecules Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by ACS Publications, PMSE, and PRES TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 205 A/B Presidential Session Celebrating a Craftsman of the Art of Understanding: RoakJ Hoffmann at 70 B. Z. Shakhashiri and F. Walworth, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. C. T. Hunt, ACS President. 1:35 Introductory Remarks. Β. Ζ. Shakhashiri. 1:40 Introductory Remarks. H. D. Abruna. 1:45 11. Roald Hoffmann, a human catalyst. O. Sacks 2:10 Discussion. 2:15 12. Computational chemistry: An increasingly important way of doing chem­ istry. O. Eisenstein 2:40 Discussion. 2:45 13. Chains, rings, substituants: Tales from the marvelous edifice of modem organic chemistry. H. Hopf 3:10 Discussion. 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 14. Metacognitjon: A key tool in devel­ oping the art of understanding. S. Y. McGuire 3:55 Discussion. 4:00 15. Consequences of orbital symmetry: Why Hoffmann was "always" right. P.T.WolczansId

SOCIAL EVENTS: Luncheon: Sun :Sun SUNDAY MORNING Drug Reprofiling Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and

Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Pore Generation Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biosensing and Drug Delivery Drug Delivery Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Immunological Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization General Methods Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanostructured Ruorocarbons: Smart Tectons for Self-Assembly From Crystal Engineering and Self-Organization to Function Sponsored by FLUO, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Physicochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Protein-Polysaccharide Interactions in Solutions Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Btomotecular Systems Probe Development Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

Metalk>Supramo4ecular Polymers Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW

Promises, Problems and Successes for Label-Free BiodetectJon Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Cantilever and Nanotube Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Energy and Environment Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nucleic Acid Enzymotogy Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Physicochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Btomotecular Systems Methods for Single-Molecule Detection Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL. and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Wotfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST SUNDAY AFTERNOON Chemical Approaches to Protein Function Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

Wotfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST Zebrafish in Drug Development and Chemical Toxicology Sponsored by TOXI, Cosponsored by BIOHW SUNDAY EVENING General Papers: Polymers in Nanotechnology Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience: Applications Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR MONDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 203 Genomics of Obesity Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC J. W. Finley, Organizer 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 1. A role for mTOR in the fuel sensing pathways in the CNS that regulate energy balance. R. Seeley

Drug Reprofiling Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Emerging Technologies: Nanobiotechnology Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOHW General Papers: Polymers in Nanotechnology Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

BIOHW 9:20 2. Comparison of gene expression in primary human adipocytes and LS14 cells: A novel human adipocyte cell line. N. Ben-Jonathan, E. Hugo 10:05 Exercise Break. 10:15 3. Human Adenovirus 36 induces adipogenesis in human adipose derived stem cells. P. Magdalene 11:00 4. From genetics to functional genom­ ics in obesity. K. Clement

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 203 Genomics of Obesity Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC J. W. Finley, Organizer

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Macromotecular Architectures Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Emerging Technologies: Nanobiotechnotogy Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOHW GalectJns: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Organometallic Polymers, Metallopoiymers and NanoparUcles Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 5. Brain regulation of nonexercise activity thermogenesis and obesity resis­ tance. C. M. Kotz, J. A. Teske, C.J. Billington 2:15 6. Estrogen: The "other" adiposity signal. D. Clegg 2:55 Exercise Break. 3:05 7. Genome-wide analysis in human adipose tissue of transcriptional responses to caloric restriction or isoenergetic carbo­ hydrate reduction. L M. Mangravrte, K. Dawson, R. R. Davis, J. P. Gregg, R. M. Krauss 3:45 8. Identification of depot-specific human fat cell progenitors through distinct expres­ sion patterns, developmental gene profiles, and function. J. KirMand, T. Tchkonia, M. Lenburg, T. Thomou, N. Giorgadze, T. Pirtskhalava, A. Cartwright, M. Cartwright, N. Gerry, A. Forse, Y. Tchoukalova, M. Jensen, C. Pothoulakis

Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Advances in Btobased Nanostructures and Nanomaterials Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Drug Delivery Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biomarker Discovery Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BTEC and BIOHW Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Nanostructured Materials and Nanocomposltes Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

W«»ln«»««—II.J« Maul fWn*«iIr» llmiiin-lmln

rorypepuGe ana rroiein Materials Characterization Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Btomotecu Motor Proteins Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromotecutes for Emerging Nanotechnotogies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Undergraduate Research Poster Session Nanotechnotogy Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by SOCED and BIOHW MONDAY EVENING

ι Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 203 Genomics of Obesity Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC J. W. Finley, Organizer

General Methods Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and

Tectons for Setf-AssemWy

Organometallic Polymers, Metallopoiymers and NanoparDctes Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Murray Goodman Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by John Wiley & Sons, ANYL, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

Analytical Technology for Drug Discovery High Throughput, High Content Screening Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL

Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Pore Generation Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL

Nano-Btochemistry and Technology Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOT, BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL Nanomaterials and Biological

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Hybridization of Nanomaterials Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biosensing and Drug Delivery Gene Delivery Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

GatectJns: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Porous Materials Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and

Pathogen Detection Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Pfizer Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Phystoochemtoal Aspects of Biopoiymsrs in Food and Nutrition Protein-Polysaccharlde Interactions on Interfaces Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOHW Polypeptide and Protein Materials Synthesis Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Safety in Nanotechnotogy Research Sponsored by CHAS, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biological Systems Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomoiecuiar Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

Nanostructured Ruorocarbons: Smart Tectons for Setf-Assembty Btomedicinal Nanostructures Sponsored by FLUO, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW

Synthetic and Biological Macromotecutes for Emerging Nanotechnotogies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Novel Targets and Therapeutic Approaches Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN

The Emerging Technologies and Capabilities of Metabotomics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL

Phystoochemtoal Aspects of Btopolymera in Food and Nutrition Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Polymers and Liquid Crystals New Concepts in LC/ Polymer Systems Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Gatectins: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Structure and Function Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN

Nanoscience: Applications Energy and Environment Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR

Polypeptide and Protein Materials Properties Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience: Synthesis and

Sponsored by FLUO, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW

Chemical and Biological Defense Nanoparticulates Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 9. OverconsumptJon of fat: Circulating lipids and brain neurochemicals in a vicious cycle. S. F. Leibowitz 9:05 10. Polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of hepatic gene transcription. D. B. Jump, D. Botolin, Y. Wang, J. Xu, B. Christian 9:50 11. Rote of bone morphogenetjc pro­ teins in brown adipogenesis and energy homeostasis. Y-H. Tseng 10:35 12. Smc1, a non-abc protein involved in transport of xenobiotjes. S. Yadav, S. S. Singhal, J. Singhal, K. Drake, S.Awasthi 11:20 13. Proopiomelanocortin neurocircuits underlying feeding behavior. M. J. Low

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Infrared and Fluorescence Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Imaging Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Materials with Special Properties Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Diffusion, Adsorption, and Reaction Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomoiecuiar Systems Novel Imaging Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Btotogical Macromotecutes for Emerging Nanotechnotogies Session V Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 203 Genomics of Obesity Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC J. W. Finley, Organizer 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 14. Enhanced metabolicflexibilitywith weight toss facilitates weight regain. P.Maclean 2:20 15. Metabolic phenotype of prediabetes in childhood obesity. S. Caprto 3:05 Exercise Break. 3:15 16. The unique delivery rote of cystine/ cysteine coupling the importance of the sulfydryl (SH) in detoxifying oxyradicals to preserve cell, gene, and immune health. A. B. Crum 4:00 17. Synaptic plasticity in energy balance regulation. T. L Horvath Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Serf-Assembly and Thin Rims Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Fast Preparative Chromatography in Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Gatectins: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW Mechanism of Action of Natural Products Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials with Special Properties Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

Visualization of Biological Processes at the Molecular Level Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, PHYS, and BIOHW

TECH-3

Chemjobs CAREER FAIR Brought to you by C&EN Chemjobs and ACS Career Management & Development

ACS 234th National Meeting August 19-22, 2007 HallC Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Boston, MA

8:00 AM-5:30 PM Are you interested in speaking with employers to discuss employment opportunities? Perhaps you would like to brush up on your interviewing skills, find out how to write a winning resume, or get valuable information on various career management and development topics. The Chemjobs Career Fair can provide all of these things and more! For additional information on all services provided at the Chemjobs Career Fair, please visit http://cen-chemjobs.org/careerfair. Job seekers and employers must sign up June 25 — August 22 to participate.

All workshops will be held in Rooms 053 and 054 of the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. IMPORTANT: Workshop times are subject to change. Please consult the Web version of the workshop schedule http://chemistryorg/careers/workshops.html or the Chemjobs Career Fair onsite brochure for final workshop times. S U N D A Y , A U G U S T 19

MONDAY, AUGUST 20

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Mock Interview Demonstration. Room 053

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Mock Interview Demonstration. Room 053

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Finding A Position in Industry. Room 054

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

First Year on the Job. Room 054

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Communication Skills for Chemical Professionals. Room 053 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Résumé Preparation for Recent Graduates. Room 054

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Finding A Position in Industry. Room 053 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Overcoming Barriers: Current Issues Facing Foreign-Born Chemical Professionals. Room 054

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Chemical Professionals. Room 053

2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Chemical Professionals. Room 053

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Résumé Preparation for Experienced Chemical Professionals. Room 054

2:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Negotiation Techniques. Room 054

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Recent Graduates. Room 054

3:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Career Strategies: Critical Steps to Success. Room 053

ICHEMJDBS.ORG

L i f e begins with chemistry. Your f u t u r e begins with

©toKryJofeSo©^

T U E S D A Y , A U G U S T 21 8:00 A M - 9 : 3 0 AM

Mook Interview Demonstration. Room 053

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Starting a Chemical Consulting Business. Room 054

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Finding A Position in Industry. Room 053 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Communication Skills for Chemical Professionals, Room 054 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Navigating the Federal Employment Process. Room 054

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Academic Employment Initiative: How Do I Get That First Job? Room 053

3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Writing Excellent Research Proposals. Room 054

4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Academic Positions. Room 053

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22 8:30 A M - 1 0 : 0 0 AM Mock Interview Demonstration. Room 053 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM Preparing Your Academic Application Package. Room 054 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Communication Skills for Chemical Professionals. Room 053 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Résumé Preparation for Recent Graduates. Room 054 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Which Path Should I Take—Industry or Acàdemia? Room 053

1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Negotiation Techniques. Room 054

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Academic Positions. Room 053

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

First Year on the Job. Room 054

d f c t r ©®ρ©©ρ-^®0®δ@(ο];

^MmmMmE^m^mmmm^^ Please consult the online technical program at http://chemistry.or9/meetings/boston2007 or the onsite program distributed during the meeting for final details on this programming. S U N D A Y , A U G U S T 19 Finding Your Catalyst — Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry. Sponsored by CHED and co-sponsored with WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC and INOR. Career Perspectives and Insights into Life After Graduate School. Sponsored by CHËD and co-sponsored with WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC and INOR. The Role of Cultural Diversity on Global Teams. Sponsored by SCHB and co-sponsored with CEPA. MONDAY, A U G U S T 20 Being a Responsible Chemist — Ethics, Politics, and Policy. Co-sponsored with Committee on Ethics, CEPA, and PROF. Pre-Retirement Considerations: Financial and Otherwise. Sponsored by SCHB and co-sponsored with CEPA. T U E S D A Y , A U G U S T 21 Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry. Sponsored by WCC and co-sponsored with Committee on Chemists with Disabilities, Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, YCC, and PROF.

American Chemical Society

BIOHW/AEI Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Pore Generation Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Diagnostics Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Panel Presentations Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience: Applications Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR Polymers and Liquid Crystals Lyotropic and Amphiphilic LC/Polymer Systems Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Applications Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Safety in Nanotechnotogy Research Sponsored by CHAS, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Biomacromolecule Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW TUESDAY EVENING Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Poster-Session Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR Polymers and Liquid Crystals Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Scaffolds and Matrices for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromotecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW WEDNESDAY MORNING Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Cheminformatfcs Techniques in Bioinformatics: Related Applications Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by COMP and BIOHW Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Structure-Property Relationships Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Current Techniques in Molecular Simulation of Biological Systems Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS and BIOHW Eli Lilly Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, CARB, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW

TECHNICAL PROGRAM Emerging Technologies: Systems Biology Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials & Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Low-k Materials Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Biosensor Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Barrier Materials Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biological Systems Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR Nanotechnotogy in Agriculture Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by BIOHW New Chemical and Biosensing Approaches for Cellular Analysis Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL Polymers and Liquid Crystals Elastomeric and Network LCs Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Scaffolds and Matrices for Tissue Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Imaging of Live Tissue, Cells, and Organelles Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Cheminformatics Techniques in Bioinformatics: Related Applications Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by COMP and BIOHW Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Fabrication and Devices Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Emerging Technologies: Systems Btotogy Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials & Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems NanopartJcles and Mlcropartictes Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Btotogtoal Defense Reactive Materials Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Explosives Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanotechnotogy in Agriculture Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Wires, Tubes, and Spheres Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Polymers and Liquid Crystals LC Polymers Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Scaffolds and Matrices for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Symposium in Honor of Perry Frey Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Methods of Slngte-Motecute Detection Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

ΑΕΙ Academic Employment Initiative J. A. Bell, M. C. Caserio, and C. Kuniyoshi, Program Chairs

THURSDAY MORNING Antibiotics Discovery, Biosynthesis, and Resistance Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Biorelated Concepts Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Current Techniques in Molecular Simulation of Biological Systems Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS and BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Dendrimers, Hyperbranched Systems, Stars and Others Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Nanosize Fibers and Particulates Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Rods and Fibers Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW Photovoltaic Solar Cells for Energy Applications: Nanomaterials for PV Applications Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Biomacromolecule Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Understanding Drug Action and Toxicity Sponsored by TOXI, Cosponsored by BIOHW THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Photovoltaic Solar Cells for Energy Applications: Nanomaterials for PV Applications Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Materials Processing Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW General Papers: Polymers in Nanotechnotogy Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

MONDAY EVENING SecttonA BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Academic Employment Initiative Cosponsored by Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, WCC, and PRES J. A. Bell and C. Kuniyoshi, Organizers 8:00-10:00 1. Synthesis and fluorescent responses of highly water-soluble zwitterionic boronic acid-grafted poly(p-phenylene ethynylene) to biological species. Z. Chen 2. Metabolic phenotypes for MCF-10A cancer cell lines. M. Ctobanu, D. E. Cliffel 3. Development of fluorescent tags for label­ ing newly synthesized proteins. J. D. Fisk, K. E. Beatty, J. M. Baskin, C. R. Bertozzi, D. Tirrell 4. Correlating DNA adduct levels and gene expression using LC-MS/MS and DNA microarrays for a foodbome heterocyclic aromatic amine procardnogen. J. Glick, R. Sullivan, H. Zarbl, P. Vouros 5. Study of inner filter effects. Q. Gu 6. Structure elucidation of microgram quanti­ ties of heparin oligosaccharides important for protein binding. A. K. Korir, J. F. K. Limtiaco, C. K. Larive 7. Development of a novel soft ionization aerosol mass spectrometer (SIAMS). J. A. Lloyd, M. V. Johnston 8. Development of analytical separation meth­ ods for actinide materials. D. Peterson 9. Development of novel spectroscopic tech­ niques and their application to environ­ mental science. J. E. Thompson 10. Metabolic profiling of pancreatic islets via scanning electrochemical microscopy. J. P. Wilbum, M. Ciobanu, D. E. Cliffel 11. Novel nanostructure architectures: How surface topography relates to materials' properties. X. Zhang, J. A. Rogers 12. Understanding proteins and their com­ plexes using small angle X-ray/neutron scattering. F. Ashish, J. Krueger 13. Molecular recognition and sensing with designed biomimetic systems: From betahairpins to lipid bilayers. S. M. Butterfteid, S. Matile, J. Rebek Jr., M. L Waters 14. Structure-based design, synthesis and structure-activity relationship of peptide libraries containing Phe analogs as revers­ ible inhibitors for thrombin. C. Clement, P. Chimieze, J. Gonzalez, M. Philipp 15. Improved cellular delivery of peptides and proteins by encodable structured motifs. D. S. Daniels, A. Schepartz

ΑΕΙ 16. Advances toward the development of small molecule transcriptional activators. J-P. Desaulniers, A. Wands, A. K. Mapp 17. Fe(ll) and a-ketoglutarate-dependent halogenases in natural products biosynthe­ sis. D. P. Galonic, S. Hrvatjn, E. W. Barr, J. M. Bollinger Jr., C. Krebs, C. T. Walsh 18. New insights into the mechanism of cleav­ age of sarcin ricin loop (SRL) RNA. S.S.JaJn.T. D.Tullius 19. Quinocarmycin analog DX-52-1 inhibits cell migration and targets radixin, disrupt­ ing interactions of radixin with actin and CD44.A.W.Kahsal 20. Perturbation of endogenous retinoid levels and retinoid metabolism by ethanol. M. A. Kane, A. E. Folias, C. Wang, N. Chen, J. L Napoii 21. Inhibition of translation by peptide ligands targeting the stem-loop H18 in 16S rRNA. B. Uanc-Sotelo, D. Klepacki, A. S. Mankin 22. Intracellular delivery of biologically active multivalent ligands. Ε. Ε. McElroy, L. L Kiessling 23. Structure function studies on the gluta­ mate racemase enzyme from Bacillus anthracis. S. Mehboob, M. E. Johnson 24. Controlled assembly of functional and structured DNA-multiprotein complexes at nanoscale. G. E. Sroga, J. S. Dordick 25. Transport of metal ions across ion chan­ nels in lipid membrane. V. Vijayvergiya 26. Application of click chemistry in ghycobiology. P.Wu 27. Folding and insertion of melittin in mem­ brane mimics. M. R. Hartings, H. B. Gray, J. R. Winkler 28. Affinity adsorption of viruses. C. L HeWt, P. V. Gurgel, L-A. Jaykus, R. G. Carbonell 29. Sensor-aided bioprospecting. K. M. Polizzi 30. Quantitative analysis of a web-based math tutorial for general chemistry and the student response. M. D. Barker, J. Heppert, B. A. Barker 31. Chemistry conceptions and misconcep­ tions of undergraduate organic chemistry students. J. M. Duis 32. Hypothesis driven assessment of an integrated NMR laboratory curriculum. K. C. Earnheart, Κ. Τ. Mueller 33. Predicting products in main-group inor­ ganic chemistry: A study of performance and implementation of a pedagogical tool. E. C. Gustafson, G. M. Bodner 34. Multisensory learning for blind or low vision learners in the chemistry laboratory. C. Supalo 35. Organometallic and chemical education research: An NMR investigation of the role of an aluminum alkyl during zirconocene catalyzed alkene polymerization and the development and evaluation of an online nanoscience course for teachers. J. M. H. Tomaslk, C. R. Landis, J. W. Moore 36. Kinetically controlled nanorod assemblies. J. W. Ciszek, L. Huang, Y. Wang, C. A. Mirkin 37. Fluorinated gold thiolate nanopartfcles by Brust synthesis and ligand exchange. A. Dass, R. W. Murray 38. Dynamic restructuring of au(111). W. Gao, L. Zhou, D. S. Pinnaduwage, B. K. Min, M. Biener, C. M. Friend 39. Synthesis of mono- and bimetallic nanopartjcle catalysts utilizing solid phase dendrimer templates. J. D. Gilberteon 40. Dual mode imaging and selective functionalization of multimaterial nanopyramids. J. Lee, W. Hasan, T. W. Odom 41. Synthesis and structure of an ultrathin aluminosilicate film. D. J. Stacchiola, S. Kaya, J. Weissenrieder, S. K. Shaikhutdinov, H-J. Freund

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

42. Dynamic reconstructuring during surface compound formation on Ag(111): Incorpo­ ration of metal atoms in the adsorbate structures on close-packed surface. LZhou, R.J.Madix 43. Development of novel computational methods for simulation of biological sys­ tems. V. M. Anisimov 44. DNA Structural motifs identified by con­ served OH radical cleavage signature (CORCS) Analyses. K. S. Byun, T. Tullius 45. Generalization of the Gaussian electro­ static model: A molecular density based force field. G. A. Cisneros, J-P. Piquemal, T. A. Darden 46. The correlation consistent Composite Approach: Efficient thermochemistry across the periodic table. N. DeYonker, A. K. Wilson, T. Cundari 47. Examining the role of conformational changes in HIV protease drug resistance. M. M. Layten, F. Ding, C. L. Simmerling 48. Investigate the fluorescence quenching and recovering process of beta-cydodextrin anchored quantum dots. M. Ning, R. E. Brown 49. Simulating nanostructure photovoltaics from atoms to devices. J. Sender 50. New methods for efficient direct calcula­ tion of ligand binding free energies. M. R. Shirts, J. D. Chodera, R. Friesner 51. Insights into peptide folding from a multiscale coarse-grained model. I. F. Thorpe, J. Zhou, G. A. Voth 52. Molecular-level interactions of tetracycline with oligomers of a model humus constitu­ ent and soil organic matter. P. Kulshrestha, R. F. Giese Jr., T. D. Wood 53. Hexavalent chromium and oxytetracycline binding to environmental interfaces studied by second harmonic generation. A. L Mifflin, C. T. Konek, M. J. MusorrafitJ, F. M. Geiger 54. Sustainable alternatives for chemical syntheses. J. P. Haltett 55. MX chain interactions in binary metallomesogenic mixtures of Pt(ll) and Pt(IV) complexes. R. J. Allenbaugh, C. K. Schauer 56. Synthesis, reactivity and electronic struc­ ture of stericalry pressured uranium com­ plexes. S. C. Bart, F. Heinemann, K. Meyer 57. Strategies for increasing the spin-reversal barrier in single-molecule magnets. B. M. Barttett, T. D. Harris, H. J. Choi, M. W. DeGroot, J. J. Wilson, J. R. Long 58. Modifications of diruthenium molecular wires through ancillary ligand exchange. S. L Bolton, M. B. Sponsler 59. Synthesis and grafting chemistry of functionalized silicone nanospheres. C. A. Bradley, M. J. McMurdo. T. D. Tilley 60. Kinetic resolution of α-olefins using Cr and C^-symmetric zirconocene polymer­ ization catalysts. J. A. Byers, J. E. Bercaw 61. Nanosized highrelaxivityMR contrast agents by conjugation to virus capsids. A. Datta, J. M. Hooker, M. Botta, Μ. Β. Francis, Κ. Ν. Raymond 62. Biophysical characterization of inorganic systems in biology utilizing spectroscopic techniques. J. J. Heymann, A. L Crumbliss 63. Employing PY5-type ligands in the investi­ gations of the magnetic properties of dinuclear and larger complexes. D. M. Jenkins, D. E. Freedman, H. I. Karunadasa, J. R. Long 64. It really is a small world after all: The joys of fabricating and characterizing nanoarchitectured materials. J. C. Lytle, A. J. Barrow, T. N. Zimmerman, J. W. Long, D. R. Rolison 65. Synthesis and C 0 2 reactivity of alkylaminozinc complexes. R. L McDonnell 66. Magnetic inorganic-organic polymers. J. E. Mertzman, S. L. Stoll 67. Mechanistic studies of dbxygen activation and substrate oxidation by model com­ plexes and metalloenzymes. L M. Mirica 68. Inorganic and chemical education research: Ethylene sensors from Ag(l)boundfluoroionophoresand the develop­ ment, beta-test, and assessment of sum­ mer chemistry camps. D. L Nutbrown, C. M. Schram, J. N. Burstyn, J. W. Moore 69. Fluid-processed tetraazaporphyrin-based photovottaics. B. D. Pate, J. E. Rogers, B. E. Taylor, B. A. Minch, J. R. Deneault, A. P. Smith, M. F. Durstock

70. PRINT: Nanomaterials for biological applications. R. A. Petros, J. M. DeSimone 71. Unsaturated organic monolayers on silicon: Surface passivation and reactivity. K. E. Plass, B. B. Brunschwig, N. S. Lewis 72. The use of metal boride precursors and nanoparticles for carbon nanotube growth. J. V. Romero, J. T. Spencer 73. Inorganic and solid state materials for energy applications. M. Schwartz 74. Metal-organic frameworks based on group 13 metal dipyninato complexes. J. Stork, V. S. Thoi, S. M. Cohen 75. Heteroleptic Ruthenium tris-bipyridyl complexes as photosensitizers for overall photocatalytic water splitting. W. J. Youngblood, M. Eguchi, A. E. Kaintz, S-H. Lee, Τ. Ε. Mallouk 76. Fluorescence/MRI sensing of zinc with water-soluble porphyrin molecular plat­ form. X-A. Zhang, K. S. Lovejoy, A. Jasanoff, S. J. Lippard 77. Synthesis and testing of novel dioxolanebased compounds with antiplasmodial activity. D. C. Martyn, M. J. Beattie, A. Ramirez, J. Cortese, V. Patel, K. A. Woerpel, J. Clardy 78.1. Synthesis of novel β-cyclodextrin deriva­ tives and their use as chiral stationary phases for GC; II. From student to scien­ tist: writing assignments in the chemistry lab. T. R. Turner, C. M. Gamer 79. Stereoselective synthesis of 2,3,4,5 tetrasubstjtuted tetrahydrofurans: Application to the total synthesis of (+)-Virgatusin and b) asymmetric radical additions to chiral sulfinimines. T. AMndele, S. P. Marsden, J. G. Cumming, K-l. Yamada, K. Tomtoka 80. Palladium-catalyzed haJocarbonyl-alkene coupling and mechanistic investigations of the beta-hydride elimination of transition metal enolates. E. J. Alexanian, J. F. Hartwkj 81. Exotic and highly-ordered bistable [n]rotaxanes. I. Aprahamian, J. F. Stoddart 82. Origins of selectivity in Pd-catalyzed C-N bond-forming reactions using biaiylphosphine ligands. M. R. Biscoe, T. E. Barder, S. L. Buchwald 83. Catalytic hydrogen transfer Synthesis of protected cyclic enamines. A. D. Bolig, M.Brookhart 84. Boron Lewis acids in organic synthesis. G. W. Kabalka, M-L Yao, S. Borella 85. Chemoselective probes for metabolite enrichment and profiling. Ε. Ε. Carlson, B. F. Cravatt 86. A) Using molecules to build molecules; B) Active transport of organic cations through fluorous bulk membranes by nanohosts. Q. Chu, L R. MacGillivray, D. P. Curran 87. Highly efficient syntheses of mechanically interlocked molecules. W. R. Dichtel, O. S. Miljanic, I. Aprahamian, W. Zhang, A. B. Braunschweig, J. M. Spruell, M. A. Oteen, J. R. Heath, J. F. Stoddart 88. Simocyclinone D8: Exploring a new mechanism of topoisomerase II inhibition. K. C. Ellis 89. Microcalorimetry to investigate biologicallike function of synthetic macromolecules. G. J. Gabriel 90. Understanding rotary motion in crystalline solids and developing high school curricula based on green chemistry principles. S. L Gould, M. Garcia-Garibay, A. A. Russell 91. Synthesis of a small library of (-)-dysiherbaine analogs as ionotropic glutamate receptor ligands. S. A. Habay, A. R. Chamberlin 92. Natural product synthesis via targetoriented and biomimetic approaches. G. H. Hanson, T. R. Hoye, S. D. Burke 93. Probing subunit interactions in Ribo­ nucleotide Reductase (RNR). A. Q. Hassan, Y. Wang, L Plate, J.Stubbe 94. Nanocrystalline ti02 solar cells based on variable band gap poly(arylene ethynylene) conjugated poiyelectrolytes. H. Jiang, X. Zhao, K. S. Schanze 95. Rapid-Injection NMR studies of carbonyl functionalities with organolithium reagents. K. J. Kotonko, H. J. Reich, M. M. Biddle 96. A natural products research program for implementation at a primarily undergradu­ ate institution. K. N. Maloney, W. Fenical, J. Clardy

97. Propargylic oxidation catalyzed by dirhodium caprolactamate: Rapid access to α,β-acetylenic ketones. E. C. McLaughlin, M. P. Doyle 98. From kinetic to thermodynamic control in the synthesis of donor-acceptor [2jcatenanes. O. S. Miljanic, W. R. Dichtel, S. I. Khan, J. F. Stoddart 99. Synthesis of tetrasubsitituted phthalocyanines and their application in pv devices. B. A. Minch, A. P. Smith, J. R. Deneault, Β. Ε. Taylor, M. F. Durstock 100. Spectroscopic characterization of organic reactive intermediates in cryogenic matri­ ces and development and testing of an interactive website to introduce current research into middle and high school classrooms. C. R. Pharr, R. J. McMahon, J. W. Moore 101. Synthetic studies of oroidin derived natural products: Ageliferin and palau'amine. S. Rasapalli, C. Lovely 102. Synthesis of tetrasubsitituted phthalocyanines and their application in pv devices. A. P. Smith, B. E. Taylor, J. R. Deneault, M. F. Durstock 103. Incorporating perfluoroanthracene units into organic semiconductors. J. F. Tannaci, M. Noji, J. McBee, T.D. Tilley 104. Indium-catalyzed enantioselective allylatJon of nonconventional nucleophiles. D.J.Weix.J. F. Hartwig 105. Reaction optimization from palladium to organo-catalysts. S. L Wiskur, G. C. Fu 106. Efficient kinetic resolution of diols through catalytic asymmetric silylation. Y. Zhao, J. Rodrigo, A. W. Mitra, A. H. Hoveyda, M. L. Snapper 107. Crosscoupling reactions of alkyl halides, H/D exchange of olefins and N-H activa­ tion. J. S. Zhou 108. A Chemical Physicist seeks teaching and research position in an undergraduate institution that calls for experience and commitment to teaching. J. K. Agbo 109. Artificial enzymes: In silico design and QM/MM characterization. A. N. Alexandrova, W. L Jorgensen, D.Baker 110. Dielectric functions for gold cluster thtolates. M. Alvarez, J. T. Khoury, T. G. Schaaff, R. L. Whetten 111. Dynamics of molecular systems: (1) Vibrational energies from ab initio semiclassical dynamics; (2) Proton conduction in nanoconfined polymer electrolyte mem­ branes for fuel cells. S. Atahan 112. Application of coarse-grained simulation techniques to ion channel kinetics. M. H. Cheng, R. D. Coalson 113. Ionization mechanisms and pathways in liquid water. C. G. Elles, R. A. Crowell, I. A. Shkrob, S. E. Bradforth 114. Pseudo-steady state kinetic model of laccase-catalyzed oxidation of aqueous phenol. S. Kumiawati, J. A. Nicell 115. Revealing the nature of solvation via cluster-ion techniques. L R. McCunn, J. R. RosckXi, J. M. Headrick, M. A. Johnson 116. Moving toward a better understanding of chemical reactions using fundamental quantum-chemistry concepts. J. Melin 117. The role of quantum coherence to energy transfer efficiency in molecular systems: Characterization, simulation, and control. M. Mohseni, A. Aspuru-Guzik 118. Understanding vibrational spectra of confined fluids. C. M. Morales, W. H. Thompson 119. Electronic and optical properties of nanostructures: (1) Optics of biosensing nanostructures; (2) Non-local density functional theory. A. Najmaie, J. E. Sipe, A. Aspuru-Guzik 120. Theoretical studies in extracting essential features and dynamics of molecular motions by advanced mathematical meth­ ods of fiber bundles on topolgical spaces and other methods. N. Panahi 121. Novel energy conversion and storage materials and in situ spectroelectrochemical studies. Q. Shi 122. Post-functjonalization of polymer brushes for pattemable nanoparticle adsorption. S. DiamantJ, S. Arifuzzaman, A. M. Elsen, S. Wargacki, R. Naik, J. Genzer, R. Vaia 123. Designing superoleophobic surfaces. A. Tuteja, W. Choi, J. M. Mabry, G. H. McKinley, R. E. Cohen

ΠΚΉ-S

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AEI/AGFD 124. Designing biocompatible and activatable nanoscale carriers for bioactive agents. A. Almutairi, R. Rossin, M. Berezin, S. Achilefu, M. J. Welch, K. L Wooley, J. M. J. Fréchet 125. Synthetic trivalent haptens that aggregate Anti-2,4-DNP IgG into complexes. B. Bilgteer, D. T. Moustakas, G. M. Whitesides 126. Polymer monolayer dynamics. C. Kim 127. Sequential formation of nanopores in thin films of block copolymer mixtures. H. Mao, T. P. Russell 128. Synthesis and applications of polymeric materials. M. J. Nasrullah

AGFD

8:55 12. Formation and syneresis of protein stabilized foam formed in a continuous shearing apparatus. L Indrawati, G. Narslmhan 9:20 13. The influence of protein on selfassembly and solubilization in microemulsions. J. Y. Kim, S. R. Dungan 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 14. Calcium-induced supramolecular structures in the calcium caseinate sys­ tem. P. X. Qi, P. M. Tomasula 10:25 15. Interfacial properties of raw and roasted peanut oils as related to emulsification. J. P. Davis, T. H. Sanders 10:50 16. Encapsulation and controlledrelease of polyphenols using protein/ polysaccharide complex coacervates. Y-W. Wang, X. Wang, Q. Huang

Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry

Analysis of Chemical Contaminants in Foods and Food Contact Substances Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by AGFD

B. S. Patil, Program Chair

SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A

BUSINESS MEETINGS: Executive Committee Meting: Sun :Mon

BCEC 255 Plant Genomics Cosponsored by BTEC

SUNDAY MORNING

J. Finley and J. N. Losso, Organizers

Section A

1:00 17. Significance of plant genomics for human health. R. Rivlin 1:20 18. Important aspects of authenticating medicinal plants. N. Techen, V. Joshi, B. Avula, Z. Pan, I. A. Khan, B. Scheffler 1:40 19. Effects of chitosan and methyl jasmonate treatments on induction of phytochemicals and vitamin Ε in sweet basil. H-J. Kim, F. Chen, X. Wang, Z. U 2:00 Intermission. 2:15 20. Genetic and environmental regula­ tion of carotenoid, tocopherol, and glucosinolate form and concentration in sweet com and broccoli. J. A. Juvik, H. S. Kim, K. Ibrahim 2:35 21. Analysis of the CBF pathway in grapes and its role in enhancing abiotic stress tolerance. A. Nassuth, M. Siddiqua, H.Xiao 2:55 22. Functional characterization of novel fatty acid desturases likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of the allelochemical sorgoleone from Sorghum bicolor. Z, Pan, S. R. Baerson, A. M. Rimando, S. O. Duke

BCEC 255 Characterization and Bioavailability of Flavonoid Glycosides A. E. Mitchell and J. Hammerstone, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 1. An improvement of the DPPH antioxidant assay. C. L. Wommack, W. L. Whaley 8:35 2. Effect of glycosylation and acytation on the chemoprotectJve effects of anthocyanins. M. M. Giusti 9:00 3. Characterization of flavonoids: Effects of structures on the analysis, bioavailability and bioactivity. R. H. Uu 9:25 4. Absorption of anthocyanins from berries: Metabolic products and influence of glycoside. R. Prior, X. Wu. T. Hager, L. Howard 9:50 Intermission. 10:05 5. Distribution of anthocyanins in pig tissues after long-term blueberry feeding. P. E. Milbury, W. Kalt 10:30 6. Bioavailability, distribution and clearance of cranberry flavonol glycosides. N. Vorsa, A. P. Singh, E. Shabrova, K. M. Schaich, H. Jin, L Quadro 10:55 7. Urinary isoflavone excretion: A comparison of fermented and unfermented soy products. A. E. Mitchell, E. Koh 11:20 8. Identification of flavonoid glycosides using metal complexation and tandem mass spectrometry. B. D. Davis, M. Pikulski, J. Zhang, P. W. Needs, P. A. Kroon, J. S. Brodbelt 11:45 9. Flavonol glycosides from melon de olor (Sicana odorifera) fruit peel and evaluation of their antioxidant activity. C. Osorio, K. Jaramillo, C. Duque, Y. Fujimoto Section Β BCEC 256 Physteochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Cosponsored by BIOHW Q. Huang, D. J. McClements, and P. L. Dubin, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 10. Stabilization of emulsions with protein-polysaccharide complexes. D. J. McClements 8:30 11. Adsorption behavior of flaxseed gum on whey protein-stabilized emulsion droplets. S. Khalloufi, H. D. Goff. M. Corredig, M. Alexander

6-TECH

Section Β BCEC 256 Physicochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Protein-Polysaccharide Interactions in Solutions Cosponsored by BIOHW Q. Huang, D. J. McClements, and P. L. Dubin, Organizers 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 23. Dilute solutions of amphiphilic polyanions to protect proteins against aggregation and unfolding. C. Tribet, J. Ruchmann 1:30 24. Molecular dynamics simulations of polyampholyte-polyelectrolyte complexes in solution. A. Dobrynin, J. Jeon 1:55 25. Protein conformation and oligomerization as determinants of interaction with anionic polysaccharides: ESI MS of heparinoid-antithrombin binding. I. A. Kaltashov, R. Abzalimov, P. L Dubin 2:20 26. Light scattering study of metastable complexes of proteins with ionic or neutral polymers in aqueous systems. E.Kokufuta 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 27. Heparin-protein interactions. R. J. Linhardt, F. Zhang, B. Li, M. Kemp 3:25 28. Frontal analysis continuous capillary electrophoresis for the rapid measurement of polyelectolyte-protein interactions and drug-plasma binding. J. Gao 3:50 29. Nuclesome as an example of protein-polyelectrolyte interations from cell biology. G. S. Manning

Tandem LOMS and GC-MS Solutions for Food Safety Analysis Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by AGFD

Section C BCEC 257A

MONDAY MORNING » between Taste, Smell and SecttonA BCEC 255

P. Breslin, J. V. Leland, T. Hofmann, and W. Meyerhof, Organizers

Plant Genomics Cosponsored by BTEC

8:00 43. Sensory interactions within the oral perceptual system. B. G. Green 8:45 44. Odor quality coding and experiencedependent recoding in the human brain. J. Gottfried 9:25 45. Neural coding and integration of multimodal flavor Animal models. J.V.Verhagen 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 46. Convergence of olfaction, taste, somatic sensation, and vision in the orbital cortex of primates. J. L Price 11:00 Panel Discussion.

J. Finley and J. N. Losso, Organizers 8:00 30. Genetic control of color and texture in fruits. G. Hrazdina, D. Zheng 8:20 31. Genetic regulation of carotenoid metabolism during tomato fruit ripening. J. J. Giovannoni 8:40 32. How the antimalarial artemisinin is made in plants. P. S. Covello, K. Teoh, D. R. Polichuk. D. W. Reed, G. Nowak 9:00 Intermission. 9:20 33. Integrated functional genomic stud­ ies of natural product biosynthesis in the model legume, Medicago truncatula. M. Farag, B. Deavours, L. W. Sumner 9:40 34. Plant genomics: Resources for investigating cell wall biosynthesis and fiber development. C. J. Nairn, D. M. Lennon, A. Wood-Jones 10:00 35. The barley coordinated agricultural project: Intersection of genomics, breeding and gene discovery. G. Muehlbauer

Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, ΒΙΟΤ, MEDI, and BTEC Sterling Hendricks Memorial Lectureship Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by FUEL and AGFD MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Section Β BCEC 256 Physicochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Protein-Polysaccharide Interactions on Interfaces Cosponsored by BIOHW Q. Huang, D. J. McClements, and P. L. Dubin, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 36. Direct determination of structures of polyelectrolyte-protein complexes by small-angle neutron scattering: From gels to globules. F. Cousin, F. Boue, J. Gummel 8:30 37. Structure, dynamics, and interac­ tions of protein/porysaccharide complexes. Q. Huang 8:55 38. Time-resolved SAXS-studies of the interaction of proteins with polyelectrolyte brushes. M. Ballauff, K. Henzler, S. Rosenfeldt, A. Wittemann, T. Narayanan 9:20 39. Polymer-protein multilayers: Equilib­ rium and dynamics. S. A. Sukhishvili, E. Khariampieva, I. Erel-Unal 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 40. Interactions between proteins and polyelectrolytes: Fundamental studies and use of polypeptide multilayer films to induce crystal growth. V. Ball, J. Hemmerié, M. Michel, J. Voegel 10:25 41. Effect of temperature on the density profile and the reorientational dynamics of proteins in polyelectrolyte brushes. C. Czeslik, O. Hollmann 10:50 42. Biofunctjonalization of materials with polyelectrolyte multilayers. P. Schaaf, J. Voegel, N. Jessel, P. Lavalle, D. Mertz

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

BCEC 255 Advances in Biobased Nanostructures and Nanomaterials Cosponsored by BIOHW P. X. Qi and M. H. Tunick, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:40 47. Protein nanomaterials and their applications. X. S. Xun, X. Mo 2:10 48. Chemically self-assembled protein nanostructures. C. R. Wagner 2:40 49. Bioengineered nanostructures from silk proteins. A. Murphy, O. S. Rabotyagova, R. Juma, P. Cebe, C. C. Perry, D. L. Kaplan 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 50. Design of functional nanostructured materials. A. Joshi, P. Asuri, S. Punyani, J. Dordick, R. S. Kane 3:55 51. DNA-based self-assembly of nano­ structures. H. Yan 4:25 52. Polymeric nanosystems responding to tumor pH. Y. H. Bae Section Β BCEC 256 Physicochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Cosponsored by BIOHW Q. Huang, D. J. McClements, and P. L. Dubin, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 53. Complexation and coacervation of serum albumin and chitosan. P. L Dubin, A. B. Kayitmazer, S. P. Strand 2:00 54. Protein-polysaccharide complexa­ tion to control texture and produce func­ tional ingredients. S. L Turgeon 2:25 55. Gelation of gelatin with sugar sub­ stitutes. S. Gunasekaran, T. Tau 2:50 56. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin on carrageenan surfaces: Effect of carrageenan linear charge density. Y. Un, Q. Huang 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 57. Starch fine structure and form related to nutritional effect. B. R. Hamaker, G. Zhang, Z. Ao, S. Maghaydah 3:55 58. Hydrophobically modified chitosan: Synthesis, characterization and food related applications. T. Wu, S. Zivanovic 4:20 59. Fabrication of chitosan/lipid multilayered films through layer-by-layer approach. X.Wang, Y. Un, Q.Huang

AGFD

Section C

Section Β

BCEC 257A

BCEC 256 ι between Taste, SnteH and

Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide D. S. Mottram, Organizer

P. Breslin, J. V. Leland, T. Hofmann, and W. Meyerhof, Organizers 1:30 61. Murttsensory processing in the gustatory system. S. A. Simon 2:10 62. Roles of Merkel cells in sensory transduction. Ε A. Lumpkin, H. Haeberle 2:50 63. TRPA1 is the primary target of pungent compounds from garlic and mus­ tard. D. M. Bautista, A. Hinman, D. Julius 3:45 64. New developments in the chemistry of cooling compounds. S. M. Furrar, J. P. Slack, S. McCkJSkey, A. T. Daniher, K. Bell, P. Krawec, L Cote, K. Gray 4:25 65. Discovery of taste modulators by means of a molecular sensory science Ί.Τ.Γ Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, andBTEC TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 255

M. Friedman, Organizer, Presiding 8:50 Introductory Remarks. 9:00 77. Review of the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of acrylamide. L M. KamenduKs, J. E. Ktaunkj 9:30 78. Genotoxfcity of gryckjamide in comparison to N-nitroso compounds and interactions of acrylamide with food matrix components. M. Baum, N. Boehm, R. N. Loeppky, S. Thieten, G. Eisenbrand 9:55 79. Molecular mechanisms of neurotox­ icity: Acrylamide targets thiolate sulfhydryls of catalytic triads. R. M. LoPachm Jr. 10:20 Intermission. 10:45 80. Neurotoxic mechanism of acryl­ amide: Correlation of Type-2 alkene-thiol reactivity with parameters derived from quantum mechanical calculations. T.Gavin 11:10 81. Dietary acrylamide and cancer risk estimation on the basis of toxicotogical data M. A. Tomqvtet B. E. Paulsson, A. Vikstrom, F. Granath 11:35 82. Acrylamide intake through diet and human cancer risk. L A. Mucci, K. Wilson Section C BCEC 257A

B. S. Patil, Organizer ι between Taste, Smell and G. Jayaprakasha and K. N. ChkJambara Murthy, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 66. Antimicrobial food packaging mate­ rial based on chitosan coated-paper. Reduction of water sensitivity by chemical modifications of chitosan. N. Bordenave, S. Grelier, V. Coma 8:35 67. Bulk and template-free synthesis of silver nanowires using caffeine at room temperature. M. N. Nadagouda, R. S. Varma 9:00 68. Competitive reactions that control wine oxidation. A. L Waterhouse, R. J. Bias 9:25 69. Stability d the plamajitimicrobial carvacrol in edible tomato/pectin puree films. M. Friedman, C. E. Levin, R. J. Avena-Bustillos, C. W. Oteen, T. H. McHugh 9:50 70. Use of deltatocopherolagainst oxidation of model flavor compounds in medium chaing triglycerides and sunflower oil. S. Lederoq, G. A. Reineccius 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 71.(>)mparativethernfK>analytical study of soybean, sunflower, olive, peanut and linseed oils of Indian origin. R. K. Verma, L Verma, K. Mallick 10:55 72. Identification of aroma compounds in food grade Argan oil. M. Zahar, G. Reineccius, J-P. Schirle-Keller 11:20 73. Process induced changes in resveratrol in peanuts. L L Dean, T.H. Sanders 11:45 74. Response of soil sulphur on trirjcale (X Triticosecale W.) sulphur contents. D.M.Làszlo 12:10 75. The evaluation of silica based self-assembling matrices for flavor encapsulation. S. Krishnan, G. Reineccius 12:35 76. Verification of isotope analysis method by HRGC-MS for the discrimination of citrus essential oils from afferent origins. T. T. Nguyen, M. Sawamura

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/

P. Breslin, J. V. Leland, T. Hofmann, and M. Wolfgang, Organizers 8:00 83. Neural representation of flavor in the human brain. D. M. Small 8:40 84. Experience-dependent odor/taste/ somatosensory interactions. J. Prescott 920 85. Odor-taste integration in espresso coffee. T. E. Acree, A. Chirlertpong, K.J.SieberLE.H.Lavin 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 86. Studying flavor cross modality through combined analyses of flavor stimuli and sensory perception. A.J.Taytor,J.Hort 10:55 87. Learned integration of subthresh­ old odors and tastes: An fMRI perspective. P. Breslin 11:35 Discussion. Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, andBTEC TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 255 Food BtoacrJves and Nutraceuticals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and neann Bnects Symposium Honoring rerskfoon Shahkti A. M. Rimando, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 88. Food btoactives in health promotion and disease risk reduction. F.Shahldl 1:40 89. Chemopreventjve potential of some anti-inflammatory and antioxidative spice ingredients. Y-J. Surh 2:00 90. Oxidative reaction of pofyphenolic. compounds in food. C. T. Ho, S. Sang 2:20 91. Georgia pecans: Examination of their nutritional and functional attributes. R. B. Pegg, R. Amarowicz, E-C. Shin, R. R. Eitenmiller

2:40 Intermission. 2:55 92. Challenges in the isolation and identification of key aroma components of complex functional foods. K. Cadwalteder, P. R. Lozano, H. Kim 3:15 93. Cranberry phytochemicals: Isolation, structure elucidation, and their anticancer activity. R. H. Uu 3:35 94. Fish oil processing, stabilization and concentration, for delivery into foods. C. J. Barrow 3:55 95. Healthy eating for life with omega-3 functional foods. S. Spurvey 4:15 96. Hydroryzed flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L) proteins and their putative biological activities. H. K. Marambe, P. J. Shand, J. P. D. Wanasundara Section Β BCEC 256 Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide M. Friedman, Organizer D. S. Mottram, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 97. Inhtortton of lop proteins and not DNA adducts drive acrylamide risk assessment. M. A. Friedman, D.W. Sickles 1:55 98. Acrylamide metabolism, elimination kinetics and hemoglobin adducts. T. R. Fennell, M. A. Friedman 2:20 99. PBPK/PD modeling of acrylamide: Integration of kinetic and bkxnarker data for use in risk assessment. D. R. Doerge 2:45 Intermission. 3:10 100. Cross-sectional study on acryl­ amide exposure, using hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers: Results from the EPIC study. H. W. Vesper, N. Slimani, G. Hallmans, A. Tjenneland, U. Stromberg 3:35 101. Acrylamide adduction with bfomacromotecules at environmental dose levels and its inhibition studied by accelerator mass spectrometry. H. Sun, Q. Xie, Y. Liu, Y. Uu, X. Ding, D. Fu, K. Uu 4:00 102. Acrylamide: Human metabolism and exposure. J. Angerer Section C BCEC 257A Thermal Generation of Flavors and

C. T. Ho, Organizer S. Raghavan and R. J. McGorrin, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 103. Thermal generation of flavors and off-flavors: An overview. R. J. McGorrin 1:30 104. What makes coffee taste that bitter? T. Hofmann, O. Frank, S. Blumberg, C. Kunert, G. Zehentbauer 1:55 105. Key aroma compounds in cooked and deep-fried onions. P. Schieberie, M. Granvogl 2:20 Intermission. 2:35 106. Comparison of isolation methods used in conjunction with GC-NPD for analysis of volatile Maillard reaction prod­ ucts. M. J. Morello, B. Vastano, S. Feng 3:00 107. Analyticaltechniquesin thermally generated flavors and off-flavors. S. Raghavan, C.T. Ho 3:25 108. klentification of polar compounds in a range of cooked meat and fish. J. K. Parker, M. Adamou, S. J. Gough, D.S. Mottram 3:50 60.2, 5-Diketopiperazines (cyclic dipeptides) in various foods: klentification, synthesis, and sensory evaluation. M.Z. Chen, N.C. Da Costa, M.Dewis, LReiber, LTrinnaman

Section D BCEC Exhibit HaH-B2 General Posters B. Patil, G. Jayaprakasha, and K. N. ChkJambara Murthy, Organizers 1:00-3:00 109. Determination of acrylamide in some Caribbean foods by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. G-A. Bent, P. Maragh, T. Dasgupta 110. Fatty acid composition and tocopherol content of pumpkin seed oil. D. G. Stevenson, F. J. Eller, L Wang, J. L Jane, T. Wang, G. E. Inglett 111. Progress in research on the environmen­ tal behaviors of aluminum in plant rizosphere. P.Wang, S.BI 112. A novel sweet mogroside from Siraitia grosvenorii. Z. Jia, X. Yang 113. Effect of damaged starch in wheat flour on Chinese noodle quality. Q. Lu, L Li, S. Guo, B. U, G. Uu 114. Effect of gluten in wheat flour on noodle quality. Q. Lu, L U, S. Guo, B. U, G. Uu 115. Effect of high-pressure microfluioization on the functional properties of soy protein isolate. Z. Tu, J. Wang, C. Uu, R. Ruan 116. Effect of surfactants on aggregation of Alzheimer Amyloid 13(1-40) peptide. Y.Wang, M.Cao 117. Effect of ultrasonic treatment on the rheotogical property of wheat gluten. LZnao,G.Uu, L L i , B.Li 118. Study on supercritical C02 extraction of flavonokJs in Eucommia ulmoktes leaves. F. Guiming ST., W. Yin, Ζ Shuo, Z. Zuowei 119. Thermal degradation of flavor compo­ nents in dentrifices. M. S. Staniforth 120. Effect of cold storage and packaging material on the major aroma components of sweet cream butter. P. R. Lozano, E. R. Miracle, A. J. Krause, M. Drake, K. R. Cadwallader 121. Pressure enhanced solvent extraction of naturally occurring materials on both the Laboratory and Pilot-scale. K. J. James 122. A novelfluorescentprobe for Hg2+ containing in food. S. Sun, T. Zhang, J. Fan, X. Peng 123. An improvement on current DPPH anti­ oxidant capacity assays. C. L Wommack, W.LWhaley 124. Analysis of 6-gingerol, 6-shogaol, and 6-gingerdiol in ginger rhizome powder and in physiological fluids by HPLC, GC/MS, and LC/MS. H. A. Schwertner, S. Valtier, M. L Edwards, S. B. Kong 125. Analysis of aroma components of Tibet Ghee by GC-MS. Y. Shi, W. Zheng, H. Xtong, J. U, W.Zhao 126. Analysis of furan in human blood using solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS). Y-K. Lee, T-K. Kim, S. J. Lee, K-G.Lee 127. Analysis of sulfonamide and quinotone antibiotic residues in milk using microbial assays and high performance liquid chro­ matography (HPLC). J-B. Lee, Y-M. Back, J-Y. Her, K-G. Lee 128. Analysis of usnic acid from Usnea sp. dispersed in rodent diet by HPLC. R. L Evans, P. H. Siitonen 129. Antidepressant and anti-stress activity of GC-MS characterized lipophilic extracts of Ginkgo bitoba leaves. S. S. Kalkunte, A.P.Singh, F.C.Chaves, T. J. Gianfagna, V. S. Pundir, A. K. Jaiswal, N. Vorsa, S. Sharma 130. Antioxidant and neuroprotective activity of Pueraria miriflca extracts against gluta­ mate toxicity in neuronal cells. A. Sucontphunt, S. D. Dimitrijevich, U. Nimmannit, W. De-Eknamkul, R. W. Gracy 131. Antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activities of Brown Seed Coated Soybean (Glycine max L). T. J. Ha, N. S. Kang, D-Y. Suh, S-H. Shin, J-D. Seong, l-Y. Baek, K-Y. Park 132. Antioxidants from Berberis vulgaris (Barberry). H. Tomosaka, H. Chai, Y-W. Chin, A. A. Salim, W. J. Keller, A. D. Kinghom

Τ ί1 C M - 7

Join the American Chemical Society's

wmrnrmmmsm®w!MigMmMimtÉM® at the

34th ACb t-ail National Meeting

BOSTON, MA AUGUST 19-23, 2007

SUNDAY, AUGUST 19

MONDAY, AUGUST 20

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21

CMA Communications Subcommittee Meeting

Many Faces of Chemistry: ACS Scholars' Contribution to the Chemical Sciences

Many Faces of Chemistry: The Role of Two-Year Colleges in Changing the Face of Chemistry

&00AM-1040AM

INDEPENDENCE W E S T SHERATON BOSTON CMA Education Subcommittee Meeting fcOOAM-lfcOOAM BERKELEY B— SHERATON BOSTON

CMA Local Section/Divisions/ Regional Meeting Interactions Subcommittee Meeting &00ΑΜ-10Λ0ΑΜ FAIRFAX B—SHERATON BOSTON

CMA Executive Session 12:00 PM-4.-00 PM INDEPENDENCE WESTSHERATON BOSTON

The Many Faces of Chemistry: International Opportunities for Chemists 1:00 P M - 2:10 PM BERKELEY A/B, ORALSHERATON BOSTON Sponsor: YCC Cosponsors: CMA and WCC

CMA Open Meeting 4.-00 P M - 5:00 PM INDEPENDENCE EASTSHERATON BOSTON

CMA Networking Social Hour and ACS Scholars Reunion &ΟΟΡΜ-&ΟΟΡΜ INDEPENDENCE WESTSHERATON BOSTON Sponsor Committee on Minority Affairs

& 3 0 A M - 1 1 : 3 0 AM LIBERTY A/&-SHERATON BOSTON Sponsor Committee on Minority Affairs

& 3 0 A M - 1 1 : 3 0 AM LIBERTY A/B—SHERATON BOSTON SponsorCMA Cosponsors: PROF, WCC and YCC

Many Faces of Chemistry: The Merck Index Women in Chemistry Award Symposium

Henry Hill Award Recipient Howard Peters—An Alternative Career of Service to the Profession

MOAM-11:50 AM 9:15 A M - 1 1 5 0 AM BEACON G, ORAL—SHERATON BOSTON REVERE, ORAL—WESTIN BOSTON WATERFRONT Sponsor WCC Cosponsors: CHED, PROF and CMA Sponsor PROF Cosponsors: CHAL, CEPA and CMA

Henry Hill Award Recipients Ted & Arlene Light— Careers of Service to the Profession

CMA Luncheon/Reception 11:30 A M - 1 : 3 0 PM BALLROOM D—SHERATON BOSTON Ticket #SE07/$50 Sponsor Committee on MinorityAffairs

Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront

2HW P M - 4 : 1 0 PM BEACON G, ORAL—SHERATON BOSTON Sponsor PROF Cosponsors: CEPA and CMA

Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry

1:30 P M - 4 3 0 PM

2:10 P M - 4 2 0 PM BACK BAY BALLROOM B, ORALSHERATON BOSTON Sponsor WCC Cosponsors: CWD, CTA, PROF, CMA, YCC and PRES

REVERE, ORAL—WESTIN BOSTON WATERFRONT Sponsor WCC Cosponsors: BIOL, INOR, CMA and PRES

20th Anniversary of National Chemistry Week: The Many Faces of Chemistry 130PM-4&5PM PLAZA B, ORAL—SEAPORT Sponsor CCA Cosponsors: CTA, CMA and PRES

Many Faces of Chemistry: Stories from ACS Scholars

Joint Subcommittee on Diversity Reception 5:00 P M - £ 3 0 PM BACK BAY BALLROOM D—SHERATON BOSTON HOTEL, Sponsored by CMA, CTA, CMA, and WCC

2:00 PM-4.-00 PM LIBERTY A/B—SHERATON BOSTON SponsorCMA Cosponsors: WCC and YCC

Academic Employment Initiative IfcOOPM-lfcOOPM EXHIBIT HALL C, SCI-MIX— BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER SponsorAEI Cosponsors: CWD, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA CPT, SOCED, WCC and PRES

AnMrtcen Gfi#intcM Society

nUMr

Meet Roald Hoffmann Professor Hoffmann, winner of the 1981 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, the 1983 National Medal of Science, and the 1990 Priestley Medal will be reading a selection of his poetry at the C&EN/ACS Publications booth in Boston. A limited number of autographed commemorative booklets containing a selection of his poems will be available.

Monday, August 2 0 , 2 0 0 7 11:00 a.m. Booth 4 5 2 7

C&EN C H E M I C A L & E N G I N E E R I N G NEWS

ACS National Meeting Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

lilliU

BiiH

AGFD 133. Antiplatelet constituents from Artocarpus communis. J-R. Weng, S-C. Chan, Y-H. Lu, O N . Un 134. Aroma active sulfur volatiles in raw and roasted Arabica coffee beans. K. Mahattanatawee, P. Ruiz Pérez-Cacho, Ν. Rattanapanone, R. L Rouseff 135. Bitter peptides from enzymatically-produced hydrolysates of commercial shrimp processing waste. I. W. Y. Cheung, E. C. Y. Li-Chan 136. Comparison of calcium-induced firmness in mushroom, fruit and vegetable by in vitro binding. X. Deng, S. Zivanovic, C. E. Sams, R. B. Beelman 137. Composition of forage and grain from second generation insect-protected com MON 89034 is equivalent to that of con­ ventional com. S. M. Drury, T. L Reynolds, W. P. Ridley 138. Withdrawn. 139. Correlation of urinary furan with plasma 7-glutamyltranspeptidase levels in healthy men and women. H. J. Jun, T-K. Kim, Y-K. Lee, S. J. Lee, K-G. Lee 140. Cranberry proantnocyanidins sensitize ovarian cancer cells to Platinum Drug. A. P. Singh, R. K. Singh, S. S. Kalkunte, R. Nussbaum, K. Kim, H. Jin, M. S. Tones, LBrard, N.Vorsa 141. Deterioration in quality of "Yuzu" essen­ tial oil according to long preservation and development of new preservation method of the oil. T. Kashiwagi, M. Sawamura, H.Sakamoto 142. Determination of authenticity of sake by 13C/12C isotope ratio analysis. V. R. Klnton, J. Ammann 143. Dihydrolipoic acid inhibits tetrachlorohydroquinone-induced tumor promotion through prevention of oxidative damage. S-Y. Ho, M-H. Pan, Y-J. Wang 144. Effect of different amylase on the struc­ ture of cornstarch granules. Q. Huang, X.Fu 145. Effect of germination on blue com phe­ nolic compounds. H. Hernandez-Sanchez, D. Nava-Arenas 146. Effect of microwave radiation on theo­ logical properties of waxy com starch pastes. L Chen, F.Zou, X . U . L U 147. Effect of the decontamination process on the nutritional quality of fresh-cut veg­ etables. I. V. T. J. Vandekinderen, J. Van Camp, F. Devlieghere, P. Ragaert, J. Debevere, B. De Meutenaer 148. Effects of isoflavone position in SDS micelles on lipkJ-phase antioxidant activity. C. L Wommack, J. D. Rummel, N. Kastrapeli, W. L Whaley 149. Electrospun nanofibers of Chrtosan blends. K. Desal, K. Kit 150. Granule structure and paste properties of waxy potato starch. F. Luo, Q. Huang 151. Hyroxypropylation and crosslinking modification effects on the stability of potato starch. L U, Q. Huang, X. Fu 152. Identification of the chemical compo­ nents in the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma atrum. M. Shen, M. Xie, S. Nie 153. Identification of the unusual hexadecatrienoic acid starter unit for the biosynthe­ sis of the allelochemical sorgoleone. A. M. Rimando, Z. Pan, S. R. Baerson 154. In vitro antioxidant activity of different extracts of Cyclocarya paliurus (Batal.) Iljinsk. C. Dong, M. Xie, C. U, S. Nie 155. Influence of ecological factors on immune system of large homed livestock. A.O.Urazov 156. Inter-laboratory trial of new detection procedure for irradiated spices using thermal luminescence (TL method). M. Miyahara, E. Sugi, H. Sunaga, T.Maitani 157. Isoflavone aglycone contents in different parts of soy plant. I-Y. Baek, J. H. Lee, J-M. Ko, H-T. Kim, W-Y. Han, N. S. Kang, K-Y.Park 158. Isolation and determination of anthocyanins from Black Seed Coated Soybean (Glycine max L) and their antioxidant activities. T. J. Ha, N. S. Kang, D-Y. Suh, S-H. Shin, J-D. Seong, S-G. Lim, S-O. Shin, K-Y. Park 159. Kinetic-catalytic determination of iron with a new reaction system and its appli­ cation to certain agricultural products. Q-L Feng, L Feng

3-TECH

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 160. Kinetics and mechanism of effectordriven oxyhalogen reactions for the inactivation of foodborne microorganisms by chlorine dioxide. C. Doona, F. Feeherry, K. Kustin, M. A. Curtin, J. Barcus 161. Lipoxygenase-1 inhibitory activity of polyphenol» acids and acyglycerylgalactosides from Perilla frutescens. N. S. Kang, T. J. Ha, J. H. Lee, C-S. Jung, M-H. Lee, D-Y. Suh, J-D. Seong, K-Y. Park 162. Mechanism of action of menthone in ameliorating oral cavity malodor caused by consumption of garlic. G. Carrasco, K. Cadwallader 163. Mutation of Acetobacter xylinum for high-yield production of bacterial cellulose. F. Hong, K. Y. Qiu 164. Novel antioxRJative and angtotensin-lconverting enzyme inhibitory peptides from Pacific hake (Merlucdus productus) fish protein hydrolysates. A. G. P. Samaranayaka, C. Hu, D. D. Kftts, E. C. Y. Li-Chan 165. Optimization the activity of immobilized cellulase in the three-phase magnetically fluidized bed reactor. B. U, L Kou, S. Guo, L U 166. Polyphenols and antioxidant capacity of coffee fruits Arabica. Β. V. Nemzer, V. Miljkovic, S. Stanley, J. V. Drunnen 167. Withdrawn. 168. Radical scavenging activity of coumarin derivatives from Angelica dahurica. K. C. Jang, S. C. Kim, Ε. Υ. Song, N. Y. Ro, D. Y. Moon, Κ. Η. Kang, Κ. Η. Park 169. Resveratro^-Jactoglobulin interaction studied by circular dichroism and fluores­ cence. L Liang, M. Subirade 170. RheoJogical behaviors of cloud carrot juices. J. He, H. Huang, W. Fan, Z. Tu 171. Rheotogy of extruded whey protein isolate. M. H. Tunlck, C. I. Onwulata 172. Some properties of a glycoprotein puri­ fied from green tea (Camellia sinensis). S. Nie. M. Xie, Ζ. Fu 173. Starch sodium octenylsuccinate as wall material for encapsulation of lemon oil. Q. Huang, L U, F. Luo 174. Structure and targeting controlled-release property of resistant starch film. X. U, L Chen, L U 175. Study on preparation and emulsifying properties of rice residues protein-malt dextrin. J. Wu, W. Zheng, W. Zhao, J-H. U, M.Xie 176. Study on the bactericidal effects of longan seed extracts. C. Un, R. Huang, Q. Deng 177. Surface properties of chitosan/PEO blend films as affected by film preparation method. J. U, S. Zivanovic, M. Davidson, K.Kit 178. Susceptibility of native and denatured bovine hemoglobins to pepsinolysis: Identi­ fication and release kinetics of peptides. R. Su, W. Qi, Z. He 179. Synthesis of a dimethylfuran-containing macrolide insect pheromone. R.J.PetrosW, R.J.Bartelt 180. Taste preference forflavonokJlevels amongst smokers and nonsmokers before and after oxidative insult C. L Wommack 181. Time-dependent nature in pancreatic hydrolysis of casein micelles: Identification and release kinetics of peptides. W. Qi, R. Su, Z. He 182. Trypsin inhibitor activity and isoflavones in soymilk processed by different methods. S. Yuan, S. K. C. Chang, Z. Uu, B. Xu 183. Ultrasound effects on the structure and chemical reactivity of cornstarch granules. L U, Q. Huang. X. Fu

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

184. Use of DDGS as a biocomposite layered fabrication material. B. J. Gilbes, F. T. Halaweish, J. Visser, Κ. Rosentrater 185. Volatile composition of Korean soybean pastes using simultaneous distillation and extraction (SDE) and headspace solidphase microextraction (HS-SPME). S-J. Lee, E-H. Kim. S-Y. Choi

10:40 198. Interactions of acryiamide with other food constituents. M. Granvogl, L Latzer, P. Koehler, P. Schieberle 11:05 199. Formation of acryiamide during roasting of coffee. M. Murkovic 11:30 200. Contribution of oxidized lipids to the formation of acryiamide in thermally processed foods. F. J. Hidalgo, R.Zamora

Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD. BIOL. BIOT. MEDI. andBTEC

Section C

TUESDAY EVENING Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition

BCEC 257A

Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by AGFD

Thermal Generation of Flavors and Off-flavors Precursors and Model Reactions

WEDNESDAY MORNING

R. J. McGorrin, Organizer

Section A BCEC 255

S. Raghavan and C. T. Ho, Organizers, Presiding

Food Bioacuves and NutraceutJcals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and

C-T. Ho, Organizer F. Shahidi and R. H. Liu, Organizers, 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 186. Development and testing of an anti-inflammatory formulation based on nutragenomics. J. W. Fintey 8:25 187. "Green" high-pressure fluid extrac­ tion of health-beneficial compounds from Swedish byproducts and wastes. M. Co, P. Koskel, C. Turner 8:45 188. Anthocyanin extraction with super­ critical C02 from two Colombian tropical fruits. C. Osorto, J. Barrios, B. Acevedo, F. Parada, M. L Gonzàlez-Miret, F. J. Heredia, A. L Morales 9:05 Intermission. 9:20 189. Investigating the interactions of black tea thearubigins with bovine serum albumin using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. M. Chitpan, Q. Huang, C-T. Ho 9:40 190. LC/MS determination of phytosterote in NIST standard reference materials comprised of saw palmetto. M. Bedner, L C. Sander, K. S. Sharpless 10:00 191. Effect of pH, sugar and phenolic compounds on the color and antioxidant capacity of caramel. P-J. Tsai, C-C. Liu, T-Y.Yu.CT. Ho 10:20 192. Effect of soaking, cooking and steaming on antioxidant properties of cool season food legumes. B. Xu. S. K. Chang 10:40 193. Vitamin C protection against aluminum stress. E. S. Shaker. H. M. Helmy

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 201. Molecular studies on the storageinduced degradation of odor-active thiols in coffee beverages. C. MOIIer, T. Hofmann 8:25 202. Free amino acids and dipeptides in meat as precursors of thermally gener­ ated aroma. M. J. Oruna-Concha, D. S. Mottram 8:45 203. Precursors of flavor formation in meat and yeast extract. L J. Farmer, M. Aliani, K. Mahadevan, T. D. Hagan, J. T. Kennedy 9:05 204. Importance of sulfur amino acids in the formation of aroma volatiles in cooked salmon. L Methven, D. S. Mottram 9:25 Intermission. 9:45 205. Formation of volatile components from the thermal interactions of theanine with reducing sugars. S. Y. Kim, Y-S. Kim 10:05 206. Identification of key thermallyderived odorants in cooked chicken liver. S. Cook, K. Cadwallader, H. Kim 10:25 207. Thermal generation of tomato flavor compounds. M. Sucan, G. F. Russell 10:45 208. Thermal generation of volatile compounds from reactions of cysteine, N-acetylcysteine or S-methylcysteine with glucose or pyruvaktehyde. Y. Wang, S. Raghavan, C-T. Ho WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 255 Food Btoactives and NutraceutJcals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and

Overview

Section Β

C-T. Ho, Organizer

BCEC 256

F. Shahidi and R. H. Liu, Organizers, Presiding

Chemistry and Toxicology of Acryiamide

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 209. Procyanidins: Effects of source and extrusion conditions on structure, degradation and absorption/metabolism. R. L Prior, L Howard, L. Gu, A. Hager, L Rooney 1:30 210. A comparison of the antioxidant components in commercial organic and conventional marinara pasta sauce. Α. E. Mitchell. E. Koh. K. M. S. Wimalasiri. E. N. C. Renaud 1:55 211. Prevention of cancer with fruit phytochemicals. R. H. Uu 2:20 Intermission. 2:40 21Ζ The multiple beneficial properties of fruits and vegetables in brain aging: Turning back the ravages of time. J. A. Joseph. B. Shukitt-Hale, D. Fisher 3:05 213. Polyphenols in nuts, cereals, pasta and snacks: Unexpected sources of anti­ oxidants with potential health properties. J. A. Vinson, Y. Cai, J. Z. Marchegiani 3:30 214. Cholesterol-lowering nutraceuticals and functional foods. Z-Y. Chen

D. S. Mottram, Organizer P. Schieberle, Presiding 8:30 194. The Maillard reaction and its role in the formation of acryiamide in foods. D. S. Mottram. B. Wedzicha 9:00 195. Heat and pH induced generation of acryiamide from N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1yl^'-aminopropionamide. V. A. Yaylayan. C. P. Locas 9:30 196. Modeling the kinetics of the forma­ tion and fate of acryiamide in food. B. Wedzicha, J. Mojtea Lazaro. G. KoutskJis, J. S. Elmore 9:50 Intermission. 10:15 197. Acryiamide formation under mild conditions: The promoting effect of ammo­ nium bicarbonate and detection of acryi­ amide in dried fruit T. M. Amrein, L Andres, G. G. Manzardo, F. Escher, R.Amado

AGFD/AGRO Section Β BCEC 256 Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide D. S. Mottram, Organizer M. Friedman, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 215. Human exposure to acrylamide: A brief history. D. E. Marroni 1:55 216. Extraction of acrylamide from foods. EV.Petersson 2:20 217. Analysis of evaporated acrylamide from food products and biological materi­ als. L S. Eriksson, P. Karlsson, M. A. Tomqvist 2:45 Intermission. 3:10 218. Acrylamide analysis in a complex matrix. T. Shibamoto 3:35 219. Heat derived toxicants in f o o d somefindingsof a collaborative European research project K. I. Skog 4:00 220. Rapid screening of acrylamide formation in a model matrix reactor under different compositional and processing conditions. G. A. Channell, A. J. Taylor

8:45 230. Interactions of functional foods and age-related macular degeneration. J.N.Losso 9:05 Intermission. 9:25 231. Inhibitory effects of chitooligosaccharides on tumor growth and metastasis. Y-J. Wang, K-T. Shen, Y-S. Ho 9:45 232. Reactive carbonyl species and tea components: Dicarbonyl compounds and 5-(hydroxymethyt)-2-furfural in beverages containing high fructose com syrup. C-Y. Lo, S. U, Y. Wang, C-T. Ho 10:05 233. Amadori compounds may have cancer prevention potential. V. V. Mosslne, T. P. Mawhinney 10:25 234. The source and biological activity of hydroxylated polymethoxyfiavones. S. U, C-Y. Lo, M-H. Pan, I. N. Sergeev, S. Dushenkov, C-T. Ho Section Β BCEC 256

A. J. Taylor, Presiding 8:30 235. Risk-benefit assessment of foods containing heat-induced carcinogens. J.R.Coughlin 9:00 236. Dietary exposure estimates for acrylamide intake. C. Mills, C. Tlustos, R. Evans, W. Matthews 237. Withdrawn. 9:25 Intermission. 9:50 238. Overview of possible approaches to reducing the acrylamide content of the diet M. Friedman 10:20 239. European regulatory perspective on the acrylamide issue. W. Matthews 10:45 240. The acrylamide "Toolbox" approach of the European Food & Drink Federation (CIAA). R. H. Stadler 11:10 241. Agronomic and genetic approachestoreducingacrylamide precur­ sors in wheat and potato. N. G. Halford, N. Muttucumaru, T. Curtis, P. R. Shewry, M. A. Parry, J. S. Elmore, D. S. Mottram

R. J. McGorrin and C. T. Ho, Organizers, 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 221. Monitoring the effect of process conditions on Maillard products and inter­ mediates using a film reactor coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry. G. A. Channell, A. J. Taylor 1:30 222. Role of hydroxycinnamic acids on the generation of Maillardreactionflavor compounds in whole grain wheat bread. M. R. Moskowitz, D. G. Peterson 1:55 223. Thermal generation of process contaminants: Furan, chbropropanols, acrylamide, and other undesired vinylogous compounds. R. H. Stadler 2:20 Intermission. 2:40 224. Impact of roasting process and cooling method on flavor formation and flavor stability of coffee. J. Baggenstoes, R. Kaegi, L Poisson, R. Perren, F. Escher 3:05 225. Thermal generation of volatile off-aroma compounds under high hydro­ static pressure. M. Qian, P. Vazquez-Landaverde 3:30 226. Effects of naturally occurring phenolic compounds in coffee on the formation of Maillard aromas. Y. Wang, C-T.Ho 3:55 227. Flavor generation from cooked beef bone marrow at high moisture condi­ tion. B. Choudhury, S. Raghavan, H. Daun, C-T. Ho THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 255 Food Bioactives and Nutraceutteals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and Health Effects R. H. Liu, Organizer F. Shahidi and C-T. Ho, Organizers, 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 228. Inhibitory effect of phenolic acids on 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and its molecu­ lar mechanism. G-C. Yen, C-L Hsu 8:25 229. Effect of wheat antioxidants on oxygen diffusion-concentration products in liposomes and its cholesterol-lowering property. L Yu, Z. Cheng, H. Zhou, J-J.Yin

BCEC 256 Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide M. Friedman, Organizer D. S. Mottram, Organizer, Presiding

D. S. Mottram and M. Friedman, Organizers

BCEC 257A

S. Raghavan, Organizer

Section Β

Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide

Section C

Off-flavors Processing Effect

3:00 247. Pomegranate fractions may pre­ vent prostate cancer. K. Chidambara Murthy, J. R. Patil, G. Jayaprakasha, B. Patil 3:20 248. Isolation and characterization of twoflavonoidsfrom Sophora flavescens roots, and their antiproliferative and COX-2 inhibitory properties. Z. Cheng, H. Zhou, LYu 3:40 249. Kagzi lime (Citrus aurantJfolia Swingle) volatile oil: A potential source for colon cancer prevention. J. R. Patil, G. Jayaprakasha, Κ. Ν. Chidambara Murthy, S. E. Tichy, M. B. Chetti, B. S. Patil

Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by AGFD andBTEC THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 255

1:30 250. The effects of sulfur nutrition on acrylamide and aroma compounds in cooked wheat and potato. J. S. Elmore, N. Muttucumaru, N. G. Halford, M. A. Parry, D. S. Mottram 1:55 251. Raw material variability: Atoolto minimize acrylamideformationin baked cereal products? C. G. Hamlet, P. A. Sadd, L Liang 2:20 252. Effectiveness of methods for reducing acrylamide in bakery products. P. A. Sadd, C.G.Hamlet 2:45 Intermission. 3:10 253. Simulation of acrylamide formation in French fries and potential strategies for mitigation. V. Gôkmen, T. K. Palazogju 3:35 254. Chemical pretreatments of potato products: Mechanisms of acrylamide mitigation and effects on the sensorial quality. F. Mestdagh, J. Maertens, T. De Wilde, T. Cucu, K. Delporte, C. Van Peteghem, B. De Meulenaer 4:00 255. Mitigation and resulting reductions in the dietary exposuretoacrylamide. P. Boon, J. D. van Klaveren 4:25 Concluding Remarks. Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition Sensory Issues in Food Packaging Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by AGFD andBTEC

AGRO

Food Bioactives and Nutraceutteals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and

Division of Agrochemicals

Cancer Prevention and AntHnflammatJon

J. J. Johnston, Program Chair

8:40 Introductory Remarks. 8:45 1. Application of immunoassay in agricultural biotechnology. G. Shan 9:10 2. Molecular breeding of medicinal plant using single chain Fv gene. Y. Shoyama, W. Putalun, H. Tanaka 9:35 3. Evaluation of a high-throughput magnetic-particle triclosan immunoassay andresultsof their application for continental waters monitoring in the Mediterranean area, M. Farre, F. Rubio, D. Asperger, S. Lacorte, M. Petrovic, W. L Sbetver, D. Barcelo 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 4. Use of EUSAtoaid management of the invasive gall wasp, Quadrasticus erythrinae Kim on native and landscape trees, Erythrina spp. Q. X. U, T. Xu, C. Jacobsen, A. H. Hara 10:45 5. Development of sensitive immunoassay formats for algal toxins. F. Rubio, L Kamp, J. Church, R. Slawecki 11:10 6. Immunoassays and immunoaffinity purification for persistent organic pollutants. J. C. Chuang, J. M. Van Emon 11:35 7. Aprjlication and validation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers immunoassay for environmental and food matrices. W.LSherver, F. Rubio 12:00 Concluding Remarks. Section Β BCEC 259B Chemistry J. J. Johnston and D. Smith, Organizers T. A. Wehner, Organizer, Presiding 8:55 Introductory Remarks. 9:00 8. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of firocoxib in horses after oral administration. V. Kvatomick, M. Pollmeier, P. D. Hanson, J. B. Fischer 9:20 9. Tissue residue depletion of firocoxib in horses after oral administration. V. Kvatomick, B. KunkJe, A. Khunachak 9:40 10. Distribution and residues of orally administered 2,4,6-trinitro-14C-toluene in ruminating sheep. D. J. Smith, A. M. Craig, J. M. Duringer, R. L Chaney 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 11. Determination of chlorophacinone in prairie dogs by microwave extraction and ion-pairing reversed-phase high per­ formance liquid chromatography with confirmation by HPLC/MS. T. M. Primus, C. R. Wermager, J. J. Johnston 10:40 12. Determination of organochlorine pesticide residues from eggs and liver. D. A. GokJade, D. L Griffin, J. J. Johnston 11:00 13. Analysis of nitrofuran residues in shrimp, channel catfish, and milk using liquid chranatography-tandern mass spectrometry. P-S. Chu, M. I. Lopez, A. Abraham, K. R. El Said, S. M. Plakas

F. Shahidi, Organizer C-T. Ho and R. H. Liu, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 242. Acylation as an approach to increase the bioavailability and enhance the cancer preventive effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate. S. Sang, J. D. Lambert, C-T. Ho, C.S. Yang 1:25 243. Potential of crtrus limonoids in pancreatic cancer prevention. K.N. Chidambara Murthy, G. Jayaprakasha, S. H. Safe, B. S. PatJI 1:45 244. Volatile oil from Sour oranges (Citrus aurantjum L) has potential benefit in colon cancer prevention. G. Jayaprakasha, K. N. Chidambara Murthy, S. E. Tichy, B. S. Patil 2:05 245. Studies on the molecular mecha­ nisms of Phloretin-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell. C-H. Wu, Y-S. Ho 2:25 Intermission. 2:40 246. Polymethoxyflavonokte (PMFs) suppressed TPA-induced up-expression of iNOS and COX-2 and tumor promotion in mice. M-H. Pan, OS. Lai, Y-J. Wang, C-Y. Lo, S. U, C-T. Ho

SOCIAL EVENTS:

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

AGRO Awarde/Boctal Banquet (6:00-ft30 PM): Tue

Section A

(12:15-1:15 PM): Tue

BCEC 259A

3UMMIIU HenUilLlLi kwmu LSLUIIS

Reception (11:30-1:30 PM): Mon Food Safety Applications n u e · & Brews (5:00-6:30 PM): Wed W. L Snelver and J. Van Emon, Organizers (5:30-10 PM): Sun SUNDAY MORNING Section A

1:50 Introductory Remarks. 1:55 14. From biosensors to dip-sticks, immunochemical based methods are being employed in every aspect of food protection. T. A. Grace

BCEC 259A Immunochemistry Biotechnology & Environmental

W. L Sherver and J. Van Emon, Organizers

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Ί'ί:α-ΐ-9

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGRO 2:20 15. Immunochemicaltestsforthe deter­ mination of nitrofuran metabolites. M. Franek, M. Vass, I. Diblikova, K.Hruska 2:45 16. Preparation of antibodies and devel­ opments of EUSA test kitsfordrugs used in animal husbandry. R. Xi, S. Lu, Y. Zhang, C. Zhao, W.Uu 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 17. Red fluorescent dyes for immuno­ chemical detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin Α. Μ. Β. Medina 3:55 18. Cloning, expression, and character­ ization of recombinant antibodies with affinity for deoxynivalenol and related mycotoxins. P. J. Doyle, M. Arbabi-Ghahroudi, N. Gaudette, G. Furzer, M. E. Savard, S. C. Gleddie, H. Tong-Sevinc, T. Hirama, C. R. MacKenzle, J. C. Hall 4:20 19. Comparison of the skerritt and R5 antibodies in gluten detection by EUSA. B.W.Ritter, LrCAIIred 4:45 Concluding Remarks. Section Β BCEC 259B

Chemistry J. J. Johnston and T. A. Wehner, Organizers D. Smith, Organizer, Presiding 1:45 Introductory Remarks. 1:50 20. Use of crop protection product global regulatory magnitude and decline of residue data on produce for residue pre­ diction purposes. C. M. Kennedy, S. F. McEuen, J. J. Anderson 2:10 21. Methods for measuring worker exposure to pesticides during seed treat­ ment. M. E. KroteM, J. R. Hudson, T.J. Gould 2:30 22. Influence of azinphos-methyl metabolites in apples on orgaxttphosphate pesticide exposure estimates. A. H. Ackerman, K. A. Anderson 2:50 23. Possibility of groundwater contami­ nation by endosulfan leaching in different types of soils. T.Jindal 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 24. Mechanistic studies of formetanate hydrochloride decomposition under aquatic conditions. C. N. Muhoro, C. B. DrvHo, S.Masoudi 3:50 25. Fate of methyl parathfon in natural sulfkJic water. X. Guo, U. Jans 4:10 26. CataboKc network and protein profiles of Mycobaterium sp JS19b1 during degradation of aromatics. Q. X. U, Y-S. Keum, J-S. Seo, S-E. Lee 4:30 Concluding Remarks. BioFuels: Biodiesel Chemistry and Implementation Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by AGRO MONDAY MORNING

Section Β BCEC Exhibit Han—C Agroc hemic al Education Awards For Graduate Student Travd

J. J. Johnston, Presiding 8:00-11:00 28. Molecular-level interactions of tetracycline with oligomers of a model humus constitu­ ent and soil organic matter. P. Kulshrestha, R. F. Giese Jr., T.D.Wood 29. Method development for multiresidue pesticide extraction from natural and processed foods. R. E. Hunter Jr., A. Riederer, P. B. Ryan 30. Molecular cloning of sodium channel and identification of point mutations putatlvefy associated with fenpropathrin resistance in Tetranychus urticae. D. H. Kwon, B. R. Choi, S. W. Lee, Η. Μ. Park, J. M. Clark, S. Lee 31. Degradation of sulfonamides in aqueous solution by membrane anodic Fenton treatment K. Neafsey, A. T. Lemley 32. Kinetics of carbaryl degradation by anodic Fenton treatment in a humic acid amended soil slurry. P. Ye, A. T. Lemley 33. Assessing pesticide exposure from treated turf. J. J. Doherty, R. A. Putnam, J. M. Clark 34. Binary mixtures of pyrethrokJs crosstalk between voltage-sensitive calcium and chloride channels in isolated presynaptic nerveterminalsfrom rat brain. H. E. Hodgdon, R. K. Frisbie, J. M. Clark 35. Resistance to dichlorodipneriyftrichloroethane (DDT) in resistant (91-R) and suscep­ tible (Can-S) Drosophila melanogaster. J.P.Strycharz,J.M.CIark 36. Analysis of DNA adducts from herbicide interactions. T. C. Andrade, D. W. Boerth, E. Eder, P. Wanek 37. Effects of some rnonoterpenoids on [^J-tbob binding to mouse gaba receptor. F. Tong, J. R. Coats 38. Fate of sulfamethazine in surface water microcosms. K. L Henderson, T. B. Moorman, J. R. Coats 39. Mosquito repeitency of Amyris and Sianv wood essential oHs. G. E. Paluch, J. R. Coats 40. Nitrate and oxytetracydine: Agricultural residues and antibiotics at environmental interfaces studied by nonlinear optics. P. L Hayes, J. J. Kruk, F. M. Geiger 41. Role of reduced sulfur species in promot­ ing the degradation of organophosphate pesticides in aqueous solution. J. He, U.Jans 42. Toxicity and mode of action of the anion transporter blockers against the European com borer. D. R. Borna, J. R. Bfoomquist 43. Clomazone sorption and desorption to soils. A. S. Gunasekara, R. S. Tjeerdema Section C BCEC Exhibit Had—B2 New Developments and IBBUOI in

Section A BCEC 259 A/B stieriing nenoncKS Momonoi Leciuresnip Cosponsored by FUEL and AGFD M. H. Tunick, Organizer J. N. Seiber, Organizer, Presiding 11:30 Introductory Remarks. 11:45 27. Award Address (Sterling Hen­ dricks Memorial Lecture, sponsored by USDA/ARS). Why ceHulosic ethanol Is nearer than you think: Creating the btofuels future. B.E. Dale 12:30 Panel Discussion. 1:00 Reception.

J. J. Johnston, Organizer, Presiding 8:00-11:00 Ayroc hemic al Residue & Metabolism 44. LC-MS-MS analysis of imkJactoorid and metabolites in hemlock trees. F. B. Cook, A. F. Lagalante 45. Investigations into physiological differ­ ences between grypnosate-resistant and -susceptible horseweed biotypes from Mississippi. V. K. Nandula. K. N. Roddy, D. H. Poston, K. R. Reddy 46. Study on pesticide residues in imported food in Japan. M. Toda, M. Yamamoto, K. Tanaka, T. Sugita, C. Uneyama, K. h 47. A high-sensltlvity immunoassay for the detection of ruminant muscle protein in meat and feeds. B. W. Rtttsr, E. S. Park, I

190tecg

K AllraH

48. Monitoring Bt proteins in soil using bkxnimetJc extraction technology. G. Shan, S. K. Embrey, R. A Herman, R. W. McCommick 49. A sensitive immunoassayforthe detection of spinosyns in industrial water. G. Shan, T. Sparks, G. D. Crouse, M. Abraham, C. Fees, T. S. Fan, B. A. Skoczenski 50. Detection of hen's egg white lysozyme in food: Comparison between a sensitive HPLC and a commercial EUSA method. B. Kerkaert, B. De Meulenaer 51. Explosives detection by HPLC-based immunoextraction coupled with LC-MS and CE. R. Burks, D. D. Snow, D.S.Hage 52. Selection and expression of recombinant single domain antibodies (VHHs) against a tow molecular weight hapten. S. Makvandi-Nejad, C. R. MacKenzie, J. C. Hall 53. Quantitative EUSA validation for GE crop expression. V. A. Korjagin, G. Shan, S. K. Embrey, A D. Thomas 54. Use of laboratory automation in GE crop regulatory expression trials. V. A. Korjagin, P. Song, A. M. Phillips, A D.Thomas Modem ChiraJ Agrochemicals. 55. Development of a single chiral HPLC method for the separation of brodifacoum enantjomers. R. S. Stahl, J. J. Johnston 56. Ena/rtiomerization of pyrethroid insecti­ cides in solvents. S. Qin, J. Gan 57. Eriantiosetective endocrine disruption effects of synthetic pyrethroids. M. Nillos, G. Rodriguez-Fuentes, D. Schlenk, J. Gan 58. Separation and aquatic toxicity of enantiomers of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalcothrin. G. Sheng, C. Xu, J. Wang, W.Uu 59. Chiral and isomer-specific chfordane signatures for stormwater runoff represent­ ing various land use categories. W. Lao, K. A Maruya. J. Peng, K. Schiff, J. Gan Nanotechnology in Agriculture. 60. The antioxidants in natural plants affecting formation of alpha synuctein nanobiopartjcles. N. A. Hodges, B. Tonjanika, S. Han Issues in Integrated Pest ManagmenL 61. Overcoming mutations in fp25k bacutovirus gene on the way to continuous btopestickJe production in insect cell culture. L Girl, D. W. Murhammer, B. Bonning, M.Feiss Developments & Issues In Agrochomlcal Sciences. 62. Bioactive materialsfororganophosphorus pesticides decontamination and protection. A. Mansee, W. Chen, A Mulchandani 63. Abraham descriptors relating to agrochemical transport processes. E. D. Clarke, J. Delaney. P. J. JurgutJs, P.Japertas 64. Agrochemicals and log Ρ octanol: Evalua­ tion of structure based predictions. E. D. Clarke, J. Delaney, P. Japertas, P. J. Jurgutls 65. Insecticideformulationsfor improved control of sand flies and mosquitoes in severe environments. F. Shi, Y. Kim, L Kagumba, A Giaya 66. Hydrolytjc enzymes produced by a bfoherbicidal strain of Myrothecium verrucaria. R. E. Hoagland, C. D. Boyette, M. A. Weaver 67. Molecular overlay as a tool to model biospecificity: A case study with mosquito repellents. R. Natarajan, S. C. Basak, W. Nowak, P. Miszta 68.5-Thioalkyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-carboxylic acid derivatives as nematicktes. W.Zhang, Y.Bethel 69. Performance of a new organic herbicide based on d-Kmonene. M. E. Koivunen, L E. Fernandez, B. J. Campbell, J. Versman, P. G. Marrone 70. The contents of organic carbon and prob­ lems of soil fertility. Τ. Κ. OrUkov 71. The influence compost is on agrochemical qualities of soil. S. B. Pardaev 72. Production of beauvericin by Fusarium sp. F-1.K.Zhong, F.Hong 73. Influence of mulching by polyethylene film on the content of rolling nutrients in soil and chemical composition of plants.

74. Bioconversion of humic substances as a promisingtoolforobtaining beneficial plant growth-stimulators. B. M. Hudaibergenova, S. Jorobekova, K. A. Kydralieva 75. Withdrawn. 76. A novel antifungal agent ilicicoJin H pro­ duced by Fusarium sp. F-4. C. Deng, Y. D. Chen, Z. Y. Shao, F. Hong 77. Application of optical properties of the (3-methoxypropyl)silsesquioxanes hybrid films for green house. L Hu, W. Wang, Y.Uu 78. Field investigation of stimulating effect for bamboo vinegar as potential plant growth regulator. B. Bao, Z. Shen, J. Ma, P. Wang, Q. Zhang, L Ye 79. Bioactivity laboratory screening of bamboo vinegar as potential plant growth regulator. B. Bao, P. Wang, Z. Shen, Q. Zhang, L Ye, J. Ma 80. Selection of an effective fungicide against rhizoctonia soteni, sphaerotheca fuliginea and pseudoperonospora cubensis. L Zhang, J . Ma, P. Wang, Y. Sun, L Ma 81. InsectjckJal activity of camptothecin iso­ lated from camptotheca acuminate against aphids on cabbage, chHo suppressalls and planthopper on rice. J. Ma, Y. Sun, P.Wang, LZhang, L M a 82. Discovery and optimization of novel 2-aryf5-thienyloxadiazoles as nematicides. W. Zhang, Y.Bethel BioFuels: Renewable Liquid Fuels & Chemicals from Biomass Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by AGRO and PETR MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 259 A/B Investigating VOCs from Pesticide and Fumigant Applications: State of the Science and New Approaches to Protect Air Quality B. L Bret, Organizer P. G. Green and L L McConnell, Organizers, Presiding 1:45 Introductory Remands. 1:50 83. Development of pesticide volatile organic compound (VOC) emission adjust­ ment factors. T. A. Barry, R. Segawa 2:15 84. Estimating fumigant emissions from agricultural soils. S. R. Yates, W. Zheng, D.Ashworth 2:40 85. Research strategy for achieving emissions reduction in a regulatory frame­ work. J. A. Knuteson 3:05 86. Overview of methods to estimate emissions from agricultural fumigants. D. A. Sullivan 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 87. Alternative methods for evaluation of VOCs. R. M. Bennett, V. Srinivas, D. A. Sullivan 4:15 88.2006 methyl isothiocyanate nearfield air assessments: Implications for air quality in south Franklin County, Washing­ ton. V. R. Hébert, J. LePage 4:40 89. Use of chain_2d to model the effect of fumigant application mitigation strategies on volatilization from soil. I. J. van Wesenbeeck, S. A. Cryer 5:05 Concluding Remarks.

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consentfromACS.

AGRO MONDAY EVENING Section A BCEC ExMbitHaH-B2

J. J. Johnston, Organizer, Presiding

2:55 101. Preparing the next generation for IPM roles in industry. N.C.Leppla, P. G. Koehter 3:25 Intermission. 3:45 102.ThelPM-PIPE:Whatdoesitdoto enhance IPM. D. E. Hershman 4:15 103. Transgenic crops and IPM: Reassessing our icon. K. LSteffey, M.E.Gray,R.A.Weinzierl 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

8:00-10:00

45,47-50,56-57,59,63-64,67,69,76. See

Section Β

previous listings. BCEC TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 259A

International Award for Research In Agrochemicals in Honor of Dr. Frederick J. Perlak Cosponsored by BASF Corp

Investigating VOCe from Peettekte and

W. P. Ridley, Organizer

State of the Science and New Approaches to Protect Air Quality

J. M. Clark, Presiding

P. G. Green, Organizer L L McConnell and B. L Bret, Organizers, Presiding 8:10 90. Evaluation of a themwgravimetric analysis (TGA) method for assessing volatile organic compound (VOC) emis­ sions potential for crop protection prod­ ucts. D. J. Unscott, I. van Wesenbeeck, B. L Bret, K. Swayze 8:30 91. PestkAlal VOCs and the formation of ozone: An academic perspective. P. G. Green 8:50 92. Photochemical ozone formation potential of pesticide solvent W.Yang, P. G. Green 9:10 93. Relationship between the evapora­ tionrateand vapor pressure of moderately ami highly volatile chemicals. I. J. van Wesenbeeck, D. J. H. Driver, J.Ross 9:30 94. VOC testing of agricultural EC formulations. A. K. Viets Section Β BCEC 259B imernauonai Awara for iiosoarcn in Agrochemicals in Honor of Dr. Frederick J. Perlak Cosponsored by BASF Corp

1:45 104. DNA screening to monitor pink boNworm resistance to Bt cotton. J. A. Fabrick, S. Morin, Y. Carrier, T. J. Dennehy, B. E. Tabashnik 2:10 105. Priytochemicals for pest control. S.O.Duke, K. K.Schrader, C.LCantreN, K. M. Meepagala, D. E. Wedge. F. E. Dayan 2:35 106. Evolution of safety assessment and regulatory approval processes for insect protected crops. R. L Fuchs 3:00 107. Environmental fate and effects of Si proteins in the environment J. R. Coats, K. R. Prihoda, B. W. Clark 3:45 108. Unusual challenges, unusual rewards: Introduction of BoHgard IKB> in Burkina Faso, West Africa. J.T.Greenptate 4:10 109. Yield effects of genettoally-rnodh fied crops in developing countries. D. Zilbennsn 4:35 110. Adoption, challenges, and future prospects for insect protected crops in India, R. D. Kstkar 5:00 Concluding Remarks. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 259A

W. P. Ridley, Organizer Cosponsored by BIOHW J. M. Clark, Presiding 10:00 Introductory Remarks. 10:10 95. Award Address (ACS Interna­ tional Award for Research in Agrochernicals, sponsored by BASF Corporation). BoHgard* Cotton: A decade of success and a glimpse of the future of cotton. F.J. Perlak 10:45 96. Protein dtecovery, design, and mechanistic analysis of Cry3Bb1. L English, K. S. Gkkfngs, J. W. Seale 11:10 97. Peptidergic regulation of an innate behavioral sequence. M. E. Adams 11:35 98. Insect resistance management in GM crops: Past, present, and future. R.T.Roush TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 259A

S. T. Ratcliffé and A. Herbert, Organizers, Presiding 1:40 Introductory Remarks. 1:55 99. Chemical and biological control: 100 Years of research and adoption in the US. LP.GianeesI 2:25 100. Endangered species and their implications to IPM programs. P.B.Goodell

N. Scott, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 111. Nanotechnotogy opportunities in agriculture and food systems. N. Scott 8:55 112. Plant power electrochemical energy conversion using photosystem I. D. E. Cliffs!, M. Ciobanu. G. K. Jennings, Y.Xun.M.Krim 9:15 113. Storage and delivery of aquatic microorganisms in emulsions stabilized by surface-modified silica nanoparticles. J. S. VanderGheynst, H. B. Scher, H. Guo 9:35 114. DNA with zip codes: Addressable DNA molecules and their applications in agriculture and biotechnology. J. B. Lee, Y. Cui, H. Funabashi, N. Park, Y.F. Chang, D.Luo 1020 115. Societal Dimensions of agrifood nanotechnotogy: Project overview. J. V.Stone 10:40 11&P^cogrritionofcorifbrmational changes in β-iactogtobulin by moteculartyimprinted thin films. D. W. Brltt, N. Turner, X. Uu, S. Piletsky, V. Htady 11:00 117. Carbon nanotubes as nearinfrared agents for photothermal narco­ therapy of bacterial infections. J-W. Kim, V.P.Zharov 11:20 118. Single molecule analysis of bacterial 16s rdna per products in subml· crometerflukflcchannels. S. Stavis, S. C. Corgié, B. R. Cipriany, H. G. Craighead, L P. Walker

Section Β

Section Β

BCEC 259B

BCEC 259B

l l m l . — ι <~lil»iil

m

I..—i.-i-

Moaern i#nirei AyiudiornicBiD nnponance or cnanuosewcuvny m raie and Effects A. W. Garrison and R. Williams, Organizers J. Gan, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. A. Wayne Garrison. 8:55 119. Enanttosetectivity in pyrethroid insecticides. J. Gan, S. Qin, M. NINos, G. Sheng, D. Schlenk 920 120.Estrogenicityofena^tiomersofthe synthetic pyrethroid insecticide (Z)-cisbrfenthrin. W. Uu, G. Sheng, L Wang, C. Yang, J. Gan 9:45 121. Utilizing in silk» techniques to elucidate the stereoselective behavior of pyrethroids within carboxytesterase. D. T. Chang, M-R. Goldsmith, R. Tomerc-Vetez, J. Rabinowitz, C.C. Dary 10:10 Intermission. 10:35 122. Comparison of aquatictoxicityof pyrethroid isomers and isomer mixtures. J. M. GkMings 11:00 123. Enanttosetective degradation of fungicides in soils: ChiraJ preference changes with soil pH. I. J. Buerge, T. Pokjer, M. D. Muller, H-R. Buser 11:25 124. Enanttosetectiveformationof the triazote fungicide triacSmenol from triadmefon in mammal and fish hepatic microsomes. J. F. Ksnneke, C. S. Mazur, A. W. Garrison 11:50 125. Enanttosetective carcinogenesis of agrochemicals and other xenobiotics. I. AH WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Modern ChiraJ Importance of 1

A. W. Garrison R. Williams, Ο 1:45 134. Enantiomeric separation of new substituted hH2-benzofthiazol)-1-(fluorophenyl)-0,C^diaJlcyl-a-amirKX)hosplx)na^ by normal HPLC on porysaocharkle-based chiral stationary phases. Z. Yuping, S. Baoan, L Mei, L Ping, L Dongmei, H.Devu 2:10 135. Chiral analysis of S-metolachlor in surface water samples collected from four Ohio watersheds. A. K. Kabter, S. M. Chen, J. Kramer, D. B. Baker 2:35 136. Quality assurance issues related to environmental monitoring of stereo­ selective dégradation of metolachtor. M. J. M. Wells, M. Y. Z. Aboul Eish 3410 Intermission. 325 137. Stereoselective behavior of chiral pesticides in environment Z. Zhou 3:50 138. Environmental fate of chiral pesticides used In Canada. P. B. Kurt-Karakus, T. F. Bkftaman, D. Muir, J. Struger, S. Cagampan, J. Small, L Jantunen 4:15 139. Importance of enanttosetectivity in fate and effectstoecological hazard assessment of chiral contaminants. J. K. Stanley, B. W.Brooks 4:40 Concluding Remarks. A. Wayne Garrison. THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 259A

Section A BCEC 259A Nanotechnotogy in Agriculture Cosponsored by BIOHW N. Scott, Organizer, Presiding 1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 126. Novel magnetic nanobars for clagnosis and sampling in food safety and security. Z.-Y.Cheng 1:50 127. Nanoencapsulatton of trictosan through ethanol mediated association of the casein micelle: Implications in antimicrobial and drug delivery systems. A. L Roach, F. M. San Martin, F. M. Harte 2:10 128. Food pathogen detection using Au/Si nanorods. B. Park, J. Fu, Y. Zhao, G. R. Siragusa, Y-J. Cho 2:30 129. Fabrication of functional food nanocomposites utilizing microolspensing technology and engineered edible films. P.Takhtetov 2:50 Intermission. 3:15 13a Nanostructored bacteriophage reporter system for the detection of bacterial pathogens. S, Ripp, J. Fleming, A. V. Metechko, M. J. Doktycz, G.S.Sayter 3:35 131. Electronic nanosemtoonductor btornotecular pathogen detector. G. K. MaM, N. Mishra, S. K. Rastogi, B. Rlanoski, R. Nelson, E. Cameron, P. Winterrowd, W. C. Maki 3:55 132. Biocc
J. J. Johnston, Organizer, Presiding 8:45 Introductory Remarks. 8:50 140. Ecology and evolution of the British super rat R. H. Smith 9:10 141. Recent finding in the development of noninvasive methodtomonitor wildlife exposuretob^ornadtotone. M. Sags, M. Coeurdassier, I. Fourei, J. Barrât P. Bemy, P. Giraudoux 9:30 142. Irrigation iroorporation and tillage impacts on runoff, erosion and preemergence herbicide loss. T. L Potter, T. C. Strickland, C. C. Truman, D.D.Bosch, T.Webster 9:50 143. Carbonate and magnesium interactive effect on prK>sphoriis recoveiy from dairy manure wastewater. X. Cao, W. Harris 10:10 Intermission. 1025 144. Rpronil residues remaining in heavy clay soils seven years after application effect nontarget arthropods. R. Horsak, R. E. Woodward 10:45 145. Electrochemical degradation of obsolete pesticide stocks. A. Vtyssktes, D. Arapogkxj, E. Barampouti, T. Mai 11:05 146. VHaminC protection against aluminum stress. E. S. Shaker, H.M.Helmy 11:25 147. Studies on blends of polyvinyl alcohol and natural polyphenols: Specific interactions and properties. Q. Shen, L-H. Zhang 11:45 Concluding Remarks.

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasysZconfex.comtes/234nmr'

ΤΙ-Γ.Η-! 1

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 234TH NATIONAL MEETING & EXPOSITION · BOSTON, MA

PRESIDENTIAL SESSION Celebrating a Craftsmanm of the Art of Understariaitrg

Roald Hoffmann at 70 Tuesday, August 21, 2007 3£\ Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, 205

1:30 p.m.

3:15 p.m.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS

BREAK

Catherine T. "Katie" Hunt, President, American Chemical Society

3:30 p.m.

Bassam Z. Shakhashiri, Professor of Chemistry and the William T. Evjue Distinguished Chair for the Wisconsin Idea, Director, Initiative for Science Literacy, Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison Hector D. Abruna, Emile M, Chamot Professor and Chair, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University 1:45 p.m

Roald Hoffmann, A Human Catalyst

.'.#::.

Metacognition: A Key Tool in Developing the Art of Understanding Saundra McGuire, Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge 4:00 p.m.

Consequences of Orbital Symmetry: Why Hoffmann was "Always" Right

Oliver Sacks, Columbia University, New York

Peter T. Wolczanski, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University

2:15 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

Computational Chemistry: An Increasingly Distinctly Chemical Explanations: Important Way of Doing Chemistry Roald Hoffmann's Philosophy of Odile Eisenstein, Institut Charles Cerhardt, Equipe Chimie Théorique Méthodologies et Modélisations, Université Montpellier, France 2:45 P-m.

Chains, Rings, SubstituentsTales from the Marvelous Edifice of Modem Organic Chemistry Henning Hopf, Institut fur Organische Chemie, Technische Universitât Braunschweig, Germany

Science Michael Weisberg, Department of Philosophy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 5:00 p.m.

Trying To Understand, Making Bonds Roald Hoffmann, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University

Meet E. J. Corey Professor Corey, winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and the 2004 Priestley Medal, will be in the ACS Publications/C&EN booth for a special recognition as a High Impact Contributor to the ACS Cycle of Excellence. Please join us for a brief presentation and autograph session with Professor Corey.

Tuesday, August 21, 2 0 0 7 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ACS Publications/C&EN Booth # 5 2 7

C&EN C H E M I C A L & E N G I N E E R I N G NEWS

ACS National Meeting & Exposition Boston Convention Center

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGRO/ANYL

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 259B Past, Present and Future of the AGRO Division J. J. Johnston, Organizer, Presiding 12:30 Introductory Remarks. 12:40 148. AGRO sympsia: Past and future. J. J. Johnston 12:50 149. Technical progamming: The lifeblood of the division. K. L Armbrust 1:00 150. AGRO membership trends and plans. D.M. Stout II 1:10 151. Picogram: AGRO's communication pipeline. C. J. Hapeman 1:20 152. AGRO strategic planning: A recipe for success! L Mcconnel 1:30 Discussion. 2:15 Concluding Remarks.

10:20 12. Global phosphoprotein analysis for assessing changes in pre-malignant and malignant breast cell lines using 2-D liquid separations, protein microarrays and tandem mass spectrometry. Τ. Η. Patwa, D. M. Lubman, F. R. Miller 10:40 13. Fast protein separations inside ordered silica nanoparticle crystals. S.Zheng, M.J. Wirth 11:00 14. Simple fabrication of fretless chro­ matographic microchips packed with conventionalreversed-phasesilica par­ ticles. A. Gaspar, M. E. Piyasena, F. A. Gomez 11:20 15. Length fractionation of carbon nanotubes using centrifugation. J. Fagan, M. L. Becker, J. Chun, B. J. Bauer, E. K. Hobbie 11:40 16. Optimization of precipitation liquid chromatography separation of acryionitrilebutadiene-styrene (ABS) partial polymers via the application of phase diagrams. J. W.Lyons Section C

ANYL

BCEC 104A

Division of Analytical Chemistry

Analysis of Chemical Contaminants in Foods and Food Contact Substances Cosponsored by AGFD

L. E. Locascio, Program

L. Dejager and G. O. Noonan, Organizers, Presiding

Chair

OTHER EVENTS OF INTEREST: CAEN Analytical PavWon In the Expo­ sition: Tue SUNDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 104B Basic Research Needs for Energy Storage Cosponsored by INOR M. V. Buchanan, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks, H. D. Abruna. 8:40 1. Basic research needs for electrical energy storage. H. Kung 9:00 2. Electrochemical energy storage: Workshop overview. J. B. Goodenough 9:30 3. Electric energy storage applications for transportation. G. Michaels 10:00 4. Electric energy storage for utility scale applications. I. Gyuk 10:30 5. Ultra or super-electrochemical capacitors are a vital energy storage technology. B. Dunn 11:00 6. Materials for supercapacrtor elec­ trodes: Challenges and opportunities. Y.Gogotsi 11:30 7. Electrochemical capacitors: The future of electrolytes. K. Lian

SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Section Β

BCEC 104B

BCEC 104C

Basic Research Needs for Energy Storage Cosponsored by INOR

Separation Science

M. V. Buchanan, Organizer, Presiding

L. E. Locascio, Organizer J. W. Lyons, Presiding 9:00 8. HPLC analysis of methotrexate in high protein concentration drug substance. H. D. Conton, D. Boisvert, J. Zadei 9:20 9. Determination of carbohydrates and sugar alcohols in plant extracts using HPAEC-PAD—method development and optimization. M. Raessler 9:40 10. Multistage sample injection: An effective way to reduce band broadening in liquid chromatography. M. J. Hayward, Q.Han 10:00 11. Discovery and validation of recur­ rent, drug-resistant serous epithelial ovar­ ian carcinoma biomarkers in a mouse model coupled with targeted and mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies. X. Fang, W. Wang, L Yang, C. S. Lee, l-M. Shih, Β. Μ. Balgley

! /

8:30 17. Evaluation of modem extraction methods for the analysis of tetramethylene disulfotetramine in foods. L Dejager, G. A. Perfetti, G. W. Diachenko 9:00 18. Sample preparation techniques for the determination of trace residues and contaminants in foods. K. Ridgway, S. P. Lalljie, R. M. Smith 9:30 19. Moleculariy imprinted materials for food analysis. D-G. Marta Elena, G. Laura, B. L Rosana 10:00 20. Development of label-free arrayed SPR sensors for food safety monitoring. A. D. Taylor, J. Ladd, S. Etheridge, J. Homola, S. Jiang 10:30 21. Lab-on-a-chip analysis of chemical contaminants in beverages: Practical solutions to complex sample matrices. C. I. Newman, C. L Copper, Q. Lu, G. E. Collins 11:00 22. When good food goes bad: A biogenic amine sensing polymer to detect food freshness. M. S. Maynor, T. L. Nelson, I. Tran, Τ. Κ. Deason, J.J.Lavigne 11:30 23. Characterization of perfluorochemi­ cals in food packaging by direct analysis in realtime-massspectrometry (dart-MS). G. O. Noonan, Τ. Η. Begley, G. W. Diachenko

! ! '' I I

1:30 24. Overview of chemical storage: Batteries, today and tomorrow. M. S. Whrttingham 2:00 25. Fundamental research needs in chemical storage. S. Visco 2:30 26. Chemical storage—cathodes. M. M. Thackeray 3:00 27. Crosscutting issues relevant to electrical energy storage. A. A. Gewirth 3:30 28. Summary overview of basic research needs for electrical energy stor­ age. H. D. Abruna, J. B. Goodenough, M. Buchanan

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

Section Β BCEC 104C Analytical Division Award Symposium

4:30 45. Ultrahighresolutionsurface plasmonresonancebiosensor based on GoosHânchen effect. L. Hesselink, X. Yin Chemical Approaches to Protein Function Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

C. G. Enke, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 29. Partnership to enhance the delivery of e-resources for the analytical commu­ nity. T. Kuwana, C. G. Enke 2:00 30. Award Address (J. Calvin Giddings Award for Excellence in Education, spon­ sored by the Division of Analytical Chemis­ try). Standing on the shoulders of giants: One woman's view of the future of analyti­ cal chemistry education. C. K. Lartve 2:35 31. Garth Simpson: The early years. R.G. Cooks 2:55 32. Award Address (Arthur F. Findeis Award for Achèvements by a Young Analytical Scientist, sponsored by Phillip Morris USA). Origins and applications of chiral phenomena in nonlinear optics. G. J. Simpson 3:40 Intermission. 4:00 33. Two decades of electrochemistry at Cornell University. H. S. White 4:20 34. Award Address (Cole Parmer Award in Electrochemistry, sponsored by Cole Parmer). Novel materials for electrical energy conversion and storage: Fuel cells and lithium ion batteries. H. D. Abruna Section C BCEC 104A Tandem LOMS and GC-MS Solutions for Food Safety Analysis Cosponsored by AGFD M. Young and J. Romano, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 35. Increased efficiency in meeting food safety regulatory requirements by combining UPLC, travelling wave tandem MS and automated quantitation. P. Young, J.Romano 2:05 36. Determination of malachite green and leucomalachite green in edible goldfish muscle by liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry. Z. Cai, K-C.Lee 2:40 37. Ultrapertbrmance liquid chromatography with polarity switching tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry for the determination of pesticide residues in baby foods. A. O'Connor, J. Romano 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 38. Some applications of GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS to analyze pesticides and chemical contaminants in foods. J.W.Wong, A.J. Krynitsky 4:05 39. UPLC with tandem mass spectrometry for multiresidue determination of sulfonamide antibacterials in milk and tissue. M. S. Young, K. Tran, M. Benvenuti Section D BCEC 105 Surface Plasmon Resonance Promises, Problems and Successes for Label-Free BiodetectJon Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL R. A. Potyrailo and S. Dasgupta, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 40. Rapid, label-free screening and affinity ranking of fragments libraries binding selectively to drug targets. S. Lofas 2:00 41. Localized surface plasmon RNresonance spectroscopy and sensing. R. P. Van Duyne, K. A. Willets 2:30 42. Nanoplasmonic refractive index sensing. M. Kâll 3:00 Intermission. 3:30 43. Sensing with surface plasmon resonance in nanohole arrays. Y. Fainman 4:00 44. Nanoplasmonics for sensing of supported lipid bilayers and tethered lipid vesicles. F. Hook

Nanobtotechnotogy Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOHW SUNDAY EVENING SectionA BCEC Exhibit Hall·-B2

I. M. Warner, Organizer, Presiding

7:00-9:00 71. Determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in dust by SFE-GC-MSMS. F. C. Calvosa, A. F. Lagalante 46. Toward achieving nonprotein based selective retrieval of cross-linked peptides in mass spectrometric analysis of protein complexes. F. Yan, R. H. Angeletti 47. A smart bioscaffoid of nanowires for monitoring proteins. F. Chen, W. Dong, T. Zhang, S. Ali, H. M. Duhart, Z. R. Tian 48. Comparison of methyl benzoate and ergosterol as markers for the quantification of mold in indoor buildings and their materials. D-R. Parkinson 49. Electrochemical immunoassay based on quantum-dot labels for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers. H. Wu, G. Liu, J. Wang, Y. Un 50. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of total uranium in geological materials after on-line electrochemical leaching of samples. A. S. F. de Sousa, E. de M. M. Ferreira, R. J. Cassella 51. Multivariate optimization of a liquid-liquid extraction of the EPA-PAHs from natural contaminated waters prior to determination by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. D. M. Brum, R. J. Cassella, A. D. P. Netta 52. A fast and sensitive method for residual hydrazine analysis in pharmaceutical samples. V. Leshchinskaya, P. Richberg, A. Kelly, Y. Zelechonok 53. In vivo imaging and quantitation of rare circulating tumor cells. W. He, H. Wang, L C. Hartmann, J-X. Cheng, P. S. Low 54. Analysis of CD24 glycans by MALDIToF-MS reveals prevalence of sialyl-T antigen. E. M. Motari, X. Zheng, Y. Uu, M. Kvaratskhelia, X. Su, M. A. Freitas, P. G. Wang 470. Non-enzymatic detection of glucose, aldehydes, and other C1 - C4 compounds based on mesoscopic metal hydroxide thin films. M. Jiang, B. Nguyen, Y. U, A. Vo, T. Nguyen, L. G. Spears 55. High throughput shake-flask with HPLC measurement based physicochemical profiling as a first step for newly synthesized lead optimization compounds. M. J. Hayward, C. Zhang 56. A case study in sizing nanoparticles. G.Thiete 472. Advances in analytical techniques for off-flavor masking in foods and beverages. K. M. Burseg, C. de Jong 57. A fast and reliable method to determine the concentration of HM-EO in aqueous solution. G. Chen 58. Withdrawn. 59. A HPLC method to determine potassium acetate concentration. T. Yu, X. Chen 60. A Hptic method for quantitative estimation of Swertiamarin in marketed polyherbal antidiabetic formulations. P. Manubhai Patel Sr. 61. A nonaqueous reverse phase HPLC method for evaluation of biodiesel feedstock and feedstock adulteration using evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD). R. Gaita 62. Absorption and emission Red-shift in the stained cell and tissue samples. E. Barash, A. Sood, R. McKay, R. A. Potyrailo, M. D. Pietrzykowski, P. A. Fomitchov

ANYL

63. Advantages of ultrafast liquid chromatog­ raphy by using 2 micron packing materials. Y. Yamada, M. Omote, N. Shoji, N. Kuriyama 64. Amidinatjon of tryptjc peptides using picolinimidate for signal enhancement in MADLI-TOF mass spectrometry. J-S. Kim, J. Song, H-J. Kim 65. An HPLC chromatographic reactor approach for investigating the hydrolytic stability of a pharmaceutical compound. P. J. Skrdla, Y. Wu, A. Abrahim 66. An NMR spectroscopic study of reaction of 1,3,6,8-tetraazatricyclo[4.4.1.13,8] dodecane with ammonium fluoride. . M. E. Nunez, A. Rivera, E. Avella, J. Rbs 67. Analysis of monosaccharide composition in water-soluble polysaccharides of Cyclocarya paliurus(Batal.)lljinsk by gas chro­ matography. J. Xie, M. Xie, S. Nie, C. U 68. Analysis of scopoletin and rutin in Noni (Morinda citrifolia) juice by LC-TOF/MS and HPLC. C. U, M. Xie, S. Nie, J. Chen, Y. Wang 69. Analysis of speciatjon distribution of Se in mungbean during enzymatic hydrolization. X. Chen, G. Zhang, J. U 70. Analytical evaluation of highly ordered poly(3-hexylthiophene)s. W. SolfkHI, R. L McCarley 71. Application of a new variable selection method to the determination of protein secondary structure determination using infrared spectroscopy. M. Hachey, A. Y. Bogomolov, M. Boruta 72. Application of new temperature-respon­ sive materials in HPLC using an aqueous mobile phase. R. Dai, H. Wang, L. Chen, Y.Deng 73. Are deprotonated amino acids all carboxylates? Z. Tian, S. R. Kass 74. Atomic force controlled capillary electro­ phoresis. A. Lewis 75. Autonomous multiarray sensors for the detection, classification and differentiation of bacteria and pathogens. O. A. Sadik, J. Karasinski, A. Zhou, N. Du 76. Biointerfacial reactivity: Homocysteine in the assembly of gold nanoparticles. S. Urn, S-H. Kim, C. Vaiana, P. N. Njoki, A. Kaul, C-J. Zhong 77. Building chemometric models based on spectral data: A study of model perfor­ mance and its applications. M. D'Souza, G. M. Banik, S. Ramos 78. Calibration of microdialysis probes during long term implantation. X. Mou, M. R. Lennartz, D. Loegering, J. A. Stenken 79. Characterization of BMP-7 extracted from SDS-PAGE by MALDI-TOF MS. P. Feng, J. D. Stahl 80. Characterization of novel salicylate drug trees via various analytical techniques. N. K. NevorekJ, Z. Wang, S. M. June, S. Tang, B. A. Howell, M. Chai 81. Characterization of small molecule induced protein-protein disruption by surface plasmon resonance imaging. M. S. Golden, J. A. Ruemmele, M. E. Anderson, Y. Gao, R. M. Georgiadis 82. Chemical characterization of some biologi­ cally active coumarin derived sulfon­ amides. H. Gosike, Z. H. Chohan, J. Luba, A. U. Shaikh 83. Chiral enrichment using ENS Polar Cationic SPE. D. Sauerstrom, M. Kopczynski, R. Valluzzi 84. Chiral LC methods development for phar­ maceutical agents: Effect of column, temperature and additives on resolution and ruggedness. J. Z. Huang, L. Tang 85. CMC determination of detergents by synchronous fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopy. D. Yu, S. Zhang 86. Colorimetric analysis of nitric oxide donors for the determination of nitric oxide release profiles. C. L Elam

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.contex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

87. Comparison of automated potentiometric titration and high-performance liquid chro­ matography for the determination of peracetjc acid and hydrogen peroxide. Q. U, T.Yu 88. Comparison of single-bubble and multibubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid. N. C. Eddingsaas, D. J. Flannigan, K. S. Suslick 89. Design and synthesis of fluorescent probes for detecting unlabeled nucleic acid and nonaqueous environment. L Huang, S-W. Tarn-Chang 90. Detection of explosives by hyperspectral imaging. D. K. Williams, H. Ayub 91. Detection of volatile organic compounds using nanostructured sensor arrays and comparison with gas chromatography. B. Wanjala, G. R. Wang, L. Wang, D. Mott, J. Luo, C-J. Zhong 92. Determination and separation of forsythoside Β and phillyrin in Forsythia suspense. Y. Yu, Y. Sun, K. Yang, Y. Deng, R. Dai 93. Determination of 7,8-dihydroxy-coumrin in roots, stems, leaves, fruit of Daphne koreana Nakai by HPLC. Y. Yu, J. Zhang, S. Jiang, R. Dai, Y. Deng 94. Determination of a vascular endothelial growth factor—aptamer photo-crosslink. I. Nikcevic, P. A. Limbach, K. R. Wehmeyer. W. R. Heineman, C. J. Seliskar 95. Determination of analytical criteria for the proteomic analysis of mouse urine. S. A. Martin-Brown, L Florens, M. Washburn, J. He, R.Yu 96. Determination of angulatin A in angulatin by RP-HPLC. L Guirong, W. Mingjian, L. Jindun, Z. Tianzeng 97. Determination of bromide in canine plasma using ion chromatography. S. Cox 98. Determination of chromium(±Y) in leather and dyestuff by spectrophotometry. X. Chen, C. Huang, Y.Zhu 99. Determination of fe (III) in sea water samples by adsorptive stripping voltammetry with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2- naphthol using a bismuth film electrode. R. Segura, M.Toral, V.Arancibia 100. Determination of hypersusceptible dyes in textile by chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. X. Chen, C. Huang, Y. Zhu 101. Determination of nitrofuran metabolites in royal jelly and royal jelly powder by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrom­ etry. X. Chen, H. Uu, W. Xie 102. Determination of phenolic components and deduction of the fragmentation mechanism of danshen by HPLC/electrospray ionization-multistage mass spec­ trometry. W. Qi, H. Wang, Z. He 103. Determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in dust by SFE-GCMS-MS. F. C. Calvosa, A. F. Lagalante 104. Determination of ppb level anions in sulfolane by ion chromatography with a novel column-switching injection system. M-LChen, X.Jiao, Y.Zhu 105. Determination of tetracyclines residues in royal jelly by liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry. C Huang, X. Chen, Y.Zhu 106. Determination of the contents of polysac­ charides in Semen Plantaginis by the phenol-H2S04 colorimetry method. C. Zhou, M. Xie, Y. Wan, S. Nie 107. Determination of toluene diisocyanate in plastic playground by ion chromatography with ultraviolet detection after alkaline suppressor. M-L· Chen, D. Fei, Y. Zhu 108. Determination of transferrin using an enzyme labeled immunoassay. S. Muncharoen, D. Nacapricha, O. Chailapakul, H. B. Halsall, W. R. Heineman 109. Development and optimization of immu­ noassays for the determination of microcystins as natural contaminants of freshwaters. L Barbi, J. M. Leao Martins, L. M. Santos, D. Seijo, A. Gago-Martinez 110. Development and validation of a liquid chromatographic-electrospray mass spectrometric method for the determination of inflammation biomarkers in rat matrices. A.J.Btewett, S.A.Jansen 111. Development and validation of LCMS/MS method for the quantification of olanzapine in human plasma using an experimental design. R. Chai, S. Gederia Sr., N. R. Medichelra, N. M. Yugandhar, B. V. V. Ratnam

112. Development of a new method for deter­ mination of manganese in human plasma and hair. Y. Wen 113. Development of a practical pH-responsive lanthanide complex with infrared emission. T. Terai, Y. Urano, T. Nagano 114. Development of a sample preparation method for the metabonomic analysis of volume-limited plasma samples from selenium exposed fish. F. Fang, X. Deng, S. S. Hung, D. Schlenk, C. K. Larive 115. Development of cITP-NMR to facilitate structure elucidation of heparin-derived oligosaccharides. S. L EkJridge, A. K. Korir, C. K. Larive 116. Development of near-infrared fluorescent probes for pH. H. Kojima, K. Kiyose, S. Aizawa, T. Nagano 117. Development of new fluorescent and colorimetric reagents for high-throughput analysis of proteins. Y. Suzuki, K. Yokoyama 118. Development of sum-frequency genera­ tion nonlinear optical ellipsometry. C. J. Dehen, G. J. Simpson 119. Direct visual detection for a human papillomavirus DNA using bioconjugated silica nanoparticles. J. Piao, E. Park, D. S. Chung, P. Park, J. Kim, J. Lee 120. DNA enzymatic amplification for DNA detection. Y. Tian, Y. He, C. Mao 121. DNA-biosenson A molecular study. N. Le Bouch, J. Brisson, M. Lederc 122. DsRed-Monomer as afunctional tag. A. M. Goulding, S. Shrestha, Y. Rahimi, E. Hunt, S. K. Deo 123. Dual function silver embedded magnetic nanoprobes and their application for sepa­ ration, tracking and imaging of cancer cell. B-H. Jun, M. Non, H. Park, J. Kim, H. Kang, J. H. Kim, M-S. Kim, S-M. Lee, Y-K. Kim, T. Hyeon, M-H. Cho, D. H. Jeong, Y-S. Lee 124. Effect of ionic strength on nanopore stochastic sensing. Q. Zhao, D. A. Jayawardhana, X. Guan 125. Effect of phosphorylation on retention behavior of peptides during ion pairing reversed-phase HPLC based on prediction model. S. Yuan, R. Su, W. Qi, Z. He 126. Effects of dehydrocarbon atom separa­ tion on the reactivity of aromatic σ,σbiradicals toward dinucleoside phosphates. N. S. Rochelle, L Yang, H. I. Kenttâmaa 127. Electrochemical characteristics of oiigothiophenes and some of their derivatives. P-T. Pham 128. Electrochemical characterization of covalently immobilized ferritin. S. S. Casella, D. C. Zapien 129. Electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen using CdS biolables and MWCNT-polyallylamine nanocomposite screen-printed electrode. S. Viswanathan, W-C. Uao, J-A. A. Ho 130. Electrochemical studies of some furyl, indole and phenyl derived sulfonamides with antimicrobial activities. R. S. Machana, Z. H. Chohan, J. Luba, A. U. Shaikh 131. Enaiitioseparation of three chiral compounds by Capillary Electrophoresis used cyclodextrin chiral selector as chiral mobile phase additives. R. Dai, L. Yang, W. Uu, Y. Deng, W. Meng, H. Wang 132. Evaluation of several retrieval methods of ignitable liquid residues from concrete. C. Owen, G. Lajoie, S. M. Theberge 133. Experimental design in the development of a method for the determination of cadmium with guanine in sea water by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. V. Arancibia, M. Acufta, R. Segura, M. C. Zuniga 134. Fabrication of dual-transducer device containing electrochemical and optical biosensor. T. H. Ho, R-A. Doong 135. Fast and reliable determination of trace concentrations of Ti and Zr in soil samples. M. Raessler 136. Ruorescence detection of TNT and other nitroaromatics using a library of structurally diverse porphyrinoids. J. Akhigbe, W. Jia, Y. Lei, C. Bruckner 137. Ruorescence identification of explosives for increased selectivity. C. N. Sheaff, D. Eastwood, C. M. Wai 138. Ruorescence polarization assay for calmodulin (CaM) binding to plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA). M. R. Uyanage, C. K. Johnson

139. Ruorescence quenching/enhancement surface assays: Signal manipulation using silver-coated gold nanoparticles. E. G. Matveeva, T. Shtoyko, I. Gryczynski, I. Akopova,. Z. Gryczynski 140. Fluorescent and magnetic detection of controlled DNA assemblies on Au patterned Si0 2 devices. S. M. Hire, G. F. Strouse, P. B. Chase, P. Xiong, S. von Molnâr 141. Fluorescent ratiometric indicators for transition metal ions: A general approach. J. O. Osambo, R. W. Seitz, S. Burdette, R. Planalp, D. Kennedy, A. Atkinson 142. FTIR and FTNIR multivariate analysis: detection of ethanol fuel adulteration. J. C. Rubim, F. C. C. Oliveira, H. S. P. Carneiro, P. A. Z. Suarez 143. FTIR, FTNIR, and FT-Raman PLS calibration models: The effect of the spectral resolution on RMSECV values. J. C. Rubim, F. C. C. Oliveira, F. A. Trindade, P. A. Z. Suarez 144. Gas chromatography-time of flight (GCTOF) and analogous separation methods in analysis of Pogostemon cablin Benth essential oil. H. Zhang, X. Chen, Q. Xu, J.Uu 145. Heat capacity of amorphous biodegradable polymers in the absence and presence of water. M. Pyda 146. Heat-induced extractable profile study in PVC films using headspace GC/MS methodology. M. Zhou, K. Chehade, A. Nikopour 147. High speed chromatographic analysis using sub-2 micron HPLC packings. M. Jacyno, R. Nguyen, S. Anderson, R. Gaita 148. High-speed bioanalysis of pharmacokinetic screening studies using a Halo™ fused-core column in AstraZeneca Discovery DMPK. M. J. H. Bock, M. Ribadeneira 149. Highly sensitive quencher-free molecular beacon for probing oxidatively damaged DNA. L Uao, R. Pires, A. Zhou, Y. Wang, L Wang 150. Homogeneous kinase activity screening for cell lysates utilizing gold nanoparticle aggregation. T. Mori, J. Oishi, Y. Asami, J-H. Kang, T. Niidome, Y. Katayama 151. HPLC separation of enantiomeric compounds using a novel stationary phase. H. Wet», M. Kopczynski, R. Valluzzi 152. Hybridization of DNA—platinum drug adducts. L Postelnicu, R. M. Georgiadis 153. Identification of species of Ganoderma by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy with the use of principal component analysis and discriminant analysis. Y. Chen, M. Xie, Y. Wang, S. Nie, X. Gong 154. Withdrawn. 155. Improved method for on-tray cuvettes washing for the biochemical analyzer "Data Pro Plus". R. K. Gotzev 156. Influence of the pyrolysis temperature to the pyrolyzate of the rubbers. Z. Yang, G. Fan, C. Gong, H. Xu, G. U, C. U 157. Information entropy and the classification of local anaesthetics. F. Terrons, G. Castellano 158. Investigating the interaction of dissolved humic acids with a model biomembrane system by 31Ρ NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. N. Elayan, R. L Cook 159. Investigation of phenyl radical-induced damage on peptides in the gas phase. S. U, S. C. Habicht, J. J. Nash, H. I. Kenttamaa 160. Investigation of protein oxidation by fixed charge derivatization and capillary electro­ phoresis. H. P. Gunawardena 161. Ion modulation and noise in Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry. O. K. Yoon, I. A. Zuleta, M. D. Robbins, G. Barbula, R. N. Zare 162. Withdrawn. 163. Kinetic studies of the formation of poten­ tial genotoxic impurities in a drug sub­ stance. F. Zheng, D. Kroon, R. Ryall, J.Weber 164. Kinetic studies on the hydrolysis of EDAC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide) in aqueous solutions and its quantitative analysis using HILIC HPLC. B. Yan, R. Francis, J. Ruan

TECH13

ANYL 165. Kinetics of cure of an epoxy-amine system studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. R. D. Rickman, J. Weaver, M. Wilson 166. LC molecular markers for elucidating oxidative stress processes. M. Marti, J. Davis 167. LC-MS determination of DNA adducts of aristolochic acids associated with kidney disease. Z. Cai 168. LC/MS solvent blends stability. K. Snoble, N. Fox, A. Kemperman, S. Lorenz, J. Przybytek 169. Low pressure adsorption characterization of pharmaceutical polymorphs. Y. Bereznitski, A. Chen 170. Luminescence temperature sensing using ruthenium diimine complexes. R. Badugu, L. Tolosa, Y. Kostov, G. Rao 171. Magnetite labeled Adenovirus for tar­ geted delivery of magnetic nanopartides. J. S. Pritchett, D. F. Reed, M. S. Farahat, M. Everts, D. T. Curiel, D. E. Nikles 172. MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of pyrolyzed peptide residues: Can we get sequence information of the peptide? M. A. Meetani, K. J. Voorhees 173. Mass spectrometry study of phosphory­ lation and phosphorylation-or DNA bind­ ing-induced conformation change of HMGA1 proteins. Q. Zhang, Y. Wang 174. Measuring the sizes of polypropylene imine) dendrimers in solution. M. Chai, L. Rakesh, N. Bedford, N. Almeida 175. Method for the determination of chloram­ phenicol residue in honey and royal jelly— LC-MS/MS. W. Xle, H-Y. Ding, X-M. Chen 176. Microchip-based conductivity detector for the detection and quantification of circulat­ ing tumor cells. P. I. Okagbare, D. Patterson, W. Stryjewski, A. A. Adams, S. A. Soper 177. Microcoil NMR for structure elucidation of microgram quantities of heparin oligosac­ charides important for protein binding. J. F. K. Umtiaco, A. K. Korir, C. K. Larive 178. Microfabrication of self-oscillating gels for geometrical chemical reactor networks. M.Ueda 179. MicroRNA detection based on protein reassembly. K. A. Cisaell, S. Shrestha, S.K.Deo 180. Microsphere-based RCA assay for DNA mutation detection. W. Zhong, J. Li 181. Modification of microfluidic surfaces with protein-polymer conjugates for capture of glycoproteins. J. M. de Guzman, R. L McCarley 182. Modification vertically iterative transition for single components in serious overlap­ ping chromatograph peaks. Z. Wang, G. Fan, C. Gong 183. Modified plate theory for simulation skewed peak and reverse type. G. Fan, S. Fan 184. Molecular architecture: Exploiting the 1,4-naphthoquinone structure for disease diagnosis. R. B. Smith, J. Davis 185. Molecular view of a colloidal gelation. S. Roke, M. Bonn, A. van Blaaderen 186. Monitoring DPA release from a single germinating Bacillus subtilis endospore via surface-enhanced raman scattering microscopy. D. D. Evanoff Jr., J. Heckel, T. P. Caldwell, K. A. Christensen, G. Chumanov 187. Multianion analysis in consumer prod­ ucts: From multielectrolytes to toothpaste. M. A. Palacios, P. Anzenbacher Jr. 188. Multiplex targeting and imaging of apoptosis in vitro and in vivo by dual mode silica nanoprobes with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescent signals. S-M. Lee, K. N. Yu, J. Y. Han, J-H. Kim, H. Park, H^J. Yoon, B-H. Jun, Y-K. Kim, D. H. Jeong, M-H. Cho, Y-S. Lee 189. NADH Detection at electrodes modified with functionalized carbon nanotubes. M. Wooten, W. Gorski 190. Nano-LC/MS/MS quantification of neuro­ peptides in CSF, plasma and brain. M. J. Hayward, D. P. Budac 191. Neutralizatjon-reionization mass spec­ trometry and computational study on the urea and guanidine radicals. C. Hao, F. Turecek

14-TECH

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 192. New acoustic droplet ejection platform enables spot-on-spot picoliter reagent deposition for MALDI imaging mass spec­ trometry, arraying and other applications. S. Pickett, B. Browning, L. Ghislain, S. Hinkson, R. Huang, L. Lee, G. Ma, W. McClintock, M. Miller, M. Mutz, W. Sagun, R. Steams, R. Ellson, E. Heron 193. New method for in vivo imaging of intra­ cellular signals and its application to can­ cer imaging. J-H. Kang, Y. Sato, R. Toita, T. Mori, T. Niidome, Y. Katayama 194. New methods for site-specific modifica­ tion of DNA: Spectroscopic and electro­ chemical characterization of labeled nucleobases. C. E. Immoos, A. A. Lakha, P. A. Bailey, L Sheynkman 195. New Os-complexes as fluorophores for DNA detection and oxygen sensing. Y. Lei, E. Wang, Y. Xie, P. Manhaji. M. Megehee, A. Okafor, N. D. Jespersen 196. Newly developed C30 packing materials: Substrate-depending preferable combina­ tion characters. Y. Matsushita, M. Omote, N. Shoji, N. Kuriyama 197. NMR characterization of novel priostar dendrimers. M. F. Federle, E. K. Groski, M. Chai, M. A. Zhuravel, S. Svenson, D. A. Tomalia 198. NMR strategies to characterize ligandreceptor interactions. J. R. Cruz, B. A. Becker, C. K. Larive 199. Nonlinear optical imaging of melanocytes in collagen matrix. K. Zhang, W. Zhang, C-Y. Yang, H. Yang 200. Nonlinear optical studies of drug-mem­ brane interactions. K. A. Briggman, L K. Wolf 201. Novel approaches to sampling and detection of PBDEs in dust using SPME and APPI-LC-MS-MS. T. Oswald, A. F. Lagalante 202. Novel biological nanoprobes via UV detectors using chrtosan stabilized CdS quantum dots. Y. Zhong, J. Wu, Y. Zhu 203. Novel microspheric sensors based on molecular imprinting and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. J. Du, W. R. Sertz 204. Novel murrjwavelength paired emitterdetector diode miniaturized photometric detector for flow analysis. Μ. Ο Toole, R. Shepherd, K. T. Lau, D. Diamond 205. Novel phases for normal phase chiral HPLC. L Uu, J. Zhang, J. Needham, R. Valluzzi 206. Online desalting device coupled to ICP-MS for in vivo determination of the transfer kinetics of trace elements in the brain extracellular fluid of anesthetized rats. Y-C. Sun, Y-T. Chung, M-H. Yang 207. Optimization and validation of a super­ critical fluid extraction for the analysis of pofycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using a multivariate method. M. C. Zufiiga, V. Arancibia 208. Peptide modified polymer nanofibers as biomimetic extracellular matrices for opti­ mized cell adhesion and differentiation. B. L Vasanthakumari, A. P. V. Nair, F. S. J Hussain, S. Valiyaveettil 209. Perylenemonoimide derivatives with pH-dependent absorption and fluores­ cence properties. L Huang, G. Aryal, S-W. Tarn-Chang 210. pH Effect on hydration of ortho-phthalaldehyde. K. Lu, T. Yu 211. pH Insensitive glucose fluorescence molecular probe. K. Ye, J. Garrett 212. Photodamage of pheophytins and chlo­ rophylls in photosynthesis. H. J-M. Hou 213. Photopolymerized silica sol-gel affinity monoliths for on-chip separations. M. H. Levy, S. Goswami, J. Plawsky, S. M. Cramer 214. Planar array infrared spectroscopy for the study of dynamics in material systems. C. M. Snively, A. Pesapane, Y. S. Kim, D. B. Chase, J. F. Rabolt 215. Platinum surfaces modified with 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid at different conditions: An electrochemical study. R. Brito-Gomez, R. J. Tremont, E. Reyes-Pizarro 216. Polymer and polymer-nanocomposites as chromatographic stationary phases. D. L Blackwell, J. S. Major 217. Polymer-based stationary phases for chemical separations: Monoliths vs. com­ posites. S. S. Bottrose, J. S. Major

218. Preparation and characteristics of graph­ ite fiber for solid phase microextraction by nonthermal plasma. Z. Wu, F. Luo, Y. Kang, X. Ma 219. Preparation and standardization of active fractions from Oriental medicinal herbs for drug development and quality evaluation. X. Wang, J. Chen, Y. Yin, F. S-C. Lee, K. Liu 220. Preparation of Bi2te3 nanotube arrays by electrodeposition. J-J. Zhu, X-H. U, B.Zhou 221. Probing the effects of a novel vacuolar protein sorting inhibitor, Sortinl, at the molecular level using NMR-based metabonomics. C. E. Merrywell, C. K. Larive 222. Probing the metabolic response of Arabidopsis thaliana to hypoxic stress using 1H-NMR. J.Bailey-Serres, C. Branco-Price, K. A. Hamersky, C. K. Larive 223. Protein sensing of zinc(ll)bis(8-hydroxyquinoline) complex nanorods. J-J. Zhu, H. Pan, F. Liang, C. Mao 224. Quantification of formoterol in human plasma by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry: Application to a clini­ cal study. V. N. Kandikere, K. Mudigonda, R. V. S. Nirogi 225. Quantification of peptides made possible with recent advances in nano-LC and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). D. P. Budac, L. Allan, M. J. Hayward 226. Quantitative method for binary rubber blends with characteristic ion by pyrorysis/ gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. G. Fan, Z. Yang, C. Gong, H. Xu, G. U, C.U 227. Quantitative method for binary rubber blends with the solution sampling method by pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Z. Yang, G. Fan, H. Xu, C. Gong, G. U, C. U 228. Quantitative method for ternary rubber blends with characteristic ion by pyrorysis/ gas chrOmatography/mass spectrometry. G. Fan, Z. Yang, H. Xu, C. Gong, G. U, C.U 229. Quantitative raman analysis based on hole-enhanced raman scattering. H. Chen, J. Banns, R. Wang, L Chen 230. Rapid analysis of urinary L-dopa using gold nanoelectrode ensembles. S. Viswanathan, L-C. Wu, W-C. Uao, J-A. A. Ho 231. Withdrawn. 232. Rational design of photoprotein aequorin mutants. X. Qu, E. Dikici, C. M. Ensor, S. K. Deo, S. Daunert 233. Real-time monitoring of gold nanorods in vivo using infrared light. T. Niidome, Y. Akiyama, T. Kawano, T. Mori, Y. Katayama, Y. Niidome 234. Reproducible and simple preparation of electrophoretic coatings for ultra microelectrodes. V. Gariepy, J. P. Claverie, J. Mauzeroll 235. Rhodamine Β as a sensing element for diastereomers. C. J. Stephenson, K. D. Shimizu 236. Sampling and characterization of explo­ sive gas emissions by solid phase microextraction. F. Luo, Z. Wu, P. Tao, Y. Tan, D.Zhou 237. Sandwich immunoassays using dendrimer-modified beads. U. B. Trwari, S. Farrell, B. H. Halsall, W. R. Heineman 238. Selective extraction and separation of vitamin Ε by functionalized ionic liquids modified mesoporous SBA-15 adsorbent. M. U, T. U 239. Self-assembly of cellulose-based trienzyme system for pseudo-reagentless biosensor. M. L Rabinovich, L Vasilchenko, K. Karapetyan, G. Shumakovich, O. Yershevich, R. Ludwig, D. Hartrich, Y. P. Kozlov, Y. Hadar. A. I. Yaropolov 240. Sensitive electrochemical sensors for determination of dopamine. J. Chou, T. J. Ilgen, S. Gordon, A. Ranasinghe, H. Metiu, E. McFarland, S. K. Buratto 241. Separation and analysis of monoclonal antibody aggregates by hydrophobicity interaction membrane chromatography. L Wang, R. Ghosh

242. Separation of chiral compouds by HPLC used cydodextrin chiral selector as chiral mobile phase additives. R. Dai, W. Liu, L Yang, Y. Deng, W. Meng, L. Chen, H. Wang 243. Separation of the two enantjomers of T-3811ME by Normal-Phase HPLC using modified amylose as Chiral Stationary Phase. J. Lu, A. M. Rustum 244. Separation using pory(N-isopropylacrylamide)-modified silica in aqueous liquid chromatography. R. Dai, L Chen, H. Wang, Y. Deng 245. SeperatJon and determination of glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin in licorice using SPE-RP-HPLC. Y. Yu, J. Cai, R. Dai, . Y. Deng, K. Yang, W. Meng 246. Simultaneous determination of COD and DOC in water using closed reflux oxidation followed by spectrophotometry and poten­ tiometer analysis. Y. Kang, Z. Wu, F. Teng 247. Single molecule analysis of DNA/protein interactions: The nanopore shift assay. M. Wanunu, D. Cohen-Kami, Y. Yu, Z. Weng, A. Meller 248. Single-walled carbon nanotubes-based near infrared absorption for DNA sensing. X.Tu, W.Zhao 249. Small molecule MALDI-TOF MS: Appli­ cation to dyes and pigments. S. Kridaratikorn, L. SoKzberg, A. Hagar, A. Mattson, R. Newman 250. Spectre-kinetic method to evaluate selenite, in nutritional supplements. A. B. Céceres, Β. Bravo, G. Châvez, F. Ysambertt, N. Marquez 251. Spectroscopic examination of a Dutch genre oil painting. A. J. Norbutus, A. F. Lagalante 252. SPR microscopy combined with a 3-d microfluidic system for high-throughput bioanalysis. J. Liu, M. A. Eddings, B. K. Gale, J. Shumaker-Parry 253. Stable and radioactive isotope dilution techniques to determine the fate and behavior of elements in terrestrial environments. J. Klrby, M. J. McLaughlin, L. Wendling. C. Wright 254. Structure of a pigment produced by host-independent Bdellovibrio bacteriovirus. E. M. Spain, M. A. Ferguson, J. Schmitt, N. F. Dalleska, W. Wang, A. R. Sindhurakar, C. B. Voile, M. E. Nunez 255. Studies on Quercetin/metal complexes using ESI-MSn. M. Guo, F. Song, Z. Liu, S.Uu 256. Studies on the preparation techniques of active positions from Résina Draconis by HPLC. Y. Yu, K. Yang, J-J. Cai, R. Dai, W. Meng, Y. Deng 257. Study of chemical structure related "Dosing Vehicle Effect" with LC/MS analysis of pharmacokinetic samples. C. Zhu 258. Study of nutrient constituents and chemical compositions in seeds of Elaeagnus conferta. R. Dai, J. Bai, Y. Chen, Y. Deng 259. Petroleum ether extract from longan seed and components analysis on GC-MS. Q. Deng, R. Huang, C. Un 260. Swallow-tailed perylene derivative: New fluorescent probe for detecting lipid hydroperoxides. N. Son, T. Ariyoshi, H. Nakajima, K. Nakano, T. Imato 261. Swellable molecular imprinted polymer microspheres that undergo fluorescence resonance energy transfer. S. Yao, W. R. Seitz 262. Synthesis and characterization of 1-D Cuv2o6 nanobelts. J-J. Zhu, C. Mao 263. Synthesis and fluorescent responses of highly water-soluble zwitterionic boronic acid-grafted pory(p-phenylene ethynylene) to biological species. Z. Chen 264. Synthesis of ionic liquids immobilized mesoporous adsorbents with silver salts and applications in concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters. M. U, P. J. Pham, T. Wang, T. U

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

ANYL 265. Synthesis of liquid crystal coated CdSe/ ZnS quantum dots and their application in monitoring dynamic pH and ionic strength levels in biological solutions. S. M. Da Sllva, Z. Rosenzweig 266. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of dried blood spots for newborn screening of lysosomal storage disorders. S. Blanchard, C. R. Scott, F. Turecek, M. H. Gelb 267. Targeted drug delivery using chemically and thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide hydrogels. J. Miseirvftch 268. The benefits of using ELSD for the analysis of traditional Chinese medicines. M. Jacyno, R. Gaita, M. Wilcox 269. The determination of the total flavonoids by UV and a flavone glycoside by HPLC in Torreya gradis Fort Leaves. R. Dai, D. Jiang, W. U, Y. Zhang, Y. Yu, Y. Deng, W.Meng 270. The development of high strength silica particles. V. Bolgova, D. Walsh, K. Wyndham, M. Kele, P. Iraneta, S. Serpa 271. The investigation of the chemical compo­ nent of Syringa pinnatifolia Hemsl volatile oiLY.Yu, H.Fu 272. The role of carbon species for the signal enhancement of Ge, As, and Se in ICP/ MS. K. S. Park 273. Toward single-molecule peptide sequencing in nanopores: Recognizing peptide molecules differing by only one amino-acid. D. A. Jayawardhana, Q. Zhao, X. Guan 274. Transfer of explosives to human hair. E.T.Bemter 275. Unique size exclusion HPLC method for monitoring free polyethylene glycol in the presence of PEGylated protein conjugate. N. U, D. Ziegemeier, L. Bass 276. Use of angle resolved multiwavelength SPRi for optimization of protein binding surfaces. J. A. Ruemmele, Y. Gao, M. S. Golden, R. M. Georgiadis 277. Using ultra fast Open Access LC/MS with multidimensional data acquisition for near real-time decision making in the medicinal chemistry environment. M. J. Hayward, Q. Han, D. P. Budac 278. Validated chiral reverse-phase liquid chromatography method for the enantio­ meric separation of Linezolid. S. Kota, R. R. Katta, K. Mudigonda, V. N. Kandikere, R. V. S. Nirogi 279. Vibrational sum frequency generation scattering from the interface of an isotropic particle: Geometrical and chiral effects. AG.F.deBeer,S.Roke 280. Chemical fingerprinting for the authenti­ cation and quality evaluation of Oriental medicinal herbs. F. S. C. Lee, X. Wang, J. Chen, P. Fu 281. Determination of bile acid profiles in scat samples of wild animals by GC-MS and LC-MS: A comparative study. A. U. Shaikh, J. Shirley, G. A. Heidt 282. In vivo analysis of UDP-glucose and UDP-glucuronic acid in animals treated with 6-thiopurine. J. L Hilsenbeck-Fajardo, C. Brown, R. M. Hyslop 283. Multivariate image processing for drugpolymer spatial distribution analysis. V. Veselov, K. M. Balss, G. Papandreou, L Alquier, C. A. Maryanoff 284. Old compounds: New structural discover­ ies. Ε. Υ. Cheung, M. L. Peterson 285. Particle size analysis using focused beam reflectance measurement probe. W.Yu 286. Reagent-free ion chromatography sys­ tems with eluent regeneration (RFIC-ER systems) and their applications. Z. Lu, Y ; Uu, J. Madden, C. Pohl

9:00 288. Metabolomics for mapping disease signatures and drug response phenotypes. R. Kaddurah-Daouk 9:30 289. Neurometabolomics: A cell at a time. S. S. Rubakhin, J. V. Sweedler 10:00 Intermission. 10:30 290. Microanalytical Methods for Metabolites in the Drosophila Brain. A. G. Ewing, N. Kuklinski, I. Arcibal, M. Makos, K-A. Han, Y. Kim, H-G. Lee 11:00 291. Advanced NMR and MS methods and their combination in metabolomics. D. Raftery, N. Pan, H. Gu, M. Shanaiah, S. Zhang, N. Gowda, N. Talaty, A. Jackson, R. G. Cooks 11:30 292. NMR or MS for global metabolite profiling in metabonomics? I. D. Wilson

MONDAY MORNING

Pfizer Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

Section A

Section Β BCEC 104C Pathogen Detection Cosponsored by BIOHW D. R. Walt, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 293. CANARY B-cell sensor for rapid, sensitive identification of pathogens. J. D. Harper 9:00 294. Real-time detection and classifica­ tion of biological aerosols using a fluores­ cent sensor array. S. U, M. B. Tabacco 9:30 295. Pathogen detection and identifica­ tion by ambient ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry. R. G. Cooks, Y. Song, N. Talaty, W. A. Tao, A. Venter, A. U. Jackson 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 296. FluChip technologies for enhanced global surveillance of influenza viruses. K. L Rowten 10:40 297. Raman chemical imaging spec­ troscopy for reagentiess pathogen detec­ tion. P. J. Treado, K. S. Kalasinsky, M. P. Nelson 11:10 298. Advances in pathogen detection using bead-based fiber optic microarrays. R. B. Hayman, D. R. Walt Section C BCEC 104A Chromatographic Separations in Clinical Chemistry K. W. Phinney, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 299. Packed column SFC: A fast sepa­ ration technique for the clinical laboratory. H. J. Issaq, X. Xu, J. M. Roman, E. Abbott, T. D. Veenstra 9:35 300. Current status of clinical 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurement. D. Wiebe 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 301. Rapid, routine and reliable mea­ surement of tacrolimus in human whole blood using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. D. S. Mason 10:50 302. New clinical applications of hplcelectrochemical detection. P. A. Ullucci, P. H. Gamache, I. N. Acworth 11:20 303. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for clinical analytes. K. W. Phinney, M. Bedner, N. G. Dodder, B. C. Nelson, C. A. Rimmer, L. C. Sander, K. E. Sharpless, S. S-C. Tai, S. A. Wise Emerging Technologies: Nanobiotechnology Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOHW

BCEC 104B The Emerging Technologies and Capabilities of Metabolomics Cosponsored by BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL J. V. Sweedler, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 287. Identification of metabolite biomarkers in prediction of ESRD mortality. L Tong, M. Hansen, G. Stephanopoulos

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 104B Nano-Biochemistry and Technology Cosponsored by BIOT, BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL Y. C. Cao, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 304. Biological assembly of nanophotonic materials. D. S. Ginger Jr. 2:05 305. New photoswitchable nanoprobes for live cell imaging. A. D. Q. U, W. Wu, L. Zhu, M-Q. Zhu, J. K. Hurst 2:35 306. Oligonucleotide nanoparrJcle conju­ gate: A versatile probe in biodetection. C. A. MlrWn 3:05 Intermission. 3:30 307. Using nanomaterials to map biomolecular processes. G. F. Strouse 4:00 308. Size/composition-tunable quantum dots and their bioapplications. M-Y. Han 4:30 309. Surface-engineered quantum dot nanopartjdes for cellular imaging and delivery of therapeutic agents. S. Nie, H. Duan, M. Kuang Section Β BCEC 104C Analytical Division Award Symposium C. G. Enke, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 310. Scientific contributions of Ray Clement to public health. D. G. Patterson Jr. 1:50 311. Award Address (Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Analytical Chemistry, sponsored by Waters Corpora­ tion). Careers in analytical chemistry: the greatest challenge is coming. R. Clement 2:35 312. Spectrochemistry and the work of Robert Com. R. Georgiadis 2:55 313. Award Address (Spectrochemical Analysis, sponsored by the Division of Analytical Chemistry). Ultrasensitive biosensing with surface plasmons, surface enzyme chemistry, nanoparticles and diffraction gratings. R. M. Com, H. J. Lee, A.Wark 3:40 Intermission. 3:50 314. The science of Scott McLuckey: An appreciation. R. G. Cooks 4:10 315. Award Address (Chemical Instru­ mentation, sponsored by Dow Chemical Foundation). Ion/ion reactions: new tools, new methodologies, and new insights. S. A McLuckey Section C BCEC 104A Biomarker Discovery Cosponsored by BTEC and BIOHW C. S. Lee, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 316. Safety and efficacy biomarkers: Utility in drug discovery and development. R. Dixit 2:05 317. Combining MALDI FTMS, com­ parative glycoproteomics, and bioinformatics for the discovery of biomarkers in Prion disease. L U, X. Wei, J. Schmidt, A. Herbst, S. Mcllwain, D. Page, J. Aiken 2:25 318. Discovery and validation of astro­ cytoma biomarkers using microdissected tissue specimens coupled with targeted and mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies. T. Guo, W. Wang, C. S. Lee, Z. Zhuang, R. Weil, Β. Μ. Balgley 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 319. Metabolomic studies for global assessment of oxidative stress and anti­ oxidant capacity by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. R. Lee, A. S. Ptolemy, P. Britz-McKibbin 3:20 320. New methods for automated identification of biomarkers and metabolic pathways in NMR-based metabolomics studies. G. M. Banik, C. Peng, T. Abshear, M. D'Souza, K. Nedwed, M. Scandone, I. Lewis, J. L. Markley

3:40 321. Comparison of lnterieukin-4 quan­ tification using protein microarrays, sus­ pension arrays, and surface plasmon resonance. L Wang, K. D. Cole, H-J. He, A. Peterson, Y. Zong 4:00 322. Enhanced surface plasmon reso­ nance imaging of protein microarrays. C. F. Grant, M. T. McDermott Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Developments in Radiochemistry and Nuclear Counting Techniques Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by ANYL Murray Goodman Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by John Wiley & Sons, ANYL, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Undergraduate Research Poster Session Analytical Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by ANYL and SOCED MONDAY EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Sci-Mix I. M. Warner, Organizer, Presiding 8:00-10:00 56, 74-75, 78, 83, 91, 94,119,136,151,167, 173,176,183,186,188,190,197,199, 205, 208, 211, 213, 229, 235, 245,247248,251,261,265-266,273. See previ­ ous listings. TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 104B Frank H. Held and Joe L Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry in Honor of Jean H. Futrell Cosponsored by PHYS P. B. Armentrout, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 323. Award Address (Frank H. Field and Joe L Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry, spon­ sored by the American Chemical Society). From reaction dynamics to peptide sequencing: Forty years of tandem mass spectrometry. J. H. Futrell 9:10 324. Dynamics of ion-molecule pro­ cesses from beam scattering studies. Z. Herman 9:45 325. Chemical dynamics simulations of surface-induced dissociation: Consonance of theory and experiment. W. L Hase 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 326. Collisions, photons, electrons and protein complexes: Gas-phase structural analysis with FTICR-MS. R. M. Heeren, R. B. J. Geels, S. M. van der Vies, A. J. R. Heck 11:10 327. Surface modification using reac­ tive landing of peptides onto self-as­ sembled monolayer surfaces. J. Laskin, P. Wang, O. Hadjar 11:45 328. Deamidation of asparagine. P. B. Armentrout, A. Heaton, R. M. Moision Section Β BCEC 104C ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry in Honor of James W. Jorgenson C. T. Culbertson, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Award Presentation. 8:35 329. Award Address (ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry, sponsored by Battelle Memorial Institute). Exploring the limits of resolution in liquid chromatogra­ phy and capillary electrophoresis. J. W. Jorgenson

TECH-15

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ANYL

9:15 330. Capillary separations in the omics era. M. V. Novotny 9:45 331. Chemical "sensing" using rapid separations. R. T. Kennedy 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 332. Dopamine release is heterog­ eneous within microenvironments of the rat brain. R. M. Wightman 11:00 333. More biocompatible glucose biosensors via nitric oxide-releasing silica nanoparticles. M. H. Schoenflsch, H. Egolf-Fox, J. H. Shin, E. M. Hetrick 11:30 334. Microfluidic devices for btoanalyrjcal analysis. C. T. Culbertson, S. A. Klasner, A. K. Price SecttonC BCEC 104A Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL G. J. Simpson and J-X. Cheng, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 335. Time-gated single photon counting enables separation of coherent AntiStokes Raman scattering (CARS) micros­ copy data from multiphoton-excited tissue autofluorescence. S. Ly, G. McNemey, S. Fore, J. Chan, T. Huser 8:50 336. New approach to broadband CARS generation. Y. J. Lee, M. T. Cicerone 9:10 337. Broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. S. R. Leone 9:40 338. Fourier transform spectral interferometric coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (FTSI-CARS) microscopy. S-H. Um, B-C. Chen 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 339. New developments in CARS microscopy. S. Xie 10:40 340. Nonlinear optical imaging of obesity and metabolic syndromes. J-X. Cheng 11:10 341. Fourier transform coherent antiStokes Raman scattering microscopy. J. P. Ogirvte, M. Cui, J. Skodack 11:40 342. Designing and characterizing biopolymer gels for 3-D cell migration studies. Y. Yang, C. Guo, L J. Kaufman

Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Developments in Radtochemistry and Nuclear Counting Techniques Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by ANYL TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 104B Frank H. Field and Joe L Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry in Honor of Jean H. Futrell Cosponsored by PHYS

BCEC 105

1:30 349. Toward the personal mass spec­ trometer. R. G. Cooks, Z. Ouyang, R. J. Noll 2:05 350. Gas phase conformations and decomposition mechanisms of activated modified peptides. J. Spraggins, S. Robinson, J. Laskin, M. V. Johnston, D. P. Ridge 2:40 351. Metal ion binding affinities and activation of phosphate esters studied by threshold collision-induced dissociation and ab initio theory. M. T. Rodgers, C. Ruan, H. Huang 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 352. Advancing the sensitivity, quality, and throughput of mass spectrometry measurements for highly complex biologi­ cal mixtures. R. D. Smith, K. Tang, M. E. Belov, J. S. Page, R. T. Kelly, I. Marginean 4:05 353. Fourier transform ton cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry at 14.5 Tesla. A. G. Marshall, C. L Hendrickson, M. R. Emmett, R. P. Rodgers, G. A. Blakney, C. L. Nilsson, T. M. Schaub 4:40 354. Structures and aggregation states of biological systems. M. T. Bowers 5:15 Concluding Remarks.

Fast Preparative Chromatography in Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery Cosponsored by BIOHW

Section Β BCEC 104C ACS Award in Chromatography In Honor of J. Michael Ramsey S. C. Jacobson, Organizer, Presiding

BCEC 105

1:30 Award Presentation. 1:35 355. Award Address (ACS Award in Chromatography, sponsored by SUPELCO, Inc). Microfabricated chemical separations devices. J. M. Ramsey 2:15 356. New detectors for separation methods. G. M. Hieftje, F. J. Andrade, G. Gamez, S. J. Ray, J. T. Shelley, J. S. Wiley 2:45 357. Analytical entanglements. W. B. Whltten, Z. Zhao, K. A. Meyer, R. W. Shaw 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 358. Comprehensive fluid-based sepa­ ration techniques (LCxLC, SFCxLC) for the analysis of small molecules. P. J. Sandra, I. François 4:00 359. Infrared multiphoton dissociation: An alternative to collision-induced dissociation. G. L Glish 4:30 360. Separations at the micro-and nanoscale. S. C. Jacobson, M. L. Kovarik, K.Zhou

W. Bartolini, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 343. Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto: Lever­ aging automation in a generalist discovery DMPK environment. A. Harsch, G. R. Ainslie, A. H. Brockman, S. V. Deshmukh, J. E. Hamill, S. E. Hill, N. Nazef, L. Xu, G. Y. Kwei 9:00 344. Techniques for rapid in vitro analy­ ses that balance speed, quality and fit. M. T. Rooney 9:30 345. Lead discovery screening using column chromatography: Mass spectrom­ etry measurement in functional biomolecular assays. M. J. Hayward, S. P. Coleman 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 346. Online nanoelectrospray and FAIMS for rapid sample analysis in a discovery pharmaceutical setting. P. Hatsis, G. A. Valaskovic, L Sawdey, J-T. Wu 10:50 347. A broadband LC-MS technique for simultaneous qualitative and quantita­ tive protein profiling. J. C. Silva, S. J. Geromanos, C. A. Dorschel, J. P. C. Vissers, M. A. Hughes, C. A. Townsend 11:20 348. Increasing data quality and metabolite identifcation by integration of plate based radioactivity and automated nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. G. A. Schultz, J. L Josephs, M. F. Grubb

16·-U: CH

Section D

P. B. Armentrout, Organizer, Presiding

Section D

Analytical Technology for Drug Discovery High Throughput, High Content Screening Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL

2:30 362. Selective two-photon activation and imaging using ultrashort phaseshaped pulses. M. Dantus 3:00 363. Directly measuring the spatiotemporal electric field of ultrashort pulses in and near a focus. P. Bowlan, P. Gabolde, R. Trebino 3:20 Intermission. 3:30 364. Concepts of far-field fluorescence nanoscopy. S. W. Hell 4:00 365. Optically active sum-frequency generation imaging. H. Yang 4:30 366. Four different uses of nonlinear excitation for biological investigations. W.Zipfel

Section C BCEC 104A

T. Palcic, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 367. Moving prep SFC to the benchtop: Chiral separations to MS triggered purification. T. DePhillipo 2:05 368. Prep SFC columns: A study of safe, high-pressure columns and their efficiencies for the purification laboratory. Z.Wang 2:35 369. A capacity and quality based approach that achieves high speed, separation & human efficiency for UV, ELSD & MS directed purification in drug discovery. D. P. Budac. X. Zhang, M. J. Hayward 3:05 Intermission. 3:20 370. Preparative chromatography in a pharmaceutical discovery laboratory: The need for speed. M. Potter, L Miller 3:50 371. Preparative supercritical fluid chromatography in high throughput purification. J. Zheng, J. Hochlowski, P. A. Searie, J. Pan, S. W. Djuric, J. A. Olson, D. P. Blanchard 4:20 372. Supercritical fluid chromatography benefits over hplc for the purification of pharmaceutical chiral and achiral molecular targets. T. Zetesky, F. Riley Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Developments in Radtochemistry and Nuclear Counting Techniques Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by ANYL Visualization of Biological Processes at the Molecular Level Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, PHYS, and BIOHW WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 104B Btoanah/sis L. E. Locascio, Organizer 9:00 373. Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to evaluate the absorption and delivery of individual stereoisomers of drug candidates. M. J. Hayward, Q. Han 9:20 374. Affinity-based protein pre-fractionation by field flow fractionation. W. Zhong, J.U 9:40 375. Stochastic sensing of organophosphates. D. A. Jayawardhana, Q. Zhao, X. Guan

Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL G. J. Simpson and J-X. Cheng, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 361. Recent developments in polarization pulse shaping and sensing from ultrafast fiber optics. A. Weiner

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

10:00 376. Single molecule mass spectrometry in solution using a solitary nanopore. J. W. F. Robertson, V. M. Stanford, O. V. Krasilnikov, C. G. Rodrigues, J. J. Kasianowtoz 10:20 Intermission. 10:40 377. Transmembrane protein electrophoresis in suspended phospholipid bilayers. M. S. Long, M. J. Wirth 11:00 378. On-chip investigations of specific ion effects on polymer and protein aggregation. Y. Zhang, D. E. Bergbreiter, P. S. Cremer 11:20 379. Microsphere-based antibody array for multiplexed detection of cytokines. T. M. Blicharz, D. R. Walt 11:40 380. Chemo-enzymatic detection of protein isoaspartate: A ubiquitous posttranslation modification. Z. S. Zhou, J. F. Alfaro Section Β BCEC 104C New Chemical and Biosensing Approaches for Cellular Analysis Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL Z. Rosenzweig, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 381. Assessing nanoparticte cytotoxicity with amperometry. B. J. Marquis, C. LHaynes 9:10 382. Design of single nanopartJcle optical sensors for imaging single receptor molecules on single living cells. X. N. Xu, T. Huang, P. D. Nallathamby 9:45 383. Molecular foundation of a diseased cell. W. Tan 10:20 Intermission. 10:30 384. Luminescent quantum dots as cellular probes. Z. Rosenzweig 11:05 385. NanopartJcle antisense and siRNA delivery agents. C. A. Mlrkin 11:40 386. NanopartJcle-core virus-like par­ ticles for intracellular probing. B. Dragnea Section C BCEC 104A Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL G. J. Simpson and J-X. Cheng, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 387. Biomedical imaging with selective two-photon excitation. L R. Weisel, B. Martin, J. Shane, J. Pote, P. Xi, Y. Andegeko, V. V. Lozovoy, M. Dantus 8:50 388. Second harmonic and sum fre­ quency generation as a probe for DNA functionalized interfaces. F. C. Boman, G. Y. Stokes, J. M. Gibbs-Davis, M. J. Musorrafrrj, B. R. Stepp, A. G. Condie, S. T. Nguyen, F. M. Geiger 9:10 389. Applications of SHG-CD and the Faraday effect. T. Verbiest 9:40 390. Structure and organization in phospholipid monolayers and bilayers. C-F. Chang, S. Z. Can, C. D. Bain, R. A. Walker 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 391. Water at model membranes: Structure, dynamics and biomolecular sensing. M. Bonn 10:40 392. The structure, amount adsorbed, and vibrational spectra of 7-14 amino acid peptides on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. G. A Somorjai, R. L York, G. Holinga 11:10 393. Microfabricating cellular interfaces using direct-write protein photocrosslinking. J. B. Shear 11:40 394. Doubly-resonant sum-frequency generation spectroscopy for the study of molecular structure at biological interfaces. L K. Wolf, K. A. Briggman Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Applications of X-Ray Techniques Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by ANYL

ANYL WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 104B

4:10 411. Is this separation chiral or not? J.G.NIng 4:35 412. NMR and computational studies of chiral discrimination by amylose tris(3,5dimethylphenyicarbamate). Y. K. Ye, M.J.Wirth.S.Bai, S.Vyas

Analytical Approaches Microfluidics

Section C

L. E. Locascio, Organizer

BCEC 104A

A. T. Woolley, Presiding

Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL

2:00 413. Automated 2-D IR spectroscopy using mid-IR pulse shaping and applica­ tions to membrane peptides. M. T. Zanni 2:30 414. Investigating the structure and dynamics of peptides and photosynthetjc complexes using multidimensional chirality-induced optical spectroscopies. S. Mukamel, W. Zhuang, D. Abramavicius, Z. Li, D. Voronine 3:00 415. High resolution spectroscopy using ultra-fast, time domain sum frequency generation at biologically relevant inter­ faces. E. Borguet, S. Nihonyanagi, A. Eftekhari-bafrooei 3:20 Intermission. 3:30 416. Vibrational sum frequency scatter­ ing from biodegradable polymer particles. S. Roko, A. B. Sugiharto, C. M. Johnson 3:50 417. Nonlinear optical ellipsometry of biomolecular assemblies. G. J. Simpson 4:20 418. Studying protein and polymer interfaces with vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. X. Chen, P. S. Cremer 4:40 419. Femtosecond infrared spectros­ copy of molecular probes of anesthetic action. L Chieffo, J. Shattuck, J. J. Amsden, M. K. Hong, S. Erramilli, L D. Ziegler

Section Β

THURSDAY MORNING

BCEC 104C

Section A

S. Ahuja, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 405. Chiral chromatographic screens in pharmaceutical analysis and purification. R. Borjas, R. DePianta, E. Pollard 1:55 406. Are chiral separations of drugs really easy? S. Ahuja 2:20 407. Chiral separation strategies in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography. Y. Vender Heyden, D. Mangelings, N. Matthijs 2:45 408. Chiral SFC and HPLC to support "high throughput" process research. A. M. Beard, X. Gong, M. Biba, W. Schafer, P. Sajonz, W. R. Leonard Jr., D. W. Henderson, C. J. Welch 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 409. Comparison of chiral chromatogra­ phy columns for pharmaceutical method development. G. K. Webster 3:45 410. HPLC method development for chiral pharmaceuticals using universal types of chiral stationary phases. X. Wang

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

BCEC 104C Analytical Approaches Mass Spectrometry L E. Locascio, Organizer

1:30 395. Remote controlled chemistry and chemical delivery on substrates. J-R. Park, C. Randall, H. Ye, T. Leong, D. Slanac, D. H. Gracias 1:50 396. Combining microfluidics with surface plasmon resonance imaging for rapid label-free immunoassays. Y. Luo, F. Yu, R. N. Zare 2:10 397. Detection of chiral molecules in a microfluidic device. A. Ghosh, P. Fischer 2:30 398. Solvent imprinting and bonding for rapid prototyping of polymer microchips. X. Sun, A. T. Woolley 2:50 399. Hectroosmotjc flow in plasma polymerized tetraglyme coated microchannel devices. M. Salim, B. O'Sullivan, P. C. Wright, S. L McArthur 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 400. Vertically grown carbon nanotube stationary phases for electrochromatographic chip separations. S. Goswami, N. Bajwa, L Ci, P. M. Ajayan, S. M. Cramer 3:40 401. Micro-fabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. W. Kim, M. Guo, P. Yang, D.Wang 4:00 402. Patterned paper An inexpensive platform for detecting disease in lessindustrialized nations. S. T. Phillips, A. W. Martinez, G. M. Whltesides 4:20 403. Microfluidic immunoaffinity capture cassette for rapid isolation and processing of neutrophils from whole Wood. K. T. Kotz, A. Russom, D. Irimia, M. Mindrinos, L L MokJawer, R. G. Tompkins, M. Toner 4:40 404. Nonlithographic fabrication of microfluidic biosensors. V. I. Vullev, M. Thomas, B. Millare

Chiral Separations Made Easy

Section Β

G. J. Simpson and J-X. Cheng, Organizers, Presiding

Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Novel Sensors for Use In Radiological and Harsh Environments Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by ANYL

BCEC 104B Analytical Approaches Bioanalysis L. E. Locascio, Organizer 9:00 420. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer based method for detection of DNA binding activities of nuclear factor κΒ. H-J. He, R. Pires, T-N. Zhu, A. Zhou, A. K. Gaigalas, S. Zou, L. Wang 9:20 421. Thermoelectric manipulation of aqueous droplets and encapsulated cells in microfluidic devices. A. E. Sgro, P.B.Allen, D.T.Chiu 9:40 422. Microfluidics-based electroporative delivery of small molecules and genes into cells under constant voltage. H-Y. Wang, C.Lu 10:00 423. Insulin detection in cell culture using dye-encapsulating liposomes. K. A. Edwards, J. March 10:20 Intermission. 10:40 424. Single cell fluorescence imaging using metal plasmon: Coupled probe. J. Zhang, Y. Fu, J. R. Lakowfcz 11:00 425. Synthetic elemental maps of cellular components using Monte Carlo simulations. K. Scott 11:20 426. Ultrasensitive detection of bacte­ rial pathogens at single-molecule level on PMMA microchip. Z. Peng, S. Soper 11:40 427. Analyzing individual biological particles on microfluidic devices using an orthogonal LIF detector Limitations of microfluidic analysis based on small sample sizes. C. Whiting, E. A. Arriaga

9:00 428. Advancing neuropeptide research by a multjfacet mass spectrometry-based platform. L U, S. DeKeyser, M. Ma, H. Behrens, J. Schmidt 9:20 429. Withdrawn. 9:40 430. Can you obtain a quantitative and reproducible LC/MS result after a sample has been fractionated at the protein level? A. B. Chakraborty, S. J. Berger, J. C. Gebler 10:00 431. Rapid mass spectrometric char­ acterization and counting of the functional­ ities in protonated amino acids through gas-phase ion-molecule reactions. S. U, M. Fu, B. E. Winger, T. A. Gillespie, H. I. Kenttamaa 10:20 432. Applications of nanoparticles in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrom­ etry. E. T. Castellana, D. H. Russell 10:40 433. Monitoring the effect of biodiesel blend on the production of nitro-potycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in diesel engine exhaust using electron monochromatormass spectrometry. A. J. Dane, M. A. Ratcliff, R. L McCormick, K. J. Voorhees 11:00 434. Withdrawn. 11:20 435. Increasing the ionization and transmission efficiency in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using an array of emitters and a multi-inlet interface. J. S. Page, R. T. Kelly, I. Marginean, K. Tang, R. D. Smith 11:40 436. MALDITOF MS of btomacromolecular complexes using a superconduct­ ing tunnel junction (STJ) cryodetector. M. E. Bier, A. A. Aksenov, A. Ozdemir, D. Sipe, R. W. Hendrix, B. Firek Section C BCEC 104A Analytical Approaches Sensors L. E. Locascio, Organizer 9:00 437. Boronic acid based smart holo­ grams for selective glucose monitoring. M. J. Thatcher, K. E. S. Medlock, A. M. Horgan, T. D. James, S. D. Bull, G.J.Worsley, F.K.Sartain, G. A. Toumiaire, H. E. Harmer, J. Pritchard 9:20 438. Synthesis of weakly-chelating monomers and copolymerizatjon with N-isopropylacrylamide to provide ratiometric metal ion sensing polymers. R. P. Planalp, D. P. Kennedy, J. O. Osambo, W. R. Seitz, A. Atkinson, S. C. Burdette 9:40 439. Chemiresistor sensor arrays con­ structed from molecularry-linked thin film assemblies of nanoparticles. L Wang, G. R. Wang, X. Shi, Q. Rendeng, M. Schadt, J. Luo, S. Lu, C-J. Zhong 10:00 440. CTAB stabilized cubic and spherical gold nanoparticles as highly sensitive extrinsic Raman labels for SERS readout in sandwich immunoassays. R. Narayanan, R. J. Lipert M. D. Porter 10:20 441. Novel platforms for single cell microscopy. U. Neugebauer, T. E. Keyes, O. Inya-Agha, A. Michota-Kaminska, N. Moran, D. Kenny, S. O'Neill, R. J. Forster 10:40 442. Fiber-optic chip spectrometers: Evaluation of a multifunctional sensor platform. Β. Μ. Beam, S. S. Saavedra, N. R. Armstrong, S. B. Mondes

11:00 443. Characterization of direct immobi­ lization on functjonalized diamond SGFETs for detecting single-mismatch oligonucleotides. J-H. Yang, S. Kuga, H. Kawarada 11:20 444. Resonating cantilever sensor detects DNA hybridization at fM in human serum. R. Mutharasan, K. Rijal 11:40 445. Peptide nucleic acid as a sensing probe on nanowire-FiekJ effect transistor (nano-FET) based biosensor. S. K. Rastogi, N. N. Mishra, W. Maki, B. Filanoski, E. Cameron, P. Winterrowd, G.Maki Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear

Technology Characterization Methods and Corrosion Control Strategies for High-level Radioactive Waste Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by ANYL THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 104B Analytical Approaches Electroanalytical Chemistry L. E. Locascio, Organizer V. Reipa, Presiding 446. Withdrawn. 1:30 447. Heterogeneous charge transfer in the redox biomolecule studies. V. Reipa 1:50 448. Electrochemical and electroanalyti­ cal applications of a new metallopolymer nanopartjcle nanocomposite material. J. L Brennan, R. J. Forster 2:10 449. Nanowire based electrochemical recording of dopamine. C. Randall, K. Murari, Z. Gu, N. Thakor, D. H. Gracias 2:30 Intermission. 2:50 450. Photoinduced electron and energy transfer processes between a ruthenium moiety and a conducting polymer. L Dennany, E. J. O'Reilly, P. C. Innis, G. Wallace, R. J. Forster 3:10 451. Rapid proton-coupled electrontransfer of hydroquinone through delocalized bridges: Implications for bioelectronic device applications. S. A. Trammell, D. S. Seferos, M. Moore, D. A. Lowy, G. C. Bazan, J. G. Kushmerick, N. Lebedev 3:30 452. Acid-base chemistry of sodium montmorillonite (SWy-1) clay nanoparticles for supporting myoglobin (Mb) electroactivity. F. Amoako 3:50 453. Withdrawn. Section Β BCEC 104C Analytical Approaches Novel Materials L. E. Locascio, Organizer O. A. Sadik, Presiding 1:30 454. Accelerated discovery of structureLCST relationships for end-functionalized polymer libraries using a temperature gradient approach. S. Jana, S. P. Rannard, A. I. Cooper 1:50 455. Preparation of metal oxide nanocrystals in aqueous solution and their biocompatibility. A. Wu, K. Brown, K. T. Thum, T. Paunesku, G. E. Wotoschak 2:10 456. Fabrication of novel moleculariy imprinted alumina-silica using non-hydrolytic sol-gel method for trace phosphine detection. S-M. Chang, C-J. Hou, S-Y. Yen, S-N. U 2:30 457. Preparation of silica particles under biocompatible conditions and their use for detection. R. Voss, J. Thompson, Y. Chen, J. D. Brennan, M. A. Brook 2:50 Intermission.

ΙΚΊΙ 1 /

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ANYL/BIOT 3:10 458. Hydroxyethyl cellulose scaffolds for tissue engineering. F. S. Jahir Hussein, A. P. V. Nair, S. Valiyaveettil 3:30 459. Novel sensor materials based on nanostructured polyamic acids. O. A. Sadik, M. Omole, J. Hassan 3:50 460. Periodic metallic nanopyramid arrays as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrates. N. Linn, C-H. Sun, P. Jiang 4:10 461. NMR and AFM investigation of supramolecular nanostructures. M. Chai, K. Freel, A. K. Holly, C. Manning, L Ong, P. Ong, R. Srinivas, M. F. Federte, E. K. Groski SectionC BCEC 104A Analytical Approaches Spectroscopy

9:05 3. Exploiting the synergy between lysate and acoustic standing wave fields to increase the retroviral transduction of suspension cells. P. R. Beauchesne, V. S. Tayi, B. D. Bowen, J. M. Piret 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 4. Self-assembly of multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) and differentia­ tion to the hepatic lineage. K. Subramanian, K. Pauwelyn, C. Verfaillie, W-S. Hu 9:55 5. 3-D differentiation model of ex vivo megakaryopoiesis. Y. Leysi-Derilou, N. Pineault, C. Duchesne, J-F. Boucher, A. Gamier 10:10 6. P53 tumor suppressor protein affects hematopoietic stem cell differentia­ tion in the megakaryocyte compartment. P. G. Fuhrken, P. Apostolidis, S. Undsey, W. M. Miller, E. T. Papoutsakis 10:25 7. Differentiation of adult human stem cells guided by mechano-sensing of matrix elasticity. F. Rehfeldt, A. J. Engler, D. E. Discher

L. E. Locascio, Organizer K. M. Balss, Presiding 1:30 462. Plasmonic enhancement of singlemolecule fluorescence near metal nano particles. Y. Fu, J. Zhang, J. R. Lakowicz 1:50 463. Quantitative spatial information of drug and polymers found in drug-eluting stents by confocal Raman microscopy. K. M. Balss, V. Veselov, E. Akerman, G. Papandreou, L Alquier, C. A. Maryanoff 2:10 464. Conformation change in platelet integrins using surface enhanced Raman microscopy. R. J. Forster, T. Keyes, U. Inya-Agha, A. Michota-Kame, N. Moran, D. Kenny 2:30 465. Native fluorescence of proteins as a real time monitor of the inactivation of ricin and model enzymes by disinfectants. A. K. Gaigalas, K. D. Cole, J. Almeida 2:50 Intermission. 3:10 466. 3-D Structure of biomolecules at interfaces: Femtosecond vibrational sum frequency generation in the fingerprint region. S. Roke 3:30 467. Rapid nonlinear optical polarization measurements by Nonlinear Optical Stokes Ellipsometery. N. Begue, G. J. Simpson 3:50 468. From art and archaeology to forensic science: Surface-enhanced Raman scattering as an analytical tool. M. Leona, J. R. Lombardi 4:10 469. Porosimetry of mesoporous Mo03 via environmental ellipsometry. R. A. May, K. J. Stevenson Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Innovative Techniques and Analytical Applications in Material Science, Separation Science, and Nuclear Material Processing Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by ANYL

BIOT Division of Biochemical Technology

BCEC 107 A/B Biophysical and Biomolecular Symposium: Protein Stability E. J. Fernandez, N. Rathore, C. R. Middaugh, A. Blake-Haskins, and A. Blake-Haskins, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 8. Use of biophysical techniques for manufacturability assessment of therapeu­ tic proteins. C. U, Y. Jiang, J. Svitel, J. Wen, R. Ramachander, S. Wang, J. Li, L. Narhi 8:25 9. A novel bioseparation approach: Use of chaotropic agents for HIC and ion exchange chromatography to dissociate noncovalent multimers during purification of an Fc fusion protein. A. B. Magill II 8:45 10. Aggregation of a monoclonal anti­ body induced by adsorption to microparticle surfaces. J. Bee, J. Stevenson, K. Chatterjee, E. Freund, J. F. Carpenter, T. W. Randolph 9:05 11. Assessment of protein stability during freeze-thaw process. K. Gupta, N. Rathore, L. Barron, W. Ji, F. Jameel, K. Murphy 9:25 Intermission. 9:45 12. Identifying optimal solution condi­ tions for high concentration protein formu­ lations: Use of self-interaction chromatog­ raphy. M. C. Manning, C. S. Henry, J. J. Valente, R. W. Payne, W. W. Wilson 10:05 13. Stability of high concentration rhuMAb VEGF. H. Liu, Μ. Ε. Μ. Cromwell 10:25 14. Stability of protein antigens in vaccine delivery formulations. J. D. Chesko, J. Kazzaz, P. Malyala, K. Patton, M. Ugozzoli, D. O'Hagan, M. Singh 10:45 15. Tungsten, prefilled syringes and protein aggregation. R. Swift, Y. Nashed-Samuel, W. Uu, L Narhi, J. Davis 11:05 Concluding Remarks.

SUNDAY MORNING

Biophysical and Biomolecular Symposium: Protein Folding & Characterization

BCEC 106

BCEC 108

K. Mallela and T. Cellmer, Organizers

Stem Cells: Quantifying, Modeling and Controlling Stem Cell Fate

8:00 16. Hidden folding intermediates in small proteins: Implications for the folding energy landscape, cooperativity, and evolution of protein structures. Y. Bai 8:25 17. Electrostatic properties of the unfolded state: What can we learn from modeling? N. C. Fltzkee, B. Garcia-Moreno Ε 8:45 18. Ultrafast folding of the villin subdomain. T. Cellmer, W. A. Eaton, J. Hofrichter 9:05 19. Simultaneous and systematic evalu­ ation of multiple protein refolding condi­ tions. P. A. Leland

J. M. Piret, Organizer 8:20 1. Behavior-activated cell selection: Application to stem cell expansion. B. Dykstra, J. Ramunas, D. Kent, C. J. Eaves, E. Jervis 8:50 2. Tracking stem cell fate using a cellbased microscale platform. T. G. Femandes, S. J. Kwon, M-Y. Lee, M. M. Diogo, C. Lobato da Silva, J. M. Cabrai, J. S. Dordick

18-TECH

BCEC 107C Upstream Processing: Advances in Biocatalysis P. C. Cirino and L Sun, Organizers 8:00 24. A blue fluorescent protein with oxidoreductase activity. Κ. Μ. PolizzJ, D. A. Moore, A. S. Bommarius 8:20 25. A novel laccase/redox mediator system increases space-time yields and operational stability in dehydrogenase reactions. R. Ludwig, D. Haltrich 8:40 26. Alginate-derived nanovolume cyto­ chrome P450 microarrays for highthroughput inhibition assays. S. M. Sukumaran, M-Y. Lee, D. S. Clark, J. S. Dordick 9:00 27. Evolution in reverse: Engineering a xylose-specific xylose reductase. N. Nair, H.Zhao 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 28. Directed evolution of Luxl for enhanced synthesis of OHHL. P. K. R. Kambam, L Sun 10:00 29. Biocatalytic systems for aromatic oxidations. A. M. Mclver, S. V. B. J. Garikapati, T. L Peoples 10:20 30. Design of an enzyme-chaperone chimera as a new approach to enzyme immobilization and self-renaturation. L M. Bergeron, T. TokatJian, D. S. Clark 10:40 31. Protein dissection and shuffling for generating recombined proteins. Y. Chen, T. Chen, H. Hua, Ζ. Lin Section Ε BCEC 107Α/Β Alan S. Michaels Recovery Award Lecture W. Zhou, Organizer 11:30 Introductory Remarks. 11:35 32. Early steps in protein recovery: The messy part of a clean industry. M-R. A. Kula SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A

SectionC

3:00 Intermission. 3:15 36. Serum-free expansion of embryonic stem cells in a bioreactor for tissue engineering applications. D. E. Kehoe, L. T. Lock, E. S. Tzanakakis 3:30 37. Hypoxic effect on hematopoietic development in human embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid bodies. C. M. Cameron, W-S. Hu, D. S. Kaufman Section Β BCEC 107A/B Downstream Processing: Primary Recovery—Membranes and Other

Section D

Section Β

W. Chen, W. Wang, and A. S. Rathore, Program Chairs

Section A

9:25 Intermission. 9:45 20. Driving forces for protein folding on the ribosome as a function of polypeptide chain elongation: Experimental and com­ putational approaches. S. Cavagnero, J. P. Ellis, B. C. Mounce, N. Kurt 10:10 21. Joining NMR and simulation to capture Alzheimer's Αβ monomer and fibril structural ensembles. N. L FawzJ, T. Head-Gordon 10:30 22. Dénaturant and isotopic effects on stability and folding of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. R. F. Latypov, D. Liu, T. Kohno, D. N. Brems, A. A. Raibekas 10:50 23. Protein folding principles: Foktons, sequential stabilization, and optional errors. K. Mallela, S. W. Englander

BCEC 108 Stem Cells: Stem Cell Based Tissue

T. McDevitt, T. McDevitt, and P. W. Zandstra, Organizers 2:00 33. Generation and characterization of keratinocytes from human embryonic stem cells. C. M. Métallo, L. Ji, J. J. De Pablo, S. P. Palecek 2:30 34. Characterization of embryonic stem cells' differentiation into insulin-producing endocrines cells in 3-D cultures. X. Wang, K.Ye 2:45 35. A novel method to control differentiating human embryonic stem cell (hESC) aggregate size and composition: Effects on cardiomyocyte development. C. L. Bauwens, R. Peerani, S. Niebruegge, K. Kolodziejska, M. Husain, P. W. Zandstra

D. J. Roush and Y. Lu, Organizers 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 38. Engineering the adsorption of plasmid DNA. W. J. Kelly, P. Butts 2:25 39. Creating a robust and reproducible recovery process using centrifugation for the recovery of a soluble fusion protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. K. Herzog, J. Barringer, C. Brady 2:45 40. Ideal membrane cascades for downstream processing. E. N. Ughtfoot, J. L O'Dell 3:05 Intermission. 3:15 41. Optimization of cell culture harvest clarification using an ultrascale down model for centrifugation. M. Menon, A. Hamilton, F. Riske 3:35 42. Effect of solid ejection size on continuous centrifugation during mamma­ lian cell culture product recovery. X. Zhao, J.Zhou 3:55 43. Case study: Optimization of harvest stream clarification steps of a commer­ cially-relevant fusion protein mammalian cell culture using charged depth filters. R. Bates, J. Ma, C. Mason SectionC BCEC 106 Biophysical and Biomolecular Symposium: Protein Folding & Characterization K. Mallela and T. Cellmer, Organizers 2:00 44. All-atom computer simulation of amyloid fibrils disaggregation. C. Tan, H-F. Chen, R. Luo 2:25 45. Dynamics of intramolecular contact formation in islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). S. Vaiana, W. A. Eaton, R. Ghiriando, J. Hofrichter 2:45 46. Folding of the β-helix domain of P22 tailspike protein. M. L Spatara, C. J. Roberts, A. S. Robinson 3:05 Intermission. 3:15 47. Folding and insertion of melittin in membrane mimics. M. R. Hartings, H. B. Gray, J. R. Winkler 3:35 48. Understanding the molecular mechanism of Hsp90: The role of nucleo­ tide hydrolysis in the chaperone cycle. K. A. Krukenberg, F. Foerster, A. Sali, D. A. Agard 3:55 49. Breaking the symmetry of a homodimeric enzyme: Engineering and characterization of monomelic disulfide isomerases. S. A. Arredondo, G. Georgiou

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

BIOT Section D

MONDAY MORNING

SectJonC

Section Ε

BCEC 107C

SectfonA

BCEC 106

BCEC 107A/B

Upstream Processing: Advances in Microbial Fermentation Process Development

W. Zhou, Organizer

D. Ren, M. Laird, and X. Yang, Organizers

11:30 93. Genentech Lucentis® Develop­ ment CMC team: "A vision saving therapy made by biotechnology". J. C. Joly

Emerging Technologies: Nanobiotechnology Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOHW J. R. Cochran and L. Malmberg, Organizers 2:00 50. Co-assembly of genetically-modified bacteriophages and inorganic nanoparticles into silica-stabilized nanoarchitectures. C. E. Ashley, E. C. Cames, L T. White, Z. Yuan, D. R. Dunphy, D. N. Petsev, P. Atanassov, D. Peabody, C. J. Blinker 2:20 51. Biofabrication with genetically modi­ fied viral nanotemplates. H. Yi, G. W. Rubloff, G. F. Payne, W. E. Bentley, J. N. Culver 2:40 52. Engineering stability and self-as­ sembly in a caged protein scaffold. S. Lim, M. Dalmau Mallorqui, C. I. Ruiz, S-W.Wang 3:00 Intermission. 3:10 53. Nanoscale reservoirs for spatially and temporally controlled biointerfaces. Ν. A. Melosh, J. J. VanDersarl, E. Hagar-Bamard, E. Yenilmez 3:30 54. Biological fabrication of nanostructured silicon-germanium photonic crystals possessing unique photoluminescent and electroluminescent properties. G. L Rorrer, C. Jeffryes, D. Lee, T. Qin, C-H. Chang, T. Gutu, J. Jiao, R. Solanki 3:50 55. Biologically programmed synthesis of hybrid semiconductor nanocrystals. S. Singh, N. Myung, A. Mulchandani, W. Chen Section Ε BCEC 109B Commercialization of Biologies: Case Studies: Post-Approval Changes & Comparability Challenges S. Lee and V. Paradkar, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 56. Post approval changes for a com­ mercial process: An historical look. C. Heath, H. Madani 2:25 57. Case study: Downstream purifica­ tion support of a cell culture raw material change for a licensed mAb product. F. Maslanka 2:45 58. Rituximab post approval changes and comparability assessments. R. Kiss, S. R. Chary, S. Meier, J. C. Goodrick, D. C. Andersen 3:05 Intermission. 3:15 59. Demonstrating comparability for post approval CMC changes. R. Harris 3:35 60. Comparability protocol to support a chromatography resin change. P. J. Kramer, R. Frankenberg, R. Bhat, P. Burd, A. Hetherington 3:55 61. Investigation of an ultrafiltration yield problem for a conjugate vaccine. S-M. Lee, B. Kruse, A. Robinson, J. Davis, C. Donaldson 4:15 Concluding Remarks. SectfonF BCEC 107A/B Perl man Lecture W. Zhou, Organizer 4:30 62. Prion proteins and how they fold. S. Lindquist Chemical Approaches to Protein Function Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

BCEC 108 Emerging Technologies: Nanobiotechnology Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOHW J. R. Cochran and L. Malmberg, Organizers 8:00 63. Inhibiting bacterial biofilm formation by serf-assembled monolayers of func­ tional alkanethiols on gold. S. Hou, E. A. Burton, K. A. Simon, D. Blodgett, Y-Y. Luk, D. Ren 8:20 64. Development of electrospun scaf­ folds for application to medical devices. R. Delaporte, H. Yesilalan, R. Skowyra, G.Cadd 8:40 65. Polymersome encapsulated hemo­ globin: A novel type of hemoglobin-based oxygen earner. A. F. Palmer 9:00 66. A novel, biomimetJc hydrogel con­ struct to repair the cornea: Molecular design and biological response. D. Myung, J. R. Cochran, J. Noolandi, C.N.Ta, C.W.Frank 9:20 Intermission. 9:35 67. Multifunctional titanium-binding peptides for rapid modification of implant surfaces. X. Khoo, D. J. Kenan, M. W. Grinstaff 9:55 68. Effects of platinum and gold nano partides on osteoblast cells: A study of nanoparticles' cancer treatment potential. Y. Sun, D. Katz, T. Fraczak, N. Pemodet, M. Rafailovich, J. Sokolov 10:15 69. Degradable nanoparticle gene carriers for efficient and versatile nonviral gene delivery. S. Lu, Y. J. Kwon 10:35 70. Assembly of PEI/DNA nanopar­ ticles for gene delivery by microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing. C-G. Koh, Z. Fei, J. Guan, Y. Xie, L. J. Lee SectJonB BCEC 107A/B Downstream Processing: Advances in Chromatography A. M. Lenhoff and S. Ghose, Organizers 8:00 71. Are high capacity and high selectiv­ ity mutually exclusive? New approaches to the chromatographic resin game. J. Rasmussen 8:20 72. Microstructure and retention proper­ ties of dextran-grafted agarose media. H. Koku, B. D. Bowes, A. M. Lenhoff 8:40 73. Use of displacement chromatogra­ phy for proteomic applications. S. T. Evans, A. S. Freed, M. Piatt, S. M. Cramer 9:00 74. High performance chromatofocusing as a novel analytical method to support process comparability and product charac­ terization. X. Kang, J. Kutzko, M. Hayes, D. Frey 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 75. Membrane adsorber technology for trace impurity removal applications. M. W. Phillips, C. Teske, R. Specht, M. Kozlov, W. Moya 10:00 76. Validation of host cell protein removal in purification processes of biopharmaceutical manufacturing. C. Jiang, J. Ma, M. Rubacha, S. Lee, A. A. Shukla 10:20 77. Profiling metal binding E. coli proteins: Its use in purification process development. R. Varakala, R. Haley, R. Henry, M. M. Ataai, R. R. BeitJe 10:40 78. Affinity adsorption of viruses using small peptide ligands. C. L Heldt, P. V. Gurgel, L-A. Jaykus, R. G. Carbonell

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 79. Alleviation of extracytoplasmic stress for improving cell physiology and recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli. C. P. Chou 8:30 80. Metabolic activities of novel induc­ ible fermentations for recombinant thera­ peutic proteins. M. Berge, R. Georgescu 8:50 81. Fast track first-in-human develop­ ment of novel therapeutic proteins with a robust microbial fermentation platform. X. Yang, B. Pendleton 9:10 82. Using the two population theory to design an inducer feeding schedule to maximize recombinant DNA protein expression in Escherichia coli. J. M. Gonzalez, J. T. Hsu 9:30 83. Mixture design for optimization of fermentation medium for cutinase produc­ tion from Colleotrichum lindemuthianum. V. Shah, F. J. Rispoli 9:50 84. Efficient antibody production with suppressing O-Glycosylation in yeast. K. Kobayashi, K. Kuroda, H. Tsumura, T. Komeda, Y. Chiba, Y. Jigami, K. Ichikawa, K. Nonaka, T. Suzuki 10:10 Concluding Remarks. Section D BCEC 107C Upstream Processing: Advances in Biocatalysls P. C. Cirino and L. Sun, Organizers 8:00 85. Efficient synthesis of simvastatin using whole-cell biocatalysis. Y. Tang, X.Xie 8:20 86. Enzyme-carbon nanotube conju­ gates in room temperature ionic liquids. B. Eker, P. Asuri, S. Murugesan, R. J. Linhardt, J. S. Dordick 8:40 87. Exploiting phenotypic diversity through global transcription machinery engineering. D. Klein-Marcuschamer, G. Stephanopoulos 9:00 88. High-throughput zcreening for methionyl-tRNA synthetases that enable residue-specific incorporation of noncanonical amino acids into recombinant proteins in bacterial cells. T. H. Yoo, D.A.Tirrell 9:20 Intermission. 9:35 89. What controls enantioselectivity for carbonyl reductase. L Hua, D. Zhu, Y. Yang, T. H-Y. Pan 9:55 90. Hydration effects on the active site and catalytic performance of organicsoluble subtilisin in octane. E. P. Hudson, J. S. Dordick, J. A. Reimer, D. S. Clark 10:15 91. Synthesis of anti-obesity stilbene derivatives using engineered microbial bbcatalysts: Structure-function analysis of {alpha}-glucosidase inhibition potency. E. Leonard, K-H. Urn, C-G. Urn, J. Chemler, M. Koffas 10:35 92. Biotransformations on solid-sup­ ported substrates. S. Brooks, L Coulombel, U. Akbar, D. S. Clark, J. S. Dordick

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Industrial Biotechnology Award Lecture

Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC Pfizer Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 108 Stem Cells: Engineering the Embryonic and Adult Stem Cell Niche A. Khademhosseini and B. Rao, Organizers 3:00 94. Matrix and environmental control of stem cell outcomes for tissue engineering. D. L Kaplan, H. J. Kim, X. Wang, X. Wang, C. Vepari, A. Murphy, I. Georgakoudi 3:30 95. The effect of cell density and oxy­ gen level on culture for rodent multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs). Y. Park, F. Ulloa, C. Verfaillie, W-S. Hu 3:45 96. cAMP induced neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: Real differen­ tiation or pseudo-differentiation? L Zhang, C.Chan 4:00 97. Effects of scaffold porosity and pore size on cell entrapment, attachment, distribution and proliferation in 3-D cell culture system. R. Ng, S-T. Yang 4:15 Intermission. 4:30 98. Ex vivo expansion of human hema­ topoietic stem/progenitor cells in a human stromal-based culture system. C. Lobato da Sih/a, R. Goncalves, M. Lemos, F. Lemos, G. Almeida-Porada, J. Cabrai 4:45 99. Multiparameter flow cytometric assay to monitor the activation of cytokine signaling pathways in specific subsets of primary erythroid cells. W. Wang, J. Audet Section Β BCEC 107A/B Downstream Processing: Bioprocess Integration & Industrial Case-Studies M. R. Ladisch and C. Liu, Organizers 3:00 100. CSAF: Constant shear affinity filtration technology. P. Francis, E. von Lieras, F. Taghipour, B. D. Bowen, C. A. Haynes 3:20 101. Production of enantiopure mol­ ecules by integration of SMB technology and biocatalysis. M. Bechtold, S. Makart, S. Panke 3:40 102. Considerations for large scale extraction of monoclonal antibodies tar­ geted to different subcellular compart­ ments in transgenic tobacco plants. S. Hassan, C. van Dolleweerd, J. Ma, W. Liu, C. R. Thomas, E. Keshavarz-Moore 4:00 Intermission. 4:20 103. Evaluating and minimizing water usage and wastewater ceneration in integrated bioprocesses using process simulation and scheduling tools. D. Petrides, C. Siletti 4:40 104. Development and implementation of a manufacturing scale virus filtration step for monoclonal antibody production. J. F. Hsii, C. Dowd 5:00 105. Humira after launch: Opportunities and challenges in downstream process. M. Wan, F. Gaibor, M. Schrader, R. M. Boychyn, E. Lundell, G. Avgerinos

TECH-1Q

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

BIOT

TUESDAY MORNING

Section C

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

BCEC 106

Section A

BCEC 106

Section A

Upstream Processing: Advances in

BCEC 109A

Biophysical and Biomolecular Symposium: Protein Chemical Instability

BCEC 109A

Development

Emerging Technologies: Bioenergy

E. M. Topp and M. Cromwell, Organizers

Emerging Technology Keynote Lecture

X. Yang, M. Laird, and D. Ren, Organizers

M. R. Ladisch and C. E. Wyman, Organizers

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 133. Chemical stability of proteins in injectable drug delivery systems. F. Okumu 8:25 134. Fragmentation within human lgG1 hinge region: Two distinct mechanisms, two different outcomes. J. Vlasak, C. E. Price, S. L. Cohen 8:45 135. Gamma irradiation-induced damage in proteins and peptides. S-X. Xie, T. D. Williams, D. Willey, E. M. Topp 9:05 136. Impact of degradations on bioactivrty: A reflection from a monoclonal antibody. B. L Yu, A. Vizel, M. Young, A. Morando, B. He 9:25 Intermission. 9:45 137. Selective protein oxidation through reactive oxygen species: Catalysis by cysteine. C. Schoneich 10:05 138. Using solution NMR to probe the effects of excipients on protein stability. J. S. Laurence 10:25 139. Effect of residual moisture content on the stability of dried Apo2L/TRAIL crystals. H. Flores, A. S. Ressurreiçao, Β. Zhang, Β. Kabakoff, Ζ. Shahrokh, Μ. Ε. Μ. Cromwell 10:45 140. Protein stability at solid sub­ strates: Influence of chemical and thermal excursions. G. Anand, G. Belfort

H. Zhao and R. Srivastava, Organizers

Section C

3:00 Introductory Remarks. 3:05 106. "Seeing the lighf with cell-free protein synthesis. A. R. Goerke, A. M. Loening, S. Gambhir, J. R. Swartz 3:25 107. Enhancing extracellular protein secretion in Escherichia coli by translation engineering. P. Gupta, P. S. Lee, K. H. Lee 3:45 108. Developing high throughput screening methods for multiple phenotype evaluation. B. Wang, Y. Zhang, G. N. Stephanopoulos 4:05 109. Metabolic and process engineering of Propionibacterium acidipropionici for enhanced propionic acid fermentation. A. Zhang, S-T. Yang 4:25 110. Production of sophorolipid from cooking oil waste through fermentation. V.Shah 4:45 Panel Discussion. 5:30 Concluding Remarks. Section D BCEC 107C Commercialization of Biologies: Data Management & Process Modeling in Support of Commercial Processes J. Prior and S. Ahuja, Organizers 3:00 111. Multivariate analysis of transition analysis calculations applied to evaluate trends and changes in chromatography column packed bed integrity at BiogenIdec. B. Gilbert 3:20 112. Application of multivariate analysis toward biotech processes: Case study of a cell-culture unit operation. A. S. Rathore, A. Kirdar 3:40 113. Production planning, scheduling, and debottlenecking practices in the biopharmaceutical industries. C. Siletti, D. Petrides 4:00 Intermission. 4:20 114. Case study: Applying the Six Sigma methodology to a commercial cell culture process. R. Davis, S. Ahuja, M. Herwig, K. Hwang 4:40 115. Strategies for integrating spectral data from raw materials to control biopharmaceutical manufacturing. J. Wei, M. Kiistala, M. Lanan, J. Ganguly 5:00 116. Use of mathematical models to determine the effect of various raw materi­ als on mammalian cell culture perfor­ mance at commercial-scale. S. Jain, B. Schilling, A. A. Shukla, S. Lee SectJonE BCEC 107A/B Industrial Keynote Symposium W. Chen, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 117. Keynote Address. B. Adamson Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, andBTEC Nano-Btochemistry and Technology Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOT, BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL Undergraduate Research Poster Session Biochemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by BIOT, SOCED, and BIOL

20-TECH

8:00 118. Commercialization of biomass processing: A consolidated approach. M. Moniruzzaman 8:20 119. Comparative hydrolysis, fermenta­ tion, and economic information for applica­ tion of leading pretreatment technologies to com stover and poplar. C. E. Wyman, B. Yang, B. E. Dale, R. Elander, M. Holtzapple, M. R. Ladisch, Y. Y. Lee, C. Mitchinson, J. N. Saddler 8:40 120. Mechanisms of plant cell wall deconstruction as a function of pretreat­ ment and enzyme hydrolysis. M. Zeng, N. Mosier, C. E. Wyman, M. R. Ladisch 9:00 121. Efficient ethanol production with engineered microorganisms. C. T. Trinh, F.Srienc 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 122. Two-stage continuous fermentation of cellulose to ethanol. C. Uu, J. Bardsley, C. E. Wyman 10:00 123. Butanol fermentation by Clos­ tridium acetobutylicum immobilized in a fibrous bed bioreactor. W-L. Chang, S-T. Yang 10:20 124. Enzymatic synthesis of biomassbased fuel methanol. P. Wang, F. S. Baskaya, M. C. Rfckinger 10:40 125. Long-term hydrogen production from robust nongrowing Rhodopseudomonas palusths coatings and strategies for increased hydrogen production. J. L Gosse, B. J. Engel, A. S. Al-Homoud, C. S. Harwood, M. C. Flickinger

Section D BCEC 108 Upstream Processing: Advances in Metabolic Engineering J. March and I. S. Aldor, Organizers

Section Β BCEC 107C Downstream Processing: Advances in

A. M. Lenhoff and S. Ghose, Organizers 8:00 126. Post Protein A removal of contami­ nants from monoclonal antibodies with a multimodal anion exchanger. K. Eriksson, A. Ljunglôf, G. Rodrigo 8:20 127. Removal of HMW species using AEX in the weak partitioning mode for antibodies and related proteins. S. A. ToWer, A. Noyés, P. R. Brown, M. Switzer, B. Kelley 8:40 128. Advances in membrane affinity chromatography for the recovery of antibodies. C. Bol, S. Dimartino, G. C. Sarti 9:00 129. The use of modeling tools for the efficient purification process development. D. Dong, T. Gervais, D. Tran, N. Quinlan, A. Velayudhan, P. Aired, P. Alfonso 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 130. Modeling-based rational approach to purify proteins: A case study. B. K. Nfor, T. Ahamed, M. Ottens, E. J. A. X. van de Sandt, M. H. M. Eppink, G. W. K. van Dedem, L. A. van der Wielen 10:00 131. Investigation of protein binding in ion exchange systems with protein charge ladders and homologous protein libraries. W. K. Chung, Y. Hou, J. J. Keba, G. Makhatadze, S. M. Cramer 10:20 132. Analysis and prediction of protein adsorption isotherms from interaction data. X. Xu, A. M. Lenhoff

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 141. Application of metabolic flux and logarithmic sensitivity analysis for optimiza­ tion of A. niger medium. R. Gheshlaghi, J. M. Scharer, M. Moo-Young 8:25 142. Proteome map of Aspergillus nidulans during osmoadaptation. Y. Kim, M. P. Nandakumar, M. R. Marten 8:45 143. Nanofactories for synthesis and delivery of signaling molecules: A tool for engineering metabolism. R. Fernandes, C-Y. Tsao, C. W. Yung. W. E. Bentley 9:05 144. Engineering signal transduction for treating type 1 diabetes. J. March, F. Duan 9:25 Intermission. 9:45 145. Development of a melanin-based screen for tyrosine production in Escherichia coli. C. N. S. Santos, G. N. Stephanopoulos 10:05 146. Engineering synthetic pathways for production of butanol as biofuels. S. Atsumi, J. C. Uao 10:25 147. Intracellular enzyme crosslinking: Toward multifunctional enzyme machines for the production of R-1,2-propanediol. R. J. Conrado, M. DeLisa 10:45 148. Toward microbial synthesis of glucaric acid. T. S. Moon, A. Lanza, L. Octavio, K. Jones Prather SectJonE BCEC 107C Marvin J. Johnson Award Lecture W. Zhou, Organizer 11:30 149. Molecular bioprocessing from design to discovery to dreams. J. S. Dordick

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, andBTEC

2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 150. Energy from biomass: Anticipating a revolution. L R. Lynd Section Β BCEC 107C Upstream Processing: Advances in Cell Culture Process Development S. T. Sharfstein, I. Blumentals, and G. Maheshwari, Organizers 3:00 Introductory Remarks. 3:05 151. Leveraging process characteriza­ tion and validation data for continuous process improvement. M. Luu, R. Kiss, S. Meier 3:25 152. Inhibitory threshold values of lactate, ammonia, carbon dioxide, and osmolality in CHO cell culture for a thera­ peutic protein production. Z. Xing, Z. Li, V. Chow, S. S. Lee 3:45 153. Scale-up of mammalian cell cul­ tures controlled by automated flow cytom­ etry. G. Sitton, F. Srienc 4:05 Intermission. 4:20 154. Metabolic process engineering applied to cell culture production pro­ cesses. Β. Μ. Schilling, A. A. Shukla, S.Lee 4:40 155. Investigating limitations during process development at reduced perfusion rates. H. Drouin, S. Lanthier, A. Kamen, J. M. Piret, Y. Durocher 5:00 156. High-throughput cell culture pro­ cess development using 3-D microbioreactors and online quantifications of cell growth and GFP expression. X. Zhang, Y. Wen, S-T. Yang 5:20 Concluding Remarks. Section C BCEC 106 Downstream Processing: Molecular

J. Thommes and Κ. Μ. Lacki, Organizers 3:00 157. Custom chromatography: Optimiz­ ing surface functionalization to meet spe­ cific separation needs. C. A. Haynes 3:20 158. Molecular dynamic investigation of the interaction of supported affinity ligands with monoclonal antibodies. L Zamoto, V. Busini, D. Moiani, D. Moscatelli, C. Cavallotti 3:40 159. Construction and study of porous polymer media for ion-exchange adsorp­ tion by molecular dynamics modeling and simulations. E. Riccardi, J.-C.Wang, A. I. Liapis 4:00 Intermission. 4:20 160. Investigation of ligand-protein binding affinity in ion exchange chromatog­ raphy. T. Yang, W. K. Chung, S. A. McCallum, J. Kempf, S. M. Cramer 4:40 161. Molecular level inspection of viral clearance and membrane adsorbers. W.T.Riordan, M.R.Etzel 5:00 162. Modeling of protein monomer/ aggregate separation using Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography: Effects of column scale. J. T. McCue

BIOT Section D

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section C

Section Ε

BCEC 108

Section A

BCEC 106

BCEC 107A/B

Commercialization of Biologies: Impact of Design Space Philosophy & Emerging Regulations on Process Validation

BCEC 108 Emerging Technologies: Systems Biology Cosponsored by BIOHW

Characterization and Improvement of Platforms to Aid Commercialization of Biologies

W. Zhou, Organizer

C. Chan and C. Cho, Organizers

S. Gadam and F. Olsen, Organizers

8:00 176. Scaffold proteins tune the regula­ tory properties of protein kinase cascades. J.W.Locasale 8:20 177. Molecular systems biology via multiscale modeling and high-performance computing. J. Purvis, Y. Liu, A. Shih, N. Agrawal, R. Radhakrishnan 8:40 178. Predicted points of cell-cycle fragility are consistent with known malfunc­ tions in solid and hematological cancers. S. Nayak, S. Salim, J. D. Varner 9:00 179. Transcription analysis with gene expression and network connectivity data. M. P. Brynildsen, L M. Tran, T-Y. Wu, S-S. Jang, J. C. Liao 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 180. Genome-scale metabolic analysis of bacteriophage infected Escherichia coli. R. Jain, R. Srivastava 10:00 181. Elucidating and filling gaps in genome-scale metabolic networks. V. SatJsh Kumar, M. S. Dasika, C. D. Maranas 10:20 182. Metabolic network inference based on probabilistic modeling of meta­ bolic profiles. J. Yoon, K. Lee 10:40 183. Isotopically nonstationary flux analysis using an elementary metabolite unit (EMU) framework. J. L Walther, J. D. Young, M. R. Antoniewicz, H. Yoo, G. Stephanopoulos

8:00 192. A systems approach to character­ ization, validation and monitoring of com­ mercial processes. A. A. Shukla, S. Lee 8:20 193. Systematic and logical strategies to reduce process scale-up and technol­ ogy transfer challenges from process development to manufacturing. T-S. Lee, M. McGill, P. Thompson 8:40 194. Evaluation of process and product impact of UVC treatment on a MAb pro­ cess. R. S. Rosenthal 9:00 195. Viral clearance strategies using improved membrane adsorbers. W.T.Riordan, M R . Etzel 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 196. Standardization of purification process development for mAbs & Fcfusion proteins. R. GodavarU, G. Bolton, J. Booth, P. R. Brown, J. Coffman, C. Esenther, C. Gallo, T. Iskra, S. Sun, M. Switzer, S. A. Tobler, R. Wright, B. Kelley 10:00 197. Characterization of a reversed phase chromatography step. X. Hu, A. Wang, Y. Lu, Ο. Kaltenbrunner 10:20 198. Strategies for maximizing the clearance of impurities across an anion exchange flow through step in the context of an integrated antibody purification process. A. Kundu, A. Miller, J. EinerwokJ, M. Xia, R. Duffy, W. Zhou 10:40 199. Platform ultrafiltration process development: Charge and conductivity effects on ultrafiltration performance of monoclonal antibodies. A. S. Len, R. van Reis

G. Knipp, K. Webber, and A. Kataria, Organizers 3:00 163. Efficient approach to setting valida­ tion acceptance criteria for a biopharmaceirtical process. T. Gleason, R. Burdick, S. Rausch, J. E. Seely 3:20 164. A systematic method for design space definition. R. D. Hegedus 3:40 165. Apply design space philosophy in the establishment of process validation parameters and acceptance criteria. X. Wang, J. Harms, P. Van Hoek, A. S. Rathore 4:00 Intermission. 4:20 166. Quality by design and process analytical technology for freeze drying. M. Pikal 4:40 167. Critical process parameters and design space. P. W. Wojciechowski 5:00 168. Use of online Process Analytical Technology (PAT) to monitor Maytansinoid conjugation to modified antibodies: Impli­ cations in establishing robust processes for manufacturing disulfide-linked immunoconjugates. I. M. Schwartz, S. Gohain, D. C. Pentia, G. Amphlett, D. H. Meshulam, G. Malin Section Ε BCEC 109A Upstream Processing: Advances in

J. March and I. S. Aldor, Organizers 3:00 169. Incorporation of thermodynamics and metabolomics data into constraintbased model of Methylobacterium extorquons AM1. R. E. Osterhout, M. van der Werf, S. Van Dien 3:20 170. Metabolic engineering of natural and unnaturalflavonokJbiosynthesis in microorganisms and their application for diabetes treatments. J. Chemler, M. Koffas, E. S. Tzanakakis, Y. Yan, E. Leonard, Z. Fowler, L. T. Lock 3:40 171. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced uptake and sequestration of arsenic. M. Shen, S. Singh, D. Shah, W. Lee, W. Chen, N.A.DaSirva 4:00 172. Metabolic flux elucidation for large-scale models: 13C labeled isotope experiments and experimental design. P. F. Suthers, A. P. Burgard, M. S. Dasika, F. Nowroozi, S. Van Dien, J. D. Keasling, C. D. Maranas 4:20 Intermission. 4:30 173. Biosynthesis of fosfomycin. Z. Shao, R. Woodyer, H. Zhao 4:50 174. Probing the supply-side attributes of different metabolically engineered host backgrounds. D. Cunningham, N. Domagalski, R. Koepsel, M. M. Ataai, M. M. Domach 5:10 175. Growth-phase accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in Escherichia coil A prospectus for continuous production. K. E. Tyo, G. N. Stephanopoulos 5:30 Concluding Remarks. Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, andBTEC Mechanism of Action of Natural Products Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW Visualization of Biological Processes at the Molecular Level Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, PHYS, and BIOHW RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY,

Section Β BCEC 107A/B Biophysical and Biomotocular Symposium: Targeted Delivery of Proteins & Nucleotides C. Meares, W. Uu, and A. Blake-Haskins, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 184. (R-Ahx-R)4 cell-penetrating pep­ tide enhances the in vivo delivery of antisense morpholino oligomers. H. M. Moulton, N. Jearawiriyapaisam, S. Fletcher, B. W. Neuman, R. Kole, W. Steve, M. Buchmeier, P. L. Iversen 8:25 185. Mutant glycosyltransferases assist in linking glycoconjugates via glycan chains: Development of a targeted drug delivery system and contrast agents for MRI. P. K. Qasba, E. Boeggeman, B. Ramakrishnan 8:45 186. A new gene delivery method based on yeast cell wall particles. E. Soto, G.Ostroff 9:05 187. Reversing the nudeophile and electrophile for covalent affinity capture. D. D. Singh, M. R. McCoy, Z. Miao, O. L Hsu, C. Meares 9:25 Intermission. 9:40 188. D-galactose receptor-targeted in vivo spectral fluorescence molecular imaging of peritoneal metastasis. H. Kobayashi, Y. Hama, A. J. Gunn, Y. Koyama, Y. Urano, P. L Choyke 10:00 189. Design of novel non-viral gene vector based on head-tail type potycation block copolymer. A. Harada, M. Kawamura, Y. Kimura, C. Kojima, K.Kono 10:20 190. In vivo RNAi: New concepts and applications of siRNA-based therapeutic agents. Τ. Μ. Rana 10:40 191. Potent immunoconjugates for cancer therapy. P. D. Senter

Elmer Gaden Award Lecture

Section D BCEC 107C Upstream Processing: Advances in Cell Culture Process Development S. T. Sharfstein, I. Blumentals, and G. Maheshwari, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 200. High-producing CHO-GS and NS0-GS cell line generation and charac­ terization using Cell Xpress(TM) technol­ ogy. N. Un, G. Richardson, L Davis, K. Lacy, M. Gray, J. Cresswell, A. Dennett, M. Gerber, M. Capte, K. Kayser 8:25 201. Developments in using the ACE System to generate high MAb expressing, stable CHO cell lines. M. L Kennard 8:45 202. Proteomic and genomic studies of mammalian cell physiology to optimize production of therapeutic and diagnostic proteins. D. Shen, T. R. Kiehl, S.T. Sharfstein 9:05 Intermission. 9:25 203. Impact of scale and bioreactor type on cell growth, productivity, product quality, and global gene expression. M. A. Hanson, J. Vallejos, X. Ge, K. Brorson, A. R. Moreira, G. Rao 9:45 204. Sodium butyrate stimulates mAb over-expression in CHO cells by improving gene accessibility. Z. Jiang, S. T. Sharfstein 10:05 205. Improved analytical technique for high throughput analysis of glycoforms. M. P. Glllmeister, N. Tomiya, S. J. Jacobia, Y. C. Lee, S. F. Gorfien, M. J. Betenbaugh 10:25 Concluding Remarks.

11:30 206. Directing the assembly of multi­ functional biomolecular architectures. J. S. Dordick WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 108 BIOT Young Investigator Award Lecture W. Zhou, Organizer 2:00 207. Building proteins with new thera­ peutic functions from peptide modules. P. S. Daugherty Section Β BCEC 107B Emerging Technologies: Systems Biology Cosponsored by BIOHW C. Chan and C. Cho, Organizers 3:00 208. Dissection of the HIV promoter and possible contribution of NFKB and Sp1 to phenotypic bifurcation and latency. J. C. Burnett, A. P. Arkin, D. V. Schaffer 3:20 209. A new kinetic model reveals the synergistic effect of E-, P- and Α-sites on +1ribosomalframeshrfting. P-Y. Liao, P. Gupta, A. N. Petrov, J. D. Dinman, Κ. Η. Lee 3:40 210. Global assessment of protein turnover rates in Streptomyces coelicolor using a multitagging proteomic strategy. K. P. Jayapal, S. Sui, R. J. Philp, Y-J. Kok, M. G. Yap, T. J. Griffin, W-S. Hu 4:00 Intermission. 4:20 211. Universal Sequence Tag ARray (U-STAR) platform: A universal platform for the quantitative analysis of transcriptomes. A. P. So, C. A. Haynes 4:40 212. Proteome-wide identification of member-specific natural substrate reper­ toire of caspases and other proteases. R. Uu, C. A. Valencia 5:00 213. Cellular scale qualitative shotgun proteomic analysis of Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 isolated heterocysts and filaments under nitrogen deficient conditions using 8-piex isobaric peptide tags. S. Y. Ow, K. Stensjô, P. C. Wright, P. Lindblad Section C BCEC 106 Biophysical and Biomolecular Symposium: Targeted Delivery of & Nucleotides C. Meares and W. Liu, Organizers 3:00 Introductory Remarks. 3:05 214. N-ethoxybenzylimidazoles (NEBIs) as potential pH-sensitive linkers for drug delivery. A. Luong, S. D. Kong, G. Manorek, S. B. Howell, J. Yang 3:25 215. Selective antitumor aptamerphotodynamic agent conjugates as a tool in photochemo therapy. P. Mallikaratchy, W.Tan

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-21

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

BIOT 3:45 216. Synthesis, phototoxicity and meta­ bolic stability of porphyrins conjugated to bifunctional peptide sequences. M. G. H. Vicente, M. Sibrian-Vazquez 4:05 Intermission. 4:20 217. Optical antisense imaging of tumored mice using a fluorescent DNA duplex. X. Liu, Y. Wang, K. Nakamura, G. Liu, S. Dou, A. Kubo, M. Rusckowski, D. J. Hnatowich 4:40 218. Specific cellular delivery of quan­ tum dot-peptide and quantum dot-polymer nanoassemblies. J. B. Delehanty, D. Farrell, I. L. Medintz, H. Mattoussi 5:00 219. Transencapsidation of Semliki Forest virus RNA with tobacco mosaic virus coat protein: Evaluation of antigen expression, antigen delivery and vaccine efficiacy. A. A. McCormick, T. Corbo, J. Bemales, J. A. Lindbo, Κ. Ε. Palmer, M. L Smith Section D BCEC 107C Commercialization of Biologies: Characterization and Improvement of Platforms to Aid Commercialization of Biologies S. Gadam and F. Olsen, Organizers 3:00 220. Development and implementation of a robust chemically-defined and highyielding GS-CHO platform mAb production process. S. A. Casnocha 3:20 221. Use of mathematical modeling to enable effective implementation of platform aeration strategies in process scale-up and transfer. G. Nyberg, F. Jimenez, F. Olsen, G. Grampp 3:40 222. Robustness screening to enable cell culture process commercialization. A. M. Rusiniak, T. Wang, G. Miroquesada 4:00 Intermission. 4:20 223. Process improvement through media development. W. Wenge 4:40 224. Rapid development of mammalian cell production process of clinical material for proof of principle of novel therapeutic molecules. J. Zhu, Y. Xie, V. V. Vyas, B. Keseling, J. Roach, G. Mitra, S. P. Creekmore 5:00 225. Rapid upstream commercial devel­ opment of an Escherichia coli.-based process for producing therapeutic proteins in inclusion bodies. H. Lin, I. Liu, H. Barkhordarian, J. Lull, X. Yang Section Ε BCEC 108 Biophysical and Biomolecular Symposium: Protein Aggregation C. J. Roberts and A. Grillo, Organizers 3:00 226. Biophysical characterization of the amylin-derived peptide pramlintide. A. Nonoyama, J. S. Laurence, L Garriques, H. Qi, T. Le, C. R. Middaugh 3:20 227. Silicone oil contamination of thera­ peutic protein formulations: Surfactant and protein effects. J. Gabrielson, D. G. Bates, B. M. Williams, J-B. Hamel, J. F. Carpenter, T. W. Randolph 3:40 228. Self-interaction chromatography applied to the rapid development of formu­ lation for therapeutic proteins. H. Kornmann, N. Collet, G. Baer 4:00 Intermission. 4:20 229. Stability of a heterogeneous lgG1 antibody with atypical glycosylate: A comparison between individual and mix­ tures of its glycoforms. G. C. Chu, S. Β. Coulibaly, Η. Κ. Khor 4:40 230. Discrepancies in the phase behav­ iors of therapeutic antibodies. B. Salinas, S. Hasige, C. Allan, S. Bishop, A. Shah, J. F. Carpenter, T. W. Randolph 5:00 231. Chemometric approach toward protein aggregation propensity. M. C. Manning, C. M. Van Pelt, R. R. Meglen, F. J. Stevens Symposium in Honor of Perry Frey Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW

22-TECH

WEDNESDAY EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Poster Session Upstream Processing Y. Tang, S. Ozturk, and S. Subramanian, Organizers 5:30-7:30 232. Role of astroglial fatty acid metabolism in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: A metabolic flux analysis (MFA) study. S. Patil, C. Chan 233. Suppression of PKR activity mediates the apoptosis induced by palmitic acid and TNF-a in HepG2 cells. X. Yang, C. Chan 234. Studies on novel optimization param­ eters for production of protease using response surface methodology. A. I. R. Chaduvula, Κ. Κ. Nalla, M. Y. Nikku, S. B. Imandi, S. K. Karanam, I. Yedluri 235. Evaluating biopharmaceutical economics and capacity with process modeling and simulation. A. Koulouris, C. Siletti, D. Petrides 236. Monitoring the expression of biosynthetic pathway genes in Catharanthus roseus hairy root cultures under optimum elicitation conditions. S. Goklany, R. H. Loring, C. W. Lee-Parsons 237. Analysis of suspended and biofilm atrazine degrading cells. N. K. Biglione, V. G. Rodgers, T. L. Peoples 238. Biosynthesis and application of colorants from fungi. F. Alihosseini, G. Sun 239. The evolution of a disposable stirred tank bioreactor at Centocor. From concept to GMP implementation. W. Christian, R. Bhatia, N. Richardson, S. Ozturk 240. Biotransformation of steroids by Exophiala jeanselmei var. lecanii comi. K. P. McCook, P. B. Reese 241. Multiplex transcript analysis for identify­ ing high-producing cell lines. C. J. Lee, G. Seth, J. Tsukuda, R. W. Hamilton 242. ReBiT, a database for enzymatic path­ way design. C. H. Martin, D. Prather, K. Jones Prather 243. Construction of ptb disrupted mutant for characterization of its function in Clos­ tridium tyrobutyricum fermentation. Y.Zhang, S-T. Yang 244. Biotransformation of steroids by Thielaviopsis paradoxa. F. A. Russell, P. B. Reese 245. Continuous perfusion process in a dis­ posable stirred-tank bioreactor: A case study. B. Chiang, N. Richardson, H. Haddock, C. Wood, R. Bhatia, S. Ozturk 246. Screening of strains for bioconversion from DL-ATC to L-cysteine. T. Dong, Z. Lin, Y. Huang 247. Development of generic feed media for protein production in contract manufactur­ ing. G. Wang 248. Enhancement of mass transfer in a 250 L bioreactor by sparger design modifica­ tion. C. Wood, H. Haddock, B. Cottee, S. Ozturk 249. Fed-batch process development: A platform-based approach. K. Stoeber, C. Ranucci, N. Villani 250. Fluid mixing practice for bioreactor scale-up and scale-down. R. D. LaRoche 251. Host system choice challenges bioprocessing of plant-derived therapeutics. L. R. Wilken, S. Woodard, G. Barros, S. White, Z. L. Nikolov 252. Implementing an automated reactor sampling system for monitoring cell culture bioreactors. L. Speciner, G. Barringer, J. Perez, C. Grimaldi, R. Reineke, A. Arroyo 253. Physiological characterization of Saccnaropolyspora erythraea deletion strains: Global and pathway specific regulators. I. A. Akinrinsola 254. Production of Galacto-oligosaccharides from whey lactose by using two-step Plug-Flow Reactor with immobilized enzyme β-Galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae and Bacillus circulans and posterior chromatographic separation. J. I. Sanz Valero, S-T. Yang

255. Rapid enhancement of antibody produc­ tion through DOE-based hydrolysate supplementation of an optimized base medium. C. Hunt, K. Hammett, T. Hill, T. Oshunwusi, S. Holdread, Y. Bai, J. W. Brooks 256. Simultaneous determination of multiple components in CHO cell culture using raman spectroscopy. S. Varma, S. Sakhamuri, M. Hausladen, Z. Li, S. S. Lee 257. Strategies for implementation of a new bioprocess container in commercial biolog­ ies manufacturing. R. Marcklinger, C. Williamson, J. Gates, A. A. Shukla, S.Lee 258. Toward reproducible and optimal opera­ tion of mammalian cell cultures: A model based approach for fault detection and isolation. S. Karra, M. N. Karim 259. Using CFD to model gas transfer in bioreactors. W. J. Kelly, J. Anderson 260. Improvement of the bleachability and brightness of wheat straw chemomechanical pulp with a pretreatment of xylanase from Trichoderma reesei. F. Hong 261. Using MAb enhancing compounds to investigate the MAb production pathway. T. D. Rau, R. R. Balcarcel 262. Analysis of gene dosage effects for metabolic engineering in Escherichia coli. N. Negron Rodriguez, K. Schumacher, K. Jones Prather 263. Analysis of substrate metabolism for an immobilized CYP2C9 construct: A poten­ tial bioreactor application. L Wollenberg, J. L. Kabulski, T. S. Tracy, D. Lederman, P. M. Gannett 264. Isolation and identification of acetic acid bacteria from Shanxi superior mature vinegar in China. N. Yang, L Hao 265. Effect of β-Mercaptoethanol on the fed-batch performance of GS-NS0 cells. Z. Naji, S. Fries, M. Chartrain, C. Seamans 266. Engineering of an L-arabinose metabolic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum. M. Sasaki, H. Kawaguchi, S. Okino, T. Jyojima, M. Inui, H. Yukawa 267. Novel large-scale production of geneti­ cally engineered elastin-like-biopolymer and endotoxin-binding peptide fusion for neutralization of endotoxin. W. Jia, Y. Lei 268. Establishment of a Wave™ bioreactor scale-down model for process develop­ ment and characterization studies. S. F. Khattak, S. Sakhamuri, Z. U, S. Lee 269. Expression of recombinant human eryth­ ropoietin having more complex N-glycans in Drosophila S2 cells through hexosamini­ dase inhibition. Y. K. Kim, K. R. Kim, Y. H. Kim, H. J. Cha 270. Inhibiting the apoptosis pathway using MDM2 in mammalian cell cultures. N. Arden, B. S. Majors, S-H. Ahn, G. A. Oyler, M. J. Betenbaugh 271. Monitoring of glucose in cell culture by glucose binding protein (GBP) combined with ultraslow microdialysis. X. Ge, M. A. Hanson, G. Rao, L. Tolosa 272. The impact of residual air in bioreactor sterilization. W. J. Kelly, S. Hannon, M. Paddock, T. B. Vickroy 273. Optimization of monoclonal antibody production using process simulation and scheduling tools. V. Papavasileiou, D. Petrides, C. Siletti 274. Proteomic investigation of elicited Eschscholzia californica cultures producing enhanced levels of benzophenanthridine alkaloids. J. T. Oldham, M. Hincapie, T. Rejtar, J. G. Dy, C. W. Lee-Parsons 275. Rational design of main-chain elongated substrates acceptable by the E.coli ribosome. K. Mizusawa, S. Sando, Y. Aoyama

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

276. Using a global model of protein produc­ tion with substrate competition to explain the complex mRNA vs. protein relationship arising from genetic perturbations. R. S. Kuczenski, K. H. Lee 277. Recombinant baculovirus-based multiple protein expression platform for Drosophila S2 cell culture. K. R. Kim, Y. K. Kim, H. J. Cha 278. Systematic approach to troubleshooting in support of a late stage antibody manu­ facturing campaign. L Ly, M. Wyckoff, C. Lee, V. Tsang, H. Yusuf-Makagiansar 279. Reduction in high mannose glycoforms in mammalian cell culture through media optimization. N. Le, B. Pendleton 280. Development of novel sourdoughs with the use of different cereal flours. H. Hernandez-Sanchez, I. Nava-Arenas 281. Production of 14-oxo-c/s-11-eicosenoic acid from lesquerolic acid by genetically variable Sphingobacterium multivorum strains. T. M. Kuo, A. Rooney, T. A. Isbell 282. Production of D-lactic acid by the RITE bioprocess using genetically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum. S. Okino, M. Suda, M. Inui, H. Yukawa, Y. Tsuchida 283. Effects of redox buffers on the folding of disulfide containing proteins. W. J. Lees, M. Gurbhele, F. Kibria 284. Withdrawn. 285. A simple and generic immunoplatform for detecting histidine tagged proteins based on biofabrication. H-C. Wu, X. Shi, A. T. Lewandowski, C-Y. Tsao, R. Femandes, C-W. Hung, P. DeShong, E. Kobatake, G. F. Payne, W. E. Bentley Section Β BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Poster Session

Y. Tang, S. Ozturk, and S. Subramanian, Organizers 5:30-7:30 486. Critical Parameters for Efficient Tangen­ tial Flow Filter Regeneration. E. Mahajan, J. Liao, D. Ege, D. Abraham, D. Wohlpart 286. Simulation of an industrial ion exchange step: The use of simulation for robustness analysis. T. B. Hansen, L. Sejergaard, E. Hansen, S. Kidal 287. Simulation of an industrial ion exchange step: The use of simulation to yield a constant output with a variable input to a process step. S. Kidal, E. Hansen, L. Sejergaard, T. B. Hansen 288. Withdrawn. 289. Characterization of peak broadening during size-exclusion chromatography of lgG2 antibodies. A. Leuras, E. Babcock, T. Li, R. Rajan 290. Cell culture conditioning to improve harvest performance and impurity removal. M. Westoby, A. Koswara, R. Haverstock 291. Column simulations of chemically selec­ tive displacement systems. A. S. Freed, C. J. Morrison, S. M. Cramer 292. Interrelating protein precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. B. K. Nfor. K. Wiedhaup. T. Ahamed, L. A. M. van der Wielen, G. W. K. van Dedem, E. J. A. X. van de Sandt, M. H. M. Eppink, M.Ottens 293. Purification of recombinant collagen from transgenic com seed. C. Zhang, J. Baez, C. E. Glatz 294. Activation of the IRF-3 transcription factor: The mechanisms of phosphorylation-induced IRF-3 dimerization and DNA binding. A. I. Dragan, V. Hargreaves, E. N. Makeyeva, P. L. Privalov 295. Withdrawn. 296. Impact of process parameters on the performance of Normal Row Parvovirus (NFP) filters in an antibody purification process. J. Einerwold, J. Jorgensen, B. Petersen, A. Kundu 297. Stability of the bZIP homo- and heterodimers and energetics of their interac­ tions with DNA. R. Carrillo, A. I. Dragan, P. L Privalov 298. Strategies for optimizing upstream clarifi­ cation of cell culture fluids. B. Raghunath, B. Cacace, D. Yavorsky

BIOT 299. Withdrawn. 300. High throughput synthesis and screening for membrane filtration. M. Zhou, J. E. Kilduff, D. G. Anderson, R. S. Langer, G.Belfort 301. Investigation of chemically selective displacers using robotic high throughput screening, SPR, NMR and MD simulations. C. J. Morrison, S. A. McCallum, R. Godawat, J. Moore, S. Garde, S. M. Cramer 302. Platform technology for developing purification processes. M. H. M. Eppink, R. Schreurs II, A. Gijsen, B. Kamps, K. Verhoeven 303. Rapid optimization of Protein A chromatography using a high-throughput format. A. Gronberg, F. Lindstrom, T. Bjorkman, G. Rodrigo 304. Streamline hydrophobic interaction chromatography resin screening for protein purification process development. J. Ma, P. Jorjorian, C. Mason, R. Bates 305. Bench scale cleaning characterization of drug products in afill-finishfacility. N. Rathore, N. Bhasin, P. Kolhe, R. Law, A. Abdul-Fattah, L U, W. Ji, K. Murphy 306. Regulatory strategy for changing a chromatography resin in a licensed process by the use of a comparability protocol. M. J. Rubino, P. R. DeVoe 307. Chromatographic HTS and simulation for improved process development and optimization. M. Bensch, J. Nielsen, J. Krarup, T. B. Hansen, S. Kidal, A. Stabe, J. Hubbuch, E. Hansen, L Sejergaard 308. Withdrawn. 309. AKTA Crossflow for characterization of an ultrafiltration and diafiltration step. C.W.RicheyJr. 310. Development of lab scale systems to evaluate micromixing in biological separations. J. Girard, M. P. Watson 311. ELISA based selection of elution buffer for IgG-affinity chromatography. R. Varakala, R. R. Bertie, K. Clark, T. W. Smith 312. EnantJoselective hydrolysis of epoxides in organic solvents by Beauveria bassiana. E. G. Ankudey, T. L. Peoples 313. Risk mitigation and optimization strategies for viral filtration. L Flansburg, R. Fomg, S. Lee, A. A. Shukla 314. Robust microscale method for yeast cell disruption in the purification of intracellular proteins. M. D. Wenger, P. DePhillips, D. G. Bracewell 315. Anomalous peak splitting of a human lgG2 mAb on HPLCSEC caused by charge variants. J. Martin, M. Dupuis, J. Kwong, G. Waszak 316. Buffer distribution capacity analysis at the pilot scale. A. Caparoni, J. B. Fletcher, J. Sinclair 317. Characterization of a new IgG binder adsorbent. P. Adielsson, S. Eriksson, F. Alamravesh, H. Wlad, J. Fârenmark 318. Characterization of cation exchange adsorbents for monoclonal antibody purification. D. Roth, C. Daniels, B. To 319. Coimmobilization of pyranose 2-oxidase, laccase, and catalase on solid supports for enhanced production of 2-keto-aldoses. R. Ludwig, P. Sukyai, T. Resic, D. Haltrich 320. Development of a high throughput purification method for analysis of cell culture samples. S. Koob, N. Barron, J. H. Chou, M. Sinacore 321. Development of a high-capacity downstream process for an NSO-derived human lgG2 based on 11-12 day fed batch fermentations with defined feed media. G. Waszak, E. Yu, M. Dupuis, J. Martin

322. Development of Biacore application for influenza virus titer determination. C. Estmer Nilsson, M. Bângtsson, A. Larsson, R. Lemmens 323. Monte-Carlo simulations of dye-labeled proteins diffusing in nanopores. J. Hohlbein, M. Steinhart, E. Hinze, C. Schiene-Rscher, C. G. Hubner, U. Gôsele 324. ELISA for Quantifying trace amount of an alkaline stabilized protein A in high concentration of mAbs. T. Bjorkman 325. High resolution anion exchange chromatography purification of oligonucleotides. J. K. O'Donnell, E. Gershenow, B. Kempf, S. Nakatani 326. Enhancing the thermostability of β-mannanase by addition of sugars, polylols and their combinations. W. Wu, Z. Uu, W. Qi, Z.He 327. Evaluation of protein A chromatography media for capture of monoclonal antibod­ ies. B. R. Nielsen, J. S. Nielsen 328. Extraction of intracellular oxalate decar­ boxylase from the white-rot wood decay fungus Trametes versicolor. C. X. Zhu, F.Hong 329. Impact of lot-to-lot variability of cation exchange resin on process performance. J. Wahome, A. Berhe, J. Jorgensen, J. Einerwold, W. Zhou, A. Kundu 330. Impact of process parameters on the performance of Normal Flow Parvovirus (NFP) filters in an antibody purification process. J. Einerwold, J. Jorgensen, B. Petersen, A. Kundu 331. Isolation, identification, and characteriza­ tion of heavy chain clips and an expressed intron in a CHO-produced mAb. M. Dupuis, J. Finnessy, J. Leone, T. Carter, J. Martin 332. Kinetics and thermodynamics of thermal inactivatJon and the thermostable mecha­ nism of protective additives for betamannanase. Z. Uu, W. Wu, W. Qi, Z. He 333. Libraries of multimodal chromatographic ion exchanger for the discovery of new selectivities and as a tool for HTPD. I. Blomqvlst, P. Adielsson, J. Fârenmark, J-L Maloisel 334. Mechanisms of protein A leaching. C. Vlcta, J. N. Franklin, P. J. McDonald, R. Fahmer 335. Novel denitrification process of electrochemical biocatalyst and its stability. J. S. Cho, J. Y. Park, Y. T. Park, Y. J. Yoo 336. Preparation and characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase-containing liposomes for improving its quaternary structure. M. Yoshimoto, M. Sato, K. Nakao 337. Process-specific range finding of chromatography resin lots used in the purification process of a recombinant product. L Lee, J. Suchecki, K. Apgar, D. Abraham 338. Production of biodiesel by transesterification with new supported solid state alkali catalyst CaO/NaY. H. Wu, Y. Zhou, J. Zhang, J. Liu 339. Successful scale-up of pH elution on cation-exchange column for the purification of monoclonal antibodies. F. Zaman, J. Glynn, N. Ramasubramanyan, P. Mensah 340. Use of analytical urtracentrifugation with a fluorescence detector to characterize high protein concentration formulations. Z. W. Kwong, J. Moore, J. Uu, Y. Shen, Q. Zhu, T. Kamerzell, T. M. Laue, S. J. Shire Section C BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Poster Session Biophysical & Blomotecular Engineering Y. Tang, S. Ozturk, and S. Subramanian, Organizers

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

5:30-7:30 341. A high-throughput genetic selection for protein folding and solubility in the bacterial periplasm. T. Manse», M. P. DeLisa 342. Creation of a fluorescent protein biosensor. E. Shusta, T. Pavoor 343. Designing AraC effector specificity through modeling and dual selection. P. C. Cirino, S-Y. Tang, H. Fazelinia, C. D. Maranas

344. Gankyrin: A general model for Ankyrin Repeat (AR) protein studies. A. Mahajan, Y. Guo, M-D. Tsai, J. U 345. High yields of complex proteins with site-specific posttranslatjonal modification using cell-free protein synthesis. A. R. Goerke, J. J. Wuu, W. Ebina, J. R. Swartz 346. Mathematical model of protein secretion incorporating pore complex sequestration by aggregated protein. R. S. Kuczenski, P. Gupta, K. H. Lee 347. New design strategies for FRET-based sensor proteins. M. Merkx, E. M. W. M. van Dongen, T. H. Evers, J. L Vinkenborg, L W. J. Klomp, E. W. Meijer 348. Protein engineering of gene switches. H. Zhao, K. Chockalingam, M. McLachlan 349. Site-specific PEGylation of interferonbeta by Cu(l)-catalyzed cycloaddition. Ν. W. Nairn, T. J. Graddis, A. Wang, K. Shanebeck, K. Grabstein 350. Withdrawn. 351. Structural stability and reactivity of bovine liver catalase modulated with liposomes. M. Yoshimoto, H. Sakamoto, K. Nakao 352. Resolution of disulfide "scrambling" through engineering of a modified form of the Nogo Receptor (NgR1) Fc fusion protein. P. H. Weinreb 353. Dendritic molecular transporters as highly targeted, controlled intracellullar delivery vectors. B. L. Evans III, K. Huang, M. Ikizler, P. F. Wright, E. Harth 354. Directed evolution of targeted cell pen­ etrating peptides for trans-BBB delivery. S. Gao, M. Simon, B. Morrison III, S.Banta 355. Hemoglobin-drug conjugates for targeted delivery of nucleoside drugs. G.Adamson, D.N. Bell 356. Ketalized polyethylenimine for tunable delivery of plasmid DNA and siRNA to intracellular targets. M. S. Shim, Y.J.Kwon 357. Polyelectrolyte multilayer films as plat­ forms for efficient siRNA delivery. S. Kidambi, S. Mehrotra, J. A. Gredell, S. P. Walton, I. Lee, C. Chan 358. Targeting mRNAs with a radiolabeled herceptin/tat/antisense MORF streptavkJin nanopartide. X. Uu, Y. Wang, K. Nakamura, A. Kubo, D. J. Hnatowich 359. The influence of different antitumor antibodies on anticancer effector accumu­ lation in solid tumors by MORF pretargeting. G. Liu, S. Dou, M. Rusckowski, D. J. Hnatowich 360. Two novel anti-TAG-72 cancer biomarkers identified by phage display. L Chen, M. Rusckowski, D. J. Hnatowich 361. Characterizing protein structure in amor­ phous solids using hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry. Y. Li, T. D. Williams, R. L Schowen, E. M. Topp 362. A highly efficient selection strategy for intracellular protein-protein interactions mediated by a unique bacterial hitchhiker transport mechanism. D. Waraho, M. P. DeLisa 363. Effects of water-miscible ionic liquids on the catalysis of horseradish peroxidase. K. Ryu, E. Hong 364. Formulation and characterization of components in vaccines. J. D. Chesko, J. Kazzaz, P. Malyala, D. O'Hagan, K. Patton, M. Singh 365. Amplification bias in competitive tem­ plates is offset through the use of proof­ reading DNA polymerases: Application to the amplification of SAGE ditags. A. P. So, C. A. Haynes 366. Dual fluorescence reporter system for studying +1 programmedribosomaJframeshifting in Escherichia coli. P-Y. Liao, K. H. Lee 367. Stabilizing protein conformations in solution with osmolytes and cosolvents. C. H. Schein 368. Highly active enzyme formulations for use in nonaqueous media. A. L Serdakowski, J. P. Lindsay, J. S. Dordick 369. Bioactive protein-based hydrogels for functional bioelectrode construction. I. WheekJon, S. Calabrese Barton, S. Banta

370. Determining antibody stability: Creation of defined interfacial effects within a high shear environment. J. G. Biddlecombe, D. G. Bracewell, B. C. Fish, S. Uddin 371. Development and validation of a novel antioxidant capacity assay using sodA::gfp as a living sensor. W. A. Lea, L Tolosa, G.Rao 372. Improved solubility and stability of cyto­ chrome c in hydrated ionic liquids. K. Fujrta, H. Ohno, D. R. MacFarlane, M. Forsyth 373. Surprising results of Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme oxygenase (pa-HO) ortho-19F phenylalanine labeling. A. Wang, M. Rivera 374. Detection of biomolecules by magnetic reporting of labeled protein nanorods. T. P. Harrah, J. Xie, J. I. Oh, M. J. Naughton, S. Sun, R. Guertin, Ε. Β. Goldberg 375. Detection of s-phase cell cycle progres­ sion using ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine incorpo­ ration with click chemistry. S. B. Buck, S. T. Clarke, J. A. Bradford, K. Gee, B. Agnew, A. Salic 376. Structure and dynamics of proteins from designed combinatorial libraries. A. Go, S. Kim, J. Baum, M. H. Hecht 377. Quantifying the effects of electrostatic forces and microstructure of protein by the change in Gibbs free energy of binding in IMAC. L. Pathange, D. Bevan, C. Zhang 378. Engineering of self-assembled vault protein nanocapsules. M. Yu, L. E. Goldsmith, V. A. Kickhoefer, L. H. Rome, H. G. Monbouquette 379. Enzyme characterization at the nano-bio interface. J. L Kabulski, L. Wollenberg, M. Yang, N. N. Wu, T. S. Tracy. D. Lederman, P. M. Gannett 380. Fibrinogen self-assembled fibrils on Clay monolayer templates. J. Koo, T. Koga, D. Galanakis, M. Rafailovich, J. Sokobv 381. Instantaneous distribution of cellular tractions duringfibroblastmigration. Z. Pan, Y. Uu, K. Ghosh, T. Nakamura, R. A. F. Clark, M. Rafailovich 382. Integrated platforms for engineered cell-cell communication via cell-directed assembly. E. C. Cames, C. E. Ashley, D. M. Lopez, C. M. Douthit, D. R. Dunphy, C. J. Brinker 383. Nanobiobased electrochemical biosen­ sors for cisplatin detection. J. E. Jett, N. N. Wu, H. U, P. M. Gannett 384. Nanotube-assisted protein inactivation. A. Joshi, S. Punyani, T. Borca-Tasçiuc, R. S. Kane 385. One pot synthesis and bbtinylation of CdS nanocrystals by incorporating intermediated protein splicing. U. L Lao, S. H. Kang, A. Mulchandani, W. Chen 386. Phytochelatin-mediated synthesis of cadmium chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals. S. H. Kang, A. Mulchandani, W.Chen 387. Proteomic characterization of E. coli metal binding proteins. R. Varakala, R. Haley, R. R. Beltle, M. M. Ataai 388. Screening the transcriptional machinery for potent artificial transcriptional activators. C. Y. Majmudar, A. K. Mapp 389. Single molecule analysis of DNA/protein interactions: The nanopore shift assay. M. Wanunu, D. Cohen-Karmi, Y. Yu, Z. Weng, A. Meller 390. Targeting gold probes to vault nanocapsule interiors using mINT "shuttles". L. E. Goldsmith, L H. Rome, H. G. Monbouquette 391. The mechanism of arginine interaction with proteins. K. Tsumoto, D. Ejima, T. Arakawa 392. Ultrafast sensing platform based on surface plasmon-coupled emission. D. S. Smith, Y. Kostov, R. Badugu, G.Rao 393. A new strategy for acylation of tRNA with unnatural substrates. H. Masu, M. Hayami, S. Sando, Y. Aoyama 394. Direct measurement of binding interactions among split inteins. M. Sorci, B. Dassa, G. Anand, S. Pietrokovski, G. Belfort 395. Development of a novel method for direct nanopatteming of bacteriophage using dip-pen nanolithography. S. F. Filocamo, C-Y. Chiang, A. M. Belcher, C. M. Mello

M-CH-2 3

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

BIOT

396. Facile and rapid direct gold surface immobilization with controlled orientation for diverse carbohydrate types. J. H. Seo, D. G. Kang, Y. K. Kim, K. R. Kim, H. Y. Lee, H. J. Cha 397. Impact of target mRNA structure on silencing efficiency and immune stimula­ tion in RNA interference. J. A. Gredell, A. Berger, S. P. Walton 398. Influence of cc-gliadin and poly(hydroxyethyl methaciylate-co-4-styrenesulfonic acid) concentrations on the structure of α-gliadin. L Liang, J-C. Leroux, M. Subirade 399. Noncovalent immobilization of proteins on a solid surface by cucurbit[7]uril- ferrocenemethylammonium pair, a potential replacement of biotin-avidin pair. K. Kim, I. Hwang, K. Baek, M. Jung, Y. Kim, K. M. Park, D-W. Lee, N. Setvapalam 400. Research of BODIPY fluorescence dyes-NHS dérivâtes with high biochemical activity. W. Dongchuan, P. Xiaojun, F. Jiang)» 401. Sensing of nucleic acid sequence using unmodified DNA/RNA as a probe. A. Narita, S. Sando, Y. Aoyama 402. Sterilizable optical sensor for alcohol measurements. Y. Kostov, G. Rao 403. Tyrosinase immobilization on carbon nanoparticles. K. S. Min, J. Y. Park, J. S. Cho, Y. J. Yoo Section D BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Poster Session Stem Ceils & Emerging Technologies Y. Tang, S. Ozturk, and S. Subramanian, Organizers

417. Characterization and isolation of neurons differentiated from mouse ES cells by DRG-conditioned medium. A. Kitazawa, N. Shimizu 418. Culture under low oxygen conditions markedly enhances differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells into cardiomyocytes. J. R. Millman, D. E. Powers, J. P. M. Mattos Almeida, C. K. Cotton 419. Engineering polymerized hemoglobins for use in transfusion medicine. A. F. Palmer 420. Enhanced albumin production by hepatic lineage cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. C-C. Hsiao, C-H. Yin, W. Chen, C-L. Chen, W-T. Wu 421. Efficient ethanol production from glucose and xylose mixture using growth-arrested Corynebacteria. S. Sakai, M. Sasaki, M. Suda, Y. Tsuchida, S. Okino, T. Jyojima, M. Inui, H. Yukawa 422. Evaluation of production of bioethanol and biodiesel from renewable resources using process simulation tools. D. Tsangaris, C. Siletti, D. Petrides 423. Heterologous expression of Hydrogenovibrio marinus NiFe-hydrogenase in Escherichia coli for biohydrogen production. J. Kim. H. J. Cha 424. Lignin blockers to reduce costs of enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated cellulose. C. E. Wyman, B. Yang, D. Willies 425. Preparation of microbial oil by fermentation for biodiesel production. Y. Mo, H. Liu, J. Zhang, X. Chen 426. Study on mild alkaline/oxidative pretreatment of bagasse. Z. Zhao, K. Cheng, J. Zhang, F. Gao THURSDAY MORNING Section A

5:30-7:30 404. Evaluation of UVC reactors using photochemically active fluorescent microspheres. A. Lewis 405. Deregulation of CAP dependent translation can play a role in the malignant transformation of eukaryotes. S. Nayak, J. K. Siddiqui, J. D. Vamer 406. Identifying toxicity pathways through analysis of global transcriptional dynamics. Z. U, S. Srivastava, C. Chan 407. Systems analysis of cellular development and apoptosis in taxus cell lines. Y-J. Yuan 408. Unsupervised classification and identification of physiologically relevant features by integrating ontology information and expression data using Bayesian regression mixture models. S. Srivastava, R. Jin, C. Chan 409. Coculture of human embryonic stem cells with murine embryonic fibroblasts on microwell patterned substrates. A. Khademhosseini, L. Ferreira, J. Blumling, J. Yeh, J. M. Karp, J. Junji Fukuda, R. Langer 410. An imaging chamber for cultures of human islets of Langerhans. D. Moogk, S. Hanley, J. Ramunas, A. Blaylock, J. Skorepova, L. Rosenberg, E. Jervis 411. System to study colony-colony interactions in murine embryonic stem cells. S. Sampattavanlch, J. Voldman 412. Effects of fiber alignment on the behavior of human dermal fibroblasts on the 3-D Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) electrospun scaffold. Y. Uu, Y. Ji, K. Ghosh, R.A.CIark,J.C.Sokolov, M. H. Rafailovich 413. Hill colonies, a putative endothelial progenitor cell derived population, are non-clonal and result from aggregation of multiple cell types as determined using long term imaging. C. S. Russell, A. Blaylock, J. Ramunas, L Kelly, E. Clarke, C. G. Pereira, A. W. Wognum, T. Thomas, A. Eaves, E. Jervis 414. Long-term expansion of embryonic stem cells in serum-free media containing plant protein hydrolysates. N. Uu, S-T. Yang 415. Application of centrifugal force to enhance cell seeding in tissue engineering scaffold. R. Ng, X. Zhang, S-T. Yang 416. Biomechanical properties of tissue engineered cartilage. F. Horkay, D. C. Lin, I. Horkayne-Szakaly, E. K. Dimitriadis, C. Silva, P. J. Basser

24-TECH

BCEC 108 Biophysical and Biomolecular Symposium: Protein Engineering G. Makhatadze and R. S. Rajan, Organizers 8:00 427. Engineering and design of repeat proteins. L Regan, A. L. Cortajarena, G. Haran 8:20 428. Enzymatic activity from a designed artificial proteome. S. C. Patei, M. H. Hecht 8:40 429. Computational procedure for transferring new binding sites into existing protein scaffolds. H. Fazeiinia, P. C. Cirino, C. D. Maranas 9:00 430. Dynamics in computational protein engineering. N. V. Dokholyan 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 431. Protein engineering of extremophilic chaperones for molecular self-assembly. T. A. Whitehead, D. S. Clark 10:00 432. Rational approaches to protein design and engineering. P. J. Reader, C. Bystroff, J. S. Dordick 10:20 433. Structure-based humanization of therapeutic antibodies. K. Hanf, Y. Li, K. Simon, L L. Chen, M. Jarpe, E. Garber, F. Taylor, L Sitvian, J. Arndt, A. Lugovskoy 10:40 434. Molecular strategy for designing robust proteins: Looking deeper at the surface. G. Makhatadze Section Β BCEC 107B Non-Chrornatographic Separation Techniques: Improving Process Throughput G. Vedantham and D. W. Wood, Organizers 8:00 435. Crystallization of therapeutic pro­ teins and antibodies at Genentech: Purifi­ cation and bulk storage applications. B. A. Bean, T. C. Matthews 8:20 436. Detergent-mediated liberation of intracellular recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) from S. cerevisiae homogenate. G. S. Kee, H. Pujar, N. Titchener-Hooker

8:40 437. Elastin-like polypeptide-intein mediated protein purification. A. R. Gillies, D. W. Wood 9:00 438. Urge-scale antibody purification using non-chromatographic methods. S. Ramanan, R. Stenson 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 439. Salt-dependent transmission of plasmid DNA through ultrafiltration mem­ branes. D. R. Latulippe, A. Zydney 10:00 440. Selective precipitation using polyelectrolytes: A novel approach to the purification of monoclonal antibodies. P. J. McDonald, J. Carter-Franklin, R. Fahmer 10:20 441. Selective precipitation-assisted recovery of immunoglobulins from bovine serum. A. Venkiteshwaran, P. Heider, G. Belfort 10:40 442. Can affinity-sinking become an alternative to affinity-chromatography? G. Patchornik Section C BCEC 106 Commercialization of Biologies: Scale-up & Process Design for Commercial Facilities: Debotttenecking and Facility Fit R. Kiss and N. Titchener-Hooker, Organizers 8:00 443. Biopharmaceutical portfolio man­ agement and capacity planning: A sto­ chastic multiobjective optimization approach. E. D. George, S. Farid 8:20 444. Gauging the technical, regulatory and financial implications of process changes. I. Hassan, M. Bulmer, J. More, S. Farid 8:40 445. Industrial case studies of debottte­ necking and future proofing through dis­ crete event simulation. P. A. Sinclair 9:00 446. Prototype software methodology for the rapid evaluation of biomanufacturing process options. S. Chhatre, R. Francis, K. O'Donovan, N. J. Titchener-Hooker, A. R. Newcombe, E. Keshavarz-Moore 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 447. Facility fit, when should it happen? J. D. Harms, A. M. Tsai, A. S. Rathore 10:00 448. Facility fit: Ensuring process performance comparability for commercial antibody processes when transferring to differently designed equipment. K. L White, R. Garcia, K. Carswell, E. Ordonez, A. Bhartiya, B. Jones, T. Renshaw, R. Kiss 10:20 449. Strategies for increasing down­ stream capacity. D. H. Peers, M. Ratna 10:40 450. Can modular construction help to address key bottlenecks in the retrofit projects? T. Kimmel Section D BCEC 107C Upstream Processing: Advances in Tissue

J. B. Leach and A. Coury, Organizers 8:00 451. Dual growth factor loaded PEGylated fibrin gels to control SMC phenotype from human MSC. C. T. Drinnan, L. J. Suggs 8:20 452. A 3-D tissue model for highthroughput drug discovery. X. Zhang, R. Ng, S-T. Yang 8:40 453. Intestinal epithelial cell response to crypt-like substrate topography. L Wang, S. K. Murthy, R. L. Carrier 9:00 454. Novel cell adhesion biomaterial based on mussel adhesive protein fused with RGD peptide. D. S. Hwang, Y. Gim, H.J. Cha 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 455. Tissue-like self assemblance of hepatocytes in vitro by manipulation of collagen. Q. Meng, J. Dai, G. Zhang 10:00 456. Anticancer drug test in tissue engineered perfusion microbioreactor array. Y. Wen, X. Zhang, S-T. Yang

10:20 457. Targeted oxygen delivery to hepatic hollow fiber bioreactors via hemo­ globin-based oxygen earners. A. F. Palmer 10:40 458. Novel systems for alginateimmobilized mammalian cell culture in bioreactors. C. A. Hoesli, K. Raghuram, M. Luu, J. Osborne, G. Korbutt, J. M. Piret THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 108 Biophysical and Biomolecular Symposium: Protein Engineering G. Makhatadze and R. S. Rajan, Organizers 2:00 459. Beyond biology: Engineering new structure and function with computational protein design. J. G. Saven 2:20 460. Directed evolution of conforma­ tional changes in peptides. M. Blenner, K. Chockalingam, S. Banta 2:40 461. Engineering allosteric inteins for use as biosensors or in bioseparations. A.R.Gillies, D.W.Wood 3:00 462. Insights into protein splicing and the engineering of inteins. B. Pereira, G. Belfort, S. Garde, V. Derbyshire, M. Belfort 3:20 Intermission. 3:40 463. Picomolar affinity fibronectin anti­ body mimics by yeast display. B. Hackel, K.D.WIttrup 4:00 464. Intracellular ribosome display for selection of synthetic antibodies in the bacterial cytoplasm. L M. Contreras Martinez, M. P. DeUsa 4:20 465. Structure-guided optimization of a therapeutic bispecrfic antibody. A. Lugovskoy, K. Hanf, B. Miller, S. Demarest, J. Michaelson, X. Wang, E. Garber, J. Browning, S. Glaser 4:40 466. Engineering protein stability using polyethylene glycol conjugation: GCSF as a case study. R. S. Rajan, T. Li, C. Sloey, M. Aras, W. Sutherland, D. N. Brems Section Β BCEC 107B Downstream Processing: High Throughput Screening in Process Development J. Coffman and G. Jagschies, Organizers 2:00 467. Chromatographic HTS and simula­ tion for improved process development and optimization. A. Staby, M. Bensch, J. Nielsen, J. C. Krarup, T. B. Hansen, S. KkJal, L. Sejergaard, E. Hansen, J. Hubbuch 2:20 468. Development and application of an automated, small-volume chromatography system for resin and condition screening. M. Teeters, D. Bezila, P. Aired, A. Velayudhan 2:40 469. Fast acquisition of bioseparation process development data from crude protein mixtures. T. Ahamed, B. K. Nfor, E. J. A. X. van de Sandt, M. H. M. Eppink, P. D. E. M. Verhaert, G. W. K. van Dedem, L. A. M. van der Wielen, M. Ottens 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 470. High throughput process develop­ ment: Determination of dynamic binding capacity using microtiter plates filled with chromatography resins. K. M. Lacki, T. Bergander, A. Gronberg, K. Ôberg 3:40 471. High throughput screening of protein A resin for purification process development. J. Booth, J. Coffman, B. Kelley

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

BIOT/BIOL 4:00 472. High throughput screening in

9:40 2. Study of direct repair of alkylation

DNA damage. C. He studies to padted bed chromatography systems. J. Hubbuch

10:20 3. Assembly, structure dynamics and function of tefomerase at the single-mol­ ecule level. X. Zhuang 11:00 4. Understanding the structural basis of the replisome function, piece by piece. T.A.Steitz

Section C BCEC 106

Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Structure-Function Correlation Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL

Bioprocessing D. D. Frey and S. Ramanan, Organizers 2:00 473. Regulatory considerations for using disposable technologies in biopro­ cessing. A. Moreira 2:20 474. A comparison of conventional and controlled freezing methods. M. Olsen 2:40 475. Disposable chromatography in antibody manufacturing: The good the bad and the ugly. U. Gottschalk 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 476. Scalability of disposable Mixer system with a single-use levitating impel­ ler. A. Terentiev 3:40 477. Use of a disposable tangential flow filtration skid to manufacture monoclonal antibodies. H. Santhanam 4:00 478. Viral clearance using disposable systems in Mab commercial downstream process. J. Zhou Section D

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Methods for Single-Molecule Detection Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Computational Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL Woifrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 109A

BCEC 107C Biophysical and Biomolecular Symposium: Protein Aggregation

Chemical Approaches to Protein Function Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW B. F. Cravatt, Organizer

T. Przybycien and M. Ricci, Organizers 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:10 479. Does one folding defect lead to another? The importance of quaternary structure in transthyretin-mediated inhibi­ tion of beta-amyloid aggregation. L Liu, J. Hou, R. M. Murphy 2:35 480. Folding, unfolding, and fibril forma­ tion of human eye lens 7C-crystallin. Y. Wang, J. King 3:00 481. Molecular insights into self-per­ petuating conformational changes of prions and amyloids. P. M. Tessler, S. Lindquist 3:25 482. Folding, misfolding, and aggrega­ tion of polyglutamine peptides and pro­ teins. M. Tobelmann, C. Lee, R. Walters, R. M. Murphy 3:50 Intermission. 4:10 483. Refolding aggregation-prone GPCRs and Q-protein α subunits from inclusion bodies expressed in Escherichia coli. E. C. McCusker, S. E. Bane, A. S. Robinson 4:35 484. Nonnative protein polymers: Struc­ ture, morphology, and relation to nucleatjon and growth rates. W. F. Weiss IV, C. J. Roberts, A. M. Lenhoff 5:00 485. Osmolyte controlled nudeatJon of insulin amyloidfibrillation.A. Nayak, C-C. Lee, G. J. McRae, G. Belfort

EUH Division of Biological Chemistry T. Begley, Program

Chair

SUNDAY MORNING

2:00 5. Chemical approaches toward the design of selective and nonselective pro­ tein kinase inhibitors. N. Gray 2:40 8. Degradomics: The proteolysis of cell death. J. Wells 3:20 7. Site specific histone ubiquitylation. T. W. Muir 4:00 8. Mapping biochemical pathways in cancer by integrated proteomics and metabolomics. B. F. Cravatt Section Β BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Frontiers in Chemical Biology T. Begley and J. T. Stivers, Organizers 5:00-7:00 9. Biomedical application of accelerator mass spectrometry: Kinetics and characterization of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct formation in naked DNA and cancer cells. S. S. Hah 10. Incorporation of exogenous 8-oxodG into DNA and RNA requires purine nucleoside phosphorylase in MCF-7 cells. J. M. Mundt 11. Campylobacter jejuni oligosaccharyl transferase PgIB donor and acceptor specificity. M. M. Chen, B. Imperial! 12. A new dimeric structure of FGFR D2 domain may contribute to the FGF signal­ ing pathway. F. Guo, D. Rajalingam, T. Kumer, J. Sakon 13. A new look at allosteric enzymes with THEMATICS. I. A. Shehadi, M. J. Ondrechen 14. Withdrawn. 15. Development of fluorescent tags for label­ ing newly synthesized proteins. J. D. Fisk, K. E. Beatty, J. M. Baskin, C. R. Bertozzi, D. A. Tirrell

Section A BCEC 109A Nucleic Acid Enzymotogy Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW G. L. Verdine, Organizer 9:00 1. Interrogation, recognition and repair of damaged bases in DNA. G. L Verdine

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/aca/234nm/ techprogram/.

16. Altering the selectivity of high affinity BH3

peptides for antjapoptotjc BH proteins. M. D. Boersma, É. S. Mies/, V. Tomtia, S. H. Geffman 17. Analysis of the Hepatitis C virus dimerization process. S. S. Shetty, R. Kailey, M. R. Mihailescu 18. Arylcyanooxime inhibitors of human carbonyl reductase. H. A. Charller Jr., N. N. Gerasimchuk, L Ward 19. ATP modulation of Human erythrocyte glucose transport Is not mediated through glucose anomer discrimination. J. M. Leitch, A. Carruthers 20. Bioorthogonal approaches for site-specific protein and carbohydrate immobilization. X-L Sun 21. Biocompatibility testing of a novel nanoporous hemodialysis membrane. M. Schneider, L. D. Bastin 22. Bioconversion of curcumin by Beauveria bassiana and Aspergillus niger. G. D. A. Martin, J. Williams, B. Mercer 23. Biophysical characterization of cytochrome c peroxidase from Shewanella oneidensis by protein film voltammetry, electron paramagnetic resonance and electronic absorbtJon spectroscopy. G. S. Pulcu, S. J. Elliott 24. Characterization of CIpA-substrate interaction time by single molecule fluorescence microscopy. M. E. Farbman, A. Gershenson, S. Licht 25. Characterization of rare mutations present in beta globin gene of Sri Lankan beta Thalassemic patients to develop more efficacious DNA screening method. R. S. Dassanayake, K. Mahadevan 26. Characterizing substrate specificity of nitrobenzene 1,2-dioxygenase and 2-nitrotoluene 2,3-dioxygenase by the generation of chimeric enzymes. K-S. Ju, R. E. Parales 27. Comparative kinetics of cofactor association and dissociation for the human and trypanosomal S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolases., 2: The role of helix 18 stability. Q. U, S. Cai, J. Fang, R. T. Borchardt, K. Kuczera, C. R. Middaugh, R. L Schowen 28. Controlled assembly of functional and structured DNA-multiprotein complexes at nanoscale. G. Sroga, J. Dordick 29. Cooperative in rabbit cytochrome P450 1A2 pyrene oxidation: Evidence for a multiple binding site model. C. D. Sohl, E. M. Isin, G. A. Marsch, F. P. Guengerich 30. Copper binding to Αβ(1-40) and Αβ(1-16) as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. L Q. Hatcher, W. D. Bush, L Hong, J. D. Simon 31. Withdrawn. 32. Designing inhibitors of DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecule 3 [ICAM-3]-grabbing non-integrin) as a route to exploring its biological properties. K. C. Altare, E. E. Carlson, M. J. Borrok, L. L Kiessling 33. Determination of binding affinities of salicylic acids to SABP2 using tryptophan fluorescence. A. B. Enyong, D. Kumar, Y. L Jiang 34. Determination of esterase activity of SABP2 using fluorescence spectroscopy. L Bannerman-Akwei, D. Kumar, Y. L Jiang 35. Determination of phospholipids in blackbone silky fowl (Gallus gallus domosticus brisson) by SPE/HPLC/PDA. W. Wang, M.XIe,Y.Tian,H.Wu 36. Detour in the search for a metalloenzyme model: A target-unrelated peptide in a phage display library. L. A. Brammer, B. Bolduc, J. L. Kass, K. M. Felice, C. J. Noren, M. F. Hall 37. Developing dynamic substrates for studies of cell adhesion and migration. E-J. Lee, M. N. Yousaf 38. Development of Lanthanide-binding tags (LBTs) for in vivo applications. A. M. Reynolds, B. Imperial! 39. Direct electrochemistry of bacterial thioredoxin reductases. M. J. Hamill, S. Chobot, H. H. Hernandez, C. L. Drennan, S.J.Elliott 40. Effect of different culture scales on sub­ strate uptake and taxol production by cell suspension cultures of Taxus chinensis. F. Yu, J. Wu, S. Deng, R. Ruan

41. Effect of labeled probe conformation on analyte binding efficiency of glucose and

O t t v r f t binding proteins,ft.daougu, E. Amor, G. Rao, L Toiosa 42. Effect of magnetic fields on free radicals of Saccharomyces cerevisrae. S. Wang, LUSr.,B.U 43. Effect of selenium compounds on microtu­ bule polymerization. M. E. Staretz, S. Sharma 44. Elucidation of ZEB-1 expression by identi­ fication of promoter regulatory elements. B. M. Anose, K. Benjamin 45. Expansion of translation initiation: Incorpo­ ration of non-alpha-amino acids into the N-terminus of proteins by using expanded initiation codons in a cell-free translation system. N. Muranaka, M. Miura, H. Taira, T. Hohsaka 46. Exploring intermediates and activation of biological methane formation. M. Dey 47. Focal adhesion dynamics. A. G. F. de Beer, P. Kaiser, G. Majer, J. P. Spatz 48. Genome mining approach to characterize an oxidosqualene cyclase from ArabkJopsls. P. Morlacchi, S. P. T. Matsuda 49. Identification of small organic molecules that bind SL3 RNA of the ψ—recognition element of HIV-1. D. M. Warul, A. M. Baranger 50. Impact of sequence and structure on the redox properties of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin. S. Mitra, H. H. Hernandez, C. L. Drennan, S. J. Elliott 51. Improvement of tethered particle motion. H-F. Fan Sr., H-W. U 52. Inhibition of platelets aggregation by [D-Phe(Transcinnamoyl)-Pro-D-Arg-P1 'CONH2] peptides reversible inhibitors of thrombin. C. Clement, A. Babinska, M. Philipp, E. Komecki 53. Intrinsic stability of common linkages used for bioconjugatjon. J. Kalla, R. T. Raines 54. Investigation on proton and hydride trans­ fer mechanisms of E. coli thymidylate synthase Y94F. B. Hong, A. Kohen 55. Investigations on the thiopeptide binding site: Synthetic and biochemical studies. H-D. Amdt, M. Riedrich, J-Y. Lu, S. D. Harkal, S. Baumann 56. Kinetic characterization of two chorismateutilizing enzymes. K. T. Ziebart, M. D. Toney 57. Labeling tetracysteine-tagged proteins with a SplAsH of color A modular approach to bis-arsenical fluorophores. A. K. Bhunia, S. C. Miller 58. Uncomycin biosynthesis: Investigating the enzymology of antibiotic assembly. J. Santa Maria, K. Colabroy 59. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits FGF induced ras signaling in prostate cancer cells. A. H. Palamakumbura, S. R. Vora, G. E. Sonenshein, P. C. Trackman 60. Manipulation of protein superstructures via the introduction of heterocyclic moieties. N. McMillan 61. Mechanism-based inhibitor development for PLP enzymes. D. L Nelson, B. D. Charette, R. L. Cemy, D. B. Berkowitz 62. Mechanistic studies of 3-deoxy-D-mannooctulosonate 8-phosphate synthase: Metal binding and substrate specificity. J. U, R. W. Woodard 63. Micropatterned serf assembled polyelectrolyte based cytophobic coatings. V. Dhir, A. Natrajan, A. Chunder, N. Bhargava, M. Das, L. Zhai, P. Molnar 64. Mutagenesis of the Human type 1 glucose transporter exit site: A functional study. T. K. Robichaud, A. Carruthers 65. N/C terminal relocation, truncation, and native chemical ligation: Accessing the chromophore of green fluorescent protein. E.H.Mellef, P.J.Tonge 66. New tripod amphiphiles for membrane protein solubilization and stabilization. P. S. Chae, M. J. Wander, A. P. Bowling, P. D. Laible, S. H. Gellman 67. Nitrophenyl phosphatase family of the HAD superfamily, a diverse family with varied activities. A. M. Sttterty, J. K. Hill, T. Leiker, I. M. Tirrell, S. F. O'Handley 68. NMR Experiments for the measurement of carbon relaxation properties in I3C, I5Nlabeled gramicidin channels. H. Gu, J. Diaz, J. F. Hinton, R. E. Koeppe II

JECM-?b

H Œ

m ACS INSURANCE PLANS

>

w

M !»

2!

it όοαίά nappe* to ηοα A 20-year-old worker has a 3-in-10 chance of becoming disabled before reaching retirement age!" Imagine covering your everyday bills and expenses without your income if you were unable to work. The result could have a devastating effect on your savings, plans for retirement and your children's education. The ACS Group Disability Income Plan is designed to keep life moving, helping you maintainfinancialstability through tough times. As a member of the ACS, you have exclusive access to this Plan, which:

GROUP DISABILITY INCOME PLAN

a

η m

• Protects up to 60% of your monthly salary, up to $10,000 a month • Can serve as a primary income replacement or supplement other benefits you have • Is completely portable and renewable**

To find out more about features, costs, eligibility, renewability, limitations and exclusions, call:

1.800.752.0179 or visit www.chemistry.org/insurance

• And much more! * U.S. Social Security Administration, February 19,2(Xi7>VWUht^://wwwj$a.gov/dibplan/ **As long as you remain a member of me ACS, pay premiums when due, and me Group Policy remains in force.

Brokered and administered by Pearl Insurance, 1200 Ε Glen Ave, Peoria Heights, IL 61616. Underwritten by New York Life Insurance Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010, under policy form GMR-G-29201/FACE.

061210^012

Ο

5β Sponsored by the Board of Trustees Group Insurance Plans for ACS Members

Your Colleagues Working For You!

>

TKK;

bioinformatics

molecular biology

excel l e ne'e

chemical biology

by c h o i c e , t . not by chance

Ν - ' ' ' '•' ·

cell biology

proteomics

http://pubs.acs.org/biochemistry

BIOCHEMISTRY a

An International Forum for the Field of Biochemistry The two most important ingredients for an excellent journal are great articles and rigorous peer review. Thanks to all of you who have provided both/' —Richard N. Armstrong, Editor-in-Chief With over 94,000 citations and an impact factor of 3.633,* Biochemistry serves as a premier resource for the field, and has an outstanding reputation for attracting highquality research from the world's leading scientists.

2007 / Volume 46 / 51 Issues

Biochemistry brings you the latest developments from the rapidly changing arena where chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular and cell biology meet. The journal serves as a catalyst for the development of new concepts and experimental approaches, particularly in rapidly advancing areas of biochemical sciences.

• View Hot Papers, Most-Accessed Articles, and Current Topics • Read articles ahead of the print issue via Articles ASAPSM • Read the free sample issue (Vol. 46, Iss. 1) • Sign up for E-mail Alerts and RSS Feeds • Register as an author and submit your manuscript via the ACS Paragon Plus Environment Richard N. Armstrong Editor-in-Chief Professor of Biochemistry & Chemistry Vanderbilt University School of Médiane

Indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE

*Data from 2006 Thomson Scientific (ISI) Journal Citation Reports®

J O I N T H E ACS^CYCLE OF E X C E L L E N C E contribute



publish

review

ACS PUBLICATIONS HIGH QUALITY. HIGH IMPACT.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

BIOL

69. On possible mechanisms for reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis manifested by cross-talk between NFkappaB and JNK. P. M. Mitrasinovic 70. Pantetheine analogs as tools for the investigation of CoA and carrier protein utilizing enzymes. J. L Meier, A. C. Mercer, T. Barrows Yano, M. D. Burkart 71. Polyaza crown ethers as nonnucleosidic building blocks in DNA-conjugates. U.Jakobsen.S.Vogel 72. Precursor to A2E and possible alternative pathway for A2E biosynthesis. S. Mandai, Ε. R. Gaillard, J. P. Dillon 73. Preparation of complex putative early- and late-stage intermediates in mitomycin and FR-900482 biosynthesis. S. Chamberiand, R. M. Williams, D. H. Sherman 74. Probing the nonoxidative tautomerizatJon of ntooethane to ethylnitronate catalyzed by 2-nltropropane dioxygenase with pH and substrate kinetic isotope effects. K. Francis, G. Gadda 75. Probing the wavelength regulation using an engineered rhodopsin mimic. K. S. S. Lee, C. Vasileiou, F. Nossoni, K. P. Korgavkar, B. Borhan 76. Protein expression pattern of mouse retinal progenitor cells grown on a poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffold. W. L Neetey, S. Redenti, M. J. Young, R. Langer 77. Purification and characterization of recom­ binant 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzenesulfinate desulfinase from nocardia astéroïdes a3h1.LM.Watkins 78. Raman spectroscopy of the BTK-SH3 domain. R. E. Rivera-Hainaj, J. Fowler, R. Ombrembowski 79. Rational manipulation of earner-domain geometry in nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Y. Uu, S. D. Bruner 80. Role of hydroxynonenal in membrane mediated amyloidogenesis by amyloid β proteins. L Uu, H. Komatsu, I. V. J. Murray, P. H. Axelsen 81. Role of intrasubunit interactions between domains in catalase-peroxidase structure and activity. C. O. Cook, R. L. Moore, D. C. Goodwin 82. Rv2985 diadenosine polyphosphatase from M. tuberculosis, an Invasion" enzyme homotog and potential novel antibiotic target. J. G. Thomson, J. N. Ramos, S. F. OHandley 83. Selection of protein core stability using combinatorial peptide microarrays. N. B. Mahany, M. A. Case 84. Small plant with big ambitions: Triterpene biosynthesis in arabidopsis. M. D. Kolesnikova, D. A. Lynch, A. C. Obermeyer, Q. Xiong, W. K. Wilson, S.P.T.Matsuda 85. Solid-liquid multiphase simulation in with simulation in CHARMM with simultaneous use of class-l and dass-ll force fields: Application to peptide adsorptions on polymer surfaces. P. Biswas 86. Stem loop II RNA-binding scaffold selec­ tion by phage display. Y. Fan 87. Structural refinement of time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering data. S. Ann, H.lhee 88. Structural studies of human plasma plate­ let activating factor acetyihydrolase, impli­ cation to its Idl binding and interfacial catalysis. U. Samanta 89. Studies of S-adenosyl-L-methionine lactonizaing enzymes. L Yi, R. W. Woodard 90. Studies on the composition and bioactivity of total lipid in black-bone silky fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus brisson). Y. Tian, M. Xie, H. Wu, W. Wang, Y. Tang, G. Wu 91. Substrate recognition by bacterial enoyl reductases. X. Zhang, P. J. Tonge 92. Substrate specificity of DNA Polymerases that replicate damaged DNA. J. Sefcikova, P. J. Beuning 93. Surface modification and photolithographic patterning of microelectrode arrays for cell-based biosensor applications. A. Natarajan, N. Bhargava, P. Molnar, K. Varghese, M. Das, V. Dhir, J. J. Hickman 94. Synthesis and activity of mechanismbased cross-linking reagents. G. Hur, M. D. Burkart, A. S. Worthington

26-TECH

95. Synthesis and fluorescence properties of DANP-conjugated DNA probes for SNPs detection. A. Kobori, T. Mori, A. Yamayoshi, A. Murakami 96. Synthesis and in vivo studies of prenylated cell penetrating peptides. M. D. Distefano, J. W. Wollack, D. G. Mullen, E. V. Wattenberg, N. A. Zeliadt 97. Synthesis and kinetic characterization of inhibitors for the tyrosine aminomutase SfifTAM.T.J.Montavon, C. V. C. Christianson, S. D. Bruner 98. Synthesis and testing of beta-cell specific Streptozotodn-derivated near infrared imaging probes. C. Ran, P. Pantazopoulos, Z. Medarova, A. Moore 99. Synthesis of a blood brain barrier (BBB)permeable MR imaging probe. M. Kumar, Z. Medarova, P. Pantazopoulos, A. V. Moore 100. Synthesis of photoactive gold nanoparticles and their evaluation for protein labeling. L Kuznetsova, M. Hu, R. P. Briftas, E. Lymar, L Qian, J. F. Hainfeld 101. Targeted mutation of the yeast reduc­ tase, YDL124w, affects enzyme stereos­ electivity. C. Archer, D. Erik, R. Patel, B. D. Feske, S. C. Mateer 102. Thermal characterization and differential scanning calorimetric investigations of wild type green and blue proteorhodopsins. M. J. Ranaghan, G. Whited, A. D. Albert, R. R. Birge 103. Thermodynamic studies of the binding of dimeric lac repressor DNA-binding domain to operator DNA. M. W. Anderson, I.A.Shkel.M.T. Record Jr. 104. Use of chimeric oxidosqualene cyclases to illuminate the mechanism of triterpene biosynthesis. A. C. Obermeyer, M. D. Kolesnikova, C. R. Zhou, W. K. Wilson, S. P. T. Matsuda 105. Using surface chemistry approach to control stem cells' differentiation. W. Luo, E. W. Chan, M. N. Yousaf 106. Utilization of an undecaprenol kinase for investigations of oligosaccharide transfer. M. D. Hartley, A. K. Larkin, B. Imperial! Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomoiecular Systems Probe Development Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomoiecular Complexes Computational Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL Surface Plasmon Resonance Promises, Problems and Successes for Label-Free Biodetection Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST

Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Understanding Potassium Channels Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Structure and Function Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomoiecular Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomoiecular Complexes Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL The Emerging Technologies and Capabilities of Metabotomics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 109 A/B Murray Goodman Award Symposium Cosponsored by John Wiley & Sons, ANYL, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW C. T. Walsh, Organizer 2:00 111. RNA tertiary structure and macromolecular machinery for group II intron. A.Pyte 2:40 112. Chemistry and biology of collagen. R. T. Raines 3:20 113. Mechanistic insights into normal and pathogenic Notch signaling. S. C. Blacklow 4:00 114. Novel strategies for chain elongation on NRPS assembly lines. C. T. Walsh Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Ion Channel Membrane Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, INOR, BIOL, and PRES

MONDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 109 A S Pfizer Award Symposium Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

Nano-Btochemistry and Technology Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOT, BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Novel Targets and Therapeutic Approaches Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN

N. L. Kelleher, Organizer 9:00 107. Chemical approaches to sorting out historié modifications. P. A. Cole 9:40 108. Exploiting marine bacterial genomes for natural products and pathways. B. S. Moore 10:20 109. Using mass spectrometry to assign the function of orphan genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. P. C. Dorreetein 11:00 110. If mass spectra could talk: Molecular movies of covalent catalysis during bioassembly of diverse natural products. N. L Kelleher

MONDAY EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

T. P. Begley and J. T. Stivers, Organizers 8:00-10:00 115. Activity probes for profiling cytochrome P450 induction and drug interactions. A. T. Wright, B.F.Cravatt 116. Improved cellular delivery of peptides and proteins by encodable structured motifs. D. S. Daniels, A. Schepartz 117. Biosynthesis of the thiazole moiety of thiamin in eukaryotes. A. Chatteijee 118. Capture, extraction, amplification and detection of influenza A: Toward the integration of discrete biological steps on a single platform. D. T. Fox, X. Lu, E. Miller, H.Cai 119. Crystal structure of alpha ketoglutarate nonheme iron halogenase CytC3. C. Wong, D. P. Galonic, C. T. Walsh, C. L. Drennan 120. Directed evolution of glycosylated macrolide antibiotics in Escherichia coli. H. Y. Lee, C. Khosla 121. Elucidating the targets of transcriptional activators. C. Y. Majmudar, L. W. Lee, A. K. Mapp 122. Endowingribonucleasea with sequence specificity. R. Watkins, R. T. Raines 123. Enzymatic activity in the crotonase superfamily: The mechanism of the reactions catalyzed by 1,4-dihydroxynaphthoylCoA synthase (MenB) and 2-ketocydohexanecarboxyl-CoA hydrolase (Badl). H. Zhang, P. J. Tonge 124. G quartet dependent interactions between MAPI Β RNA and the RGG box of the fragile X mental retardation protein. L Menon, M. Rita Mihailescu 125. Human phosphomevalonate kinase: Functional evaluation of basic residues. T. J. Herdendorf, H. M. Miziorko 126. In vitro reconstitution of wall teichoic acid biosynthesis in S. aureus NCTC 8325. S. L Brown, X. Fang, Y. Zhang, S. Walker 127. In vivo carrier protein modification in native systems. A. C. Mercer, J. L Meier, M. D. Burkart 128. Investigation of the conformational dynamics of the U1A protein. D. Anunciado, J. L. Knee, A. M. Baranger 129. Isolation of proteins involved in recogni­ tion of oxidatively damaged DNA from the yeast Saccaromyces cerevisiae. L Xu, T. D. Tullius 130. Mechanism of the assembly of the pseudomonic acids. J. Wu, J. Hothersall, S. M. Cooper, D. R. J. Cox, J. Crosby, C. M. Thomas, C. L Willis, T. J. Simpson 131. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for triterpenoid production. C. V. McNeil, A. M. Baevich, W. K. Wilson, S. P. T. Matsuda 132. Probing the mechanism of a tyrosine 1,2-aminomutase from enediyne natural product biosynthesis. C. V. Christianson, T. J. Montavon, S. D. Bruner 133. Role of YfaE in the cofactor assembly and maintenance of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase small subunit. OH. Wu, W. Jiang, C. Krebs, J. Stubbe 134. RV1106c from Mycobacterium tuberculo­ sis is a 33-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. X. Yang, E. Dubnau, I. Smith, N. S. Sampson 135. Structural studies of RebC, involved in rebeccamycin biosynthesis. K. S. Ryan, A. R. Howard-Jones, C. T. Walsh, C. L Drennan

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomoiecular Systems Motor Proteins Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomoiecular Complexes Computational Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL Undergraduate Research Poster Session Biochemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by BIOT, SOCED, and BIOL

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

BIOL TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 109B Repligen Award Symposium Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

2:40 141. Discovery of cotransin, a sub­ strate-selective inhibitor of secretory pro­ tein biogenesis. J. Taunton 3:20 142. Natural product discovery. J. Clardy 4:00 143. Natural products as probes of the Eukaryotic translation initiation machinery. J. 0 . Liu Section Β

M. A. Marietta, Organizer 9:00 136. Regulatory mechanisms in protein tyrosine kinase signaling. J. Kuriyan 9:40 137. Phosphatase crossing evolutionary boundaries links carbohydrate metabolism to neuronal disease. M. S. Gentry, R. H. Dowen III, C. A. Worby, S. Mattoo, J. R. Ecker, J. E. Dixon 10:20 138. Regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonucleotide reductase. J. Stubbe, A. Ortigosa, D. Hristova, D. Perlstein, M. Huang 11:00 139. Nitric oxide function in biology: Twists, turns and unexpected deviations. M. A Marietta Analytical Technology for Drug Discovery High Throughput, High Content Screening Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Biological ton Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Gating Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL From Peptide Bond Formation to Functional Proteins: Symposium in Honor of Ada Yonath Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by Committee on International Activities, CHED, PROF, and BIOL Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Novel Imaging Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL

BCEC 207 Molecular Imaging Visualization of Biological Processes at the Molecular Level Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, PHYS, and BIOHW J. Zhang, Organizer 2:00 144. Selective labeling of proteins for molecular imaging. K. Johnsson 2:40 145. Dynamic visualization of signaling activities in living cells. J. Zhang 3:20 146. Biosensors for multiplex imaging of endogenous protein activation. Κ. Μ. Hahn 4:00 147. Ribozyme-mediated in vivo RNA imaging. J. Rao Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Biological ton Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Ligand Gated Ion Channels Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Biomacromotecule Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Computational Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A

Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Dynamics at Multiple Resolution Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL

BCEC 109A

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

A. K. Mapp, Organizer

Eli Lilly Award Symposium Cosponsored by MEDI, CARB, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW

J. O. Liu, Organizer

9:00 148. Exciting challenges for chemical synthesis. S. J. Danishefsky 9:40 149. Understanding carbohydrate biosynthetic pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. L L Kiessllng 10:20 150. Toward transcriptional therapy with programmable DNA binding oligo­ mers. P. B. Dervan 11:00 151. Small molecule control of tran­ scription initiation. A. K. Mapp

2:00 140. Synthesis and use of natural and designed nonnatural products to impact cell biology. C. J. Forsyth

Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL

Section A BCEC 109B Mechanism of Action of Natural Products Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW

Biological ton Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Ugand Gated ton Channels Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

New Chemical and Btosensing Approaches for Cellular Analysis Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems

Imaging of Live Tissue, Cells, and Organelles Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Strategies In Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Computational Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 109A Symposium in Honor of Perry Frey Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW C. A. CaJacob, Organizer 2:00 152. Metabolic engineering of oilseeds: Utilizing lipid biosynthetic enzymes to modify vegetable oil content and composi­ tion. K. J. Grays 2:40 153. Cavity or collapse? Structural consequences of abasic substitutions within the core of a small RNA enzyme. J.E.WedekJnd 3:20 154. Taking a hit for the team: Selfsacrifice as an enzymatic strategy in the biosynthesis of lipoic acid. S. J. Booker 4:00 155. Utilization of intrinsic phosphate binding energy in enzymatic catalysis. J. P. Richard, T. L. Amyes Section Β BCEC Exhibit Hall-B2 Frontiers in Chemical Biology T. P. Begley and J. T. Stivers, Organizers 5:00-7:00 156. Construction of C-terminal GFP tag of recombinant SNAP-25 chimeric protein for assaying botulinum neurotoxin enzyme activity. S. Cai 157. Effect of tryptic cleavage on proteolytic activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain. S. Cai 158. Establishing a direct interaction between type A botulinum neurotoxin and a toxin protection protein using two-hybrid system in yeast cells. S. Cai 159. Fluorescent dye release from liposomes to develop high throughput screening for botulinum neurotoxin activity. S. Cai 160. Immunological characterization of type A botulinum neurotoxin and its purified and complex forms. S. Cai 161. Mechanistic studies of IspH reaction in DXP pathway. Y.Xiao 162. Protein-based drug formulation in solid and solution states-changes in protein secondary structure analyzed by FT-IR spectroscopy. S. Cai 163. Resistance of hemagglutinin-33, the type a botulinum neurotoxin associated protein to lysosomal proteases. S. Cai 164. Using differential mobility spectroscopy for the detection of biological threat agents: Botulinum neurotoxins. S. Cai 165. A kinetic study of the radbresistance of prostate carcinoma cells. A. Niciforovic, J. Djordjevic, M. Adzic, V. Vucic, P. M. Mrtraslnovlc, M. B. Radojcic 166. New insights into the mechanism of cleavage of sarcin ricin loop (SRL) RNA by the hydroxy! radical. S. S. Jain, T.D.Tullius 167. Antibody purification by positive charged membrane and filter. B. X. Chen 168. Antisense cassette for gene expression imaging. H. Fang, B. Y. Oquare, Y. Zhang, J-S. Taylor 169. Aptazyme-based riboswitches. A. Ogawa, M. Maeda 170. Asymmetric reduction catalyzed by yeast in ionic liquids/water Diphasic system. J.Wu,J.Hu,G.Xu, LYang 171. Binding of a potent PDT drug to the vicinity of Sudbw's Site I of human serum albumin: A biophysical study. S. Patel, A. Datta

172. Biological thermodynamics: Thermal set point and the origin of life. P. W. Chun 173. Biophysical origins of high specificity recognition in K-tum RNA-protein interac­ tions. H. Workman, P. F. Flynn 174. Biosynthesis of Microcin E492m, a peptide toxin posttranslationally modified with a siderophore moiety. Ε. Μ. Nolan, M. A. Rschbach, C. T. Walsh 175. Botrytis cinerea effects on grape pro­ teins: Potential winemaking applications. S. Van Sluyter, F. Pettolino, A. Bade, E. Waters 176. Catalytic importance of the substrate binding order for the FMN-dependent alkanesulfonate monooxygenase enzyme. X. Zhan, R. Carpenter, H. Ellis 177. Catalytic mechanism of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. M. Valtev, J. H. Weare, J. A. Adams, S. S. Taylor 178. Catalytic role of a conserved cysteine residue in the desulfonation reaction of the alkanesulfonate monooxygenase enzyme. R. A Carpenter, X. Zhan, H. R. Ellis 179. Characterization of Drosophila melanogaster CTP: Phosphocholine cytkfylyrtransferase Isoform 1 (Drosl). D. M. Tilley, J. A. Friesen 180. Characterization of NcsB2 as a promis­ cuous naphthoic add/coenzyme A ligase integral to the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic neocarzinostatin. H. A. Cooke, S. D. Bruner 181. Characterization of the orphan human cytochromes P450. K. Stark, Z-L. Wu, M. V. Martin, C. D. Sohl, F. P. Guengerich 182. Characterization of the Rhizobium legumiosarum outer membrane lipid A oxi­ dase, LpxQ. B. O. Ingram, C. R. H. Raetz 183. Charge-reversal lipids for siRNA transfection. S. Y. Kwon, C. A. H. Praia, D. Luo, M. W. Grinstaff 184. Chemical modification resolves the asymmetry of si RNA strand degradation in human blood serum. J. Hoerter 185. Computational simulations on a-crystallin dimers. H. Guo, C. Zheng, E. R. Gaillard 186. Conditional gene inactivation in zebrafish. I. A Shestopatov, S. Sinha, J. K. Chen 187. Contribution of ring strain to catalysis: Comparison of cyclic and acyclic forms of octapeptides as substrates for high Mr thioredoxin reductases. B. M. Lacey, S. Flemer Jr., R. J. Hondal 188. Control of biological crystal growth. R. Hickey, J. J. Guerrieri, E. Unk, L D. Bastin 189. Crystal structure of a peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase domain of a Class A penicillin binding protein. Y. Yuan, D. Barrett, Y. Zhang, D. E. Kahne, P. Sliz, S.Walker 190. Design and development of multifunc­ tional inhibitors for cardiovascular dis­ eases. F. Guo, D. Li 191. Design, synthesis and screening of cleavable nucleotides as reversible termi­ nators for DNA sequencing by synthesis. S. Zhang 192. Development of bioluminescent gene reporter system for Candida albicans. T. Thomas, K. E. Cano, D. S. McNabb 193. Differential calcium and magnesium binding by parvalbumin isoforms isolated from fish. M. Sirohi, D. Coughlin, L D . Bastin 194. Direct electrochemistry of the decaheme cytochrome, MtrA, from Shewaneila oneidensis MR-1. M. A. Firer-Sherwood, S. J. Elliott 195. Directed evolution of site-specific prote­ ases for turnover-based therapy. O. C. Coton-Vlllafane, S. N. Savinov 196. Discovery of a novel substance which inhibits somatic embryogenesis in Loblolly Pine. D. Wu, C. D. Oldham, G. S. Pullman, S. W. May 197. Double lanthanide-binding tags: Powerful and versatile protein probes. L J. Martin, B. Imperial! 198. Effect of Ckysteine insertion on the catalysis of Drosophila melanogaster thioredoxin reductase. A P. Lothrop, R. J. Hondal 199. Effect of acteoside and isoacteoside in Plantago asiatica L. on proliferation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in vitro. Y. Tang, D. Huang, M. Xie, X. Xie, Y. Wan, D. Dai

TfECH-27

BIOL/BMGT 200. Effect of base lesions on duplex DNA. A. Rumora, A. Malhowski, M. E. Nunez 201. Effects of glutathione reductase inhibition on intracellular redox systems. Y. Zhao, T. Seefeldt, W. Chen, X. Wang, D. Matthees, X. Guan 202. Electrochemiluminescent metallopolymers for detection of biological analytes. E. J. O'Reilly 203. Elicitor-like effects of ultrasonic irradiation on key enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. L. Zhou, B. Li, L. Li, X. Zhang, X.Li 204. Epsin is the adaptor for dathrin mediate endocytosis of influenza virus. C. Chen, X. Zhuang 205. Estimation of partition coefficients of Fe-S/Se protein models. F. Torrens, G. Castellano 206. Fast binding kinetics studies of the FYN Sh3 domain-peptide interaction. J-P. Demers, A. Mitteimaier 207. Flux balance analysis (FBA) of metabolic network for β-mannanase production from Bacillus licheniformis. Z. Uu, W. Qi, Z. He 208. Harnessing the power of chemical genet­ ics: A measure of cellular EGFR inhibition with tyrosine kinase affinity probes. J. A. Blair, K. M. Shokat 209. Hydration as a reversible approach for temporal expansion of penetration path­ ways to enhance transcutaneous delivery of biomacromolecules. G. Tan, P. Xu, L. Lawson, J. He, J. D. Clements, L C. Freytag, V. T. John 210. Identification and characterization of oxidized lipid analogs of platelet activating factor (PAF). X. Chen, G. G. Marathe, W. Zhang, T. M. Mclntyre, R. G. Salomon 211. Identification of collapsed intermediates with non-native interactions on the folding of a mutant intestinal fatty acid-binding protein using 19F-NMR. H. Li, C. Frieden 212. Improving asymmetric reductions by building reductase chimeras and the investigation of systematic reductase mutations. B. D. Feske, S. C. Mateer, C. Archer, E. Davis, R. Patel 213. Inactivation of thiolase by 2-alkynoyl-CoA via its intrinsic isomerase activity. L Wu, D.U 214. Influence of the CCAAT-binding factor on the iron-uptake pathway in Candida albi­ cans. K. E. Cano, E. C. Kroger, D. S. McNabb 215. Inhibition of tau fibrillization by oleocanthal via reaction with the amino groups of tau. W. U, J. B. Sperry, A. Crowe, A. B. Smith III, V. M. Lee 216. Interference of mannose 6-phosphate/ insulin-like growth factor II receptor func­ tion by interactions with cancer-associated minireceptors. J. L Kreiling, J. L Kopanic, M. A. Hartman, R. G. MacDonald 217. Investigating the glycosylation of interieukin 13 receptor alpha 2 proteins expressed in cancerous and noncancerous human cell lines. C. R. Pope, J. P. Thompson 218. Kinetic characterization and substrate specificity studies of Protein Arginine Deiminase 4. M. Bhatia, P. R. Thompson 219. Mathematical biodescriptors for DNA sequences: Applications to avian influ­ enza. B. D. Gute, A. Nandy, S. C. Basak 220. Mechanisms of spectral tuning in eubacterial rhodopsins. R. Rangarajan, J. R. Hillebrecht, J. F. Galan, R. R. Birge 221. Mechanistic investigation of functional inhibition of hemoglobin by glucose addi­ tion. X. Guo, K. Dannheim, J. Kempf 222. Mechanistic studies of DpgC, a unique dioxygenase in vancomycin biosynthesis. E. N. Fielding, P. F. Widboom, Y. Uu, S. D. Bruner 223. Mechanistic studies of the intradiol cat­ echol dioxygenases. M. Xin, T. D. Bugg 224. Metal assisted assembly of collagen-like peptides. S. Banerjee, M. A. Case 225. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new sesquiterpene synthase in Streptomyces avermitilis. X. Lin 226. NanG5 encoding an O-glycosyltransferase, is responsible for attached the 4-0methyl-L-rhodinose on the hydroxy group of polyether. T. Uu, D. E. Cane, Z. Deng 227. Nanoengineered multivalent ίθΠίϋηβ and cyritestin mimics for inhibition of fertiliza­ tion. Y. Lee, N. S. Sampson

28-TECH

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 228. Nature of guanine oxidation in RNA produced via the flash-quench technique and direct oxidation with metal-oxo com­ plexes. D. R. Holcomb, P. A. Ropp, E. C. Theil, H. Thorp 229. Neighboring group participation in the transition state of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. A. S. Murkin, M. R. Birck, A. Rinakjo-Matthis, W. Shi, S. C. Almo, V. L Schramm 230. Observing 2-D surface topography of reconstituted purified bovine and swine heart mitochondrial ATP synthase with atomic force microscopy and LB tech­ nique. J. Zhu, L. H. Guo, G. D. Wang 231. Phylogeny and characterization of triterpene synthases. C. S. Onak, G. C. Fazio, W. K. Wilson, S. P. T. Matsuda 232. Precise computational prediction of interaction sites in 3-D protein structures. Y.Wei, M.J.Ondrechen 233. Preparation of 3-D aerogel protein array. J-C.Wu 234. Probing of electrostatically adsorbed cytochrome c by attenuated total internal reflection spectroscopy on a fused silica surface. K. D. Clevenger, G. Hoops, T. A. Hopkins, K. S. Bloome, C. M. Kraning, C. A. Hedge 235. Progress toward isolating the biosynthetic gene cluster of phosphonopeptide K-26.1. Ntai, V. V. Phelan, Y. Du, Β. Ο. Bachmann 236. Protein conjugation using dick chemistry. M. E. Brown, J. N. Fitzner, J. P. Boyce 237. Protein splicing of a noncanonical intein from C. thermocellum. K. V. Mills, J. N. Reitter, K. R. Connor, T. L. Powers, M. J. Drago 238. Proto-oncogene histone methyl-transferases are misregulated under toxic and carcinogenic stress. S. S. Mandai, Κ. I. Ansari, G. A. Woldemariam, V. Phan 239. Quantification of thiols and disulfides through HPLC determination of 5-thk>-2nitrobenzoic acid. W. Chen, Y. Zhao, T. Seefeldt. X. Guan 240. Quinoline-based helix-threading pep­ tides: A new class of RNA binding ligands. M. Krishnamurthy, P. A. Beal 241. Recognition of promoters of target genes in vivo by hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides. Y. Luo, X. Xiao, B. Liu, R. Friedberg, T. J. Kodadek 242. Selection and characterization of a peptoid that blocks VEGF-induced VEGFR2 activity. D. G. Udugamasooriya, R. A. Brekken, T. J. Kodadek 243. Single-channel analysis of acetylcholine receptor blockade byflexiblebis(trimethylammonium) compounds: A model study for the rational design of channel blockers. W-C. Lin, S. Licht 244. Spectral tuning of deep red cone pig­ ments. T. L Amora, L. S. Ramos, J. F. Galan, R. R. Birge 245. Stereochemistry of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation catalyzed by ATP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinases. E. Perez, G. Zeikus, M. Laivenieks, E. Cardemil 246. Structural basis for substrate flexibility and product diversity of cytochrome P450 PikC from Streptomyces venezuelae. S. Li, L M. Podust, D. H. Sherman 247. Studies on the mechanism of chain release in the biosynthesis of the polyether antibiotic nanchangmycin. T. Liu, Z. Deng, D. E. Cane 248. Study and development of analytical immune-ferment planchets. O. Ismailov, N. Dustova, N. Q. Muhamadiev 249. Study fatty-acid composition of blood serum in children at vitamin D-deficient rachitis by the method of gas-liquid chro­ matography. N. Q. Muhamadiev, S. M. Ibatova, I. M. Ergashev 250. Study on the extraction and separation of AECI from enzymatic hydrolysate of oyster. R. Huang, Q. Deng, C. Lin 251. Syntheses and cross-linking activities of furan-conjugated oligodeoxynucleotides. A. Kobori, T. Kobuchi, M. Ikeda, A. Murakami 252. Synthesis and application of nucleoside analogs to study RNA-editing and RNA interference. O. Maydanovych, P. A. Beal 253. Synthesis of 6-amino-2,3-dimethylpyrimido[4,5-e][1,2,4]triazine-8-one as an inhibitor of dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR). J. Kang, R. Z. B. Desamero

254. The processive protease CIpAP translo­ cates its substrate in discrete steps. L D. Jennings, D. S. Lun, M. Médard, S. Licht 255. Toward glycoprotein structure, dynamics and function from NMR. L. Zhang, J. Gibson, J. Kempf 256. Use of nanostream microparallel liquid chromatography system to develop a kinase assay. W. Ding, K. Pitts, G. Krishnamurthy Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecuiar Complexes Computational Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 109A

BMGT Division of Business Development & Management J . L. Bryant a n d M. L. Hurrey, Program Chairs

OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront (see WCC, Mon) The ADVANCE Project (see WCC, Wed) Best Steps for Chemical Entrepreneurs (see SCHB, Tue) Creating and Sustaining International Research Collaborations (see COMSCI, Tue) SOCIAL EVENT: 2007 Whalen Award Reception In Honor of Cynthia Maryanoff: Mon BUSINESS MEETING: BMGT Open Meeting: Sun SUNDAY MORNING

Antibiotics Discovery, Biosynthesis, and Resistance Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW S. Walker, Organizer 9:00 257. Biosynthesis of lantibiotics, polycyclic thioether antibiotics. W.A.vanderDonk 9:40 258. Enzymatic resistance to rifamycin antibiotics. G. D.Wright 10:20 259. Targeting virulence as a new antibiotic strategy. D. T. Hung, E. Pierson, A. Clatworthy, J. Lee 11:00 260. Transglycosylation step of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. S. Walker

Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Preparing for a Successful Transition from Graduate School to Work Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB. YCC, and INOR SUNDAY AFTERNOON Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Career Perspectives and Insights into Life after Graduate School Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR

Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Proton and Chloride Pathways Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL

MONDAY MORNING

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Biomacromolecule Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

BCEC 207

Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecuiar Complexes Computational Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL

J. L. Bryant, Organizer

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Permeation and Selectivity Sponsored by PHYS. Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL

Section A

Globalization of the Chemical Enterprise Emphasis on the European Community

9:30 Introductory Remarks. 9:35 1. CaRLa: Catalyzing the cooperation between science and industry. C. Jaekel 10:05 2. The effects of globalization of the chemical enterprise on recruiting, retention, training, mentoring and outsourcing of technical employees. M. Driscoll 11:35 Concluding Remarks. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Methods of Single-Molecule Detection Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

BCEC 207

Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecuiar Complexes Computational Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL

Henry H. Whalen, Jr. Award for Excellence in Development and Management within the Chemical Enterprise in Honor of Cynthia Maryanoff, 2007 Recipient Cosponsored by WCC

Section A

J. L. Bryant, Organizer

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

3:00 Introductory Remarks. 3:10 3. Chemometrics of the solid state. K. M. Balss 3:30 4. Mathematics of chemometrics. V. Veselov 3:50 5. The impact of a successful manager Protege development is an investment in business development. J. Cohen

BMGT/CARB 4:10 6. Travels through the chemical enter­ prise: Instructions for reinvention and renewal. C. A. Maryanoff 4:50 Concluding Remarks.

Changing Landscapes of the Blo-Pharma Industry Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by BMGT

2:45 9. Advances in nucleic acid shape recognition by aminosugars. D. P. Arya 3:20 Intermission. 3:30 10. Photochemistry as a tool for glycopeptide and peptide thioester synthesis. K. Michael 4:05 11. Synthetic and biochemical investi­ gations related to cell wall polysaccharides from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. T. LLowary 4:40 12. New methods and strategies for convergent oligosaccharide synthesis. A. V. Demchenko

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

MONDAY MORNING

Chemical Logistics and Informatics Challenges for Companies Small, Medium and Large I Know the Data is Around Here Somewhere Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by SCHB and BMGT

Section A

Opportunities in Open Innovation Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by BMGT and CEPA TUESDAY MORNING

WEDNESDAY MORNING Intellectual Property and Licensing Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHAL, SCHB, and BMGT

CARB Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry D. P. Arya, Program Chair SUNDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 162B Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST

BCEC 162B Galectins: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Cosponsored by BIOHW Z. J. Witczak, A. Klyosov, and D. Platt,

S. H. Barondes, R. S. Bresalier, and F-T. Liu, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks, A. Klyosov. 9:30 Personal Reflections on Galectins, S. H. Barondes. 9:45 13. Galectin-induced cell death: Differ­ ent galectins, different deaths. L G. Baum 10:30 Intermission. 10:40 14. Nuclear and cytoplasmic localiza­ tion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 and their roles in pre-mRNA splicing. J. L Wang, K. C. Haudek, P. G. Voss, R. J. Patterson 11:25 15. Fine specificity of galectins: Molecular mechanism, cellular function and design of inhibitors. H. Leffler, S. Carisson, E. Salomonsson, M. Carisson, C. Cederfur, B. Kahl-Knutson, Y. Qian, J. Tejler, C. Oberg, U. Nilsson Section Β

V. Mohan, Presiding W. Priebe, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 1. ACS Carbohydrate Chemistry Divi­ sion Awards of 2007: Melville L Wolfrom Award, Horace S. Isbell Award, and New Investigator Award. W. Priebe 8:40 2. Rational drug design for the treat­ ment of hormone refractory prostate can­ cer. M. E. Jung 9:15 3. Discovering and predicting new functions in the enolase superfamily. J.A.Gertt 9:50 4. Antiviral lead discoveries in nucleo­ sides, nucleoside phosphate mimics and oligonucleotides: Nucleic Acid Related Compounds. P. D. Cook 10:25 Intermission. 10:40 5. Nucleic acid carbohydrate modifica­ tions: A structural and etiological view. M. Egli 11:15 6. Sweet interactions with sugar moi­ eties: From conformational analysis of saturated heterocydes to making drugs out of interfering RNAs. M. Manoharan SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 162B Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST

BCEC 208 Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Structure and Function Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN D. P. Arya, Organizer D. Ly, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 16. Progress toward a chemical code for targeting RNA. M. D. Disney 8:40 17. Interplay of chemical modifications and hydration in RNA studied using osmotic stress. E. Rozners 9:10 18. Targeting nucleic acid structures. J. B. Chaires 9:40 Intermission. 9:50 19. The chemical and biological conse­ quences of deoxyribose oxidation in DNA. P. C. Dedon 10:20 20. Structure-based identification of functional regions in the human genome. T. D. Tullius, S. C. J. Parker, E. Bishop, L Hansen, E. H. Margulies 10:50 21. Nucleic acid derivatization with selenium for structure and function studies of nucleic acids as drug targets. Z. Huang, J. Jiang, J. Sheng, J. Salon, J. Caton-Williams 11:20 22. Optical spectroscopic properties of DNA aptamers. G. R. Bishop

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 7. Pattern recognition based sensing: Carbohydrates. E. V. Anslyn 2:10 8. Studies toward DNA sequence recognition by the Janus Wedge format. L W. McLaughlin, M. Meena, H. Chen

Section A BCEC 162B Galectins: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Cosponsored by BIOHW Z. J. Witczak, A. Klyosov, and D. Platt, Organizers L. G. Baum, J. L. Wang, H. Leffler, and R. Cummings, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. L Baum. 23. Withdrawn. 2:30 24. Galectins: From structural analysis to their role in regulation of tumor cell proliferation. H-J. Gabius, H. Kaltner, S.Andre 3:15 Intermission. 3:25 25. Elucidating how galectin-1 protect melanoma and glioblastoma cells against chemotherapy. R. Kiss 4:10 26. Galectin binding mechanisms to multivalent carbohydrates and glycopro­ teins. C. F. Brewer Section Β BCEC 208 Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Novel Targets and Therapeutic Approaches Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN D. P. Arya, Organizer, Presiding 1:40 27. Development of cell-permeable peptide nucleic acid (PNA). D. H. Ly 2:10 28. Sequence recognition in the minor groove of DNA by covalently linked H-pin polyamides: The effect of Η-pin linkage, linker length, and N-terminus modification on selectivity and affinity. C. O'Hare, P. Uthe, H. Mackay, K. Blackmon, J. Jones, T. Brown, L Westrate, A. Sielaff, J. Lajiness, B. Nguyen, D. Wilson, J. Kluza, J. Hartley, M. Lee 2:40 29. Drug targeting of secondary DNA structures in oncogene promoter elements. L H. Hurley 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 30. Designed spirocydes as probes for DNA and RNA microenvironments. G.Jones 3:50 31. Platinum-DNA interactions: Struc­ tures and consequences. S. J. Lippard 4:20 32. Targeting hepatitis C virus RNA. T.r MONDAY EVENING SectionA

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

9:45 34. Seeing strangers or announcing "Danger": Galectins as a novel type of immunomodulator. G. Rabinovich, S. Sato 10:30 Intermission. 10:40 35. Galectins targets: The role of galectin-3 in the progression and metasta­ sis of colorectal neoplasia. R. S. Bresalier 11:25 36. Effects of lactulosamines in cancer models. V. V. Mossine, T. P. Mawhinney Section Β BCEC 208 RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC M. Manoharan, Organizer 8:30 37. Discovery and development of RNAi-based therapeutics: An overview. 9:05 38. Small RNA diversity and function. P. D. Zamore 9:40 39. Structural biology of RNA silencing. D.J.Patel 10:15 Intermission. 10:25 40. LNA as a modification for siRNA designs and applications. J. Wengel 11:00 41. Modified siRNAs containing 2'-fluorinated nucleotides. J. Watts, F. Robert, A. Kalota, J. Pelletier, J. Garcia Fernandez, J. Defaye, A. M. Gewirtz, M. Damha 11:35 42. siRNAs with a Universal Base. K. G. Rajeev, J. Xia, T. Novobrantseva, S. S. Morskaya, R. K. Pandey, A. Geick, T. De Fougerolles, Z. Zimmerman, M. Manoharan TUESDAY AFTERNOON SectionA BCEC 162B Galectins: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Cosponsored by BIOHW Z. J. Witczak, A. Klyosov, and D. Platt, Organizers H-J. Gabius, V. V. Mossine, and A. M. Mercurio, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. R. Kiss. 2:30 43. The regulation of myofibroblast activation and liver fibrosis by galectin-3. N. Henderson 3:15 44. Regulation of alternative macro­ phage activation with leukocytes. T. Sethi 4:00 45. Galectin signaling and interactions with leukocytes. S. R. Stowell, R. Cummings 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Sci-Mix

Section Β

D. P. Arya, Presiding

RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC

8:00-10:00

54, 57, 59, 63, 65-66, 68,73,76-77, 81-82, 86,88,90,92-93,96. See subsequent listings. TUESDAY MORNING SectionA BCEC 162B Galectins: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Cosponsored by BIOHW

V. Mohan, Presiding W. Priebe, Organizer, Presiding

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Z. J. Witczak, A. Klyosov, and D. Platt, Organizers C. F. Brewer, T. Sethi, and R. Kiss, Presiding 9:00 33. Galectins in regulation of inflamma­ tion and immunity. F-T. Uu

BCEC 208

M. Manoharan, Organizer A. M. Gewirtz, Presiding 1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 46. Delivering RNAi Therapeutics. J. Maraganore 2:05 47. MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets. C. F. Bennett 2:40 48. Delivery of siRNA using stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALP). I. MacLachlan 3:15 Intermission. 3:25 49. A polymer-based nanoparttate delivery system for targeted, systemic delivery of siRNA. J. D. Hetdel 4:00 50.2'O-ALE (acetal levulinylester) and 2'-0-ester groups for 2'-hydroxyl protection in the solid-phase synthesis and delivery of siRNA. J. G. Lackey, G. Pascal, M. Hassler, M. J. Damha

TECH-29

CARB/CHED 4:15 51. Lipophilic conjugates for the in vivo delivery of siRNA. M. Jayaraman, K. N. Jayaprakash, G. Wang, R. K. Pandey, T. Nakayama, T. Racie, T. Zimmermann, M. A. Maier, V. Kotelianski, K. G. Rajeev, M. Manoharan 4:30 52. Metal-ion chelated siRNA used to study distribution and uptake of siRNA. Y. Fan, R. K. Pandey, M. A. Maier, K. G. Rajeev, D. W. Sah, M. Manoharan Section C BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 General Posters D. P. Arya, Organizer 6:00-8:00 53. Advances in the recognition of DNA:RNA hybrids. N. N. Shaw, H. Xi, D. P. Arya 54. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugates for in vivo delivery of siRNA. K. Mills, R. Braich, K. Charisse, T. Racie, I. Tourdjaarska, K. G. Rajeev, T. Zimmermann, M. Manoharan 55. Double-headed nucleosides with thymine in the 2'-positk>n. C. Andersen, P. Nielsen 56. Effect of ligand tethered 2,4-drfluorotoluyl ribonucleosides on RNA interference. R. K. Pandey, J. Xia, G. Lavine, A. Akinc, K. G. Rajeev, M. Manoharan 57. DNA universal residues based on rational design. D. F. Qualley, S. A. Woski 58. Novel psoralen-conjugated antisense oligonucleotides having high photocrosslinking efficiency. M. Higuchi, A. Yamayoshi, A. Kobori, A. Murakami 59. Stacking of nonnatural bases in DNA duplexes. S. A. Woski, C. Uu, D. F. Qualley 60. Pyrene-perylene as a FRET pair coupled to the N2'-functionality of 2'-amino-LNA. A. S. Madsen, D. Lindegaard, I. V. Astakhova, A. D. Malakhov, B. R. Babu, V. A. Korshun, J. Wengel 61. Synthesis of conformatJonally restricted nucleic acid fragments using Ring-dosing alkene, alkyne and enyne metathesis reactions. S. I. Steffansen, N. Albœk, P. Nielsen 62. Synthesis, molecular modeling studies and properties of oligonucleotides containing 5-(1H-1,2,3-triazc4-4-yl)-2'-deoxyuridine derivatives. P. Kocalka, Ν. Κ. Andersen, P. Nielsen 63. Characterizing the binding site of the sialyltransferase ST6Gal1 using NMR of bound sugar nucleotide analogs. S. Liu, J. H. Prestegard 64. Design and synthesis of inhibitors of heparan sulfate O-sulfotransferases. B. Kuberan, M. Ethirajan, X. Victor, V.Tran 65. Click xylosides that stimulate heparan sulfate biosynthesis. B. Kuberan, X. Victor, T. K. N. Nguyen, M. Ethirajan, V.Tran 66. Preparation of 15-N and 13-C enriched heparan sulfate oligosaccharide precur­ sors. B. Kuberan, X. Victor 67. Structural and kinetics study on the inter­ actions between Heparin/HS and dengue virus envelope protein. F. Zhang, B. Li, Z. Zhang, R. J. Linhardt, R. Marks 68. Synthesis of cluster xylosides that prime heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate polysaccharides. B. Kuberan, V. Tran, T. K. N. Nguyen, M. Ethirajan, X. Victor 69. Room temperature ionic liquid derived heparin-cellulose coated carbons. J. G. Martin, T-J. Park, V. Nikolaev, R. J. Linhardt

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

30-Ti~:CH

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 70. Synthesis of nonnatural UDP-sugars for the enzymatic preparation of well defined heparin-like oligosaccharides. M. Werwer, F. Huang, R. J. Linhardt 71. Biomimetjc synthesis of chiral cyanogenic glycosides. G. Singh, A. DooMeram 72. Biomineralization studies of carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-D-glucuronic acid mem­ branes for tissue engineering applications. R. Jayakumar, H. Tamura 73. Chondrogenic eiectrospun polyelectrolyte fiber meshes. Z. Ma, J. Song 74. Design of resin-bound C/S-glycoside sialidase inhibitors for use in therapeutic recombinant glycoprotein production. S. R. Houghton, C. Boddy 75. Directjng-protectJng groups: Hydrogen bonding protecting groups mediating regioselective functJonalizatJon. J. Lawandi, N. Moitessier 76. Enzymatic synthesis of 3'-fluorinated siabsides. H. A. Chokhawala, H. Cao, H. Yu, X. Chen 77. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides enhance endocytosis and promote TLR4 signal transduction of cytokine expression. H-Y. Hsu 78. GlycosylatJon in room temperature ionic liquid using unprotected and unactivated donors. T-J. Park, M. Weiwer, X. Yuan, R. J. Linhardt 79. Immobilization and stabilization of bovine milk galactosyltransferase and synthesis of the disaccharide D-Glu{beta}1-»4Fuc{beta} in the ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate. G. Singh, N. Ramroop Singh, D. Narinesingh 80. Investigation of intermediates in lactonization-mediated and related glycosylations. J. Y. Baek, K. S. Kim 81. Isolation and structural characterization of a unique phosphorylated polysaccharide from the green microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa: Immunostimulatoy effect of poly­ saccharides having various degrees of phosphorylation. E. Reyes Suarez, L. Zhang, J. A. Kralovec, S. Bugden, F. B. Kai, S. Hewart, C. J. Barrow, M. D. Noseda, T. B. Grindley 82. Linkage position and nonreducing end residues (glucose, galactose, and mannose) determination of disaccharides by graphite assisted laser desorption/ionization and tandem mass spectrometry. H. Zhang, E. S. Young 83. Monte Carlo MM3(96) conformational analyses of N.N'-dimethylylaramide, N,N'dimethyl-L-arabinaramide and their 2,3,4tri-O-acetyl derivatives: Some compari­ sons. M. R. Hinton, M. K. Dowd, B. Nicholson, D. E. Kiely 84. Monte Carlo MM3(96) conformational analysis and X-ray crystal analysis of Ν,Ν'-dimethylxylaramide as a mimic for xylaric acid derived poiyhydroxypolyamides (PHPAs). M. R. Hinton, M. K. Dowd, B. Nicholson, D. E. Kiely 85. Novel saccharide-peptide hybrid copoly­ mers as siRNA delivery agents. F. L Lin, Z. Guan 86. Photochemical preparation of peptide/ glycopeptide-alpha-thioesters. T. J. Hogenauer, K. Michael 87. Preparation and characterization of longchain fatty acid esters of maltodextrins. W.Zhao, W.Zheng, J. Wu 88. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro biodégradation of highly substituted N.Nalkylchitosan films. K. D. BeMeld, M. E. Nunez, S. Bai, M. Daoudi 89. Production and evaluation of new products prepared from date peel. H. M. Moussa, H. A. Abogharbia 90. Recent developments in the chemistry of sialic acid. C. De Meo, B. Gulley 91. Static fermentation of bacterial cellulose and characterization of the cellulose's physical properties. F. Hong 92. Synthesis of a mannose tetrasaccharide: α(1,6)-(α(1,4))-α,α(1,1). G. Singh, N.ICJalsa 93. Synthesis of hetero chitooligosaccharides. B. Vijayakrishnan, M. G. Peter 94. Synthesis of neuraminic acid based C-glycosides and its application. C-C. Chen, M.Weïwer, R. J. Linhardt 95. Synthesis of oligosaccharide repeat subunits of O-polysaccharide LPS from Dan-

ish Helicobacter pylori. D. B. Fulse, K. S. Kim 96. Synthesis of partially benzytated pentose sugars, NMR analysis and application to oligosaccharide synthesis. G. Singh, P. Plaza 97. Synthesis of phenylazonaphtol glycosides under weak acidic diazonium salts conditions. M. Brito-Arias, D. Cruz-Salazar 98. Unique carbohydrate profiles in different brands of tequila. M. Jacyno, R. Gaita, M. Wilcox WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 162B Sugars as Organic Intermediates K. Tatsuta and W. Priebe, Organizers Z. J. Witczak, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 99. Total synthesis of furano-and pyrano-naphthoquinone antibiotics from carbohydrates. K. Tatsuta 9:35 100. Total synthesis of BenanomicinPradimicin antibiotics. K. Suzuki 10:05 101. Use of the de novo synthesis of sugars in natural products synthesis. G. A. O'Doherty 10:35 Intermission. 10:45 102. Chemical glycosylation methods inspired by new biomimetic concepts and their application to natural products synthesis. K. Toshima 11:15 103. Exploration of functionalized carbohydrate enones to the synthesis of tagetitoxin. Z. J. Witczak Eli Lilly Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, CARB, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 162B Sugars as Organic Intermediates Z. J. Witczak and W. Priebe, Organizers K. Tatsuta, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 104. Synthetic approaches to glycoprotein functions. Y. Ito, S. Hagihara, I. Matsuo, M. Takatani, K. Totani, T. Watanabe 2:30 105. Withdrawn. 3:00 106. The GlcNAc-thiazoline trail. S.Knapp 3:30 Intermission. 3:40 107. Glycal-based syntheses of biologically important molecules. W. Priebe 4:10 108. Carbohydrate based oxepines: Preparation and reactivity. M. W. Peczuh 4:40 Concluding Remarks.

L. Chen, G-Y. Gao, R. Petrelli, E. M. Bennett, K. W. Pankiewicz 9:30 112. Developing the structure-activity relationships for cADPR: Conformational analysis of cADPR analog agonists and antagonists using PSEUROT. S. M. Graham 9:50 113. "Clicking" calix[4]arenes and carbohydrates together, targeting cell-surfaces. S. P. Bew 10:10 114. Activation of innate immunity by a capsular saccharide from B. fragilis. C. H. Marzabadi, D. L Kasper 10:30 115. Design and synthesis of novel inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. G-Y. Gao, L. Bonnac, L. Chen, K. Felczak, M. Kullberg, R. Petrelli, E. M. Bennett, K. W. Pankiewicz 10:50 116. Exploring the scope of oxyaminemediated neoglycosylation. J. M. Langenhan 11:10 117. Pro-XylaneTM, a new xylosederivative as an activator. M. Dalko-Csiba, A. Cavezza, P. Pichaud, S. Trouille, N. Pineau, L. Breton 11:30 118. Extraction of the chitosan-glucan complex and chitosan from fungal cell wall and their application intissueengineering. N. Nwe, W. F. Stevens, H. Tamura THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 162B Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry D. P. Arya, Organizer M. Nitz and J. M. Langenhan, Presiding 2:00 119. New fluorescent tools for glycosaminoglycan research. M. Nitz 2:20 120. Boroxoles as new and improved carbohydrate-binding boronic acids and their use in the design of oligomeric receptors for glycoconjugates in water. M. Berubé, M. Dowlut, D. G. Hall 2:40 121. De novo asymmetric synthesis of landomycin glycon via a palladium catalyzed glycosylation. M. Zhou, G. A. O'Doherty 3:00 122. Fiber and clay nanocomposites based on amylopectin. D. Nordqvist 3:20 123. Lactonization-mediated and related glycosylations for oligosaccharide synthesis. K. S. Kim, J. Y. Baek, B-Y. Lee, D. B. Fulse 3:40 124. Novel catalysts for sugar conversion to 5-hydroxymethytfurfural. Z. C. Zhang, H. Zhao, J. E. Holladay, H. Brown 4:00 125. Structure and conformation study of the heparin, heparosan and intermediate products by NMR. Z. Zhang, S. A. McCallum, J. Xie, J. Uu, R. J. Linhardt 4:20 126. Synthesis and evaluation of multivalent Leishmania-associated capping carbohydrates. E. Song, P. Boggiatto, C. Petersen, N. L. Pohl 4:40 127. Synthesis of polymerizable methacrylate derivatives of carbohydrates. LN.AIbers

THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 162B Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry D. P. Arya, Organizer

CHED Division of Chemical Education C. Middlecamp, I. C. Montes, and M. T. Oliver-Hoyo, Program Chairs

M. Nitz and J. M. Langenhan, Presiding 8:30 109. Short RNA hairpins targeting the RNase H activity of HIV-1 RT. A.S.Wahba, M.J.Damha 8:50 110. Synthesis of 4-eeoxy-4-fluoro-agalactosytceramide. B. F. Castillo II, A. Howell 9:10 111. Synthesis of NAD analogs as sélective inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. L Bonnac,

SOCIAL EVENTS: Dinner Sat 6SSPC Réception: Sun cheon: Sun Reception Honoring the German Exchange: Sun Social Hour: Sun

CHED SUNDAY MORNING

Section C

Section A

Seaport Flagship Room

Seaport Constitution Room Center for Workshops in the Chemical Sciences (CWCS)

A. Lee, Organizer

3:45 Intermission. 3:55 35. Polymerization studies of oil paint films. L J. Muller, S. B. Stollar, E. Williamson, J. Dekenmendjian 4:15 36. Verdigris: Taking copper patina from the Roman dung pile to the modem chemistry lab. D. M. Simon 4:35 37. Big excitement—small science. Ν. Ε. Schlatter 4:55 38. Enhancing teaching and learning chemistry with natural bond orbital (NBO). M.Ayoub

S. Habicht, Presiding

Section Β

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 17. Preparing for life after graduate school (PfLAGS): A new ACS workshop. J. I. Shulman 9:00 18. ACS resources for career success. D. E. Harwell 9:25 19. Transitions from graduate school to professional life. S. V. Vercellotti, J. R. Vercellotti 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 20. Preparing for interviews and work in "Big Pharma". L S. Malisheski 10:25 21. Career preparation from beyond the laboratory. A. C. Myers 10:50 22. A new faculty's perspective on critical professional development skills. G. D. Bothun 11:15 23. What to expect in the workforce and what is expected of you. C. A. Maryanoff 11:40 Concluding Remarks.

Seaport Plaza A

Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Preparing for a Successful Transition from Graduate School to Work Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR

Forensic Science; Chemistry and Art D. M. Collard and J. C. Smith, Organizers L. J. Kaplan, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 1. Building communities of scholars: The NSF-sponsored Center for Work­ shops in the Chemical Sciences (CWCS). D. M. Collard, J. C. Smith, L J. Kaplan 8:55 2. Freshman seminar Critical thinking through science and justice. B. Hillery 9:15 3. Camera, light, action: The effective use of films as a teaching tool in forensic science course. F. RyvWn, R. Hunt 9:35 Intermission. 9:45 4. Development of a general education introduction to forensic science course at Bloomsburg University. M. E. Pugh 10:05 5. The rise and fall of forenstas at Merrimack College. S. M. Theberge 10:25 6. Mentoring and collaboration in the development of teacher-scholar communi­ ties. P. S. Hill 10:45 Intermission. 10:55 7. Chemistry in art: Technical exami­ nation of 17th century Dutch painting as interdisciplinary course work for nonscience and science majors. E. S. Uffelman 11:15 8. Cross-curriculum implementation of art in chemistry at Villanova University. A. F. Lagalante 11:35 9. Developing a chemistry in art course at Miami University. S. S. Marine 11:55 10. Chemistry of art: Development of a college-level course for nonscience majors and a summer camp for students in middle school. E. T.Wise Section Β Seaport Plaza A Green Chemistry as an Integral Component of Academic Sustainability Centers E. J. Brush, Organizer P. T. Jackson and K. J. Matus, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 11. Solution based sustainability cen­ ters. J. C. Warner 9:00 12. Like a covalent bond for sustainabil­ ity centers: The linking role of green chem­ istry. K. J. Matus, P. T. Anastas, W. C. Clark 9:25 13. Integrating sustainability into the STEM disciplines at Bridgewater State College. E. J. Brush 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 14. Incorporating green chemistry into the campus sustainability initiatives at St. Olaf College. P. T. Jackson, G. O. Spessard, R. M. Hanson, M. A. Klingshim, P. Sandberg, J. Farrell 10:25 15. Infusing sustainability across the curriculum using our green chemistry project as a model. M. C. Cann 10:50 16. Green chemistry and sustainability: Essential elements for chemical pedagogy. T.J. Collins 11:15 Discussion.

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Section D Seaport Plaza Β High School Program The High School-College Interface R. Tanner and L Thompson, Organizers S. Lantos, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:45 24. Exploring the high school-college interface. M. Z. Hoffman 9:10 25. Challenges of teaching high school chemistry in Germany. M. Sgoff 9:30 26. Teaching chemistry with technology from Texas Instruments. M. Osborne 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 27. Polymers in the field and track. M. E. Harris 11:00 28. AP redesign panel. D. Kliza, H. Gendreau, J. Spencer, J. Mauch Ε-Books for Chemistry Research and Instruction Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHED SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A Seaport Constitution Room Center for Workshops in the Chemical Sciences (CWCS) Chemistry and Art J. C. Smith and L. J. Kaplan, Organizers D. M. Collard, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 29. Art and chemistry: Italian style. J.A.Smieja 1:55 30. Broad application of materials and ideas from the "Chemistry of Art" work­ shop: From campus to community. E.K.Woller,D.F.Woller 2:15 31. Case of the fantastic forgery: A chemical instrumentation capstone project M.L Shulman 2:35 Intermission. 2:45 32. Developing and teaching an honors chemistry and art course. J. Touster 3:05 33. Enriching a science and art course for nonscience majors through polarized light microscopy. M. S. Leonard 3:25 34. Incorporating art into the chemistry curriculum. N. A. Eskew

Connections to Germany: Research and Education Opportunities Cosponsored by German Chemical Society, ACS International Activities Committee, CHED International Activities Committee, ACS Northeastern Section, Graduate Student Symposium Planning Committee, SOCED, WCC, YCC, and PRES Μ. Ζ. Hoffman, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 39. Biological chemistry research at Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany. E-M. Jahn, T. Carell 1:55 40. DNA as catalyst in organic synthe­ sis: An approach for sequence-specific DNA detection. T. N. Grossmann, O.Seitz 2:15 41. Characterization of smart materials synthesized via controlled radical polymer­ ization. C. Corten, D. Kuckling 2:35 Intermission. 2:45 42. DAAD: Funding academic exchange and promoting research in Germany. C. Schaefer 3:05 43. Basic research in Germany: DFG, the German Research Foundation. G.BechtokJ 3:25 44. The Boston Consulting Group Germany. C. Jopp 3:45 Intermission. 3:55 45. The German Chemical Society and chemical education and research in Ger­ many. K. Begitt, J. Breffke 4:20 46. Younger Chemists Committee of the Northeastern Section. L Daflk 4:40 47. Study abroad opportunities in Ger­ many for American science and engineer­ ing undergraduates. M. Z. Hoffman, N.Downey 4:55 Concluding Remarks. Section C Seaport Flagship Room Finding Your Catalyst Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Career Perspectives and Insights into Life after Graduate School Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR A. Lee, Organizer M. Wyche, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 48. Academic vs. industrial research in my career. R. R. Schrock 2:00 49. Career evolution from academia to industry. A. D. Palkowttz 2:25 50. Life after graduate school: Working at a national laboratory. E. S. Peterson 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 51. Making the transition: How to go from a scientist to the Patent Office. S. P. Thompson 3:25 52. The blending of research and teaching with entrepreneurship: The launching of LiqukJia Technologies by graduate students. J. M. DeSlmone 3:50 53. Things you should know before starting your career in industry. V. J. Kuck 4:15 Concluding Remarks.

Section D Seaport Plaza Β High School Program The ACS and You R. Tanner, Organizer L. Thompson, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 54. Programs and products from the ACS Education Division: An update. M. Tinnesand 1:55 55. ACS Exams Institute. T. Holme 2:20 56. Chemistry clubs. T. Taylor 2:45 57. Ready-to-use resources from the Journal of Chemical Education. E. K. Jacobsen, J. W. Moore, L. Slocum, LFanis 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 58. Art of chemistry. L Weber 4:15 Closing Remarks and Evaluations. Section Ε Seaport Seaport C High School Program The High School-College Interface R. Tanner and L Thompson, Organizers S. Lantos, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 59. Inquiry learning in the hetero­ geneous classroom. L Thompson, J. Speyer, M. Angione 2:20 60. VSEPR shmsepn How do you teach molecular geometry? D. Kliza 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 61. Creative activities for National Chemistry Week and your classes. LHogue 4:15 Closing Remarks and Evaluations. Ε-Books for Chemistry Research and Instruction Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHED SUNDAY EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 General Posters C. V. Gauthier, Organizer, Presiding 7:30-9:30 62. National Chemistry Day/Week: Highlights and successes from 20 years. R. M. de Greet, L Hogue, T. A. Halmi, Κ. Μ. Jackson 63. Twenty years of National Chemistry Week: Twenty years of volunteers. P. G. Fox, C. V. Gauthier, A. G. Wall, C M . Lang 64. Chemists celebrate Earth Day: 2007 report and 2008 preview. A. Jorgensen, M. Burgener, K. M. Jackson 65. National Chemistry Week 2007: The many faces of chemistry. T. A. Halmi, R. A. Woodall, A. J. Ribes, R. M. de Groot 66. Your new chemical education resource shelf. H. H. Harris 67.20th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education. K. Reck, S. M. Wietetock, R.Zbuck 68. Tribulations and jubilations initiating a chemistry club. C. A. Smith 69. Today's Science for Tomorrow's Scien­ tists: A web based tool to introduce current research in science and engineering into middle and high school classrooms. C. R. Pharr, J. W. Moore 70. Evaluation of an online professional devel­ opment course: Nanoscience for teachers. J. M. H. Tomasik, J. W. Moore 71. Teaching middle school students the concept of the cosolvent using colorful chemistry and molecular modeling. J. M. E. Quirke, J. C. K. Quirke 72. Teaching school children about mixing colors using a reversible color change experiment. J. M. E. Quirke, J. C. K. Quirke, J. B. Alweiss

1 EC H -31

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHED 73. Using a colorful, 10-mlnute demonstration to Illustrate thermodynamic vs. kinetic control. J. M. E. Quirke, D. R. Hajje 74. Improved student retention and timely graduation via "Plus Two" peer-led team learning. Y. J. Kim, J. E. Becvar 75. Online pre-lecture quiz design for student learning optimization in a one-semester non-majors general chemistry course. S. Shima, T. A. Miller 76. Online assessment in general chemistry. C M . Torres 77. Analysis of initial placement test results and enrollment in honors general chemis­ try on chemistry major graduates. Κ. Ε. Stevens 78. Facilitating student preparation for exams in general chemistry. D. B. King 79. Undergraduate students' beliefs about the nature of matter. M. B. Nakhleh, J. K. Weller 80. Match and Flip Puzzle—for the teaching of fatty-acid-containing lipids. B. Budy 81. Inquiry-based laboratory instruction by minijoumal format materials. N. Zhao, F. Schmidt 82. Research in the first year laboratory. A. Carrier, J. Ford, G. M. Willette 83. Nanoparticle uptake by cut flowers: A laboratory demonstration. K. M. Metz, Κ. Η. Pedersen, R. J. Hamers, J. A. Pedersen 84. Incorporating nanoscience into first two years of chemistry laboratory curricula. P. Y. Furlan 85. Guided-inquiry exercises in the beginning organic laboratory course to promote student comprehension of the molecular world. J. A. Cramer 86. Was it murder? A case study for an organic chemistry laboratory. M. A. Boucher, K. M. Specht 87. An information-rich experiment in organic chemistry for chemistry majors: Synthesis of 1-(halobenzyl)-4-(halophenoxy)methyl triazoles. R. N. Hanson, I. Kendrick, D. Falcone, J. Bottomy, G. Jones 88. Using study logs to promote learning in organic chemistry. M. L Greer 89. Teaching professional writing in organic chemistry lab courses. P. J. Alaimo, J. M. Langenhan, J. Loertscher 90. Analysis of ascorbic acid. W. E. Adams, S. R. Marcsisin, O. Ngo 91. Acylation of ferrocene: A greener approach. K. R. Birdwhistell, A. Nguyen, R. Kobelja 92. Introducing ecotoxicity to the chemistry laboratory curriculum: Studying green chemistry principles by measuring ecotox­ icity using Escherichi coli. A. R. Luhrs, D. J. Tshudy 93. Incorporating green chemistry into an analytical chemistry curriculum: II. Labora­ tory development and implementation. P. T. Jackson, J. A. Brown, L. M. Kunz, M. J. Germscheid 94. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of archaeological materials: An interdiscipli­ nary project for first-year students. M. L Parr, A. H. Lehman, A. D. Hill, A. C. O'Neal 95. Emission quantum yield determinations: Use of a standard linear relationship. D. P. Rillema, R. Kirgan 96. Integrating statistical mechanics with experimental data from the rotationalvibrational spectrum of HCI into the physi­ cal chemistry laboratory. B. R. Findley, S. E. Mylon 97. Developing an ongoing service-learning program through environmental chemistry. R. L Cook, J. Lappin, E. Cook 98. Chemical safety teams: An approach for teaching laboratory safety. J. M. Langenhan, P. J. Alaimo, M. Tanner 99. A research seminar course to support undergraduate research at Bridgewater State College. S. A. Waratuke 100. Primo Levi's The Periodic Table: A tool for teaching descriptive inorganic chemis­ try. J. M. Heising 101. lONiC: Interactive online network of inorganic chemists. H. J. Eppley, M. J. Geselbracht, A. R. Johnson, B. A. Reisner, B. S. Williams 102. Simultaneous assessment of students and courses through outcome mastery data. H. Debolt, A. Baur, E. L Harvey

32-TECH

103. AstraZeneca careers in chemistry day, an undergraduate education tool for the exploration of drug discovery. T. Hoerter, R. C. Mauger, D. G. Brown, T. Daniels, L. Hinkley, V. Hoesch, J. Krumrine, R. Smith, S. Wesolowski 104. Eggciting! The isolation of porphyrins from brown egg shells and their detection by luminescence. M. L. Dean, T. A. Miller, C. Bruckner 105. New advances in supercritical fluid extraction: Analysis of fats and natural product process development. K. J. James 106. Study of the matrix effects of two types of soils (kaolin and montmorillonite) on the electrokinetic remediation. X. Lu, X. Huang, J. Cheng, Z. Zheng, S. Bi 107. Bioinformatics approach to evaluate structure/function relationship and evolu­ tionary aspects of proteins: Comparison of hen egg white lysozyme C and HSLLP1. K. A. Lenkart, S. T. Buddha 108. Evaluation of carbohydrate levels in sweet sorghum for biofuels production in Oklahoma. H. Marshall, J. Hill, M. Pilkington, K. Ducker, N. L. Paiva 109. Improved stability of fluorinated chloram­ phenicol acetyltransferase by a singleisoleucine mutation. M. X. Lee, N. Voloshchuk, J. K. Montclare 110. Studies on the protein-substrate hydro­ phobic interactions of the retinoid binding proteins. F. Nossoni, C. Vasileiou, K. S. S. Lee, B. Borhan 111. New method of synthesis for the substi­ tuted aromatic di-carbonyl pigments. S. Khatirinejad-fard, M. Khanlou MONDAY MORNING SectionA Seaport Constitution Room Revitalizing the Undergraduate Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry Course G. Crundwell, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 112. Teaching descriptive inorganic chemistry in the format of the game show, "Jeopardy". J. Van Houten 9:00 113. Utilizing a postdoctoral faculty fellow as the central instructor for inorganic chemistry at Boston University. J. R. Miecznikowski, L A. Tyler, J. P. Caradonna 9:25 Discussion. 9:35 Intermission. 9:40 114. The traditional survey without the mind-numbing boredom. B. L Westcott 10:05 115. Introducing materials chemistry into descriptive inorganic chemistry. K.S. Brewer 10:30 116. What should be included in a "Foundations of Inorganic Chemistry" course for the new ACS guidelines? G. WuHsberg, T. Koritsanszky 10:55 Discussion. Section Β Seaport Plaza A Community Outreach and Service Learning through Green Chemistry J. C. Warner and I. J. Levy, Organizers

9:45 120. Green chemistry laboratory and ACS SEED students: A unique match. S. Trakhtenberg, A. S. Cannon, R. A. Boggs, J. C. Warner 10:05 121. Green chemistry curriculum development to empower outreach to middle- and high-school students and teachers. A. L Langlais, I. J. Levy, A. L Wagers 10:25 122. Loyola University green chemistry outreach program. L Thomas, K. R. Birdwhistell, E. J. Ramos, C. Simmers 10:45 Intermission. 10:55 123. Green chemistry exposure on campus. J. B. Easter 11:15 124. The state of green chemistry at the University of Detroit Mercy. A. M. Hamlin, L R. Cullen, K. C. Lanigan, M. J. Mio 11:35 125. U.T.-Martin SAACS and local ACS sections network for green chemistry outreach. S. K. Airee

Many Faces of Chemistry: The Merck Index Women in Chemistry Award Symposium Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and CHED

SectJonC MONDAY AFTERNOON Seaport Flagship Room

SectionA

NSF Catalyzed Innovations in the Undergraduate Curriculum

Seaport Constitution Room

C. Burkhardt, Organizer Ft. K. Boggess, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 126. Picturing to learn: Visually thinking and expressing science as a powerful tool for both teachers and students. F. Frankel, D. R. Sadoway, R. Rosenberg, J. Larrabee, C. Muldoon, H. Haste 8:55 127. LUCID: Measuring and improving learning outcomes in general chemistry. T. Wolfskill, D. M. Hanson 9:15 128. Service learning in chemistry: A three year assessment. A. G. Cavinato 9:35 Intermission. 9:45 129. Enhancing the undergraduate laboratory experience by combining an environmental focus, instrumental methods and service-learning. S. Sutheimer 10:05 130. Interdisciplinary teaching: Using the study of sprouts to teach mathematics and science at a liberal arts college. W. Lammela, B. Brown, C. Boyd, L M. O'Brien 10:25 131. ICP-MS analysis of lead contami­ nation in soil: Integrating research into first semester general chemistry. D. Richter-Egger, N. Grandgenett, J. Hagen, F. Laquer, R. Shuster 10:45 Intermission. 10:55 132. Implementation of a virtual control room in the Integrated Science, Business and Technology Program. W. L Weaver, M. W. Timmerman, N. L. Jones 11:15 133. Integrating computation, indepen­ dent inquiry, and scientific presentations with the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. C. K. Johnson, J. E. Headrick, D. L. DuBose, C. L Berrie, J. Heppert 11:35 134. Identification of bacteria using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry: An undergraduate laboratory exercise. W.A.Patton 11:55 Concluding Remarks. Section D Seaport Plaza Β 20th Anniversary of National Chemistry

D. K. Wicht, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 117. Improving people's lives through the transforming power of green chemistry. C. M. Baldwin, J. R. Barker, K. B. Lewoczko, R. F. Johnston, S. E. Periinger 8:55 118. Chemistry and consumption: Introducing green chemistry to the general college community through greened con­ sumer products. R. W. Gurney 9:15 119. Future policy makers need science too: Participatory learning for nonscience majors. K. J. Matus, W. C. Clark 9:35 Intermission.

9:25 137. NCW 20th anniversary: Pittsburgh style! V. M. Mautino 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 138. PR experience with television public service announcements: NCW and CCED. J.B.Trent 10:25 139. African-American women chemist project, the scientific achievements of some remarkable women. J. E. Brown 10:50 140. Volunteer in public outreach: Thinking outside the box". R. A. Woodall 11:15 141. Communicating chemistry. D.A.Katz 11:40 Intermission. 11:45 142. New directions and current activi­ ties in the Division of Chemical Education. M. M. Cooper, T. J. Greenbowe, L Jones, J. E. Lewis

The Many Faces of Chemistry Cosponsored by Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, and PRES

Forensic Chemistry in the Undergraduate Curriculum L A. Porter Jr., Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 143. CSI in the classroom: Teaching science in a non-majors first-year seminar using forensics and chemistry. J. J. Heymann, L. K. Charkoudian, M. J. Adler, K. L. Haas, K. A. Mies, J. F. Bonk 1:55 144. Engaging non-majors beyond introductory chemistry: A liberal arts sci­ ence course in forensic chemistry. L A . Porter Jr. 2:15 145. Bachelor of science in forensic science. M. H. Silveira 2:35 Discussion. 2:55 Intermission. 3:05 146. Hands-on forensics. D. A. Katz 3:25 147. Internship with the Boston Police Crime Lab: Validation of Py-GC/MS and creation of automotive paint chip cross sections: Lessons in research practices. K. E. O'Brien, E. Ziolkowski 3:45 148. Multistep synthesis of highly functionalized diphenyl ethers: A non-majors' forensic science experiment. M. H. Silveira, M. D. Blalock, M. Q. Clark, T. M. Doggett, B. L Galloway, N. A. Jones, C. A. Nettles, Ε. Ε. Templet, K. M. Thibodeaux 4:05 Discussion. 4:25 Concluding Remarks. SectionB Seaport Plaza A Community Outreach and Service Learning through Green Chemistry J. C. Warner and I. J. Levy, Organizers Ft. W. Gumey, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 149. Creating the WOW! F.K. Wood-Black 1:55 150. "Sewing" the seeds of green chemistry: Cub Scouts. R. MacTaylor

I. Montes, Organizer L. Hogue, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 135. Connecting chemistry to the com­ munity: 20 Years of National Chemistry Week. A. G. Wall, C. M. Lang 9:00 136. George Pimentel and why every week is National Chemistry Week. B.Z.Shakhashiri

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

CHED 2:15 151. Using green chemistry as an outreach to youth through WISE, Kids to College, and Girls Incorporated. C. E. MacTaylor, L. Comeford, R. MacTaylor 2:35 Intermission. 2:45 152. Green chemistry outreach to Salem, Massachusetts public schools. C. E. MacTaylor, L Comeford, D. Mason-McCaffrey 3:05 153. Service learning opportunities with K-12 educators: Developing a green chemistry unit plan for eastern Massachu­ setts high schools. C. Burke, E. J. Brush 3:25 154. Partnering with K-12 organizations to develop green chemistry curricula that meet local needs. A. S. Cannon 3:45 Intermission. 3:55 155. Hands on learning: The joy of discovery. F. K. Wood-Black 4:15 156. Evaluation of the "Whafs 'Green' About Biodiesel?" high school curricular unit. A. N. French, J. Heppert, C. Bode 4:35 157. "Cleaning up" chemistry: Soap making workshop demonstrating the principles of green chemistry. J. M. Kivaa, I. J. Levy Section C Seaport Flagship Room NSF Catalyzed Innovations in the Undergraduate Curriculum R. K. Boggess, Organizer C. Burkhardt, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 158. NSF course, curriculum, and laboratory improvement (CCLI) program. S. Hixson, E. L. Lewis, H. H. Richtol, P. Varma-Nelson 1:55 Revised CCLI Program Panel Discus­ sion. 2:40 Intermission. 2:50 159. Enhancing the undergraduate chemistry curriculum with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. E. S. Magyar, M. C. Lamontagne, J. G. Magyar 3:10 160. Incorporating GC-MS into facultymentored teaching and research. D. A. Perry 3:30 161. Conducting polymers in under­ graduate general and organic chemistry laboratories. T. M. Pappenfus, D. L. Hermanson, M. L. Mekoli, J. H. Melby, N. E. Carpenter 3:50 Intermission. 4:00 162. Enhancing student learning by incorporating NMR spectroscopy into the general and organic chemistry curriculum. I. B. Nejad, J. S. Chen 4:20 163. GC and elemental analyzer labora­ tories in general chemistry. S. J. Donnelly 4:40 164. Application of AFM in imaging of nanowires and nanostructured semicon­ ductor electrocatalysts. M. Hepel 5:00 Concluding Remaries. Section D Seaport Plaza Β 20th Anniversary of National Chemistry Week The Many Faces of Chemistry Cosponsored by Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, and PRES I. Montes, Organizer L Hogue, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 165. National Chemistry Week: Twenty years of growth, success, and great chem­ istry. R. M. de Groot, C. M. Lang, A. G. Wall, L. Hogue, T. A. Halmi, Κ. Μ. Jackson 1:55 166. Chemistry outreach from 2 to 102. A.Hazari 2:15 167. Living NCW to the extreme. W.F.Carroll Jr. 2:35 Intermission. 2:45 168. National Chemistry Week tradi­ tions for the California Section. M. L Wu

3:05 169. Erie, Pennsylvania puts a positive face on chemistry. T. A. Halmi 3:25 170. Scaling up the fun: The evolution of National Chemistry Week in Cleveland. P. G. Fox, L T. Kuhns, M. Schiele, K. M. Wollyung 3:45 Intermission. 3:55 171. Chemistry Open House and Sci­ ence Exploration Gallery at Texas A&M University. W. L Keeney-Kennicutt 4:15 172. Science and fun—a great combi­ nation during NCW. L Hogue, A. M. Sarquis Section Ε BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Analytical Chemistry Cosponsored by ANYL and SOCED N. Bakowski, Organizer, Presiding 2:30-4:30 173. Analysis of mitochondrial distribution within muscle fibers as an age dependent factor using direct histological sampling interfaced with capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detector. S. P. Hartono, H. Ahmadzadeh 174. Analysis of vitamin C in fruit, vegetables and juices via high pressure liquid chroma­ tography. Y. Ha, S. Ranganathan, P. Irigoyen 175. Applications of hydroponics on phytoremediation using sweet tomato and patio tomato. A. P. Aguirre, S. Arteaga 176. Assessment of second hand cigarette smoke on various fabrics. L Buttitta, R. Miller, D. Nguyen, E. White, C. H. Usse 177. Cyclic, differential pulse and square wave voitammetry of dibenzazepine derivatives and analogous compound. I. Nieves, J. A. Rodriguez, R. Oyola, L E. Pirtero, C. Garcia 178. DDT dehalogenation reaction catalyzed by cobalt tetrapyridinoporphyrazine com­ plexes in pyridine solution. A. Thomas, J. Shao, C. A. Hansen 179. Detecting serotonin using capillary elec­ trophoresis. R. N. Nunes, J. Bedard, C. E. MacTaylor 180. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical characterization and ESR studies of cobalt tetrapyridinoporphyrazine com­ pounds in DMSO solution. J. Shao, J. Commodore, B. Han, C. A. Hansen 181. Epicatechin levels in coffee. A. N. Phillips, C. E. MacTaylor 182. Epicatechin levels in teas with and without milk. R. L Benson, F. I. Edionwe, C. E. MacTaylor 183. Extraction of nicotine from various food sources. L Nguyen, C. E. MacTaylor 184. Lead quantitation in soils surrounding Salem Harbor. T. Husejinovic, C. E. MacTaylor 185. Measuring heterogeneous rate con­ stants: Reactions at indium surfaces. E. Giordano, Y. Baez Sosa, W. J. Bowyer 186. Monoclonal antibodies as probes for conformational changes of ferritin on gold electrodes. N. L Ritzert, D. C. Zapien 187. Mycotoxins: Identification procedures established by the Food and Drug Admin­ istration. N. Kaur, P. Svoronos, P. Devy, V. Abbruscato 188. Non-destructive detection of deep muscle bruising in salmon by near infrared spectroscopy. M. M. Hammers, M. Lin, D. M. Mayes, B. A. Rasco, A. G. Cavinato 189. Nonlethal detection of bacterial kidney disease in Pacific salmon by near infrared spectroscopy. T. L Boethin, M. M. Hammers, K. Troutman, T. Hoffnagle, A. Greenlee, A. G. Cavinato

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

190. Quantification of lead in paint samples. A. M. Burridge, C. E. MacTaylor 191. Quantitation of taurine in a variety of energy drinks. N. C. Rudolph, C. E. MacTaylor 192. Quantitative measurements of illicit drugs using Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics. O. S. Fenton, K. Frederick 193. Sieving buffers in capillary electrophore­ sis with derivatization and laser-induced fluorescence detection. J. Bedard, C. E. MacTaylor 194. Structural determination of silanols using a combinatorial approach. M. Chauhan, H.Ann 195. Study and characterization of electrogenerated chemiluminescence. A. Hruska, P. Walsh, R. Scott 196. Toward the development of photochromic optical sensors for metal ion detection based on spiropyran dyes. O. Duong, C. A. Kelley, A. R. Williams, S. E. Stitzel 197. Use of inductively coupled plasma opti­ cal emission spectrometry ICP-OES to measure metal uptake in grass. L. De Santiago, S. Arteaga PH. D 198. What's in your bottle of water? Study of metal ions in bottled water. Κ. Μ. Ashley, R. Abbas, I. U. Ekpo, M. C. Koether 199. Method development for the elemental analysis of air sensitive silicon based compounds. M. Chauhan, N. Kaur SectjonF BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Biochemistry Cosponsored by BIOT, SOCED, and BIOL N. Bakowski, Organizer, Presiding 2:30-4:30 200. Analysis of commercially available anti­ bodies to hepatitis Β surface antigen. C. McCage, O. Ngo, C. E. MacTaylor, A. MacLean 201. Characterization of human breast can­ cer-derived epithelial cells (HBCEC). C. Gottfried, C. Bertram, R. Hass 202. Cloning and overexpression of an E. coli pbpla. C. M. Alexander, L T. Lamech, Κ. Μ. Specht 203. Cloning and overexpression of a putative penicillin-binding protein from Burkholderia cenoœpacia in E. coli. L H. O'Connor, L T. Lamech, K.M. Specht 204. Detection of small interfering RNAs by rolling circle amplification. N. Li, S. Kress, W. Zhong 205. Determination of homocysteine levels in endothelial and stromal cell cultures by HPLC. A. Riggi, G. Donohoe, Z. Brewer, B. Freeman, M. Rood, S. Dodson, A. Baur 206. Development of an immunoassay for 5-S-cysteinyl dopa. L B. Sullivan, J. M. St. John, C. E. Immoos 207. DNA damage induced by chromium picolinate. J. A. Mackey, V. H. Coryell, A. Lencinas, D. M. Steams 208. Effect of nonenzymatic glycation on the autooxidation kinetics of adult human hemoglobin. R. M. Raagas, D. M. Robles, R. M. Esquerra 209. Effects of pH and urea on the random coil α-proton chemical shift of alanine in pentapeptides with neighboring acidic and basic amino acid residues. A. R. de Alwis, S. L. McKay 210. Evaluation of natural variation in gene expression among the normal population, with a further focus on the mitochondrial genes and enzyme activity. U. Anting, K. Chow, D. Mehta, T. Meitinger, H. Prokisch 211. Fluidic production of molecular hydrogen using the biocatalyst hydrogenase. D. M. Stallings, K. D'Antignac, K. Knappenberger 212. Identification of the c-met receptor as a novel target for the treatment of EGFRvlllexpressing glioblastoma. R. A. Flynn, P. Huang, F. B. Furnari, W. K. Cavenee, F. M. White 213. Lipophilic cations: DNA interactions, and bacterial toxicity of arylphosphonium salts. L D. Munoz, K. H. Almeida, J. C.Williams Jr.

214. Metabolic engineering to biosynthesize terpenoids. A. M. Baevteh, C. V. McNeil, S. P. T. Matsuda 215. Production of heterologous proteins by means of the recombinant moss Physcomitrella patens in photobioreactors. E. A. Voigt, F. Lehr, C. Posten 216. RNAi related dsRNA-protein complexes investigated by atomic force microscopy. H. A. Arjes, N. Anspach, W. Nellen 217. Role of alternative processivity clap β*: Interactions with UmuD. M. J. Ordazzo, B. Koleva, T. E. Wales, C. Morgan, J. R. Engen, P. J. Beuning 218. S-glutathiolation of c-Abl in vitro and in vivo. Y-C. Chai, A. Leonberg, J. Sullivan 219. Structural elucidation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Onosmodium virginianum. T. D. Holcomb, A. M. Justensen, W. R. Parker, R. B. Kelley Section G BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Chemical Education Cosponsored by SOCED N. Bakowski, Organizer, Presiding 2:30-4:30 220.19F-NMR investigation of the addition reactions of 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone. K.W.Field, K.M.Williams 221. Ammonia borane as an alternative to sodium borohydride. N. T. Strande, S. S. Shafer, K. H. Sheetz, T. A. Evans, P. Arthasery, S. L. McKay 222. Comparative ecotoxicity of petroleum diesel, biodiesel from waste fryer oil and biodiesel from unused fryer oil. L R. Hasiuk, I. J. Levy, S. E. Massanari, M. A. Weaver, E. Wetter 223. Cups to cleaners: Trash to treasure. J. N. Boice, R. W. Gumey 224. Determination of pKg of mono-, di-, and tricarboxylic acids using 13C NMR spectro­ scopic method. E. Hughes, J. H. Shin 225. Determination of refractive index using a laser pointer Quantitative analysis of binary solvent systems. H. Chon, J. H. Shin 226. Determination of the isoelectric points of neutral and basic amino acids by 13C NMR spectroscopic method. Y. M. Kim, J. H. Shin 227. "Green" electrophilic aromatic substitu­ tion for the organic chemistry laboratory. E.Eby,S.T.Deal 228. New chemistry laboratory experiments involving art. C. A. Morse, M. Sweetgall 229. Conversion of instructional software to modem computing environments. D. P. Pieper, J. L Holmes, J. W. Moore 230. Searching for the infamous trans-fat. M. H. Tran, T. A. Evans, J. L Fantini 231. Single crystal and powder X-ray diffrac­ tion of titanium dioxide: An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment. J. B. Heyman, B. M. Foxman, T. L. Rose 232. Understanding keto/enol and enol a/enol b equilibria: A computational laboratory using AM1 method. L J. Cotto, J. G. Estevez, Z. Cortes, M. E. Maldonado, L Ramirez-Velez, V. M. Ramos 233. Upper-level chemistry students' concep­ tions of buffers and acid-base equilibrium problems. A. Sutherland, Y. Kim, G. Simpson, M. Orgill 234. Using concept inventories in organic chemistry. M. R. Dobberpuhl, D. P. Cartrette SectionH BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Computational Chemistry Cosponsored by SOCED N. Bakowski, Organizer, Presiding 2:30-4:30 235. Hydrogen abstraction-induced ring open­ ing in thiazoles. D. S. Dudis, T. Verrilli, J. Houseknecht, V. Benin, A. T. Yeates

lfrCH-33

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHED 236. Liphophilic cations: Computational analysis of arylphosphonium salts bound to DNA. G. Rodrequez, J. C. Williams Jr. 237. Spherical atom model for dispersion forces. M. K. Lee, G. A. Petersson Section I BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Environmental Chemistry Cosponsored by ENVR and SOCED N. Bakowski, Organizer, Presiding 2:30-4:30 238. "CDtrodes" vs. traditional gold film electrodes in determination of a soil pollutant. E. Davila, C. A. Smith 239. Comparing the properties of pyridinium and 4-dimethylaminopyridinium ionic liquids. J. Hatcher, M. Thomas, S. I. Lall-Ramnarine, J. F. Wishart 240. Evaluation of simple solar cells using plant materials as the electron donor. D. Huntington, C. E. MacTaylor 241. Gentle capture of an airborne virus for online detection with flow cytometry. K. M. McElhoney, E. Schick, M. Beckert, D. A. Orsini, K. P. Rhoads 242. H20conee and beyond: Making a difference one paddle at a time. B. Barfield, J. N. Cross, K. Harper, L M. Peaden, S. Rowland, D. Wilson, C. H. Usse 243. In search of the best biodiesel: Bomb calorimetry and GC-MS of biodiesel made from six different oils. J. Nyoike, L Comeford, C. E. MacTaylor 244. Investigating the microwave assisted synthesis of ionic liquids. K. Kerr, G. Subramaniam, S. I. Lall-Ramnarine, J. F. Wishart 245. Metal uptake by Raphnus sativus using hydroponics. R. Armenta, S. Arteaga, L De Santiago, A. Aguirre 246. Novel determination of hydrophobic pollutants in surface waters. B. Vallejo, C. A. Smith 247. Physical properties of phosphate ionic liquids. K. Urena, M. Thomas, J. F. Wishart, S. I. Lall-Ramnarine 248. Sarcosine, AMPA and glyphosate in montmorillonite clay interlayers: A theoretical molecular level study. L Tribe, A. Slutter, A. Rennig 249. Search for a cadmium point source using stripping voltammetry. L Zuniga, C. A. Smith 250. Synthesis of ionic liquids for toxicity studies. X. Li, J. Hatcher, H. R. Walker, C. McEntee, J. F. Wishart, S. I. Lall-Ramnarine 251. Trace metal concentrations in soils on the campus of Southern Connecticut State University. J. W. Gleason, G. S. Kowalczyk 252. Ultraviolet analysis of the toluene fraction in bitumen from Agbadu (Western Nigeria). O. K. Theophilus, O. Rex 253. Using a bubble column to measure surface activity for wastewater remediation. A. Uu, C. Schnitzer 254. "Wood" you use it? S. Rowland, B. Barfield, J. H. Owens Jr., D. Wilson, J. K. Metzker Section J BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Inorganic Chemistry Cosponsored by SOCED

258. Comparison of the catalytic activity of water-soluble ruthenium complexes toward phosphate ester hydrolysis. S. R. Finnell, T. J. Ahmed, D. R. Tyler 259. Inorganic interface design as a tool for optimization of conducting polymers. K. Pueschel, J. J. Martin, C. J. Timpson, A. Sattler, P. N. Kariuki, J. Shah, W.E. Jones Jr. 260. New dibenzofuran-based tridentate ligands for transition metal catalysts for environmentally benign oxidation reactions. D. Foster, A. Ali, J. Erier, M. Fujita 261. New indole-based tri- and tetradentate ligands and their complexes. K. G. Perkins, A. Ali, M. Fujita 262. Porphyrin nanoparticle supramolecular systems and their catalytic activities. J. D. Arijeloye, G. Smeureanu, C. M. Drain 263. Solution behavior of an octabrominated gadolinium porphyrin. J. H. Owens Jr., R. A. Richards 264. Synthesis of chelated gadolinium as MR contrast agents for zinc detection. R. M. Boiteau, J. L. Major, T. J. Meade 265. Transfer hydrogénation of acetophenone catalyzed by ruthenium-arene complexes with β-diketonate and β-ketoiminate ligands. L S. VakHvia, T. A. Passik, L. M. Stafford, D. A. Freedman 266. Wide bite angle phosphines: Synthesis, structure and catalysis. R. J. Gilliard, B. P. Morgan, R. C. Smith Section Κ BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Medicinal Chemistry Cosponsored by MEDI and SOCED N. Bakowski, Organizer, Presiding 2:30-4:30 267. Design, synthesis, and activity of small molecule inhibitors of the TNFa/TNFR interaction. J. M. Davis, C. Pace 268. Liphophilic cations: Synthesis and toxicity of arylphosphonium salts conjugated to hydrocarbons, ureas and polypeptides. S. P. Hersey, J. C. Williams Jr. 269. Lipophilic cations: Synthesis, analysis and HPLC of novel arylphosphonium salts. D. Bennett, J. C. Williams Jr. 270. Lipophilic cations: Synthesis, analysis and screening of aryl phosphonium salt esters. L Chin, J. C. Williams Jr. 271. Molecular modeling of polymer day nanocomposites: Lysine and arginine in montmorillonite. L Tribe, A. Davis, G. Joanis 272. Photosensitized oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and uric acid in the presence of an alkylating quinone. Y. Inostroza, A. E. Alegria 273. Practical and scalable synthesis of amino acids and their use as precursor molecules of the bifuntional ligands for cancer therapy and imaging. H. Lee, H-S. Chong 274. Synthesis and characterization of amino phenyl propane derivatives as monoamine transport inhibitors. B. J. Heyen, S. Adrian, K. Wimalasena 275. Synthesis of alkynyl derivatives of substi­ tuted 4-anilinoquinazolines as coupling partners for the Huisgen [3+2] cycloaddi­ tion reaction with novel azides. R. N. Hanson, K. Bailey, A. Visentin, A. Kozhushynan, H. T. Pham

N. Bakowski, Organizer, Presiding 2:30-4:30 255. Application of "click" chemistry to CdSe quantum dots. K. A. Tantillo, R. C. Somers, P. T. Snee, M. G. Bawendi, D. G. Nocera 256. C-H···! hydrogen bonding networks in 1,3-d/5-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazolium iodide. C. D. Abemethy, J. P. Jasinski, C. E. Johnson, A. S. Metell, J. W. Queen 257. Catalytic oxidation of alkenes involving a nafion-bound (peroxynitro)cobalt porphyrin intermediate. D. Kavanagh, J. A. Goodwin

34-TECH

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

276. Synthesis offluorine-18labelled 1-fluoro-2propanamine viaring-openingof an acylaziridine with fluoride: A new synthon for positron emission tomography. E. M. van Oosten, N. Zadikian, K. A. Stephenson, A. A. Wilson, A. K. Yudin, J. H. Meyer, S. Houle, N. Vasdev 277. Synthesis of new porphyrin derivatives for photodynamic therapy. S. Laurent, D. Samaroo, C. M. Drain Section L BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Nanotechnotogy Cosponsored by SOCED and BIOHW N. Bakowski, Organizer, Presiding 2:30-4:30 278. Controlled functionalization and quantifi­ cation of organic molecules on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. R. E. Kohl, B. G. Trewyn, V. S-Y. Un 279. Electrochemical characterization of self-organized gold nanoparticle-cytochrome c superstruc­ tures. A. Piper, A. S. Harper-Leatherman 280. Growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a 5 gas mixture of H2, CH 4 , CO, C 0 2 and H 2 0. D. Callahan Jr., J. Leong, E. Pandowo, K. Ziemer, D. Papageorgiou, A. Sacco Jr. 281. Imaging nanoparticles using an EasyScan2 scanning tunneling micro­ scope. Y. Z. Snyder, G. W. Britton, T. James, A. Clement, A. Talerico, K. Schreffler, S. Wurzbacher, P. Furlan 282. Liquid crystal organization of carbon nanotubes. G. Y. Georgiev, R. Doyle, A. Ahlawat, C. Rocheleau, B. Mulkem, J. Mongeau, A. Ogilvie 283. Polyaniline-enzyme nanocomposites for biosensors. B. Khan, W. L'Amoreaux, D. M. Samo 284. Reaction pH and the morphological evolution of polyaniline nanofibers. K. Ampofo, D. M. Samo 285. Ring-substitution and the formation of polyaniline nanomaterials. S. Da Sirva, D. M. Samo Section M BCEC Exhibit Hall-B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Organic Chemistry Cosponsored by SOCED N. Bakowski, Organizer, Presiding 2:30-4:30 286. Alcohol formation: Reduction of carbonyl compounds using green chemistry. L Ritchie, A. B. Todaro 287. Approaches to the synthesis of selenium analogs of dapsone. J. A. Hoch, K. H. Le, L. J. Guziec 288. Arylphosphonium salts conjugated to polypeptides. S. Adediron, J. C. Williams Jr., J. Henkler 289. Aryl substituted corroies: Synthesis and characterization of free base and cobalt containing derivative. C. A. Pruente, C. A. Hansen 290. Biomimetic receptor-modified chromophores as biosensors. R. J. Gilliard, R. C. Smith 291. Bipyridyl-incorporatjng pi-conjugated metallopolymer progenitors. A. Dennis, R. C. Smith 292. Concomitant crystallization of a hydrocar­ bon as conformational polymorphs. R. I. Goldstein, T. R. Newhouse, D. M. Thamattoor, R. R. Conry 293. Design and synthesis of a novel, natural product-based chemotherapeutic agent. S. E. Winkleman, M. F. Mechelke 294. Design and synthesis of novel goniothalamin analogs. A. A. Dillman, M. F. Mechelke 295. Design and synthesis of novel Ras famesyl protein transferase inhibitors. Κ. Ε. Walters, M. F. Mechelke 296. Withdrawn.

297. Direct synthesis of tamoxifen and related triaryl-substituted alkenes via two-fold extrusion reactions. I. R. Bothwell, F. Guziec Jr. 298. Electronic perturbation of the copper(ll)catalyzed aminohydroxylation of alkenes: Mechanistic insights and synthetic improvements. A. C. Jacobsen, D. J. Michaelis, T. P. Yoon 299. Elusive planar bond shifting in [12]annulene: The failure of CASPT2 in singlet diradical systems. M. N. Braten, C. Castro, W. L. Kamey, M. G. Gutierrez, J. Moll 300. Fragmentation of largering-fusedcydopropylcarbinyl radicals. D. E. Jones, G. Kujawski, A. Girardin, D. Le, C. Hunt, E. J. Kantorowski 301. Green chemistry using bismuth com­ pounds: Bismuth triflate catalyzed allylation of dioxolanes. R. S. Mohan, J. E. Christensen, M. Huddle 302. Green chemistry: Scaled-up solvent-free synthesis of chalcones and epoxkJation of synthesized chalcones with hydrogen peroxide. M. R. O'Brien, A. B. Todaro 303. Hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of o-quinones. D. Nayyar, C. Taylor, J. Zhang 304. Hydrogen-bonded structures as organocatalytic motifs. J. P. Morgan, K.R. Sanders 305. Syntheses of tailor-made open-chain oligopyrroles. E. S. BarUett, R. Krueger, M. Broering 306. Kinetic isotope effects in the rearrange­ ment of β-acetoxycarbene. J. M. Nguyen, M. J. Schnermann, D. M. Thamattoor 307. Kinetic studies of alcohol acylation using N-heterocydic carbene chloroform adducts as organocatalysts. J. P. Morgan, J. H. Shrimp 308. Microwave mediated reactions toward synthesis of radiosensitjzers. W. Price, M. J. Scheuermann 309. Nudeophilic asymmetric substitution at silicon. C. A. Meece, W. R. Winchester 310. Oxidation of phenols with o-iodoxybenzoic acid. J. Phillips, C. Taylor, J. Zhang 311. Oxidation of vanillyl alcohol to vanillin: Comparing TEMPO reactions. E. Zabtowsky, S. lacobucci, C. Jaworek-Lopes 312. Pd-catalyzed [3+2] cydoaddition between carbon dioxide and (2-(acetoxymethyl)-1 -buten-3-yl)trimethylsilane. A. D. Worthy, G. E. Greco 313. Phase vanishing reactions: Use of solid reagents and substrates. N. M. Windmon, V. Dragojlovic 314. Preparations and biological evaluation of new anthrapyrazoles and bis-anthrapyrazoles. K. A. Marshall, H. Liang, X. Wu, B. B. Hasinoff, L. J. Guziec, F. Guziec Jr. 315. Progress in the development of protect­ ing group strategies for alkylguanidines. R. Funkhouser, J. Yox, J. A. Asper 316. Reaction of acethydrazides with ketones: 2. Investigation of the effect of electronwithdrawing groups. A. E. Samek, J. Sullivan, D. L. Dillon 317. Reactions of hexachloroacetone with primary diamines: Synthesis and charac­ terization of N.N'-ethylenebistrichloroacetamkte. J. Bakalis, J. H. Shin 318. Reactivity of tris(trimethylsilyl)phosphitefTMSP): Reactions with chlorofor­ mâtes. L. Vargas, J. D. Mammano 319. Regiospecrfic synthesis of 1-methyl-4vinylimidazole. B. Granger, C. G. Collison, T. W. Smith 320. Sensitized organic photooxidations on solid surfaces. A. A. Andriello, D. L. Dillon 321. Solid-phase synthesis of rationally designed PPAR δ ligands. L N. Aldrich, J. D. Dortch, Κ. Μ. Bucholtz 322. Solution conformation of longifolene. V. Patel, S. Karimi, G. Subramaniam 323. Studies toward the total synthesis of a novel 7-lactone. J. Smith, W. T. Spencer III, M. Agusto, C. G. Collison 324. Synthesis and biological evaluation of inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin metalloprotease. J. R. Widom, P. Wipf 325. Synthesis and biological studies of prekinamycin derivatives. K. S. Feldman, K.V. Potts 326. Synthesis and characterization of substi­ tuted aryl acetic and propanoic adds. N. A. Tavernier, K. L. Gomes, C. A. Hansen

CHED 327. Synthesis and characterization of thiolcontaining nucleobases for DNA modifica­ tion. A. A. Lakha, P. A. Bailey, C. E. Immoos 328. Synthesis of biaryliodonium salts using m-CPBA as a versatile oxidant. J. Letessier, S. M. Paradine, B. Witulski 329. Synthesis and reactions of 4-aryl-3pyrrolin-2-ones. K. P. White, S. J. P. Yoon-Miller, E. T. Pelkey 330. Synthesis, characterization, and confor­ mational analysis of amido-ester and diamide liquid crystal twist agents. J. A. Rego, M. C. Mellen, C. Ha, M. L Hughs 331. Synthesis of 13 C-labeled chrysenes for soil sorption studies. J. Noguiera, L. Phun, P. Wang, C. Jaworek-Lopes 332. Synthesis of acyloxy substituted dicarboxylic acids. A. M. Pappas, J. Joerres, C. A. Hansen 333. Synthesis of anion binding capsules intended for aqueous solutions using olefin metathesis. K. M. Yehl, T. Fiehn, S. Kubik 334. Synthesis of chlorambucil analogs. A. Khetani, G. Subramaniam, W. Saffran, S. Karimi 335. Synthesis of ηοη-β-lactam inhibitors for AmpC. R. A. Powers, C. J. Davis, R. L Kubiak, U. J. Mishra, R. P. Smart, J. M. Tomlinson 336. Synthesis of substituted tri-aryl amines for use as electrocatalysts. L. K. Steffen, A. D. Pelle, J. Koliani, M. Shinall, A. J. Fry Section Ν

347. Survival of the fittest: Using a genetic mutation algorithm to design better fuel cell catalysts. N. Froemming, G. Henkelman

Research in Chemical Education Organic Chemistry, Student Conceptions, Skill Development and Metacognition

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Polymer Chemistry Cosponsored by PMSE, POLY, and SOCED Presiding

2:30-4:30 348. Development of reactive coatings for decontamination of chemical and biological hazards. D. L Wang, F. Gu, H. M. Jensen, C. E. Immoos 349. Electrospinning mesoporous bridged organosilanes. M. K. Finch, K. Balkus Jr., H. A. Liu 350. Polyurethane synthesis for use with polydiacetylene strain sensors. C. J. Pollock, J. S. Kauffman, W. T. Pennington 351. Synthesis and characterization of por­ phyrins immobilized in a sol-gel matrix. D. E. McCall, P. Simon, D. Nguyen, C. H. Lisse, R. A. Richards Many Faces of Chemistry: Merck Index Women in Chemistry Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and CHED

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Undergraduate Research Poster Session Physical Chemistry Cosponsored by PHYS and SOCED

M O N D A Y EVENING

N. Bakowski, Organizer,

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Presiding

2:30-4:30 337. Computational study of the keto/enol equilibrium in 2-fluoro-beta-diketones, (R1COCHFCOR2 with R2 = -CH 3 ) and trifluormethyl-beta-diketones (RICOCH2COR2 with R2 =-CF3) using semiempirical method AM1. J. G. Estevez, M. E. Maldonado, M. Perez, L. Ramirez-Velez 338. Electric field strength of the peptide helix macrodipole as measured by intramolecu­ lar stark spectroscopy. E. Falcone, M. Kubasik 339. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies of short, helical peptides in nonaqueous solvents. M. Guildford, M. Kubasik 340. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the organization of SAMs on nanoasperities. N. Pearsall, R. L. Jones, J. D. Batteas 341. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy of biomimetic catalysts for the production of hydrogen. B. W. Caplins, T. A. Gutowski, C. J. Stromberg, E. J. Heilweil 342. Measuring the ionization of salts and weak acids using freezing point depres­ sion measurements. S. Yau, P. Svoronos, D. M. Sarno, P. Irigoyen, G. Subramaniam 343. Nucleation behavior of coordination complexes in confined geometry. K. Allain, C. Luis, S. Lee 344. Photoinduced electron transfer in a quaterthiophene-amide-anthraquinone dyad. A. Ferreira, W. Xia, J. Wan, C. H. Chow, G. Jones II 345. Porous silicon with crystallographically defined macropores created by wet-chemi­ cal etching. M. E. Dudley, K. W. Kolasinski 346. Proton transport in water: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations performed in the complete basis set limit. T. C. Berkelbach, H-S. Lee, M. E. Tuckerman

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Section A

Sci-Mix C. Middlecamp, Organizer,

Section A Seaport Constitution Room

Section 0

N. Bakowski, Organizer,

TUESDAY MORNING

Presiding

8:00-10:00

62-67, 83, 85, 89, 91, 93, 97,100-101. See previous listings.

B. Blake, Organizer,

Section Β Seaport Plaza A Assessing Chemistry Laboratory Courses Non-Major and First Year Chemistry

Section Β BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

C. R. Ward,

Organizer

J. Reeves, Organizer, Successful Student Affiliates Chapters Cosponsored by SOCED N. Bakowski, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 359. When push comes to shove: Student development of arrow-pushing formalism (APF) skills. J. P. Anderson, G. M. Bodner 8:55 360. Approaches in synthesis problem solving by sophomore organic chemistry students. D. P. Cartrette, P. M. Mayo 9:15 361. Chemistry conceptions and mis­ conceptions of undergraduate organic chemistry students. J. M. Duis, L. L. Jones 9:35 Intermission. 9:45 362. Assessment of organic molecule stereochemistry through a formal inter­ view. T. A. Miller, M. Enoh, E. Reed 10:05 363. Meaning of organic chemistry. G. Bhattacharyya 10:25 364. Graduate students' perspectives on chemists and chemistry. B. Walls, G. Bhattacharyya 10:45 Intermission. 10:55 365. Combined effect of metacognitive activities in chemistry problem solving. S. Sandi-Urena, M. M. Cooper 11:15 366. Multiple instructional representa­ tions for promoting concept learning and attitude for science learning. I-Y. Cho, Y. Kang 11:35 367. Development of nanoconcept inventories: A big task! A. K. Szeto, C. S. Cahill, N. A. Unterman, L. J. Lauhon, G. Light, D. L. Drane, G. M. Bodner, J. S. Krajcik, E. A. Hagedorn 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

Presiding

8:00-10:00 352. Fairmont State University chemistry in the community. S. M. Boblett, J. W. Moran, M. Damm, J. M. Carlile, M. J. Scanlon, A. Baur 353. Girls in science: An outreach program to encourage young women into STEM disciplines. J. C Deutsch, T. L. Boethin, M. J. Bechaver, T. Holcomb, A. G. Cavinato 354. Growing green at Suffolk: A community approach. A. Marchetti, Κ. Β. Schallies, C Guifarro, K. Krevolin, A. Marciniak, K. Bélanger, J. Urbanczyk 355. Science Society of CSUDH right on NCW themes. T. Davis, C DeCastro, C Glenn, J. Osorio, S. Pappatheodorou 356. Texas Wesleyan University Summer Science Camp: Enhancing college awareness. D. A. Rodriguez, C R. Lewis, R. E. Rodriguez 357. The many faces of chemistry: Undergraduate program at NORM '07. J. C Deutsch, T. L. Boethin, M. J. Bechaver, T. Holcomb, A. G. Cavinato 358. University of Connecticut SAACS chapter activities. V. A. Williams, K. Longo, C. Walker, M. Ellis, I. L Lagadic, T. A. Miller, M. W. Peczuh Academic Employment Initiative Sponsored by ΑΕΙ, Cosponsored by Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, WCC, and PRES

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 368. Chemistry and engineering work­ ing together for assessment at Milwaukee School of Engineering. A-M. L. Nickel, C. Barnicki 9:00 369. Assessing students' abilities to make connections: Improving the lab experience for non-majors. E. D. Wischow, G. M. Bodner 9:25 370. Assessment of the effect of inter­ national TAs on student attitude and learning in a first year chemistry laboratory program. W. L. Keeney-Kennicutt 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 371. Practical laboratory assessment. C. Kieber, C. R. Ward, J. Reeves 10:25 372. Assessing online laboratory experiences. K. C. McGill, A. Turns, C. McTeer, A. M. Smith, O. M. Ezeokoli, M. Johnson 10:50 373. Assessing online laboratories. J. Civelli, J. H. Reeves Section C Seaport Flagship Room Undergraduate Chemistry for Liberal Arts Students Cosponsored by WCC E. Del Federico,

Organizer

J. M. Iriarte-Gross, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 374. Engaging non-science majors to learn chemistry in a nontraditional way. E. Gravely

9:00 375. Fostering student engagement via interdisciplinary themes: A liberal arts approach to chemistry for non-majors. L. A. Porter Jr. 9:25 376. Linking non-majors chemistry to real-life and other disciplines. A. B. Moore 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 377. Science and art during the intersession: Engaging the non-science major. M. S. Leonard 10:25 378. Frontiers of science: A nonmajors course experience for arts and communications students. K. Kostecka 10:50 379. Mobile single-sided NMR spec­ troscopy in the chemistry curriculum of Liberal Arts and Fine Arts majors. E. Del Federico, S. Centeno, L. Isolani, J. Newman, A. Jerschow 11:15 Concluding Remarks. Section D Seaport Plaza Β Computers in Chemical Education, Past, Present and Future: Symposium in Honor of Professor Donald Rosenthal T. J. Zielinski,

Organizer

G. R. Long, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 380. Donald Rosenthal and the Com­ mittee on Computers in Chemical Educa­ tion: A retrospective. S. E. Van Bramer 9:00 381. Chemistry and Second Life: Teaching in a virtual world. H. E. Pence 9:25 382. Evolution of computer use in physical chemistry: An enriching odyssey. T. J. Zielinski, G. R. Long 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 383. Design of computer-based visual­ ization and animation: What theories of learning apply? E. M. Dorland 10:25 384. Feedback. D. W. Brooks 10:50 385. Preservation of chemistry instruc­ tional software. J. L. Holmes, J. W. Moore From Peptide Bond Formation to Functional Proteins: Symposium in Honor of Ada Yonath Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by Committee on International Activities, CHED, PROF, and BIOL Going With the Information Flow: Chemical Abstracts Service 100th Anniversary Presidential Symposium Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by HIST, CINF, and CHED TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Seaport Constitution Room Research in Chemical Education Program Development and Pedagogy B. Blake, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 386. Making the implicit explicit in the teaching of chemical equilibrium. D. J. Yaron, J. Davenport, M. Karabinos, J. G. Greeno, G. Leinhardt 1:55 387. Formative assessment as a peda­ gogy in General Chemistry. S. A. Jansen, J. Ducette, J. Stull, J. Schiller, L. Roberts, T. Gilles 2:15 388. The many faces of formative assessment in university science courses. J. Stull, S. A. Jansen, J. Schiller, J. Ducette, L. Roberts 2:35 Intermission. 2:45 389. Blended learning in general chem­ istry, part I: Redesigning a course based on pedagogical literature. I. Shibley, Κ. Ε. Amaral 3:05 390. Blended learning in general chem­ istry, part II: Outcomes of the redesigned course. Κ. Ε. Amaral, I. Shibley 3:25 391. Recruitment and retention of chemistry majors: The Chemistry Scholars Program. B. Blake 3:45 Intermission.

TECH-35

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHED

3:55 392. Workshop approach in physical chemistry: A preliminary evaluation. L. B. Garmon, F. A. Khan 4:15 393. Attitudes of general chemistry I students to small group learning experi­ ence. G. A. Brown Wright 4:35 394. Self-efficacy beliefs of women in chemistry: Influences and career effects. M. L. Grunert, G. M. Bodner 4:55 Concluding Remarks. Section Β

Assessing Chemistry Laboratory Courses Laboratory Assessment Beyond the First Year C. R. W a r d ,

2:00 408. Wikis, hyperglossaries and web literacy. R. E. Belford 2:25 409. Electronic quizzes for quantum chemistry. E. L. Harvey, T. J. Zielinski 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 410. Teaching of force-field based modeling techniques through EMUDA modeling. J. N. Grima, R. Gatt, T. G. Chircop Bray 3:25 411. Teaching organic reaction mecha­ nisms using CAI. J. H. Penn, A. Al-Shammari 3:50 412. The past, present, and future of spectral reference sources and software in academic teaching and research. G. M. Banik, L. Collins, M. Scandone Chemical Information Education Round Table Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHED

Organizer WEDNESDAY MORNING

J. Reeves, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 395. Challenges associated with national lab assessment programs. T. A. Holme, K. Murphy 2:00 396. Characterizing inquiry in the under­ graduate chemistry laboratory: A rubric to aid curriculum development and evalua­ tion. M. Towns, M. E. Fay, S. L. Bretz 2:25 397. Implementing the Science Writing Heuristic and POGIL strategies in the organic chemistry laboratory. J. D. Schroeder, T. J. Greenbowe 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 398. Hypothesis driven assessment of an NMR laboratory curriculum. K. C. Earnheart, Κ. Τ. Mueller 3:25 399. Assessment of reforms in the physical chemistry laboratory. J. D. Batteas, P. S. Cremer, H. C. Gaede, C. Hilty, S. W. North, D. H. Son 3:50 400. Design and evaluation of an inte­ grated undergraduate research laboratory. J. D. Lewis, H. Altmiller, E. F. Healy, M. A. Kopecki-Fjetland Section C Seaport Flagship Room Undergraduate Chemistry for Liberal Arts Students Cosponsored by WCC E. Del Federico,

Organizer

J. M. Iriarte-Gross, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 401. Chemistry in the kitchen: A labora­ tory adventure for liberal arts students. R. E. Rivera-Hainaj 2:00 402. CSI Wenham: Outreach to the community using forensic science. D. J. Tshudy 2:25 403. Challenging course on medicinal chemistry for non-science majors. M. G. Zysmilich 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 404. Liberal arts students learn well through song, dance and drama. L. J. Jones 3:25 405. Using learning communities to attract chemistry majors at a liberal arts college. W. A. deProphetis, M. C. Gelabert, N. P. Richardson 3:50 406. Explorations in chemistry: A course for pre-service teachers. N. J. Gardner 4:15 Concluding Remarks.

B. Blake, Organizer,

Computers in Chemical Education, Past, Present and Future: Symposium in Honor of Professor Donald Rosenthal G. R. Long and T. J. Zielinski,

Organizers

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 407. Independent student use of inter­ net resources to solve chemistry problems. G. R. Long, C. McCue

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 413. Laboratory ^conundrum: A mixedmethods comparison of the traditional laboratory, inquiry, and classroom-based authentic research. C. B. Russell, M. R. Abraham, G. C. Weaver 8:55 414. Introducing advanced inorganic chemistry concepts in the high school classroom. D. J. Collins, N. P. Grove, N. P. Guerin, H-C. Zhou 9:15 415. Value of research: The next attempt for assessing professional growth. W. J. F. Hunter, G. M. Ferrence, S. L. Persson, R. House, T. B. Higgins, M. A. Jones, J. E. Otto 9:35 Intermission. 9:45 416. Withdrawn. 10:05 417. Development of a tutorial instruc­ tion method to study student understand­ ing of solutions. S. A. Cunningham, D. J. Wink, S. K. Brennan, M. Bertenthal, S. R. Goldman 10:25 Intermission. 10:35 418. The use of storyboards and student-constructed animation in college general chemistry. J. T. Watkins, V. M. Williamson, R. D. Macfarlane 10:55 419. A study of the impact of spatial skills training for non-engineering students. P. Charlesworth, H. Kedmon, S. Sorby, T. Drummer 11:15 420. The effect of macroscopic and particulate visualizations on student rea­ soning. T. Gilbreath, V. M. Williamson, R. D. Macfarlane 11:35 421. Visible spectroscopy and student perceptions of the material and immaterial worlds. S. J. Donnelly 11:55 Concluding Remarks. Section Β

Section C Seaport Flagship Room The Laboratory and First-Year Chemistry D. A. Katz, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 428. 40-Plus years of laboratory experi­ ments. D. A. Katz 9:00 429. Observing and measuring the macroscopic world in freshmen chemistry lab. S. J. Donnelly 9:25 430. Laboratory activities for a large, first-year chemistry course. F. Garafalo, E. DePierro, R. Toomey 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 431. Texas A&M University and the first year program: Investment, change and sustainability. Ε. Ε. Simanek 10:25 432. Creative scientific inquiry experi­ ence in first year chemistry. T. R. Brewer 10:50 433. Incorporating research into the first-year chemistry laboratory. J. Ford, T. A. Newton, C. K. Prudente Section D Seaport Plaza Β Computers in Chemical Education, Past, Present and Future: Symposium in Honor of Professor Donald Rosenthal T. J. Zielinski,

Organizer

G. R. Long, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 434. PC to PC communications: A portal to science. E. Mercado, L. Gonzalez, E. Ferrer, M. E. Castro 9:00 435. Using Web 2.0 in a student-cen­ tered approach to teach quantum mechan­ ics to graduate students. T. A. Baker, A. Aspuru-Guzik 9:25 436. Revitalizing the communication of chemical information. J. Corkery, K. Schmidt, B. Kelley, R. Tolbert, A. Nicholls 9:50 437. Geometry prediction using Micro­ soft Excel. R. A. Gross Jr. 10:15 Intermission. 10:25 438. Illustrating dynamic chemical processes with Microsoft Excel. T. S. Kuntzleman 10:50 439. A neophyte's venture into computerland teaching: An online GOB course. C. E. MacGowan 11:15 440. Student-designed computer learning modules for general chemistry. M. AI Sadah, M. Al-Saffar, J. AI Thani, M. M. Bader

Section A Writing to Learn: Using Writing to Engage Students in the Chemistry Classroom Cosponsored by CINF

Seaport Constitution Room Research in Chemical Education Tutorials, Assessment and Learning Styles

Organizer Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 422. Grading writing assignments without investing an inordinate amount of time. I. Shibley 9:00 423. Controversial science: A writing assignment in general chemistry. B. W. May 9:25 424. Learning curve: Reflections from exam rewrites. K. Anderson 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 425. Development of content under­ standings using student journals in an elementary education majors course. D. J. Wink, M. Dianovsky

2:45 444. An effective strategy for predicting success in general chemistry: Proper placement of first-year students. B. Blake, K. A. Chambers 3:05 445. Evaluating threats to the validity of a particulate multiple-choice gas question. M. J. Sanger 3:25 446. Assessing the role of learning-style preferences on three different measures of learning—recall, conceptualization, and transfer. J. L. Hilsenbeck-Fajardo, J. P. Suits, R. M. Hyslop 3:45 Intermission. 3:55 447. Qualitative inquiry into the effects of visualization on high school chemistry students' learning process of molecular structure. S. R. Vaidya, S. Deratzou 4:15 448. General chemistry education on the border: A case study from El Paso community college. S. H. Abbas 4:35 Concluding Remarks. Section Β Seaport Plaza A Writing to Learn: Using Writing to Engage Students in the Chemistry Classroom Cosponsored by CINF L. Tribe,

Organizer

I. Shibley, Organizer,

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Seaport Plaza A

L. Tribe, Organizer,

Seaport Plaza Β

36-TECH

Research in Chemical Education Laboratories, Skill Development and Student Conceptions

I. Shibley,

Section D

Η. Ε. Pence,

Seaport Constitution Room

10:25 426. Role of nontraditional texts in organic chemistry. Κ. Ε. Amaral 10:50 427. Nanotechnology as a topic for teaching freshman writing. A. L. Marsh 11:15 Discussion. 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

B. Blake, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 441. Quantitative analysis of a webbased math tutorial for general chemistry and the student response. M. D. Barker, J. Heppert, B. A. Barker 1:55 442. Feedback and attitude study of online web-based learning (OWL) in first semester general chemistry. T. L. Sarvela, V. M. Williamson, R. D. Macfarlane 2:15 443. The second generation of a math diagnostic tool for introductory chemistry. C. A. Morse 2:35 Intermission.

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 449. Overcoming student resistance to writing with CPR™. W. L. Keeney-Kennicutt, A. B. Gunersel, N. Simpson 2:00 450. Students writing for students: Peer-reviewed class notes in general chemistry courses. L. Tribe 2:25 451. Reading, writing, and (web) roving: Student engagement through short focused assignments. Μ. Ε. Schott 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 452. Scientific argument exhibited by students using the Science Writing Heuris­ tic format for laboratory notebooks. A. Choi, B. M. Hand, T. J. Greenbowe 3:25 453. More than lab reports: Integrating information literacy and writing-to-learn in organic chemistry labs. T. R. Turner, G. B. Blalock, C. Schuetz 3:50 454. Investigational writing exercises for undergraduate biochemistry experiments. P. J. Higgins 4:15 Discussion. 4:25 Concluding Remarks. Section C Seaport Flagship Room The Laboratory and First-Year Chemistry D. A. Katz, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 455. Statistical techniques as an inte­ gral part of first-year chemistry laboratory classes. J . N. Grima, R. Gatt 2:00 456. Multiple uses of instrumentation in the general chemistry program. C. R. Pulliam, W. F. Pfeiffer 2:25 457. Project based advanced general chemistry laboratory. I. Black 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 458. Rethinking introductory under­ graduate organic laboratory. G. M. Gawlik, J. T. Henssler, B. P. Coppola 3:25 459. Laboratory experiments and activi­ ties for the 21st century. D. A. Katz

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

CHED/CHAS Section D Seaport Plaza B Green Chemistry Resources and Activities J. M. Smist, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 460. "Green" learning activities in the general chemistry curricula. S. J. Donnelly 2:00 461. Preparation of biodiesel using microwave heating in an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course. T. A. Miller, Ν. Ε. Leadbeater 2:25 462. Extension of an undergraduate green organic chemistry experiment: Asymmetric reduction of carbonyls with polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS) and a chiral fluoride catalyst. Κ. Ε. O'Brien, D. K. Wicht 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 463. Green chemistry in the organic lab: An ongoing process at Siena College. A. B. Todaro, M. R. O'Brien, L. Ritchie 3:25 464. Engine emissions with biodiesel fuels and biodiesel blends. B. W. May THURSDAY MORNING Section A Seaport Constitution Room General Papers Animation and Technology in Chemistry Curriculum T. A. Miller,

Organizer

M. L. Dean,

Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 465. QSAR World: A free online resource dedicated to Quantitative Struc­ ture-Activity Relationship modeling. S. K. Dogra, A. Parkhe 8:25 466. Animation makes college chemis­ try more animated. Y. Hu, L. Hu 8:45 467. Communication for the 21st cen­ tury: Podcasting in the chemistry lab. W. M. Heiserman, B. Dixon, P. Bueno 9:05 468. Fertile fodder for research. L. J. Jones 9:25 Intermission. 9:35 469. Five years of computer based technology in the general chemistry class­ room. G. D. Phelan 9:55 470. K-20+ Expository programs: Enhancing chemistry education. J. Lopez-Garriga, R. Camacho II, S. Mercado 10:15 471. Self-tutoring for advanced prob­ lems in freshman chemistry. G. Subramaniam, J. L. Zambrana, H. D. Gafney

8:25 473. Entropy first: A novel, integrated, molecular approach to the physical chem­ istry curriculum. S. F. Cartier 8:45 474. Group work between students in different science courses: General chemis­ try and pharmacy. T. A. Miller, E. J. Neth, R. H. Bogner 9:05 Intermission. 9:15 475. Integrating biology and chemistry in a first-semester college course. G. B. Gillis. A. L. Springer, S. M. Decatur 9:35 476. Peer led team learning (PLTL) in organic chemistry laboratory. A. Fraiman, V. Curtis-Palmer 9:55 477. Science from the S.T.A.R.T.: Integrating primary scientific literature into the 2-year community college curriculum. S. Kolchens Section C Seaport Flagship Room Visualization and Learning Chemistry L. J. Jones, Organizer,

Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 478. Bring chemistry alive in the class­ room. J. L. Holmes, W. F. Coleman, J. J. Jacobsen, J. W. Moore 8:25 479. Using animated flowcharts to teach organic reactions to the non-science major students at Clayton State University. S. F. Hornbuckle 8:45 480. Using PowerPoint animations to illustrate biochemical processes. S. S. Zimmerman 9:05 Intermission. 9:15 481. Visualization of hydrogen bonding in the water dimer. M. Ayoub 9:35 482. Visualization of close-packed crystal structures using both primitive and non-primitive unit cells. R. C Rittenhouse, L. M. Soper, J. A. Hawkins, J. L. Rittenhouse 9:55 483. Visualization of fluorescence and phosphorescence using demos, slides, hand motions and song. K. Fallo, G. DeMenna 10:15 Intermission. 10:25 484. Lecture demonstrations that increase student understanding. P. M.Todebush 10:45 485. Probing the effect of visual and kinesthetic teaching methodologies on middle school science students. K. T. Powell, K. L. Wooley, C. J. Anderson 11:05 486. Concrete models and physical movement help students visualize. L. J. Jones 11:25 Concluding Remarks. Section D Seaport Plaza Β Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) Introduction and General Chemistry

Section Β R. S. Moog,

Seaport Plaza A

F. J. Creegan,

General Papers Group Work and Integrated Curriculum T. A. Miller, C. Cardillo,

Organizer Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 472. Collaborative experiment between environmental chemistry and instrumental analysis laboratory courses. T. A. Jackman

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

10:45 494. Implementing POGIL: One step at a time. J . L. Sarquis 11:05 495. Overcoming fear of perceived hurdles in implementation of POGIL. C. M. Partigianoni 11:25 Panel Discussion. THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Seaport Constitution Room General Papers T. A. Miller, Organizer,

Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 496. Adapting research for laboratory experiments in undergraduate environ­ mental chemistry courses. J. F. Hauri 1:25 497. Drug design for HIV-1 integrase with an undergraduate researcher. J. B. Ealy, S. Aggarwal 1:45 498. Pros and cons of microwaveassisted organic synthesis in the under­ graduate organic chemistry laboratory. C. B. McGowan, Ν. Ε. Leadbeater 2:05 Intermission. 2:15 499. Research-inspired organic chemis­ try experiments for the undergraduate laboratory: Suzuki-Miyaura and BuchwaldHartwig coupling reactions. A. L. Kohnen, M. Twardowski, R. L. Danheiser 2:35 500. Undergraduate laboratory renais­ sance. R. W. Gurney Section Β Seaport Plaza A General Papers T. A. Miller,

Organizer

M. L. Dean,

Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 501. Candy engineering: A module for teaching fifth graders mass, density, and volume. M. Birnkrant, P. Blount, E. Fromm, A. K. Fontecchio 1:25 502. Densities and compositions of pennies. D. C. Haagenson 1:45 Intermission. 1:55 503. Enhancing student learning in general chemistry: A case study from El Paso community college. S. H. Abbas 2:15 504. Investigation on the relationships between gender, mental capacity, reason­ ing ability, and chemistry achievement. E. Hacieminoglu, E. Alp, H. Ertepinar 2:35 505. Post-Mendeleevian evolution of the periodic table. G. Katz 2:55 Intermission. 3:05 506. Project Crossover: Early interest in chemistry. A. V. Maltese, R. H. Tai 3:25 507. Theory of electrical conductivity. Y. Gankin, V. Gankin 3:45 508. Theory of metallic bonding. Y. Gankin, V. Gankin

Organizer Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 487. POGIL and the POGIL project. R. S. Moog 8:25 488. POGIL as a model for general education in chemistry. S. E. Van Bramer 8:45 489. POGIL and quantitative literacy: Combining two learning initiatives. C Coolidge 9:05 Intermission. 9:15 490. Initial assessment of POGIL-IC activities. D. L. Slusher, J. A. Goodwin, A. M. Hitt, T. R. Gilbert, D. M. Hanson 9:35 491. Retention and achievement among underprepared students using POGIL in a two-semeter general chemistry course. B. D. Barker, D. Freistroffer, L. Heasley 9:55 492. Discovery learning in large intro­ ductory chemistry courses at UMBC. W. R. LaCourse, T. Carpenter, D. Hamilton, M. Perks 10:15 Intermission. 10:25 493. General chemistry POGIL in a learning community: Math background and outcomes. H-W. Kim

2:35 513. Discovering the glycolytic pathway with an inexpensive microarray laboratory lesson. W. D. Bonds Jr. 2:55 514. Incorporation of interdisciplinary student-directed research projects in biochemistry/biotechnology laboratories. C. Ispas, J. Warner, J. Njagi, S. Andreescu 3:15 Intermission. 3:25 515. Numeracy project: Analysis of quantitative literacy and achievement in chemistry. T. Neal, C. Geary, D. Weittenhiller 3:45 516. Numeracy project: Using assess­ ment to improve quantitative literacy. C. Geary, T. Neal 4:05 Concluding Remarks. Section D Seaport Plaza Β Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) Implementations Across the Curriculum R. S. Moog,

Organizer

S. E. Van Bramer,

Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 517. POGIL in the laboratory. F. J. Creegan 1:25 518. POGIL with a diverse student population. J. Collins 1:45 519. Do minority students benefit from a change to active learning? A. Straumanis 2:05 Intermission. 2:15 520. Hands on, minds on: Solutions for inquiring minds. B. Howson, D. Krone 2:35 521. Development and implementation of POGIL activities for allied-health bio­ chemistry courses. P. S. Workman 2:55 522. To ask or not to ask . . . that is the question: Using clickers to create a safer chemistry learning environment. D. W. Parkin 3:15 Intermission. 3:25 523. POGIL in the biochemistry class­ room. L. M. Watkins 3:45 524. Preparation and use of analytical POGIL and group exams in the secondyear quantitative analysis course. L. D. Margerum 4:05 Panel Discussion.

CHAS Division of Chemical Health & Safety S. Wawzyniecki Jr. and D. M. Decker, Program Chairs

SOCIAL EVENTS: Executive Committee Breakfast: Sun Programming Luncheon: Mon

Section C SUNDAY AFTERNOON Seaport Flagship Room General Papers T. A. Miller,

Organizer

C. Cardillo,

Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 509. Exploring relationships among students' learning approach and motiva­ tional goals. E. Hacieminoglu, O. Yilmaz Tuzun, H. Ertepinar 1:25 510. Nanochemistry the second time around: Changes made and lessons learned. M. W. Pitcher 1:45 511. Nanoscience and engineering high school research internship program at the University of Alabama. D. E. Nikles, G. B. Thompson 2:05 Intermission. 2:15 512. Student-centered approach to teaching biochemistry. L D. Bastin, A. Nagengast, R. W. Morris

Section A Seaport Seaport A Awards Symposium D. Walters,

Organizer

1:00 1 . Laboratory chemical safety needs in India and Viet Nam. D. Walters, M. Labosky, L. DiBerardinis, L. Keith 1:30 2. Overview of ANSI Z9.2-2006: Design and operation of LEV systems. J. Burton 2:00 3. Take a chemist to lunch. S. DiNardi 2:30 Intermission. 2:35 4. Community colleges and their poten­ tial to provide leadership in grades K-12 chemical health and safety. J. R. Agar Jr. 3:05 5. Recollections on 25 years in chemi­ cal safety: The good, the bad, and the indifferent. Ε. Β. Segal 3:35 6. Who me? Just how does one end up here? F. K. Wood-Black

TECH-37

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHAS/CINF MONDAY MORNING Section A Seaport Seaport A Safety in Nanotechnology Research Cosponsored by BIOHW R. Ogle and K. Jeskie, Organizers 9:00 7. A scientific perspective on the need for and future of nanotechnology. J. M. Pickel, P. F. Britt, L. Horton 9:30 8. A regulatory outlook for "nanosafety". Κ. Β. Jeskie 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 9. The interactions of nanoparticles with cells: Is nano neccesarily bad. M. Rafailovich, N. Pernodet 10:50 10. Applying control banding in the determination of control measures in laboratories using nanoparticles. J. T. Jankovic MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Seaport Seaport A

11:05 26. Science IS-inquiry...safely. L. M. Stroud 11:25 27. It was toxic.it was on the news. I. J. Wilk TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Seaport Seaport A Safety in Nanotechnology Research Cosponsored by BIOHW

1:30 28. Development and use of an indus­ trial hygiene sampling method for nanoparticulates. R. Ogle 2:00 29. Occupational medicine implications of nanoparticulates. P. Lichty 2:30 Intermission. 2:40 30. NIOSH: Nanotechnologies safety and health initiatives. M. Hoover 3:20 31. Challenges of analysis of environ­ mental nanoparticles. G. Casuccio

GINF Division of Chemical Information

R. Phifer and E. A. Talley, Organizers

L. R. Solla, Program Chair

MONDAY EVENING

Teaching Safety G. H. Wahl Jr. and T. Murdock, Organizers 9:00 20. The challenge of managing hazard­ ous wastes from class laboratories. R. Stuart, D. Dubois 9:20 21. 21st Century laboratory design. S. Wawzyniecki Jr. 9:40 22. Are YOU practicing safe chemistry? A. Hazari 10:00 23. Hierarchical MSDS retrieval sys­ tem and analytical capabilities. G. R. Thompson 10:20 Intermission. 10:25 24. Safety considerations for science in the home school environment. F. K. Wood-Black 10:45 25. Safety in academic chemistry laboratories: The Arabic translation. M. M. Bader, A. Hazari

38-TECH

C. F. Huber, Organizer

Herman Skolnik Award Symposium

9:00 9. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics: E-book and beyond. F. Macdonald, D. R. Lide, R. Morris 9:30 10. Challenges in building e-books collections. A. Twiss-Brooks 10:00 11. Doing 18th century chemistry in the 21st century: The value of 18th and 19th century digitized books and journals. S. A. Koch 10:30 12. eBook customers and product design. C. F. Wain 11:00 13. Expect at least six times more usage from e-books than the print version: The acquisitions and usage of a large e-book collection at Texas A&M University. R. Kimball, G. Ives, Κ. Μ. Jackson

R. S. Pearlman and O. F. Guner, Organizers

Section A

BUSINESS MEETINGS: Open Meeting. CINF Division: Mon Open Meeting. Committees on Publi­ cations and Chemical Abstracts: Mon

A. Tropsha and C. A. Lipinski, Organizers

BCEC 252A

Seaport Seaport A

BCEC 252A

BCEC 252A

Section A

Section A

Ε-Books for Chemistry Research and Instruction Cosponsored by CHED

SOCIAL EVENTS: Herman Skolnik Award Reception: Mon Luncheon: Mon Reception: Sun, Tue

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

TUESDAY MORNING

MONDAY MORNING Section A

SUNDAY AFTERNOON Drug Discovery (see COMP, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu)

SUNDAY MORNING

8:00-10:00 17. Did I really just see that? F. Wood-Black 18. Safety: It's not just for the birds. T. Black 19. Where's the hazard? F. Wood-Black

Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn The Foundations of QSAR Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by CINF

BCEC 251

OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST:

Section A

S. Wawzyniecki Jr., Presiding

2:30 23. Ε-Books in chemistry: Are they being used? B. Thomsett-Scott 3:00 24. Aligning authors, publishers, and customers: Finding the right solution for eBooks in chemistry. M. Forster 3:30 25. Transformation of reference books in chemistry from print to electronic: What works and what doesn't. M. Lafferty 4:00 Panel Discussion.

Section Β K. Jeskie and R. Ogle, Organizers

RCRA 2007 & Other Regulatory Issues

1:00 11. Avoiding the million dollar fine: Practical solutions to common hazardous waste laboratory violations. E. A. Talley 1:20 12. Environmental and safety manage­ ment systems; A brief introduction and personal impressions. K. G. Benedict 1:40 13. Environmental management sys­ tems at colleges and universities. T. Balf 2:00 Intermission. 2:20 14. TSCA: How it affects academic institutions. R. Toscano 2:40 15. What's STILL wrong with RCRA. R. Phifer 3:00 16. Life outside of RCRA: The Lab XL Experience. R. Stuart

10:10 Intermission. 10:30 5. Transcriptional connectivity map for biomedical discovery. J. Lamb 10:55 6. GAUDI: An integrated tool for navi­ gating through the small molecule—target protein space. J. Mestres, T. I. Oprea 11:20 7. Relating protein pharmacology by ligand chemistry. M. Keiser, B. L. Roth, B. Armburster, P. Ernsberger, J. J. Irwin, B. K. Shoichet 11:45 8. Hypothesis-driven drug reprofiling based on a novel systems biology approach. F. S. Young

Drug Reprofiling Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW A. Tropsha and C. A. Lipinski, Organizers 8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 1. Mining the receptorome: A powerful approach for predicting efficacies and side effects of repositioned medications. B. R. Roth 8:55 2. Side effect profile prediction: Compu­ tational tackling of big pharma's worst nightmare at an early stage. J. Scheiber, J. L. Jenkins, A. Bender, S. Whitebread, J. Hamon, L Urban, K. Azzaoui, J. H. Nettles, M. Glick, J. W. Davies 9:20 3. Development of high-throughput repurposing technologies. J. Prous Jr., D. Aragones 9:45 4. Use of integrative pharmacology in drug repositioning. T. Barnes

Drug Reprofiling Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW

2:00 14. MLR-1023: A drug candidate for type II diabetes with a novel molecular target discovered by using an in vivo drug repositioning approach. M. S. Saporito, C. A. Lipinski, A. Ochman, D. Koemer, J. Batten, A. Reaume 2:25 15. Construction of a virtual library of endocrine disruptors for in silico target fishing. C. Laggner, L. G. Nashev, D. Schuster, T. Langer, A. Odermatt 2:50 16. "Emergency discovery"; of novel antimicrobials among known drugs in response to new and reemerging infec­ tious threats. A. Cherkasov 3:15 17. Effective and rapid bioactivity profil­ ing using pharmacophore-based parallel screening. T. M. Steindl, D. Schuster, J. Kirchmair, R. Hoffmann, C. Laggner, G. Wolber, T. Langer 3:40 Intermission. 4:00 18. Knowledge-based prediction for alternate indications and targets for known drugs. A. W. E. Chan, J. P. Overington 4:25 19. Synergistic advantages of drug reprofiling and clinical trial offshoring in India. J. Maki 4:50 20. Drug reprofiling platform as a risk leverage strategy in drug discovery. A. Mochizuki 5:15 21. Taking advantage of therapeutic switching: Commercialization in a world of generic substitution. D. Cavalla Section Β

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

BCEC 251 Ε-Books for Chemistry Research and Instruction Cosponsored by CHED C. F. Huber, Organizer 2:00 22. Improving cross-searchability of interactive e-books in Knovel Library by normalizing chemical data. S. I. Gurke

A. Rusinko III, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 26. Fractal properties of representations of chemical libraries. M. Grigorov 9:00 27. Recent trends in library design: "Rational Design" revisited. D. Schnur, C. L. Cavallaro 9:30 28. Generating diverse and biologically relevant ensembles of ligand conformers: Addressing flexible rings using a general­ ized knowledge-based approach. B. B. Masek, R. Dorfman, Κ. Μ. Smith, R. D. Clark 10:00 Intermission. 10:30 29. Ligand based virtual screening using BCUT descriptors. U. Lessel 11:00 30. ChemModLab: A web-based cheminformatics modeling laboratory. S. S. Young, A. D. Brooks, W. Welch, M. G. Khaledi, D. Hawkins, K. Patil, G. W. Howell, R. T. Ng, M. T. Chu, J. M. Hughes-Oliver 11:30 31. Bridging the gap between discov­ ery data and development decisions. J. M. Skell MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 252A Herman Skolnik Award Symposium R. S. Pearlman and A. Rusinko III, Organizers O. F. Guner, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 32. CONCORD and early 3-D search systems. A. Rusinko III, Κ. Μ. Smith 2:30 33. Application of DiverseSolutions (DVS) in the establishment and validation of a target class-directed chemistry space. E. L. Stewart, P. J. Brown, J. A. Bentley, T. M. Willson 3:00 34. Flexible ligand alignment protocols and their use in de novo design. J. R. Damewood, C. L. Lerman 3:30 35. Cheminformatics for computational chemistry and computer-aided molecular discovery. R. S. Pearlman, Y. Wu, K. M. Smith, Β. Β. Masek 4:05 Award presentation. 4:10 Intermission. 4:15 Open Meeting. CINF Division. 4:30 Open Meeting. Committees on Publica­ tions and Chemical Abstracts Service. Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn

CINF/TECH Theory Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by CINF

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

S. K. Cardinal and A. B. Twiss-Brooks, Organizers

Sci-Mix Organizers

8:00-10:00 36. Molecular profiling of inhibitor analogs of Indinavir and the HIV mutation pattern. B. Bhhatarai, R. Garg 37. Pharmacodynamic modeling of C2 sym­ metric HIV-1 protease inhibitors. R. C. Kasara, R. Garg 38. Proper use of cross-validation while descriptor-thinning: Naïve vs. true q 2 . R. Natarajan, S. C. Basak, D. M. Hawkins, J. Karaker 39. Using a chatbot to access chemical information. D. Jiao 40. Revised chemical component dictionary for the Worldwide Protein Data Bank. M. Yousufuddin, D. Dimitropoulos, Z. Feng, J. Ory, H. Sun, J. Westbrook, K. Henrick, H. Berman 4 1 . Systematic, automated analysis of solubilizing groups in oral drugs. P. N. Mortenson, M. S. Congreve, C. W. Murray 42. MUT-HIV: Mutation database of HIV proteases. R. Garg, S. A. Reddy, X. Zhang, A. R. Hadeagh 43. Desktop cheminformatics: A new free application for end users. T. Dudgeon, P. Hamernik, G. Priok, S. Dorant, F. Csizmadia 69, 7 1 , 75, 80, 84. See subsequent listings. TUESDAY MORNING Going With the Information Flow: Chemical Abstracts Service 100th Anniversary Presidential Symposium Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by HIST, CINF, and CHED TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 252A Chemical Logistics and Informatics Challenges for Companies Small, Medium and Large I Know the Data is Around Here Somewhere Cosponsored by SCHB and BMGT Organizers

2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 44. Decision making for research informatics: Technical, financial and organizational considerations and method. G. Fond 2:30 45. Chemical Compliance Analytical System (C-CAS). G. R. Thompson 2:55 46. Chemistry informatics in academic laboratories. M. P. Hudock 3:20 47. Complete chemical inventory management. R. D. Feinstein, J. Moeder, B. Daniel, A. Reum, G. Fond 3:45 48. Developing proprietary systems in a small company environment. C. Nair 4:10 49. Outsourcing of discovery informatics: The new Indian model. E. A. Jamois, S. Subramaniam 4:35 50. Chemical inventory services. J. Jegla, M. A. Miller 5:00 5 1 . Use of Chem SW CisPro for inventory and MSDS management. S. C. Boito

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 52. Partnering with the libraries: Chemical information instruction for a large freshmen core chemistry course. A. Locknar, D. R. Sadoway 2:35 53. Providing for graduate student information needs at a large research university. J. R. Garritano 3:05 54. Chemical information course at a small public liberal arts college. A. K. Hovland 3:35 55. Undergraduate cooperative access to information resources. R. G. Landolt 4:05 Panel Discussion. Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn Methods Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by CINF WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 252A Cheminformatics Techniques in Bioinformatics: Related Applications Cosponsored by COMP and BIOHW R. Guha,

Organizer

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 56. Bio- and chem-lnformatics: Where do the twain meet? N. Sukumar, C. M. Breneman, K. P. Bennett, C. Bergeron, T. Hepburn, C. M. Sundling, S. Garde, R. Godawat, I. Manjrekar, M. McLellan, M. Krein 9:35 57. Enabling systems biology: Automated elucidation of metabolite structures. C. Steinbeck, M. Rojas, T. Helmus, E. Willighagen, S. Kuhn 10:05 58. Genome scale enzyme-metabolite and drug-target interaction predictions using support vector machines. J-L. Faulon 10:35 Intermission. 10:50 59. Structural similarity of binding sites in analogous enzymes. Y. Shen, D. Beglov, R. Brenke, D. Kozakov, S. Vajda 11:20 60. Using reaction mechanism to measure enzyme similarity. N. M. O'Boyle, G. L Holliday, D. E. Almonacid, J. B. O. Mitchell Section Β

Writing to Learn: Using Writing to Engage Students in the Chemistry Classroom Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by CINF

BCEC 252A

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

General Papers

Section A

L. R. Solla,

BCEC 252A

1:30 82. Evaluation of 3-D descriptors in virtual screening. X. Ning, G. Karypis 1:55 83. Relative chirality index: Novel approach for the numerical characteriza­ tion of molecular chirality. R. Natarajan, S. C. Basak 2:20 84. An address book for chemical space: The Chemical Structure Lookup Service (CSLS). M. Sitzmann, I. V. Filippov, W-D. Ihlenfeldt, M. C. Nicklaus 2:45 85. Spectral reference databases: Traditional, open access, or somewhere in between? G. M. Banik, L Collins, M. Scandone, T. Abshear 3:10 86. Protein-ligand interaction finger­ prints: Method, user interface and case studies. A. M. Clark 3:35 87. Using the PDBML schema to dis­ ambiguate PDB files. H. J. Feldman 4:00 88. Visualizing biological activity profiles using target affinity maps. F. Bendix, V. Sladariu, T. Langer, G. Wolber 4:25 89. Tautomer and conformer focusing in structure-based drug discovery. H. Zhu

Cheminformatics Techniques in Bioinformatics: Related Applications Cosponsored by COMP and BIOHW R. Guha,

Intellectual Property and Licensing Cosponsored by CHAL, SCHB, and BMGT Organizer

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 6 1 . Introduction to licensing chemical technology and intellectual property. B. C. Meadows 9:35 62. Licensing and technology transfer: An academic perspective. T. Herlihy 10:05 63. Licensing and technology transfer: Planning for the future. C. M. Sorensen 10:35 64. Role of information management in pharmaceutical licensing and partnering. S. Wang 11:05 65. Government and academic issues on IP rights and licensing in Europe. S. R. Adams 11:35 66. Impact of recent court decisions and intellectual property trends on licenses and agreements. P. Waller 12:05 Discussion. Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn

Organizer

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 67. Development of mathematical biodescriptors for proteomics maps. S. C. Basak, B. D. Gute 2:05 68. Prediction of small molecule targets based on protein domains: Extrapolation into unknown target space. J. L. Jenkins, A. Bender, D. Mikhailov 2:35 69. "Phylochemical Tree" for drug targets: Putting biological activities into context via ligand-based similarity mea­ sures. A. Bender, J. L. Jenkins, J. W. Davies 3:05 Intermission. 3:20 70. Structural genomics approach to the assessment of biologically relevant diver­ sity of compound collections. J. O. Ebalunode, Z. Ouyang, J. Liang, W. Zheng 3:50 7 1 . Combining natural language pro­ cessing with substructure search for effi­ cient mining of scientific literature. S. K. Dogra, R. Hariharan 4:20 72. Methods for effective virtual screen­ ing and scaffold-hopping in chemical compounds. N. Wale, G. Karypis, I. A. Watson 4:50 73. Bioinformatics to chemistry to therapy: Some case studies deriving information from the literature. D. Walter

Organizer

Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn Applications Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by CINF

•UBSUUH Division of Chemical Technicians K. P. Hunter, Program Chair

Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn Methods Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by CINF

M O N D A Y EVENING Section A

Writing to Learn: Using Writing to Engage Students in the Chemistry Classroom Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by CINF

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

THURSDAY MORNING Sci-Mix Section A J. Lugo, BCEC 252A General Papers L. R. Solla,

BCEC 251

P. J. Scott,

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Chemical Information Education Round Table Cosponsored by CHED

Section A

T. Wright and M. A. Miller,

Applications Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by CINF

BCEC 251

M O N D A Y EVENING

L. R. Solla and G. Grethe,

Section Β

Organizer

8:30 74. Automated generation of pharmaco­ phore type constraints to improve FlexX docking. A. Volkamer, T. Lengauer, A. Karnper 8:55 75. Scoring function to rank pharmaco­ phore alignments and its application to h i antagonists. Τ. Τ. Η. Huynh Buu, G. Wolber, T. Langer, P. Lackner, G. Lirk 9:20 76. New approaches to 3-D pharmaco­ phore searches in virtual screening for bioactive molecules. Y. Podolyan, G. Karypis 9:45 77. "Plate cherry picking": A novel semisequential screening paradigm for cheaper, faster, information-rich compound selection. M. Glick 10:10 78. On some aspects of validation of predictive QSAR models. K. Roy, J. T. Leonard, P. P. Roy 10:35 79. Tailoring molecular similarity met­ rics for property estimation. B. D. Gute, S. C. Basak, D. M. Hawkins 11:00 80. PIME: A quantitative predicting application to find the isoelectric points for peptides. D. Li 11:25 8 1 . Learning optimum Decision Trees: Influence of parameter choice and feature selection. S. K. Dogra

Organizer

8:00-10:00 1. TECH: Developing professional bonds. K. P. Hunter 2. Technican Affiliate Groups: TAG. M. K. Moore, C. Dunn 3. TECH tips. E. Cole, M. K. Moore, J. Engelman 4. The many faces of CTA. V. M. Mautino, C. A. Hinkfuss 5. History of the National Chemical Techni­ cian Award. J. M. Smith, M. K. Moore 6. Green Is Clean (GIC). F. Dominquez 7. Production control at the LANL plutonium facility. A. Padilla, G. Bustos, R. Gomez, J. Lugo 8. Pathway to an injury free career: Safety observations at the Stockpile Manufactur­ ing and Support Directorate at Los Alamos National Laboratory. M. R. Montalvo, J. Kleinsteuber 9. Studies on direct electrosynthesis condi­ tions of niacin from 3-methylpyridine. L. Wang, J. Zhao, C. Song 10. Study on electrochemical performance of anode materials in the electrosynthesis process of 2-methylnaphthoquinone-1,4. S. Chengying, L Zhisheng, W. Liucheng, Z. Jianhong 11. Study on synthetic process of menadione sodium bisulfite. S. Chengying, S. Hongzhi, W. Liucheng, Z. Jianhong

TECH-39

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

TECH/TOXI

3:30 7. Oxidative xenobiotic metabolism in zebrafish: The cytochrome P450 gene complement, regulation and function. J. J. Stegeman, J. V. Goldstone, M. Jonsson, B. Woodin 4:05 8. Zebrafish and the discovery of can­ cer genes. J. Lees

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 213 Soup to Nuts: It's All Good Chemistry Cosponsored by Committe on Technician Affairs M. K. Moore and J . Lugo,

Organizers

1:00 12. Flavor chemistry. S. J. Risch 1:55 13. The chemistry of clam chowders... or chowdas! G. DeMenna 2:50 Intermission. 3:05 14. Chocolate: Food of the gods. H. Peters 4:00 15. Spices and herbs: Chemistry and health. C. Fisher WEDNESDAY MORNING Role of Chemical Technologists in the Area of Environmental Science Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by Committee on Technician Affairs, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH) and TECH

S U N D A Y EVENING

K. S. Gates, Program Chair

OTHER S Y M P O S I A O F INTEREST: Drug Safety (see MEDI, Tue) SOCIAL EVENT: Named Lecturer Reception: Sun BUSINESS MEETINGS: Division Business Meeting: Mon Executive Committee Meeting: Sat SUNDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 258C DNA-based Biomarkers A. Bryant-Friederich,

Organizer

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:10 1. DNA adducts formed in vivo vs. those that can be synthesized. J. Swenberg 9:45 2. DNA and RNA lesions as biomarkers of inflammation. P. C. Dedon 10:20 Intermission. 10:40 3. Selective detection and quantifica­ tion of DNA lesions using chemical probes. M. M. Greenberg 11:15 4. DNA damage lesions as potential biomarkers. A. C. Bryant-Friedrich SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 258C Zebrafish in Drug Development and Chemical Toxicology Cosponsored by BIOHW P. C. Dedon,

Organizer

2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 5. Use of zebrafish chemical genetics to find inducers of stem cells. L. I. Zon 2:45 6. Zebrafish: A predictive model for assessing drug toxicity and efficacy. P. McGrath 3:20 Intermission.

40-TECH

Section A

BCEC 258C

BCEC 204A/B

Frontiers in Chemical Toxicology Sponsored by Chemical Research in Toxicology L. J . Marnett,

BCEC 258C Division of Chemical Toxicology Lecture K. Gates,

Organizer

5:00 Introductory Remarks. 5:05 9. Random mutations and human cancer. L. A. Loeb, J. H. Bielas, N. G. Ericson, M. Vermulst 6:00 Reception. MONDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 258C

K. S. Gates,

Division of Chemical Toxicology

T U E S D A Y EVENING

Poster Session and Awards K. S. Gates,

Organizer

Section A

Young Investigator Session

•©S

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Organizer

8:15 10. How a fullerene water suspension kills bacteria: Exploring three possible mechanisms. D. Y. Lyon, P. J. Alvarez 8:30 11. NMR structural studies of stereoiso­ mer^ n3-(2-hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl)-2'deoxyuridine DNA adducts paired opposite da. S. K. Musser, I. D. Kozekov, A. A. Liudahl, R. P. Hodge, R. S. Lloyd, C. J. Rizzo, M. P. Stone 8:45 12. Alkylation of DNA by primary diazonium ions: Determination of the basis for atom site selectivity. X. Lu, J. C. Fishbein 9:00 13. Bis-functional electrophile-induced DNA-protein crosslinks. E. M. Loecken, A. J. L. Ham, D. C. Liebler, F. P. Guengerich 9:15 14. Direct mapping of sites of modifica­ tions in DNA by tandem mass spectrom­ etry. G. Chowdhury, F. P. Guengerich 9:30 15. Mechanistic studies of DNA dam­ age induced by antitumor acylfulvene. J. Gong, V. G. Vaidyanathan, S. J. Sturla 9:45 16. Inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) by the endog­ enous/dietary aldehyde acrolein. D. R. Seiner, J. LaButti, K. S. Gates 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 17. Influence of AlkB on l./v^-ethenoguanine genotoxicity and mutagenicity in E. coli. J. C. Delaney, I. D. Kozekov, A. Kozekova, C. Wong, C. L. Drennan, L. J. Marnett, C. J. Rizzo, J. M. Essigmann 10:30 18. Lipid peroxidation biomarkers from cellular proteins. M. V. Williams, P. G. Slade, J. S. Wishnok, S. R. Tannenbaum 10:45 19. Quantifying the spectrum of DNA, RNA and protein adducts arising from lipid peroxidation in cells. C. E. Elmquist, M. R. Sullivan, J. L. McFaline, J. Flarakos, R. G. Liberman, P. L Skipper, S. R. Tannenbaum, P. C. Dedon 11:00 20. Role of S-nitrosation in contributing to Tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer. K. Pant, H. Saito-Benz, J. Li, F. M. White, S. R. Tannenbaum 11:15 2 1 . Solution structure of the alphaN7-dG aflatoxin B1 formamidopyrimidine (FAPy) adduct in duplex DNA. K. L Brown, S. Magee, M. W. Voehler, J. Z. Deng, C. M. Harris, T. M. Harris, M. P. Stone 11:30 22. Structural basis of DNA interchain crosslink formation by stereospecific 1,N2-dG adducts of trans-4-hydroxynonenal in the 5'-CpG-3' sequence: An NMR study. H. Huang, H. Wang, T. M. Harris, C. J. Rizzo, M. P. Stone 11:45 23. The influence of DNA repair path­ ways on the toxicity and mutagenicity induced by pyridyloxobutylating agents. L Li, A. E. Pegg, Y. Lao, S. S. Hecht, J. T. Reardon, A. Sancar, E. V. Wattenberg, L. A. Peterson

Organizer

1:00 24. Frontiers in chemical toxicology: An editor's perspective. L. J. Marnett 1:35 25. Endogenous DNA lesions that promote aging. L. J. Niedernhofer 2:10 26. Searching for endogenous activa­ tors of the Ah receptor. B. McMillan, C. A. Bradfield 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 27. Interactions between nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways influence the vascular side-effects of NSAIDs. V. O'Donnell 3:35 28. PBPK modeling, a tool for low-dose toxicology and individual effect assesment. P. J. van Bladeren, I. M. Rietjens 4:10 29. Protein modifications as biomarkers of oxidative stress and chemical toxicity. D. C. Liebler, S. G. Codreanu, H-Y. Kim, M. E. Szapacs, A. Vila, N. A. Porter M O N D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Sci-Mix K. S. Gates,

Organizer

8:00-10:00 36, 39-41, 43, 60-61, 65-66, 68, 72, 74-75, 78, 84, 96,109-111,113-114,118. See subsequent listings. TUESDAY MORNING Drug Safety Sponsored by MEDI, Cosponsored by TOXI TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 258C Drug Safety Cosponsored by MEDI F. P. Guengerich and N. A. Meanwell, Organizers 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 30. Understanding idiosyncratic drug reactions in animal models and humans. J. A. Uetrecht 2:40 3 1 . Gastrointestinal toxicity as a con­ tributor to hepatotoxicity associated with a p38 alpha kinase inhibitor. H. Hamadeh 3:15 32. Drug hypersensitivity reactions: Mechanisms of pseudoallele and infu­ sion reactions. T. T. Kawabata 3:50 33. Role of the innate immune system in drug-induced liver injury. C. Ju, Q. You, M. Holt, L Cheng, L. R. Pohl 4:25 34. The influence of inflammatory stress on drug hepatotoxicity. R. A. Roth

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

6:00-10:00 35. Kinetics and characterization of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct formation in naked DNA and cancer cells using accelerator mass spectrometry. S. S. Hah, R. A. Sumbad, K. W. Turteltaub, P. T. Henderson 36. A rule-based method for comprehensive risk assessment of the mutagenic potential of drugs. C. Hasselgren Arnby, L. Carlsson, C. Gavaghan, S. Boyer 37. Estrogen sulfotransferase inhibition modu­ lates estradiol in human mammary cell systems. R. Y. Meyer, R. S. King 38. Nitrogen mustard-induced cross-linking of the human DNA repair protein C^-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase to its DNA substrate. R. L. Loeber, M. Goggin, D. R. Quirk Dorr, A. E. Pegg, N. Tretyakova 39. A survey of RNA damage products in the SJL mouse model of inflammation. B. Pang, J. L. McFaline, M. R. Sullivan, C. E. Elmquist, P. C. Dedon 40. Aldo-keto reductase 1C3 regulates prosta­ glandin signaling in breast cancer. M. C. Byrns, S. H. Lee, L Duan, I. A. Blair, T. M. Penning 41. Chemical properties of malondialdehyde nucleoside adducts and their amino acid crosslinks. J. Szekely, C. J. Rizzo, L. J. Marnett 42. Synthesis of and mechanisms of DNA damage by 3-cyclopropyl-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide. U. Sarkar, K. S. Gates 43. Drug metabolism in 3-D perfused microreactor liver cultures. J. Liu, W. Inman, S. Karakattu, M. Bokayza, K. Domansky, K. Hoffmaster, L. G. Griffith, S. R. Tannenbaum 44. E. coli DNA polymerase I catalyzed incor­ porations of dATP and dGTP opposite rfi-(7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyren-10yl)-2'-deoxyguanosine occur by different mechanisms. A. S. P. Gowda, J. Krzeminski, S. Amin, T. E. Spratt 45. Development of an in vitro model for the study of drug-induced bile acid synthesis and transport dysfunction in a 3-D tissue engineered liver microreactor culturing system. J. R. L. Vidales, J. Liu, J. N. Kim, S. Karackattu, M. Bokayza, K. Hoffmaster, S. R. Tannenbaum, L G. Griffith 46. A synthetic nucleoside probe that discerns a DNA adduct from unmodified DNA. J. Gong, S. J. Sturla 47. Acute toxicity (LD50) modeling utilizing fragmentai QSAR, similarity analysis and reliability of prediciton. P. Japertas, R. Didziapetris, A. Petrauskas 48. An LC-ESI-MS/MS technique for quantify­ ing polar oxidized guanine nucleotides from DNA digests. P. G. Slade, J. S. Wishnok, S. R. Tannenbaum 49. Analysis of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine in human bronchoalveolar dells by immunoaffinity liquid chromatography/mass spec­ trometry. D. Mangal, S. H. Lee, J. H. Park, T. M. Penning, I. A. Blair 50. Benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol produces reactive oxygen species via the Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR) pathway in A549 cells: Involvement of BP-mediated redox cycling and alteration in redox status. J. H. Park, K. A. Tacka, T. M. Penning 51. Bulge migration of the malondialdehdye OPdG DNA adduct when placed opposite a two-base deletion in the (CpG)3 frameshift hotspot of the Salmonella typhimurium hisD3052 gene. Y. Wang, S. Selch, L. J. Marnett, M. P. Stone 52. Bypass of dG-AAF by human polymerase ι : Molecular dynamics studies. K. P. Donny-Clark, L. Wang, R. Shapiro, S. Broyde 53. Characterization of a novel glutathione adduct from arachidonic acid metabolism. K. Rangiah, S. H. Lee, A. Y. Wehr, I. A. Blair

τοχι 54. Characterization of DNA adducts formed by3,5-dimethylaniline. L Cui, J. Flarakos, L J. Trudel, H. P. Sun, R. G. Liberman, J. S. Wishnok, P. L Skipper, S. R. Tannenbaum 55. DNA-Binding by analogs of the left-half of azinomycin: A minimal DNA-intercalating structure. J. Szekely, H. Zang, M. Shipman, K. S. Gates 56. Computational analysis of the lesion recognition mechanism of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. K. Song, C. De los Santos, A. P. Grollman, C. L. Simmerling 57. Correlation between mutation, gene expression and DNA adduct formation in human lymphoblast cells dosed with benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide. C. Ceailles, W. Luo, W. Fan, L P. Zhao, H. Zarbl, P. Vouros 58. Correlative study of heavy metal levels in rat tissues by STEM coupled EDAX elemental mapping and ICP-MS spectros­ copy following chronic exposure to low levels of cadmium CdCI2. B. A. Wilson 59. Covalent crosslinking of small-molecule antielectrophiles to proteins by 4-oxo-2nonenal. L M. Sayre, X. Zhu 60. Defining the spectrum of protein carbonyls formed in cytochrome C by peroxidation of linoleic acid. J . Son, M. V. Williams, J. S. Wishnok, S. R. Tannenbaum, P. C. Dedon 61. DNA polymerase V allows bypass of toxic guanine oxidation products in vivo. W. L. Neeley, S. Delaney, Y. 0 . Alekseyev, D. F. Jarosz, J. C. Delaney, G. Walker, J. M. Essigmann 62. DNA sequence effect on the conformation of the food mutagen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) in the recognition sequence of the Narl restriction enzyme. F. Wang, C. E. Elmquist, J. S. Stover, C. J. Rizzo, M. P. Stone 63. Comparison between the Base Eversion of 80G:C and G:C. A. J. Campbell, A. P. Grollman, C. L. Simmerling 64. DNA-protein cross-links between guanine and lysine depend on the mechanism of oxidation. X. Xu, J. G. Muller, C. J. Burrows 65. Dynamics of a benzo[a]pyrene-derived guanine DNA lesion in TGT and CGC sequence contexts: Enhanced mobility in TGT explains conformational heterogene­ ity, more flexible bending and greater nucleotide excision repair susceptibility. Y. Cai, N. E. Geacintov, S. Broyde 66. Effect of sequence context on rate and yield of interstrand crosslinks generated by abasic sites in duplex DNA. D. R. Seiner, S. Dutta, K. S. Gates 67. Enzymatic modulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase inactivation by H202: Phosphoryl transfer to produce peroxymonophosphate. J. LaButti, K. S. Gates 68. Formation of 2'-deoxyguanosine adducts from 12(S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid. S. H. Lee, C. Mesaros, I. A. Blair 69. Incorporation of nucleoside triphosphates opposite stereoisomeric R and S N3-(2hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl)-2'-deoxyuridine adducts by the Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase dpo4. W. Xu, R. P. Hodge, R. S. Lloyd, M. Egli, M. P. Stone 70. Genomic approaches to understanding cellular determinants of DNA damage. S. S. Kalinga, R. C. Fry, P. C. Dedon 71. Global proteomic analysis of zebrafish plasma. I. R. Babu, W. Goessling, L I. Zon, J. S. Wishnok, S. R. Tannenbaum 72. Glutathione concentration and the aerobic fate of the C3'-thymidinyl radical in DNA. R. A. Zaidi, A. C. Bryant-Friedrich 73. Human akrs display quinone reductase activity with pah oquinones. C. A. Shultz, A. M. Quinn, T. M. Penning 74. Identification of covalent DNA adducts in vitro from bioactivation of pentachlorophenol. V. G. Vaidyanathan, P. W. Villalta, S. J. Sturla 75. Identification of nitrated proteins from iNOS-induced macrophages using biotin labeling and capture. J . R. Seal, J. S. Wishnok, S. R. Tannenbaum

76. Identification of quinol-thioether adducted proteins excreted in the urine after I.V. administration of 2-(glutathion-S-yl)HQ in Long-Evans rats. M. T. Labenski, A. A. Fisher, G. Tsaprailis, T. Monks, S. S. Lau 77. Implications for the existence of a heptasulfur linkage in natural o-benzopolysulfanes. A. Mahendran, D. Aebisher, E. M. Brzostowska, N. Sawwan, R. Ovalle, A. Greer 78. Planar chirality due to a polysulfur ring in natural pentathiepin cytotoxins. Implica­ tions of planar chirality for enantiospecific biosynthesis and toxicity. A. Mahendran, E. M. Brzostowska, M. Paulynice, R. Bentley, A. Greer 79. Synthesis of sulfur-substituted quinones from the oxidation of 5-methyl-4-mercaptocatechol and 5-methyl-3,4-dimercaptocatechol. A. Mahendran, D. Aebisher, A. Castillo, J. F. Liebman, A. Greer 80. Generation and characterization of a nucleoside radical resulting from dissocia­ tive electron attachment. S. Abdallah, C. Trzasko, A. C. Bryant-Friedrich 81. Independent generation of DNA radicals resulting from low-energy electrons. B. Abdallah, A. C. Bryant-Friedrich 82. Influence of guanine oxidation potential on DNA-protein crosslinking reactions. E. D. A. Stemp, A. Estonactoc, A. Madison, J. Scala, C. E. Ochoa, K. Schaefer, K. Kurbanyan 83. Inhibitory targets of fluoroquinolone antibi­ otics in the photosynthetic electron trans­ port chain: SAR modeling analysis and in vitro binding studies. L. Aristilde, G. Sposito 84. Insights into the determinants of the quantity and chemistry of sequenceselective guanine oxidation in DNA. Y. Margolin, V. Shafirovich, N. E. Geacintov, P. C. Dedon 85. Intracellular arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) is inactivated by the 4-nitroso metabolite of the tobacco smoke compo­ nent, 4-aminobiphenyl. P. E. Hanna, L Liu, C. R. Wagner 86. Irradiation of retinol in ethanol with UVA light: Formation of photodecomposition products, reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxides. Q. Xia, J. J. Yin, S-H. Cherng, J. P. Freeman, H. Yu, M. D. Boudreau, W. G. Warner, P. P. Fu 87. LC-MS identification of toxic alkaloids from fungi in the family Clavicipitaceae. M. S. Torres, A. P. Singh, N. Vorsa, J. F. White 88. LC-MS/MS analysis of nanoparticleinduced oxidative DNA damages. H. Hong, Y. Wang 89. Mass spectrometry studies on the modifi­ cation of cytochrome c by HNE. L. M. Sayre, X. Tang 90. Mechanism of etheno adduct formation from the reaction of lipid peroxidation products with deoxyguanosine. K. V. Petrova, I. D. Kozekov, D. F. Stec, S. T. Duncan, C. J. Rizzo 91. Mechanistic studies on anti-tumor proper­ ties of 2-arylcarbonyl-3-trifluoromethylquinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide analogs. V. Junnotula, K. Gates, B. Soland, A. Marin, R. Villar, A. Burguete, E. Vicente, S. Perez-silanes, I. Aldana, A. Monge 92. Methylated-bay region and fjord-region PAH o-quinones form mono- and bisconjugates with N-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione. C. A. Shultz, D. Mangal, S. R. Gopishetty, R. G. Harvey, I. A. Blair, T. Penning 93. Methylglyoxal-induced covalent modifica­ tions of proteins: Is there any correlation with diabetic complications? Y. Gao, Y. Wang

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

94. Mutagen/nonmutagen classification of diverse and structurally homogenous chemicals using calculated molecular descriptors: A hierarchical approach. D. Mills, S. C. Basak, D. M. Hawkins, B. D. Gute 95. Use of theoretical descriptors in predicting aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor binding affinity of dibenzofurans: A hierarchical QSAR approach. D. Mills, S. C. Basak 96. Novel modification of amyloid beta pep­ tides by metal-catalyzed oxidation. T. Oe, K. Inoue, C. Mesaros, C. 0 . Garner, B. L. Ackermann, I. A. Blair 97. Nucleotide pool as a target for nitrosative deamination during inflammation. V. Dendroulakis, W. M. Deen, P. C. Dedon 98. Oxidative DNA damage by cytotoxic N-oxides of 1-hydroxyphenazine: Toward a molecular understanding of the bacterial virulence factor 1-hydroxyphenazine. S. Sinha, K. Gates 99. Potential health impacts of silver nanoparticles. P. V. N. Asharani, Z. Gong, M. P. Hande, S. Valiyaveettil 100. Probing the aminofluorene-induced conformational heterogeneity in a simu­ lated translesion synthesis by 19F NMR and differential scanning calorimetry. F. Liang, B. Cho 101. Protein adduction by reactive lipid oxida­ tion-derived electrophiles. S. G. Codreanu, B. Zhang, J. S. Myers, S. M. Sobecki, D. D. Billheimer, D. C. Liebler 102. Proteomic analysis of Azido-HNE adducted proteins in RKO cells. A. Vila, K. A. Tallman, N. A. Porter, D. C. Liebler, L. J. Marnett 103. Quantification of folate in whole blood by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Y. Huang, Z. Lu, A. S. Whitehead, I. Blair 104. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1Β function by an organic peroxide:. S. Bhattacharyya, K. S. Gates 105. Role of Z-DNA in arylhydrazine carcino­ genesis. V. Vongsutilers, P. M. Gannett 106. Rule based approach for prediction of rabbit eye and skin irritation. P. J. Jurgutis, R. Didziapetris, P. Japertas 107. Sequence effects on the Narl-derived frameshift mutagenesis by 19F NMR, DSC, and CD spectroscopy. N. Jain, S. R. Meneni, B. Cho 108. Serial analysis of mutation spectra (SAMS): A new approach for the determi­ nation of mutation spectra and their sequence dependence. H. Fang, J-S. Taylor 109. Shoot the messenger: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κΒ) pathway components are sensors for reactive electrophiles. H. L. Wong, J. S. Myers, S. G. Codreanu, C. R. Orton, M. E. Szapacs, R. W. Ganster, D. W. Ballard, D. C. Liebler 110. Structural characterization of 1,N2ethenodeoxyguanosine in the dodecamer 5'-CGCATethenoGGAATCC-3". G. Shammugam, I. D. Kozekov, F. P. Guengerich, C. J. Rizzo, M. P. Stone 111. Studies on Λ/1-inosine and /^-adenine adducts in mice after inhalation exposures to 1,3-butadiene. G. Boysen, M. Troutman, L. B. Collins, J. Swenberg 112. Synthesis and conformational character­ ization of the oligodeoxynucleotide duplexes modified by the model carcino­ gen fluoroaminobiphenyl. V. Biyyala, N. Jain, B. Cho 113. Synthesis of alpha-methylene-deoxynucleotide triphosphates (alpha-m-dNTP) as non-cleavable substrates for polymer­ ases. F. Liang, N. Jain, A. S. P. Gowda, T. E. Spratt, B. Cho 114. In vitro replication study of an intrastrand crosslink lesion G[8-5m]T and 8-oxo-2'deoxyguanosine/thymidine glycol tandem lesion. Y. Jiang, Y. Wang 115. Systematic study of 2'-deoxyoxanosine formation during nitrosative deamination of 2'-deoxyguanosine under biologically relevant conditions. J. L. McFaline, B. Pang, M. R. Sullivan, P. C. Dedon 116. Toxico-cheminformatics and QSPR modeling of the carcinogenic potency database. K. Wang, A. Richard, I. Rusyn, A. Tropsha

117. Translesion DNA synthesis across pyrimido[1,2-a]purin-10(3/-/)-one adduct by human DNA polymerase Pol η. M. A. Kalam, C. J. Rizzo, F. P. Guengerich, L J. Marnett 118. Translesion synthesis past the Me-FAPy adduct in oligonucleotides by DNA poly­ merases. P. P. Christov, I. D. Kozekov, K. L. Brown, M. P. Stone, T. M. Harris, C. J. Rizzo 119. Unambiguous detection and quantifica­ tion of 3-(2-deoxy-3-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-4,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxypyrimido[1,2-a]purin-10(3H)-one (6-HOPdG) from the reaction of acrolein with calf thymus DNA. G. R. Alas, I. D. Kozekov, C. M. Harris, T. M. Harris, C. J. Rizzo 120. Nitric oxide-induced deamidation retards and reverses fibril formation by an oligo(glutamine/asparagine) peptide. L Kong, J. E. Saavedra, K. Nagashima, J. Zheng, A. Patri, L. K. Keefer WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 258C Mass Spectrometry of DNA and Protein Damages Y. W a n g ,

Organizer

8:10 121. DNA adducts and you: When bad things happen to good cells. J . Glick, H. Zarbl, P. Vouros 8:45 122. Oxidative stress as a component of aging and disease. F. Régnier 9:20 123. Oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage. I. A. Blair, S. H. Lee, D. Mangal, J. H. Park, T. M. Penning 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 124. Protein interaction with anticancer platinum drugs. X-F. X. Li, R. R. Mandai, Μ. Β. Sawyer 10:45 125. When good cholesterol goes bad: Mass spectrometric approaches for the analysis of dysfunctional HDL. J. Heinecke 11:20 126. Mass spectrometry for the identi­ fication and quantification of new types of oxidative DNA lesions. Y. Wang, H. Hong, H. Cao, C. Gu WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 258C General Papers K. S. Gates,

Organizer

1:00 127. Role of dietary components on acrylamide induced neurotransmitter turnover alterations in PC 12 cells. E. Tareke, S. Ali, B. Lyn-Cook, H. M. Duhart 1:15 128. Influence of nanoparticles on soil microbial community. V. Shah, I. Belozerova 1:30 129. Problems with the use of riskassessment approaches to estimate differ­ ences in health risks from various smoking products. J. H. Lauterbach 1:45 130. Identification and quantitative analysis of bifunctional DNA adducts of 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane. N. Tretyakova, U. Seneviratne, M. Goggin 2:00 131. Structure-function relationships in the recognition and DNA repair of bulky lesions by the human nucleotide excision repair apparatus. Ν. Ε. Geacintov, K. Kropachev, M. Kolbanovskiy, F. A. Rodriguez, Y. Cai, L. Zhang, Y. Tang, A. Kolbanovskiy, D. J. Patel, S. Broyde 2:15 132. Natural terpenone analogs as a novel class of chemoprevention agents. Q. Zhou, L. Zhang, J. K. Stewart 2:30 133. NMR characterization of duplex DNA containing an aristolochic acid II lesion. M. Lukin, T. Zaliznyak, R. R. Bonala, F. Johnson, C. De los Santos 2:45 Intermission.

TECH-41

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

TOXI/CHAL

3:00 134. Mechanism of 8-hydroxyguanine metabolism and incorporation into DNA and RNA: A novel route to mutagenesis from reactive oxygen species. P. T. Henderson 3:15 135. Mechanisms of DNA polymerasecatalyzed bypass of /^-(y.e.iUO-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyren-10-yl)-2'-deoxyguanosine. A. S. P. Gowda, L R. DeCarlo, J. Krzeminski, S. Amin, Z. Suo, T. E. Spratt 3:30 136. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrom­ etry analysis of 7-ethylguanine in human liver. L Chen, M. Wang, P. W. Villalta, S. S. Hecht 3:45 137. Effects of arachidonic acid peroxyl radicals on the fates and end-products of guanine neutral radicals. C. Crean, N. E. Geacintov, V. Shafirovich 4:00 138. In vitro and in vivo metabolism of a novel p38 kinase inhibitor. K. Mitra, Κ. Samuel, S. Natarajan, S. Kumar 4:15 139. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and the metabolic activation of trans-7,8dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol) in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. T. M. Penning, J-H. Park, K. A. Tacka, A. M. Quinn, D. Mangal, I. A. Blair 4:30 140. In silico predictive tools for screen­ ing hERG activity in early drug discovery. C. Gavaghan, I. Belda, L Carlsson, H. Donner, S. Boyei THURSDAY MORNING

9:30 2. Pharmaceutical salts: Are they pat­ entable or obvious? S. J. Sarussi 10:00 3. The invention disclosure form: Friend or foe? S. P. Thompson 10:30 4. Select changes in international patent law. B. W. Crawford 11:00 5. Case study on pharmaceutical patent law in India. S. E. Perlinger 11:30 6. Patent reform: Legislative proposals impacting pharmaceutical patent enforce­ ment. J. J. Hasford SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 257B Strengthening Your Future Patent Rights in Light of Recent Federal Circuit Decisions X. Pillai and J . M. Brown, Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 8. Technology options of GHG emis­ sions reductions in coal-based power generation: The role of regulation. J. M. Beér 2:50 9. EU emissions trading scheme. T. Bainbridge 3:35 Intermission. 3:45 10. California's greenhouse gas emission reduction program. D. G. Lewis 4:30 Discussion.

Organizer

D. G. Lewis, Organizer,

Presiding

MONDAY MORNING

J. J. Hasford and A. I. Ahmed,

SOCIAL EVENTS: Happy Hour: Mon Strategic Planning Session: Fri BUSINESS MEETING: Executive Committee Meeting: Sun SUNDAY MORNING

CHAL's 25th Anniversary Series: Recent Developments in Intellectual Property Law Trademarks, Trade Secrets, and Expert Witnessing Cosponsored by PRES A. I. A h m e d , Organizer,

Presiding

9:45 12. How to protect your most valuable asset: The trade secret. B. C. Diner 10:25 13. And now for something completely different: Expert witnessing. J. W. Cox 11:05 14. Choosing and using economic experts to help prove your damages in a patent infringement case. G. B. Price Jr. 11:45 Discussion.

Section A BCEC 257B The Many Faces of CHAL: Where Chemistry Meets the Law J. J . Hasford, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00 1. Threshold intellectual property issues for the VP of R&D at small pharmaceutical companies. S. J . Sarussi

42-TECH

9:30 Introductory Remarks. 9:35 15. Massachusetts v. EPA: The Supreme Court addresses climate change regulation. S. Tai 10:10 16. International climate treaties and U.S. obligations. W. R. Moomaw 10:55 Intermission. 11:10 17. McCain-Obama-Lieberman climate change bill. D. G. Lewis 11:55 Discussion. MONDAY AFTERNOON

CHAL's 25th Anniversary Series: Trends in Chemical and Pharmaceutical Patent Law Over the Past Twenty Five Years

S. P. Thompson, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 26. Determination and ethics of inven­ torship. J. M. Brown 2:05 27. Hidden traps: Subject matter conflict of interest in patent law. S. Thompson 2:35 28. Full disclosure: How to avoid an unenforcable patent. B. S. Gibbs 3:05 29. Inequitable conduct:: Stuff happens/ how to avoid getting any on you. T. Saunders 3:35 30. Ethics in the marketplace: Can you keep a (trade) secret? K. Drake 4:05 3 1 . Ethical issues in toxic tort litigation. J. C. Carver 4:35 Discussion. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Cosponsored by PRES

Section A

J. J . Hasford,

BCEC 257B

Organizer Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 18. Recent developments in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office patent prac­ tice. C. E. Van Horn 2:15 19. Inequitable conduct: Only what you know can hurt you, and it can hurt badly. T. L Irving 2:55 20. Hot topics in pharmaceutical patent law. J. J. Hasford 3:35 2 1 . Changes in case law making it easier to challenge patents. T. W. Banks 4:15 Discussion. M O N D A Y EVENING

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Science in Litigation: Views from the Bar and the Bench Ε. Η. Barash, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:45 32. Strategies for managing patent litigation. S. J. Bornstein 9:30 33. Science and technology in the courtroom: A view from the bench. J. E. Jones III 10:15 34. Expert witnesses in science-based litigation. Ε. Η. Barash 11:00 Panel Discussion.

BCEC

Intellectual Property and Licensing Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHAL, SCHB, and BMGT

Exhibit Hall—B2

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

J. J . Hasford, Organizer,

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 11. Trademark protection in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and biotech industries. L. R. Robins

Program Chairs

BCEC 257B Ethics Overview: Inequitable Conduct and Conflicts of Interest Issues in Intellectual Property

Organizer

Sci-Mix

Section A BCEC 205C

CHAL

D. G. Lewis,

A. I. A h m e d ,

J. Kotz,

Division of Chemistry & the Law

Legal and Policy Aspects of Greenhouse Gases Cosponsored by FUEL

Section Β

J. J . Helble,

Organizer

Section A

BCEC 205C

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 7. Strengthening your future patent rights in light of recent federal circuit decisions. X. Pillai, J. M. Brown 3:35 Discussion.

Systems-wide Approaches to Understanding Drug Action and Toxicity Cosponsored by BIOHW

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 141. Chemical biology on PINs and NeeDLes. S. W. Michnick 9:20 142. Network-level analysis of kinase inhibitors. F. M. White 10:00 143. The connectivity map: Using gene-expression profiling to identify new therapeutics and potential adverse drug effects. J. Lamb 10:40 144. Profiling small molecules, assay measurements, and cell states using the principles underlying ChemBank. P. A. d e m o n s 11:20 145. Understanding gene function and drug action. G. Giaever

BCEC 260

Organizers,

Legal and Policy Aspects of Greenhouse s Cosponsored by FUEL

BCEC 258C

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

BCEC 260

Section A

Section Β

Section A Presiding

8:00-10:00

BCEC 257B

22. Achieving environmental regulatory com­ pliance by developing a hazardous materi­ als management system. A. M. Mendonza

Paradise Lost: Intellectual Property Protection for Pharmaceuticals

TUESDAY MORNING

J. T. Wager, Organizer,

Section A

12:00 Introductory Remarks. 12:05 35. What pharma needs to know about patent law. J. Van Amsterdam 12:35 36. The nexus between NDA filings, Orange Book listings and Market Exclusiv­ ity. M. Winokur 1:05 37. Extending patent term and calculat­ ing patent expiration. M. Siekman 1:35 38. Anatomy of a pharmaceutical col­ laboration. M. Baker 2:05 39. Pursuing intellectual property for old molecules. E. Gates 2:35 Discussion.

BCEC 257B Bayh-Dole and the CREATE Act M. Armstrong, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 23. Overview of the CREATE Act and Bayh-Dole Act. M. Armstrong 9:50 24. Collaborative agreements and licensing technology. M. A. Capria 10:35 25. Small-company perspective on collaborations and government funding. T. Whitaker 11:20 Discussion. Henry Hill Award Recipient Howard Peters: An Alternative Career of Service to the Profession Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CHAL, CEPA, and CMA

Presiding

Section Β BCEC 257B New Proposed U.S. Patent Rules and Legislation D. M. Benner, Organizer,

Presiding

3:00 Introductory Remarks. 3:05 40. Proposed changes to claims and continuation practice. D. M. Benner 3:50 4 1 . The Patent Reform Act of 2007. R. M. Schulman 4:35 Discussion.

CHAL/COLL

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

9:20 2. Cantilever-based detection of patho­ gens using multiple biological signatures. T. A. Sulchek, F. A. Bourguet, M. A. Coleman, A. Loui, T. V. Ratto, B. R. Hart 9:40 3. 10-Minute assay for a food toxin (Staphylococcal enterotoxin B) in food matrix at 10 femtograms/mL R. Mutharasan, D. Maraldo 10:00 4. Polythiophene/carbon nanotube chemi resistors as high-performance chemical sensors. F. Wang, Y. Yang, T. M. Swager 10:20 5. Aligned carbon nanotubes for bioand chemical-sensing. L. Dai, K. Gong 10:40 6. Role of carbon nanotube defects in making highly sensitive, selective chemical sensors. S. C. Badescu, J. A. Robinson, E. S. Snow, F. K. Perkins, T. L. Reinecke 11:00 7. Gas sensing with liquid deposited carbon nanotube networks. M. D. Lay, P. Vichchulada 11:20 8. Portable sensor array systems for monitoring air contaminants. J. Luo, L Wang, X. Shi, W. Hao, S. Lu, C. J. Zhong 11:40 9. Chemical detection with robust polyolefin-coated cantilever arrays. T. V. Ratto, A. Loui, T. S. Wilson, S. K. McCall, E. V. Mukerjee, B. R. Hart

Section A

Section Β

BCEC 257B

BCEC 152

The Many Faces of CHAL: Where Chemistry Meets the Law

Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Computational Challenges in Modeling Catalysis Cosponsored by PHYS

THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 257B The Many Faces of CHAL: Where Chemistry Meets the Law J. J. Hasford, Organizer S. P. Thompson, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 42. Application of forensic chemistry to environmental and toxic tort litigation. L. S. Kurfirst 9:35 43. Broad global strategies for protect­ ing intellectual property rights. S. P. Thompson 10:05 44. Wow the examiner and impress your friends: New strategies to responding to the Patent Office. S. P. Thompson 10:35 45. Compulsory patent licensing: Real threat, or remote possibility? J. A. Yosick 11:05 46. Intellectual property issues associ­ ated with doing business in India. J. Malik

J. J. Hasford, Organizer

11:40 23. Using anisotropic microscale topography to reduce the retention of water on aluminum. A. D. Sommers, A. M. Jacobi Section D BCEC 153B Surfactant Self-Assembly Surfactants in Bulk M. L. Lynch and O. Soderman, Organizers G. J. Tiddy and J. A. Zasadzinski, Presiding 9:00 24. Surfactant structures from droplet templates. D. A. Weitz 9:40 25. Design and synthesis of imidazolium-based photopolymerizable gemini surfactants forming lyotropic liquid crystal­ line phases with room temperature ionic liquids. J. E. Bara, X. Zeng, C. J. Gabriel, S. Lessmann, R. D. Noble, D. L. Gin 10:00 26. Coarse-grained molecular simula­ tion of surfactant self-assembly. W. Shinoda, M. L. Klein 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 27. Flexible bilayers with spontaneous curvature lead to lamellar gels and sponta­ neous vesicles. J. A. Zasadzinski 11:15 28. A new method to probe membrane fluidity in liposomes. C. Chen, C. P. Tripp 11:35 29. Water triggered vesicle-to-micelle transition for a bisphosphonic amphiphile in THF. K. Sakurai, M. Sakuragi, Y. Takeda 11:55 30. Mechanisms of lamellar/gel and gel/sub-gel phase transitions in lecithinwater systems. G. J. Tiddy, J. W. Jones, L. Lue, A. Saiani

S. P. Thompson, Presiding

N. Marzari and A. Wieckowski, Organizers

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 47. Federal Electronic Discovery rules: Protect yourself and your company. L. S. Kurfirst 2:05 48. Implementing an effective invention disclosure system. J. A. Yosick 2:35 49. Dot your i's and cross your t's or you could be headed to invalidity. S. P. Thompson 3:05 50. Opinions of counsel and their use in business strategy. J. Malik 3:35 51. Launching products while limiting exposure to patent infringement. J. Malik

9:00 10. Error-controlled multiscale modeling approaches to surface chemistry and catalysis. K. Reuter 9:40 11. Finding catalyst leads from compu­ tational screening. T. Bligaard 10:20 12. Progress in density functionals relevant to catalysis modeling. G. E. Scuseria 11:00 13. Hybrid functionals applied to extended systems. J. Paler, A. Stroppa, M. Marsman, G. Kresse 11:40 14. Positronium physisorption at quartz surfaces. R. Saniz, B. Barbiellini, P. Platzman, A. Freeman

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Methods for Single-Molecule Detection Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

Section C

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

BCEC 153A

Section A

«MM Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry P. S. Cremer, Program Chair

SOCIAL EVENTS: Luncheon: Tue Social Hour: Mon BUSINESS MEETINGS: Executive Committee Meeting: Sat Open Business Meeting: Mon Program Committee Meeting: Sat SUNDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 151B Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Cantilever and Nanotube Cosponsored by BIOHW S. Lee, T. A. Hatton, and W. Zukas, Organizers R. Nagarajan, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 1. Detection of biothreat agents using cantilever sensors. K. Rijal, G. A. Campbell, D. Maraldo, P. Shetty, R. Mutharasan

Chemically and Topographically Textured Surfaces Wetting and Interfacial Tension S. Bhattacharjee and A. Amirfazli, Organizers 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 15. Controlled packing of nanoparticles: From magnetic materials to superhydrophobic surfaces. B. Samanta, Y. Ofir, A. Chompoosor 9:00 16. Self-assembled biomimetic multi­ functional coatings. N. Linn, C-H. Sun, B. Jiang, P. Jiang 9:20 17. Periodically textured surfaces ternplated from self-assembled colloidal crys­ tals. C-H. Sun, N. Linn, P. Jiang 9:40 18. Applicability of the modified Young's equation involving line tension to solidliquid-liquid systems. D. N. Rao, D. Saini 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 19. Designing superoleophobic sur­ faces with fluoroPOSS. A. Tuteja, W. Choi, J. M. Mabry, G. H. McKinley, R. E. Cohen 10:40 20. Withdrawn. 11:00 21. Topology and chemistry in the wetting of superhydrophobic surfaces in the presence of surfactants. A. J. B. Milne, K. Grundke, M. Nitschke, R. Frenzel, F. Simon, A. Amirfazli 11:20 22. Re-entrant structures for superhy­ drophobic and superoleophobic surfaces. W. Choi, A. Tuteja, R. E. Cohen, G. Mckinley

Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Structure-Function Correlation Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Nanotechnology in Catalysis V Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by COLL, l&EC, and PETR

BCEC 151B Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Immunological Cosponsored by BIOHW R. Nagarajan, S. Lee, and T. A. Hatton, Organizers W. Zukas, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 31. Rapid immunochromatographic biowarfare detection using affinity reagents from microfluidic in vitro selections. L. J. Scoter, D. N. Stratis-Cullum, Y. Zhang, P. S. Daugherty, H. T. Soh, P. Pellegrino, N. Stagliano 2:20 32. A potentiometric sensor for the Ddtection of proteins or viruses built with surface molecular imprinting method. Y. Wang, M. Rafailovich, Z. Zhang, B. Rigas, K. Levon, S. Mueller, V. Jain, J. Yi, J. Sokolov

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

2:40 33. Nanoparticle labels/electrochemical immunosensor for rapid detection of biomarkers of nerve agent exposure. Y. Lin, G. Liu, R. Barry, J. Wang, A. Busby, C. Timchalk 3:00 34. Analysis of bacterial spore perme­ ability to water and ions using NanoSecondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS). S. Ghosal, T. Leighton, K. Wheeler, I. D. Hutcheon, P. K. Weber 3:20 35. Nanoparticle simulants for calibrat­ ing avian influenza immunosensors. D. E. Cliffel, A. E. Gerdon, Y. Zhang, R. G. Keil, L. Tiensvold, S. A. Miller 3:40 36. Design and synthesis of an immu­ nological mimic of the Ebola glycoprotein. R. D. Rutledge, D. E. Cliffel, D. W. Wright 4:00 37. Nanofluidic preconcentrator for sensitive and wide dynamic range immuno-sensing. Y-C. Wang, V. H. Liu, J.Han 4:20 38. The biological effects of manufac­ tured nanomaterials and their impacts on environment. N. Wang, J. Cheng, Y. Jin, K. Yao, S. Bi 4:40 39. Nanoscale carriers for diagnosis and therapy. A. Almutairi, M. Berezin, R. Rossin, S. Achilefu, M. J. Welch, C. J. Hawker, K. L. Wooley, J. M. J. Fréchet Section Β BCEC 152 Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Modeling Reactivity Cosponsored by PHYS N. Marzari and A. Wieckowski, Organizers 2:00 40. Transition states of NH, CH and OH bond activation. R. A. van Santen 2:40 41. Modeling reactivity of metal cata­ lysts. S. de Gironcoli 3:20 42. Trends in configurational dependent adsorption energies on noble metals. J. R. Kitchin 4:00 43. Controlling carbon chemistry on Ni surfaces by the surface alloying: An ab initio approach toward carbon-tolerant alloy catalysts for chemical energy conver­ sion. S. Linic, E. Nikolla Section C BCEC 153A Chemically and Topographically Textured Surfaces Charge Heterogeneous and Chemical Gradient Surfaces S. Bhattacharjee and A. Amirfazli, Organizers 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:10 44. Preparation of surface energy gradients on the submicron scale by photooxidation. P. Burgos, M. Geoghegan, G. J. Leggett 2:30 45. Fabrication of surface energy gradi­ ents using direct laser patterning for self assembled monolayer surfaces. S. Meyyappan, M. R. Shadnam, A. Amirfazli 2:50 46. Analytic theory of polymers adsorp­ tion onto chemically patterned surfaces. A. I. Chervanyov, G. Heinrich 3:10 47. Particle deposition on chemically and topographically textured surfaces. S. Bhattacharjee, T. Rizwan, J. A. L. Kemps, N. Nazemifard 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 48. Using textured surfaces to separate microcapsules. O. B. Usta, A. Alexeev, A. C. Balazs 4:10 49. Surface-potential heterogeneity introduced by nanostructures on reacted calcite and rhodochrosite. C. Na, T. A. Kendall, S. Martin 4:30 50. Nanoscale chiral texturing of metal surfaces. A. Gellman, L. Baker, Y. Huang, A. Koritnik 4:50 51. Interaction between a peptide and SAM patterned surface with different functional groups by molecular dynamics simulation. K. Kaur, W. Soliman, S. Bhattacharjee

il CM-A3

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL 5:10 52. Properties of physically cross-linked poly(styrene-co-AAisopropylacrylamide) colloidal crystals. C. D. Sorrell, J. G. McGrath, L A. Lyon Section D

4:35 67. Toward controlled drug delivery from polyelectrolyte multilayer films. R. Smith, P. T. Hammond 4:55 68. Nanoscopic probing of amphiphilic polysaccharide drug carriers. T. A. Camesano, Y. Liu, E. Rotureau, A. Durand, M. Léonard

11:50 83. Modeling of surface diffusion of adsorbed intermediates on bimetallic catalysts supported on metal and metal oxide clusters. M. Hepel, M. Fayette Section C

11:25 99. Synthesis and LB monolayer studies of D-σ-Α molecules with PEG and mixed PEG swallowtails. R. Samudrala, D. L. Mattem 11:45 100. Synthesis of thiol monolayerprotected gold nanorods. Q. Li, J. M. El Khoury, X. Zhou

BCEC 153B

Emergence of Function in Molecular

BCEC 153A

Section Ε

Surfactant Self-Assembly Surfactant-Polymer Mixtures

Nanoparticle Serf-Assembly Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COLL

Chemically and Topographically Textured Surfaces Fabrication and Characterization

BCEC 153C

M. L. Lynch and O. Soderman, Organizers

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Probe Development Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

S. Bhattacharjee and A. Amirfazli, Organizers

E. W. Kaler and T. Nylander, Presiding 2:00 53. Surfactant interactions with polyelectrolytes yields gel particles. E.W. Kaler, Y.Lapitsky 2:40 54. Formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes on surfaces. T. Nylander, Y. Samoshina, B. Lindman 3:00 55. Pluronic block copolymers in bal­ anced microemulsions. T. Sottmann, L. M. Tchekountieu, R. Strey 3:20 56. Original nanostructures formation via orthogonal self-assembly of surfactants and hydrogelators. A. M. A. Brizard, M. C. A. Stuart, K. J. C. van Bommel, A. Friggeri, M. R. de Jong, J. H. van Esch 3:40 Intermission. 3:55 57. Phase behavior in systems of polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged micelles. P. L Dubin, A. Kumar, Y. U, M. Hemon, W. Jaeger, P. D. Butler 4:35 58. Light-triggered assembly of hydrophobically modified polymers with micelles of surfactants. C. Tribet, J. Ruchmann 4:55 59. Preparation of fluorinated polymeric nanoparticles containing betaine-type and adamantyl segments possessing a lower critical solution temperature characteristic in organic media. M. Mugisawa, K. Ohnishi, H. Sawada Section Ε BCEC 153C Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Drug Delivery Cosponsored by BIOHW D. J. Burgess, Organizer 2:00 60. Triggering release from thermosensitive polymer gels by magnetic field heating of Fe304 nanoparticles. K. Hamad-Schrfferli 2:20 61. Generation of biodegradable drugloaded polymer microspheres using hydrodynamic flow focusing. T. Schneider, U. Hafeli 2:40 62. PLGA/PVA hydrogel composites for long-term inflammation control on s.c. implantation of biosensor. U. Bhardwaj, R. K. Sura, F. Papadimrtrakopolous, D. J. Burgess 3:00 63. Tunable surface delivery of antibiot­ ics from polyelectrolyte multilayers. H. F. Chuang, P. T. Hammond 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 64. Penetration of biomacromolecules through the stratum corneum for transcuta­ neous delivery. P. Xu, G. Tan, L Lawson, J. He, J. D. Clements, K. D. Papadopoulos, V. T. John 3:55 65. Ruoropolymer-based emulsions for the intravenous delivery of sevoflurane. J. P. Fast, S. Mecozzi 4:15 66. Linear-dendritic block copolymers toward micellar drug delivery. P. M. Nguyen, Z. Poon, P. T. Hammond

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.


MONDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 151B Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Infrared and Fluorescence Cosponsored by BIOHW R. Nagarajan, T. A. Hatton, and W. Zukas, Organizers S. Lee, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 69. Novel nanoarray SERS substrates used for high sensitivity virus biosensing and classification. J. Driskell, R. Tripp, Y-P. Zhao, L. Bottomley, R. Dluhy 9:20 70. Gold-nanoparticle-based miniaturized FRET probe for ultrasensitive detection of anthrax DNA. P. C. Ray, G. K. Darbha, A. Ray 9:40 71. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy characterization of biological agents. S. P. Hernandez-Rivera, T. Luna-Pineda, K. SotoFeliciano, C. Rios-Velazquez 10:00 72. Gold nanorods substrates at different aspect ratios for sensing applications. O. M. Primera-Pedrozo, Y. M. SotoFeliciano, E. M. Figueroa-Mas, J. I. Jerez-Rozo, M. E. Castro, S. P. Hernandez-Rivera 10:20 73. Enhanced Raman detection using spray-on nanoparticles/remote sensed Raman spectroscopy. S. P. Hernandez-Rivera, L. C. Pacheco-Londofio, W. Ortiz, 0. Rivera-Batancourt 10:40 74. Self-assembled nanosensors using Cow Pea Mosaic Virus as a scaffold. B. R. Ratna, A. S. Blum, C. M. Soto 11:00 75. Novel GaN-based chemical sensors for long-range chemical threat detection. K-A. Son, B. Yang, M. Gallegos, A. Liao, N. Prokopuk, J. S. Moon, J. Yang, M. A. Khan 11:20 76. Polydiacetylene self-assembled materials for fluorescent detection of bioanalytes. M. A. Reppy, B. A. Pindzola 11:40 77. Atmospheric ionic liquid nanoelectrojet sources for chemical ionization sensing of chem/bio agents. Y-H. Chiu, D. J. Levandier, R. A. Dressier Section Β BCEC 152 Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Oxide-Supported Catalysts Cosponsored by PHYS N. Marzari and A. Wieckowski, Organizers 8:30 78. Pinning of graphene to lr(111 ) by flat Ir dots. P. J. Feibelman 9:10 79. Formation of Au clusters on rutile TiO2(110). B. Hammer 9:50 80. Metal-support interactions in realis­ tic environments. W. F. Schneider, L. Xiao, W. Un, Y. Xu 10:30 81. Ferroelectric PbTi03-supported Pt films as tunable catalysts. A. M. Kolpak, 1. Grinberg, A. M. Rappe 11:10 82. Interaction of Platinum with the stoichiometric RuO2(110) surface. P. Liu, J. T. Muckerman, R. R. Adzic

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 84. Combining conventional lithography with molecular self-assembly for chemical patterning. M. E. Anderson, C. Srinivasan, J. N. Hohman, M. J. Shuster, Ε. Μ. Carter, M. W. Horn, P. S. Weiss 9:00 85. Synergism of top-down and bot­ tom-up approaches in nanoparticles and polymers nanofabrication. Y. Ofir, Q. Xiao, B. Samanta, P. Arumugam, M. T. Tuominen, V. M. Rotello 9:20 86. Generation of chemically active surface templates with multifunctional binding motifs. D. Wouters, C. Haensch, S. Hoeppener, U. S. Schubert 9:40 87. Reactive polymer platform for sur­ face patterning. B. Zdyrko, G. Chumanov, I. Luzinov 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 88. Surface modification of elastomeric stamps for microcontact printing by molecular recognition. V. B. Sadhu, A. Perl, D. I. Rozkiewicz, M. Péter, G. Engbers, Β. J. Ravoo, D. N. Reinhoudt, J. Huskens 10:40 89. Hydrothermal treatment: An in situ method of strengthening nanopartfclecontaining layer-by-layer coatings. Z. Gemici, H. Shimomura, R. E. Cohen, M. F. Rubner 11:00 90. Systematic study of film growth in short chain alkylsilanes including issues of phase segregation and islanding. L Guy 11:20 91. Patterning magnetic nano-islands arrays by distortion-assisted soft lithogra­ phy. Y. Zhang, A. Peter, D. Chandra, J. M. Kikkawa, S. Yang 11:40 92. Production and nanopatteming of ultra-thin metal oxide films, by scanning probe lithography. S. M. D. Watson, K. S. Coleman Section D BCEC 153B Surfactant Self-Assembry Surfactants at Interfaces M. L. Lynch and O. Soderman, Organizers J. N. Israelachvili and S. A. Safran, Presiding 8:30 93. Molecular rearrangements and dynamics during the self-assembly from solution of bilayers on surfaces. J. Israelachvili, T. Anderson, H. Zeng, Y. Min, K. Weirich, D. K. Fygenson, Y. L. Chen 9:10 94. Single-molecule studies of surfac­ tant diffusion and adsorption-desorption kinetics with fluorescence microscopy. A. Honciuc, D. K. Schwartz 9:30 95. Young's modulus of a switchable peptide film. A. P. Middelberg, L He, A. F. Dexter, H-H. Shen, S. A. Holt, R. K. Thomas 9:50 96. Conformation at air/water interface and self-assembly behavior in solution of a polymerizable cationic Gemini surfactant. M. Abe, K. Tsubone, T. Koike, K. Tsuchiya, T. Ohkubo, H. Sakai, J. Schmidt, Y.Talmon 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 97. Self-assembly of charged surfac­ tant domains on surfaces. S. A. Safran, A. Naydenov, P. A. Pincus 11:05 98. The effect of adsorption history on the surface morphology of a self-associat­ ing di-block co-polymer A surface forces study. M. L Gee, S. C. McLean

Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Drug Delivery Cosponsored by BIOHW D. J. Burgess, Organizer 8:00 101. Polyketal micropartides: A new delivery vehicle for treating inflammatory diseases. N. Murthy 8:20 102. Hyaluronic acid hydrogel particles and particle containing networks for bio­ medical applications. X. Jia, N. Sahiner, A. Jha, T. Jiao, R. J. Clifton 8:40 103. Electrospun weak polyelectrolyte ultrathin fibers and their controlled releas­ ing properties. A. Chunder, L Zhai 9:00 104. Liposome based multiprong enzyme inhibitors. A. Elegbede, M. Haldar, S. Manokaran, S. Mallik, D. K. Srivastava 9:20 105. Single wall carbon nanotubes exhibit strong antimicrobial activity. S. Kang, M. Pinault, L Pfefferle, M. Elimelech 9:40 Intermission. 9:55 106. PRINT nanoparticle-based cancer immunotherapies. R. A. Petros, A. Buntzman, J. A. Frelinger, J. M. DeSimone 10:15 107. Porous silica spheres: Unique uptake mechanism and enhanced drug delivery with respect to lung epithelial and mesothelioma cells. K. Cheng, S. R. Blumen, M. Ramos-Nino, D. Taatjes, D. Weiss, B. T. Mossman, C. C. Landry 10:35 108. Lateral fusion of lipid membranes to nanoscale functionalized posts. B. D. Almquist, N.A.Melosh 10:55 109. Use of electrostatically selfassembled nanolayers for growth factor delivery from implant surfaces. M. L. Macdonald, N. Brenner, G. Endale, N. Rodriguez, P. T. Hammond 11:15 110. Surfactant vesicles for highefficiency capture and separation of charged organic solutes. D. English, E. Danoff, X. Wang, J. Park, N. Sinkov, P. DeShong, S-H. Tung, S. R. Raghavan 11:35 111. Synthetic route toward multifunc­ tional microgels. Ν. Singh, L. A. Lyon 11:55 112. Computer modeling of nanopar­ ticle targeting in drug delivery. S. Wang, M. C. Hagy, C-C. Chen, E. E. Dormidontova Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Understanding Potassium Channels Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Nanoparticle Serf-Assembly Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COLL Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL

COLL

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section C

Section A

BCEC 153A

BCEC 151B Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Porous Materials Cosponsored by BIOHW R. Nagarajan, S. Lee, and T. A. Hatton, Organizers W. Zukas, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00 113. Blending the micro- and nanoscale for attomolar toxin detection. S. P. Mulvaney, Κ. Μ. Myers, P. E. Sheehan, L J. Whitman 2:20 114. Ultrasensitive chemical vapor sensors based on VHF NEMS resonators. E. B. Myers, M. Li, J. S. Aldridge, H. McCaig, N. S. Lewis, M. L. Roukes 2:40 115. Porous silicon waveguides for small molecule detection. G. Rong, S. M. Weiss 3:00 116. Infinite and microscale patches of nanohole arrays: A scalable platform for refractive index sensing with increased sensitivity. T. W. Odom 3:20 117. Assisted stochastic sensing of analytes by a synthetic nanopore with adaptor. Z. Siwy, M. Powell, M. Sullivan, R. Eisenberg 3:40 118. Nanosensors based on localized plasmon resonance in responsive polymer composite thin films. I. Tokareva, I. Tokarev, E. Hutter, J. H. Fendler, S. Minko 4:00 119. Organophosphorus acid anhydrolase-CdS quantum dots conjugation for detection of diisopropylfluorophosphate. R. M. Leblanc, J. Xu, R. C. Triulzi 4:20 120. A microfluidic sensor array for ricin detection. Ζ. Η. Fan 4:40 121. Exploiting self-assembly strategy to generate pattern for sensing using a single receptor scaffold. S. Thayumanavan, B. S. Sandanaraj

2:20 145. Amphiphiles possessing novel peptide binding sites as nonviral gene delivery agents. X. Zhang, C. A. H. Prata, M. W. Grinstaff

Chemically and Topographically Textured Surfaces Applications S. Bhattacharjee and A. Amirfazli, Organizers 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:10 128. Dielectrophoretic lévitation in presence of shear flow: Implications on colloidal fouling control on textured channel walls. S. Bhattacharjee, S. Molla 2:30 129. Engineering surface of nanoparticles through self-assembly. O. Uzun, A. Verma, A. M. Jackson, C. Dubois, F. Stellacci 2:50 130. Hydrazine fuels for catalytic pumping over bimetallic patterned surfaces. M. E. Ibele, Y. Wang, T. R. Kline, T. E. Mallouk, A. Sen 3:10 131. Increased vascular endothelial cell function on nanopatterned Ti surface features. J . Lu, T. J. Webster 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 132. Ferroelectric texture in a simple organic monolayer system. A. E. Baber, S. C. Jensen, E. C. H. Sykes 4:10 133. Friction of aromatic monolayers in contacts of different size and adhesive strength. M. Ruths, Y. Yang 4:30 134. Amphiphilic triblock copolymers and their crosslinked co-networks as potential antibiofouling coatings. J . W. Bartels, D. S. Germack, K. L. Wooley 4:50 135. Correlation of receding contact angle with interfacial tension in crude oil-brine-rock systems. D. N. Rao

3:20 Intermission. 3:35 148. Mesoporous silica as a DNA delivery vehicle. S. M. Solberg, C. C. Landry 3:55 149. Amphiphilic core-shell nanoparticles with poly(ethylenimine) shells as potential gene and drug delivery carriers. L. J. Li, Y. S. Siu, W. Li, M. Feng, D. K. L. Lee, P. Li 4:15 150. DNA-template molecular assembly of a benzyl amine micelle and relation between gene transfection efficiency. K. Sakurai, M. Sakuragi 4:35 151. Dual mode imaging and selective functionalization of multimaterial nanopyramids. J . Lee, W. Hasan, T. W. Odom 4:55 152. Imaging telomerase in situ using aptamer-derivatized quantum dots. M. D. Roy, S. H. Lacerda, J. P. Jakupciak, J. C. Hwang, M. L Becker Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Ion Channel Membrane Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COLL

Section D Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Motor Proteins Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

BCEC 153B Surfactant Self-Assembly Surfactants in Biotechnology

M O N D A Y EVENING M. L. Lynch and O. Soderman,

Organizers

Section A

Section Β D. Berti and M. Caffrey, BCEC 152 Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Industrial Applications Cosponsored by PHYS N. Marzari and A. Wieckowski,

2:40 146. Functionalized zeolites for applica­ tions in gene delivery. S. C. Larsen, A. K. Salem, M. Pearce, N. Lee 3:00 147. Designed metallo-lipids for DNAdelivery into eukaryotic cells. A. Arzola, I. Cruz-Campa, H. Alarcon, A. Jimenez, J. C. Noveron

Organizers

2:00 122. Using DFT to explore catalysts consisting of an atomic active center. S. Chrétien, R. Pala, V. Shapovalov, H. Metiu 2:40 123. Oxygen buffering at reducible oxide surfaces: Interplay between vacancies, electron localization, and adsorbate mobility on ceria. S. Fabris 3:20 124. Theoretical study of selectivity in olefins partial oxidation. D. Torres, F. Illas, N. Lopez, R. M. Lambert 4:00 125. Acrolein hydrogénation on silver catalysts: A density functional study of mechanism. N. Roesch, A. B. Mohammad, Κ. Η. Lim, I. V. Yudanov, Κ. Μ. Neyman 4:40 126. Release of gold atoms from Au(111) upon the adsorption of electro­ negative atoms: A density functional theory study. T. A. Baker, C. M. Friend, E. Kaxiras 5:00 127. Computational studies of mercury adsorption on metal surfaces. J. A. Steckel

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Presiding

2:00 136. Surfactant effects on folding and stability of a beta-barrel integral membrane protein. A. M. Lenhoff, C. L. Bianco, C. S. Schneider, E. W. Kaler 2:40 137. Membrane protein crystallization in lipidic mesophases: A mechanism study using X-ray microdiffraction. M. Caffrey, V. Cherezov 3:00 138. Small molecule surfactants as mediators of membrane protein crystallization. D. R. Davies, E. Wallace, P. D. Laible, C. Kors, P. Nollert 3:20 139. Determination of second virial coefficients for membrane proteins using self-interaction chromatography. C. S. Henry, R. W. Payne, P. J. Loll, W. W. Wilson 3:40 Intermission. 3:55 140. Photoresponsive catanionic vesicles for nonviral gene delivery. Y-C. Liu, A-L. M. Le Ny, C. T. Lee 4:35 141. Nucleolipoplexes: A new paradigm for phospholipid bilayer-nucleic acid interactions. D. Berti, S. Milani, F. Baldelli, P. Baglioni 4:55 142. Self-assembled soft materials from biobased surfactants. G. J o h n 5:15 143. Short designed peptides as rapidly switchable surfactants. A. F. Dexter, A. P. Middelberg Section Ε BCEC 153C Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Gene Delivery Cosponsored by BIOHW D. J . Burgess,

Organizer

2:00 144. Long-term cellular trafficking stud­ ies of nonviral vectors utilizing quantum dot bioconjugates. C. Srinivasan, F. Papadimitrakopoulos, D. J. Burgess

BCEC East Registration Fundamental Research in Colloid and Surface Chemistry R. Nagarajan,

Organizer

6:00-8:00 153. New Gemini amphiphiles with a [12]annulene core. L. Shi, D. Lundberg, D. G. Musaev, F. M. Menger 154. Comparative SERS and in situ ATRFTIR study of protein/Ag nanoparticle multilayers. M. Erol, H. Du, S. A. Sukhishvili 155. Effect of membrane stiffness on the adhesion dynamics of polymeric vesicles. J . Nam, M. M. Santore 156. Effect of silanol density on formation of supported lipid membranes on S1O2 nanoparticles. S. Ahmed, S. L. Wunder 157. Exchange dynamics of probe molecules in colloidal polyelectrolyte capsule disper­ sions measured by PFG-NMR. R. P. Choudhury, M. Schoenhoff 158. High density encapsulation of Fe304 nanoparticles in lipid vesicles. A. Wijaya, K. Hamad-Schifferli 159. Hydrogel-stamped membrane protein arrays for high-throughput applications. S. Majd, R. F. Capone, M. Mayer 160. Influence of anchoring and terminating groups on tunneling properties of alkane molecules on gold. J-G. Wang, A. Selloni 161. Withdrawn. 162. Self-assembled monolayers of peptide linked ruthenium polypyridyl complexes: Luminescent monolayer formation and probes of distance dependence in surface enhanced resonance raman spectroscopy. S. Finn, T. E. Keyes 163. The effect of additional matter with different properties on characteristics of polyelectrolyte complex membrane and related mechanism exploration. G. Chen

164. Aromatic thiols as friction modifiers. Y. Yang, M. Ruths 165. Monovalent cation mediated strong attraction among polyoxometalate mac­ roions. J . Pigga, T. Liu 166. Nanopatteming of GaAs surfaces using scanning probe lithography. Y-H. Chan, G. Liang, R. P. Mirin, J. D. Batteas 167. Novel synthesis of Janus particles from 1-D polymer substrates. C-C. Ho, C. Kuo 168. SP study of structure and composition of the surface of crystals containing longchain perfluorocarbons. P. Metrangolo, G. Resnati, R. Cingolani, R. Rinaldi, G. Maruccio, V. Arima, T. Pilati 169. 3-D Electrically interconnected nanowire networks formed by fluidic diffusion bond­ ing. Z. Gu, H. Ye, A. Bemfeld, D. H. Gracias 170. Using "click" chemistry to tether ligands to gold nanoparticles. M. W. Heaven, C. A. Beasley, R. W. Murray 171. Variation in adsorption isotherm and melting temperature of polyethylene oxide) adsorbed on modified silica sur­ faces. R. Madathingal, S. L. Wunder 172. X-Ray crystal structure and variable temperature NMR studies on /V-arylhydroxamic acids. R. Natarajan, I. Nirdosh, A. Balaban, E. Czerwinski 173. High length single-wall carbon nanotubes dispersed in water. T. J . Simmons 174. Magnetic field induced particle clustering and its application in viscosity measure­ ment. R. Hong, M. J. Cima, R. Weissleder, L. Josephson 175. Methane hydrate formation at the inter­ face between methane and water phases. T. Koga, D. Fourman, J. Bryant, J. Wong, M. Eaton, J. Koo, M. K. Endoh, J. Jerome, S. Satija, M. H. Rafailovich, D. Mahajan 176. Nanocrystalline Ti02 thin films: From hydrothermal preparation to photocatalytic activity. C. Su, T-Y. Yang, J-L. Chen 177. Nanopatteming T1O2 for photovoltaic applications. S. Williams, M. J . Earl, Z. Zhou, V. Gowrishankar, M. D. McGehee, E. T. Samulski, J. M. DeSimone 178. Nanorod-coated PNIPAM microgels: Thermoresponsive optical properties. M. Karg, I. Pastoriza-Santos, J. Pérez-Juste, T. Hellweg, L. M. Liz-Marzân 179. New well-defined hybrid materials with thermoresponsive PNIPAM-shells and inorganic nanoparticle-cores. M. Karg, I. Pastoriza-Santos, L. M. Liz-Marzân, T. Hellweg 180. Novel polymerization of a N-halamine biocidal monomer on the surface of cotton fibers. X. Ren, S. D. Worley, L Kou, C. Zhu, H. B. Kocer, R. M. Broughton, T. S. Huang 181. Patterning of a wide variety of materials by template-directed adsorption on alkanethiol-patterned gold surfaces. A. Chandekar, J-S. Im, S. K. Sengupta, J. Whitten 182. Patterning of poly(acrylic acid) by ionic exchange reactions in microfluidic channels. M. lahav, M. Narovlyansky, A. Winkleman, R. Perez-Castillejos, E. A. Weiss, G. M. Whitesides 183. Study of phase behavior of fatty acid in oil/water system by HPLC. B. Bravo, J. Sanchez, G. Chavez, A. B. Caceres, N. Marquez, F. Ysambertt, M. Briceno, J. L. Salager 184. Physicochemical formulation of ethoxylated octylphenol surfactants in microemulsion-oil-water systems. N. Marquez, Β. Bravo, G. Chavez, A. B. Caceres, F. Ysambertt 185. Plasmid DNA as a template for metal nanoparticle formation. J . Samson, C. M. Drain, A. Varotto 186. Preparation and applications of novel fluorinated oligomeric nanoparticles. T. Kariya, M. Mugisawa, T. Oya, S-l. Ogino, H. Sawada 187. Preparation and characterization of bimetal thiolate monolayer protected clusters (MPCs). C. A. Fields-Zinna, J. B. Tracy, M. C. Crowe, R. W. Murray 188. Preparation and photocatalytic activity study of nanocrystalline Ti02 thin films. C. Su, C-K. Lin, Y-F. Hsieh 189. Preparation of organic-inorganic layered double hydroxide. H. Tagaya, R. Aida

TECH-45

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL

190. Predicting bacterial adhesion to host cells and implants via thermodynamic calculations and direct force measure­ ments. Y. Uu, J. A. Strauss, P. A. Pinzon-Arango, T. A. Camesano 191. Reversibility of pH- induced dewetting of poly(vinyl pyridine) thin films on silicon oxide substrate. R. Burtovyy, I. Luzinov 192. Self-assembly of lipid conjugated gold nanoparticles. S. Chatterjee, M. Krikorian, B. L Gersten 193. Sitoxane based adhesion promoting photo-acid and photo-base generators and their application in DUV, EUV and E-beam lithography. S. Sharma, R. P. Meagley 194. Simulation study on hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes. D. Minami, T. Ohkubo, H. Sakai, M. Abe 195. Single-molecule observations of azobenzene photo-switching in controlled nanoscale environments. A. Kumar, T. Ye, T. Takami, B-C. Yu, A. K. Flatt, J. M. Tour, P.S.Weiss 196. Size-controlled interpartjcle charge trans­ fer between ΤΊ02 and quantized capaci­ tors. J. Kim, D. Lee 197. Sol-gel process of silanized (CdSe)ZnS QDs in Langmuir monolayer. J. Xu, C.Wang, R.M.Leblanc 198. Solid phase organic synthesis of pegylated disulfides for the generation of biocompatible self-assembled monolayers. L S. Wong, S. J. Janusz, G. J. Leggett, J. Micklefield 199. Spectroscopic studies of cytochrome c adsorbed to silica. T. A. Hopkins, K. S. Bloome, C. A. Hedge, C. M. Kraning, M-C. Su, G. C. Hoops 200. Stability and degradation of PRINT nanoparticles. J. Guo, S. E. A. Gratton, P. D. Pohlhaus, A. Murphy, A. Galloway, D. Schorzman, J. M. DeSimone 201. Stimuli responsive hybrid polymer brushes with instant switching behavior. M. Motomov, R. Sheparovych, I. Tokarev, Y. Roiter, S. Minko 202. STM study of monomer Au on a Ti02 (110)-(1x1) surface. X.Tong, L B. Benz, P. Kemper, H. Metiu, M. T. Bowers, S. K. Buratto 203. Structural and compositional mapping of a phase-separated Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer by atomic force microscopy. S.E.Qaqish, M.F.Paige 204. Structures and displacement of 2-adamantanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au{111}. M. Kim, J. N. Hohman, P. S. Weiss 205. Study on polymerization of styrene in liquid crystal by rheological behavior. G. U Sr., J. Wang Sr., X. Yang Sr. 206. Superparamagnetic magnetite-polysty­ rene composite colloids with anisotropic structures. J. Ge, Y. Hu, Y. Yin 207. Supported planar lipid bilayers on stepand-terrace Ti0 2 surfaces. R. Tero, T. Ujihara, T. Urisu 208. Surface imprinted silica nanoparticles for FRET based detection of methyl salicylate. C. B. Smith, J. E. Anderson, B. Tatineni 209. Surface modification of gold nanopar­ ticle—DNA conjugages toward enhanced functionality and stability. S. Park, K. Hamad-Schifferli 210. Surface modification of PET membranes by "grafting to" approach. O. Burtovyy, V. Klep, T. Turel, Y. Gowayed, I. Luzinov 211. Surface organization of thiol tethered tripyridyl porphyrin derivatives on gold. A. Schuckman, Y-H. Chan, M. Vindu, L. M. Perez, C. M. Drain, J. D. Batteas 212. Surface properties of jellyfish: Langmuir monolayer study of aequorin. C. Wang, R. M. Leblanc 213. Surface tension driven self-folding polyhedra. T. Leong, P. A. Lester, D. H. Gracias 214. Surface-enhanced vibrational, ATR-FTIR, TPD and DFT study of various ortho-, meta-, and para-aromatic isomers adsorbed on vacuum-deposited Ag films and Ag powders. D. A. Perry, S. E. Baker 215. Switching on the dipole: A new principle for the self-assembly of asymmetric mono­ mers on metal surfaces. O. P. H. Vaughan, A. Alavi, F. J. Williams, R. M. Lambert 216. Synthesis and thermal stability of fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomer/silica gel nanocomposites. T. Tashima, T. Narumi, S. Kodama, H. Sawada

46- TECH

217. Synthesis of amorphous palladium selenide nanoparticles via cation exchange and studies of their phase transformation. S. E. Wark, C-H. Hsia, D. H. Son 218. Synthesis offluoroalkylend-capped cooligomers possessing a lower critical solution temperature characteristic. K. Takahashi, M. Mugisawa, T. Ova, S-l. Ogino, H. Sawada 219. Synthesis of new Η-bonding porphyrins for materials design. S. Singh, C. M. Drain, X. Shi 220. Imaging of protein layers with an optical microscope for the characterization of peptide microarrays. O. Melnyk, V. Souplet, R. Desmet 221. Imaging, spectroscopy and manipulation of water on Au(111), from single mol­ ecules to nanoscale ice crystals. H. L Tiemey, A. E. Baber, E. C. H. Sykes 222. Influence of fatty η-alcohols as cosurfactants in the micellizatjon of polyethoxylate alcohol surfactants. G. Chavez, G. Arenas, B. Bravo, A. B. Caceres, N. Marquez, F. J. Ysambertt 223. Influence of shear strain on liquid-crystal­ line columnar arrays in the bisazo dyeswater chromonic liquid crystals. M. Kobayashi, J. Saeki, A. Ishima, K-l. Kumagai 224. Infrared reflectance spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic characterizations of the assembly of gold nanoparticles on planar surfaces via amino acid interac­ tions. D. Mott, B. Cotts, S. Urn, W-P. Chan, H-Y. Park, J. Luo, C-J. Zhong 225. Interaction and reactivity of water on O-covered Au(111). R. G. Quiller, T. A. Baker, W. Gao, C. M. Friend 226. Interaction of thermally deposited gold with 3-mercaptopropytoimethoxysilanemodified silicon surfaces. J. Singh, J.E.Whitten 227. Interfacial characterization of Cu/Ru bimetallic corrosion: Effect of polyphenol antioxidants. S. S. Venkataraman, K. K. Yu, K. S. Pillai, F. Yang, P. N. Reddy, O. Chyan 228. Interfacial studies of sexithiophene deposited on fullerene surfaces. Y. Ge, J. E. Whitten 229. Light scattering study on molecular conformation of casein micelles in various physicochemical conditions. W. Qi, Y. Zhang, R. Su, Z. He 230.2-D Infrared spectroscopy of Si-Η bond dynamics in a-Si:H. R. J. Scharff, S. D. McGrane 231. A novel approach to surface specific biomolecules: In vitro selection on sur­ faces (ISOS). S. F. Sweeney, A. E. Mahady, J. A. Berglund, J. E. Hutchison 232. AFM studies of protein-protein interac­ tions on designed arrays of nanografted carboxylate-terminated nanopattems of alkanethiols. J. Ngunjiri, J. C. Gamo 233. Another look at organic/metal interfaces: Correlation with experiment. M. L Mihajlovic, P. M. Mitrasinovic 234. Applications of magnetic Fe203 nano­ particles in organic chemistry. G. U, P. Stevens, Y. Gao 235. Aqueous dispersion/emulsion polymer­ ization of tetrafluoroethylene. L Du, L. Chi, J. M. DeSimone, G. W. Roberts 236. Atomic force microscope observation on friction of phospholipid micro domains in monolayer. T. Oguchi, K. Matsuda, T. Ohkubo, K. Sakai, H. Sakai, M. Abe 237. Atomic force microscopy investigation of cranberry juice cocktail's effect on bacterial adhesion. P. A. Pinzon-Arango, Y. Liu, T. A. Camesano 238. Binding affinity between bacteria and antimicrobial peptides. J. A. Strauss, T. A. Camesano 239. Characterization of lipopolysaccharide monolayers from Bdellovibrio predator and E. coli prey. C. B. Voile, S. Azan, E. M. Spain, M. E. Nunez 240. Chlorine promotion of olefin partial oxida­ tion reactions on Au(111 ). D. S. Pinnaduwage, W. Gao, L. Zhou, C. M. Friend 241. Collection methods for detection of spores by IR spectroscopy. H. U, C. P. Tripp

242. Comparative study of the fundamental properties of liposomes made by sonteation and by extrusion. A. A. Castro Forero, A. J. Greiner, M. M. Lapinski, G. J. Blanchard, R.M.Worden, R.Y.Ofoli 243. Contact dynamics: The role of contact time and diffusion on microcontact printed pattern quality. J. N. Hohman, C. Srinivasan, H. M. Saavedra, T. J. Mullen III, E. I. Morin, P. S. Weiss 244. Control of dewetting dynamics at a polymer-polymer interface by adding multiwalled carbon nanotubes. J. Koo, K. Shin, Y-S. Seo, T. Koga, S. Park, S. K. Satija, X. Chen, K. Yoon, B. S. Hsiao, H. Calev, J. Sokolov, M. Rafaitovfch 245. Controlled localization of FePt nanopar­ ticles in block copolymers for modulation of magnetic properties. D. Patra, S. Srivastava, T. Lu, B. Samanta, V. M. Rotello 246. Core-shell and segmented polymermetal composite nanostructures. M. lahav, E. A. Weiss, Q. Xu, G. M. Whitesides 247. Correlation between interpartide and electrical/optical properties for molecularly mediated thin film assemblies of nanopar­ ticles. L. Wang, Q. Rendeng, G. R. Wang, J. Luo, C-J. Zhong 248. Critical coagulation concentrations for SWCNTs in nonaqueous solvent. J. Poler, A. Giordano 249. Cysteine-functJonalized polyaspartJc acid: A polymer for coating and bioconjugation of nanoparticles and quantum dots. N. Erathodiyil. N. R. Jana, J. Y. Ying 250. Dependence of the deemulsifier action of water-soluble polymers in compositions with surface-active substances from col­ loid-chemical properties. S. B. Aktarova, G. M. Madibekova, B. Z. Mutaliyeva 251. Developing nonfouling materials and understanding their nonfouling mecha­ nism. S. Chen, Z. Zhang, S. Jiang 252. Dispersion of carbon nanotube into water by the use of novel dendritic fiuorinated block copolymer. N. Naltoh, R. Kasai, M. Suzuki, K. Ohnishi, H. Sawada 253. Disulfides and quantum dots: Binding as observed through interactions of free radicals with the nanoparticle surface. P. S. Billone, L. Maretti, J. C. Scaiano 254. Effect of NaCI concentration on the behavior of stimuli-sensitive microgel in SPR sensor. A. Jeenanong, H. Kawaguchi 255. Effect of salt and fatty η-alcohols in the viscosity behavior of emulsified surfac­ tants/oil/water systems. I. Parra, G. Chavez, C. E. Avendaho, B. Bravo, F. Ysambertt, A. B. Caceres, N. Marquez 256. Effect of Ti02 coating thickness of Si02/ ΊΊ02 core-shell particles on anatase crys­ tallite growth and morphology at high temperature. J. Kim, J. Lee, Y-H. Park, W-S. Kim 257. Electrochemical imaging of surfaces and adsorbates at the atomic-scale. E. V. Iski, M. El-Kouedi, E. C. H. Sykes 258. Electrochemical studies of carbon nano­ tube networks. P. Vichchulada, M. D. Lay 259. Electroosmoticflowson uncharged surfaces. D. Kim, E. Darve 260. Electrophoresis of semiconductor quan­ tum dots on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). M. K. F. Lo, H. G. Monbouquette, M. A. Garcia-Garibay 261. Electrostatically limited assembly of acid terminated thiols. A. Y. Cheng, R. Terrill, Y. N. Pak, S. Chen 262. Elucidating the role of hydrosilation for nanopatteming n-alkylsilanes via particle lithography. J-R. U, J. C. Gamo 263. Exploration of the use of novel silica nanocomposite materials doped with fluorescent rare earth/sensitizer complex for forensic applications. S. K. Gill, B. Doyle, K. H. Cheng, L. J. Hope-Weeks 264. Effect of plasma on iron-copper catalysts for mixed alcohols synthesis from carbon monoxide hydrogénation. H. Zhang, W. Chu, H. Xu, L Shi, J. Zhou, J. Xu, M. Chen 265. Exploring the mechanism of glutathione mediated release of Rhodamine Β from quantum dot surfaces using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. A. Chompoosor, P. Arumugam, G. Han, V. M. Rotello

266. Enlarging the pore size of mesoporous V-MCM-41 materials by adding organic amine. J. Xu, W. Chu, L Yu 267. Fabrication of antireflective optical mate­ rials using self assembly. T. Lohmueiler, M. Helgert, R. Brunner, J. P. Spatz 268. Fabrication of Co, Ni, and Fe nanopar­ ticles using a plasmid DNA template. A. Varotto, C. M. Drain, J. Samson 269. Fabrication of pectin films with control­ lable wettability. X. Wang, Y-W. Wang, Q. Huang 270. Fiuorinated gold thtolate nanoparticles by Brust synthesis and ligand exchange. A. Dass, R. Gao, R. Balasubramanian, A. D. Douglas, J. B. Tracy, R. W. Murray 271. FDR and AFM studies of organosilane self-assembled monolayers in silica asper­ ity-asperity junctions. R. L Jones, N. Pearsall, J. D. Batteas 272. Helical morphologies in the sotf-assembly of chiral Schiff-based rod-coil amphiphiles. T-F. Un. R-M. Ho, C-H. Sung, C-S.Hsu 273. Hydrogen adsorption on platinum nano­ particles and synthesis of metal nanopar­ ticles. P. N. Njoki, J. Luo, B. Khan, S. Mishra, R. Sujakumar, C-J. Zhong 274. Hydropnobic-hydrophilic patterning materials. T. Hoshino, Y. Furukawa, Y. Morizawa 275. Synthesis and properties of novel chelat­ ing surfactant. J. Wang Sr., X. Yang Sr., G. U Sr., Y. Shi 276.2-D Assembly of viral particles and their application in cell binding. G. Kaur, M. Bruckman, Z. Niu, S. V. Pingali, P. Thiyagarajan, B. Lee, T. Emrick, T. P. Russell, Q. Wang 277. Gravity sedimentation self-assembly of small-size polystyrene latex with low density of surface charges. R. Uu, P. Dong, S-L. Chen 278. Chemoselective derivatization of a btonanoparticle by click reaction and ATRP reaction. Q. Zeng, T. U, B. M. Cash, S. Li, F.Xie, Q.Wang Section Β BCEC East Registration Catalysis Posters Cosponsored by CATL B. Zhou, Organizer 6:00-8:00 279. A novel indium on tungstated zirconia catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with methane in the presence of oxygen. J. U, D. Yang 280. Fabrication of metal oxide nanofibers as gold nanoparticle support matrices. D.M.Andala, W.Jones Jr., F. O. Ochanda, K. Cho 281. Metal nanoclusters supported on mag­ netic nanoparticles: Highly active and recyclable catalysts. L M. Rossi, M. J. Jacinto 282. Photocatalytic degradation of gaseous toluene over N-doped nanocrystalline Ti02 with enhanced activity under UV and visible light irradiation. F. Dong, S. Guo, W. Zhao, Z. Wu 283. Photocatalytic degradation of gaseous toluene over Zn2+-doped ΤΊ02: Optimiza­ tion of the preparation conditions. F. Dong, S. Guo, W. Zhao, Z. Wu, Z. Cao 284. Photoelectron diffraction studies of thin organic and oxide films. C. L A. Lamont, K. Hogan, G. Nisbet, E. A. Kroeger, F. Allegretti, M. Polcik, M. Knight, D. P. Woodruff 285. Ti02-based nanotubes and nanorods for photodegradation of organic dyes. K. J. Balkus Jr.

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

COLL

Section C BCEC East Registration Catalytic Activity and Surface Characterization of Deposited Metal Nanoparticles and Polyparticles on Metal Oxides G. N. Salaita,

Presiding

6:00-8:00 286. Sintering effect on N-doped Ti02 nanoparticles for photocatalytic applications. Y. Zhao, X. Qiu, C. Burda 287. Synthesis and characterization of N-doped ceramics nanoparticles. C. Mao, X. Qiu, Y. Zhao, C. Burda, J-J. Zhu Section D BCEC 153B Surfactant Self-Assembly M. L. Lynch and O. Soderman,

Organizers

M. Gradzielski and B. F. Chmelka, Presiding 6:00 288. Microstructure of shear-banding wormlike micellar solutions. N. J . Wagner, F. Nettesheim, M. E. Helgôson, L. Porcar 6:40 289. Polymer self-assembly in binary water-ethahol mixtures. R. Hoogenboom, H. M. L. Thijs, D. Wouters, S. Hoeppener, U. S. Schubert 7:00 290. Withdrawn. 7:20 Intermission. 7:35 291. Guest-host interactions in selfassembling surfactant systems studied by NMR. B. F. Chmelka, C. A. Steinbeck 8:15 292. Self-assembly of sugar-based surfactant in the presence of phenol. S, Lu, P. Somasundaran 8:35 293. Formation of mixed aggregates of zwitterionic hydrocarbon and anionic pérfluoro surfactants: Structural and dynamical investigations. M. Gradzielski, K. Bressel, C. Wolf, T. Narayanan, I. Grillo 8:55 294. Ion-specific effects on interactions among surfactant assemblies. D. Bratko Section Ε

Section F BCEC East Registration

Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Cosponsored by BIOHW Organizer

6:00-8:00 295. Targeted therapies and imaging of B-cell malignancies using PRINT particles. C. L. Brannen, J. A. Weaver, H. An, R. Z. Orlowski, J. DeSimone 296. Transporting lipophilic drugs in aqueous media through PEG-derivatized nanopar­ ticles. Y. Cheng, A. C. S. Samia, C. Burda 297. Organic-inorganic mesoporous nanocarriers integrated with biogenic ligands. J. Gu, T. Okubo, W. Fan, A. Shimojima 298. Water-soluble microgels for protein binding. A. Kraft, A. F. Tominey, J. Liese 299. Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) for bioConjugation and ligand immobilization. A. N. Zelikin, G. K. Such, A. Postma, F. Caruso 300. Directed evolution of bone proteins and their therapeutic usage. S-W. Lee, K-Y. Kwon, J-H. Lee, W-J. Chung 301. Synthesis and applications of meso(nano)porous silica particles from disodium trioxosilicate an inorganic silica source. I. Sokolov, S. Naik 302. Molecularly mediated assemblies of nanoparticles in solution and their bioapplications. S. Lim, H-Y. Park, P. N. Njoki, L. Wang, C-J. Zhong 303. Influence of surface chemistry on the properties of proteins entrapped in functionalized sol-gels. H. O'Neill, V. Urban, G. Luo

TUESDAY MORNING

Section C

Section A

BCEC 153A

BCEC 151B Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Nanoparticulates Cosponsored by BIOHW R. Nagarajan, T. A. Hatton, and W . Zukas, Organizers S. Lee, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00 321. NanoActive materials for chemical and biological protection and decontamina­ tion. O. B. Koper 9:20 322. Pore size modification of zeolite ZSM-5 for enhanced ethylene oxide filtra­ tion. G. W. Peterson, C. J. Karwacki, W. B. Feaver, J. A. Rossin 9:40 323. Applications of nanocrystalline zeolites to CWA decontamination. S. C. Larsen, V. H. Grassian 10:00 324. Metal-organic frameworks as air-purification materials. D. Tranchemontagne, O. M. Yaghi 10:20 325. Oxidation of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide catalyzed by vanadium-doped mesoporous silica. S. R. Livingston, C. C. Landry 10:40 326. Visible-light activated ceramic powders for chemical and biological decontamination. C. Burda, J. Li 11:00 327. Catalytic magnetic nanoparticles for organophosphate degradation. H. Zhang, L. Bromberg, T. A. Hatton 11:20 328. Carbon nanospheres formation using metallic nanoparticle templates. C. Zhang, M. Fransson, S. Parasher, J. Crockett, B. Zhou 11:40 329. Effect of pore size distribution on the adsorption capacity and off-gassing characteristics of activated carbon fabrics for decontamination of surfaces. R. Kaiser, B. K. Maclver, A. J. Kulczyk, R. B. Spafford III, R. J. Willey, J. Miniccuci

Chemically and Topographically Textured Surfaces Interfaces and Related Fundamental

Issues S. Bhattacharjee and A. Amirfazli, Organizers 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 337. Surface tensions at fluid-solid interfaces. C. A. Ward, J. Wu 9:00 338. Elucidating the origins, dynamics and mechanism of 1-adamantanethiolate monolayer displacement for advanced patterning. H. M. Saavedra, T. J. Mullen III, A. A. Dameron, C. M. Barbu, V. H. Crespi, P. S. Weiss 9:20 339. Local probe oxidation of n-octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayers with high resolution: formation of chemically active surface templates and subsequent assem­ bly of functional nanostructures. D. Wouters, S. Hoeppener, U. S. Schubert 9:40 340. Statistical mechanical, molecular theory of solvation for supramolecular nanoarchitectures and electrochemical devices with nanoporous electrodes. A. Kovalenko 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 341. Variations in bacterial surface hydrophobicity measured by atomic force microscopy. L. S. Dorobantu, S. Bhattacharjee, J. M. Foght, M. R. Gray 10:40 342. Morphology and aggregation control of birnessite nanoparticles: Stirring vs. no stirring. M. A. Cheney, P. K. Bhowmik, S. Moriuchi, M. Villalobos 11:00 343. Withdrawn. 11:20 344. Predicting the morphology of plasma-sprayed nickel droplets on oxi­ dized steel. M. Xue, A. McDonald, C. Moreau, S. Chandra 11:40 345. An efficient approach to surfaceinitiated ROMP of low-strain cyclic olefins. J. Feng, N. N. Lokko, W. Chen

Section Β Section D

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Cosponsored by BIOHW R. Nagarajan, S. Lee, T. A. Hatton, and W. Zukas, Organizers

BCEC East Registration

D. J. Burgess,

304. Toward a liposome beacon: FRET between liposome encapsulated conju­ gated polymers and lipophilic dyes. G. Cosa, A. T. Ngo, M. Burger, E. Fuller, J. Quesnel 305. Magnetic and superparamagnetic poly­ mer nanocomposites for bone surfactants. N. Brenner, R. Isseroff, G. Rudomen, R. Gambino, S. Liang, D. Sunil, M. Si, M. C. Wen, J. Weh, H. Lewkowitz-Shpuntoff, N. Pernodet, M. Rafailovich 306. Eliminating nonspecific protein adsorp­ tion at the quantum dot surface. M. R. Warnement, I. Tomlinson, S. J. Rosenthal 307. Nanoparticles for multimode biological imaging. V. S. Lelyveld, M. G. Shapiro, A. Jasanoff, K. Hamad-Schifferli 308. Nanoparticle bioconjugates purified by AE-HPLC: Superior substrates for enzy­ matic and spectroscopic applications. S. A. Claridge, H. Liang, R. Basu, J. M. J. Frechet, A. P. Alivisatos 309. Quantitative analysis of nanoparticleDNA conjugates in antisense gene regula­ tion. K. A. Brown, K. Hamad-Schifferli 310. Interaction of Rhodococcus and its biosurfactant, mycolic acid, with different mineral surfaces. Z. Zhang, M. Geoghegan 311. Dynamic nanopattemed gradients for studies of cell migration. M. N. Yousaf 312. Binding and templation of nanoparticle receptors to peptide alpha-helices through surface recognition. P. S. Ghosh, A. Verma, V. Rotello 313. Withdrawn. 314. Micrometer silica colloidal particles for potential biological carrier. R. Liu, P. Dong, S-L. Chen 315. Chemo selective modification of turnip yellow mosaic virus by Cu(l) catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3- dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Q. Zeng, H. Bamhill, L. A. Lee, I. E. Tzanetakis, T. Dreher, Q. Wang

6:00-8:00 316. Branched polyethyleneimine/HEPES reduced silver nanoparticles for improved in situ SERS-detection of anions in aque­ ous solutions. S. Tan, H. Du, S. A. Sukhishvili 317. Hydrophilic colloids functionalized by iodoxybenzoic acid for chemical defense. L. Bromberg, T. A. Hatton 318. Lyotropic liquid crystal-butyl rubber nanocomposites with a bicontinuous cubic morphology: A highly selective, breathable barrier material for chemical agent protec­ tion. X. Lu, V. Nguyen, M. Zhou, X. Zeng, B. J. Elliott, D. L. Gin Section G BCEC East Registration Advanced Materials for Conversions and Separations in Energy Applications Cosponsored by PHYS J. R. Kitchin and J. B. Miller,

BCEC 152 Surfactants and Polymers for Personal, Home and Health Care Skin and Delivery of Actives P. Somasundaran, R. S. Farinato, K. P. Ananthapadmanabhan, L. D. Rhein, and N. Garti, Organizers 9:00 330. Overview of surfactants and poly­ mers for personal, home and health care. A. Lips 9:30 331. Skin lipid macromolecular struc­ ture: Relationship to compromised barrier and disease states. L. D. Rhein 9:50 332. Demands of dermal delivery. J. M. Chandler, J. W. Wiechers 10:10 333. Membrane models of the skin barrier: lipid dynamics and organization. D. J. Moore 10:30 Intermission. 10:45 334. Stimuli sensitive disassembly of polymer micelle for targeted release. S. Thayumanavan 11:05 335. Delivery of hydrophobic bioactive materials in water-based formulations. K. S. Narayanan, D. Jon, J. Patel, L. Senak 11:25 336. Looking at nanoparticles at the cellular level. M. Rafailovich, N. Pernodet

Organizers

6:00-8:00 319. Spatially controlled functionalization of ordered mesoporous carbons. J-J. Nitz, H. Tuysuz, A-H. Lu, F. Schuth 320. Photochemical corrosion inhibition of n-GaAs by cetylpyridinium chloride. M. M. Khader, A. S. Algaber

BCEC 153B Surfactant Self-Assembly Applications of Surfactants M. L. Lynch and O. Soderman, J. Vartuli and P. Baglioni,

Organizers

Presiding

8:30 346. The use of surfactants as tem­ plates in molecular sieve synthesis: An historical perspective. J. Vartuli 9:10 347. Synthesis of morphology controlled spherical MCM-41 with broad particle size distribution. Y. Yang Sr., X. Liu 9:30 348. Non-covalent functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes by in situ polymerization of micelles. S-M. Choi, T-H. Kim, C. Doe, S. R. Kline 9:50 349. Ordered assembly of gold nanorods using block copolymer films. Y. Liu, R. Deshmukh, R. J. Composto 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 350. Amphiphilic self-assemblies decorated by nucleobases. P. Baglioni, D. Berti, M. Banchelli, F. Baldelli, F. Betti 11:05 351. Self-assembly in sugar-oil com­ plex glasses. C. C. Co 11:25 352. Reversible switching colloidal systems from amphiphilic nanoparticles. M. Motornov, R. Sheparovych, R. Lupitskyy, O. Hoy, I. Luzinov, S. Minko 11:45 353. Interface assemblies of multienzyme systems for organic synthesis. R. Narayanan, P. Wang

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

I[-CH--i"/

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL

Section Ε

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section D

SectionF

BCEC 153C

Section A

BCEC 153B

BCEC 154

BCEC 151B

Surfactants and Polymers for Home and Health Care Surfactants and their Interactions

Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Imaging Cosponsored by BIOHW D. J. Burgess, Organizer 8:00 354. Hybrid nanopartictes for multimo­ dal imaging of cancer and Inflammation. J. S. Kim, W. J. Rieter, Κ. Μ. Taylor, W. Un, T. Κ. Tarrant, T. A. Van Dyke, W.Un 8:20 355. Toward a multifunctional nanoplatform for cancer targeting, imaging and therapy. D. E. NlkJes, C. S. Brazel, D. T. Curiel, M. Everts, J. N. Glasgow, D. T. Johnson, T. C. Ng, J. A. Nikles 8:40 358. Design of multifunctional surface ligands to enhance the biological activity of quantum dots. K. Susumu, I. L. Medintz, H. Mattoussi 9:00 357. Electron-dense cluster compounds for macromolecular imaging by cryoelectron microscopy. S-H. Cho, G. Lander, J. Quispe, M. G. Finn 9:20 358. Water-soluble dendron-functjonalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation and application as pH-sensing MRI contrast agents. C. Duanmu, I. Sana, Κ. Ε. Chaffee, B. M. Crase, B. M. Goodson, Y. Gao 9:40 Intermission. 9:55 359. Fluorescent nanoparticles with switchable polymer coating. V. Tsyalkovsky, V. Klep, R. Burtovyy, R. Lupitskyy, M. Motomov, S. Minko, I. Luzinov 10:15 360. Magnetic resonance sensing applications of enhanced sensitivity. R. Hong, M. J. Cima, R. Weissleder, LJosephson 10:35 361. Photocrosslinked surfactant shells improve stability, bioconjugate chemistry of nanoparticles biolabel. Y. Chen, J. Cho, Y. Alexi, T. A. Taton 10:55 362. Preparation of micro/nano bubbles for ultrasound contrast agents. K. Tsuchiya, K. Fujiwara, T. Konno, K. Itani, T. Ito, T. Matsuura, K. Ohkawa, K. Tsubone, H. Sakai, M. Abe 11:15 363. An AFM study of human embry­ onic stem cells at the single cell level. R. Wang, D. Qiu, I. Sridharan, Z. U, A. Krishnamoorthy, J. Xiang 11:35 364. Poly(epsilon-caprolactone)poly(ethylene oxide) ketoxime ether conju­ gates as functional nanomaterials for diagnostic imaging and biomedical applica­ tions. R. K. Iha, B. A. Van Horn, K. L Wooley 11:55 365. Biofunctionalization of europium doped lanthanum nanoparticle. A. A. Ansari, N. Singh, S. P. Singh Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Gating Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Microfluidics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COLL Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Novel Imaging Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL

48~U:CH

Langmuir Lectures P. S. Cremer, Organizer F. Zaera, Presiding 2:00 366. Nanowires, nanoscience and nanotechnologies. C. M. Ueber 3:00 367. Science and technology of nanocrystal quantum dots. M. G. Bawendi Section Β BCEC 152 Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Nanoparticle Catalysts Cosponsored by PHYS N. Marzari and A. Wieckowski, Organizers 2:00 368. First principles elucidation and design of active catalytic sites and their environment. M. Neurock, C. Plaisance 2:40 369. Quantum finite size effects in chemistry of nanoscale gold clusters. H. Hàkkinen 3:20 370. Designing core/shell nanoparticles for catalytic reactions. W. Tang, N. Froemming, G. Henkelman 3:40 371. The role of electrode structure in formic acid decomposition on ruthenium/ platinum catalysts: XPS and reactivity studies. A. Wieckowski, W. P. Zhou, M. Rigsby, H. Duong 4:20 372. Particle size and surface structural effects on electrocatalytic activity of Pt. B. Han, G. Céder 4:40 373. The electronic structure and electrocatalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. Y. Shao-Horn, S. W. Lee, T. Mitani, Y-T. Kim SectionC BCEC 153A Processes at Functional Plasmonic and Materials Design and Applications D. H. Gracias, Organizer J. D. Batteas, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 374. Plasmonic rulers for measuring the kinetics of macromolecular assembly. A.P.AIivisatoe 2:40 375. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and imaging of self-assembled hierarchical structures. M. E. Anderson, Ε. Μ. Cornelius, Y. Gao, M. S. Golden, L Postelmicu, J. A. Ruemmele, R. M. Georgiadis 3:00 376. Colloidal plasmonic particles for optical sensing and imaging. C. J. Murphy 3:35 377. Monodisperse metal nanoparticle arrays for convenient and highly sensitive label-free biosensors. W-S. Liao, X. Chen, T. Yang, E. T. Castellana, J. Chen, P. Cremer 3:55 Intermission. 4:10 378. Combining surface enhanced vibrational spectroscopies on the same plasmonic. H. Wang, C. S. Levin, A. Barhoumi, D. Zhang, O. Neumann, J. Kundu, P. Nordlander, B. G. Janesko, G. E. Scuseria, N.J.Halas 4:45 379. Plasmonics of gold nanopattems and their applications as SERS substrates for studying protein orientations. Q. Yu 5:05 380. Study of the characteristic relax­ ationtimesof associative polymer net­ works by surface plasmon resonance. L Fu, X. Guo, R. K. Prudhomme

P. Somasundaran, R. S. Farinato, K. P. Ananthapadmanabhan, L D. Rhein, and N. Garti, Organizers 2:00 381. Surfactant interactions with skin: factors that contribute to irritation potential. L D. Rhein 2:30 382. Surfactants in skin cleansing. A.Ups 2:50 383. Diffusion and in-vitro skin perme­ ation of actives from the water/docusate sodium/propylene glycol system. D.W. Osborne 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 384. Mixed systems based on a designed surfactant peptide. A. F. Dexter, A. S. Malcolm, A. P. MkJdelberg 3:45 385. Natural secondary surfactants based on hydrolyzed amaranth protein. J. V. Gruber, V. Padyachi, E. Balidemaj, K. O'Brien, K. Lou 4:05 386. Study of interactions between surfactants and liposomes/proteins. N. Deo, P. Somasundaran Section Ε BCEC 153C

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Panel Presentations Cosponsored by BIOHW S. Lee, T. A. Hatton, and W. Zukas, Organizers R. Nagarajan, Organizer, Presiding 4:00 Panel Discussion. P. Weiss, S. Lee, K. Gleason. Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Ugand Gated Ion Channels Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Emergence of Function in Molecular Microfluidics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COLL Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Btomacromolecule Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Diagnostics Cosponsored by BIOHW

WEDNESDAY MORNING

D. J. Burgess, Organizer

BCEC 151B

2:00 387. Plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles with low porydispersity. J. Lim, A. Eggeman, S. Majetich, R. D. Tilton 2:20 388. Detection of electron transfer proteins using water soluble cadmium sulfide nanocrystals. S. K. Gill, L J. Hope-Weeks 2:40 389. DNA-Mediated protein assembly and biocatalytic nanomaterials. C. V. Kumar, A. Bhambhani, V. K. Mudhivarthi 3:00 390. Gold nanoparticle protein conju­ gates: Study of pulsed laser heating as a biomolecular activity switch. J. Alper, K. Rahlin, K. Hamad-Schifferii 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 391. Hybrid gold/pojymer nanoparticles for use in bioassays. T. L Schiller, Z. Merican, C. J. Hawker, I. Blakey, P. M. Fredericks 3:55 392. Binding affinity determination of RGD-functionalized shell crosslinked nanoparticles to {alpha}v{beta}3 and {alpha}v{beta}5 integrins. A. L Fiamengo, Z. U, G. Sun, J. Xu, K. L. Wooley, C. J. Anderson 4:15 393. Nanostructured phospholipid polymer surface by electrospray deposition for enhancement of ELISA sensitivity. K. Ishihara, K. Nishizawa, M. Takai 4:35 394. Mechanical response from normal and transformed cells and their ECM fibers. N. Pernodet, J. Fields, A. Fields, V. Jurukovski, A. Ramek, T. Mironava, K. Ghosh, T. Bemheim, K. Hall, S. Ge, L Slutsky, M. Simon, M. Rafailovich 4:55 395. SERS enhancements from iso­ lated silver nanoparticles. E. Sheridan, O. Inya-Agha, R. J. Forster, T. E. Keyes 5:15 396. Molecular processes in single vesicles. N. Srividya, W. Okumu, K. McPherson, G. Balandram, S. Muralidharan

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

Section A

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense s Cosponsored by BIOHW R. Nagarajan, S. Lee, and T. A. Hatton, Organizers W. Zukas, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 397. Multilayered membrane assem­ blies for chemical defense. I. Luzinov, O. Burtovyy, V. Klep, R. Burtovyy, T. Turel, Y. Gowayed 9:20 398. Membrane development for light­ weight, chemical biological protection. E.WHUSZ

9:40 399. Electrosensitive permeablility of polymer-polymer nanocomposite mem­ branes. H. L. Schaeffer, G. R. Palmese, Y. A. Elabd 10:00 400. Nanoengineered additives with self-stratifying characteristics: A novel approach to improve CBD technologies. J. A. Orlicki, A. M. Rawlett, N. E. Zander, J. J. La Scala, W. E. Kosik, P. Smith, K. Andrews 10:20 401. Ionic liquid materials for barrier applications. R. D. Noble, D. L. Gin, C. Koval 10:40 402. Surface functionalization of butyl rubber electrospun membranes: Applica­ tions in chemical protection. D. Q. Murphy, W. Zukas, J. L Mead 11:00 403. Photocatalytic layer-by-layer coatings for degradation of chemical warfare agents. K. C. Krogman, P. T. Hammond 11:20 404. Polymer-nanotube-enzyme conju­ gates as active self-decontaminating films. P. Asuri, G. Zhu, Z. C. Dinu, S. S. Bale, R. S. Kane, J. S. Dordick 11:40 405. Design of highly selective "breathable" vapor barrier materials for chemical agent protection based on lyotropic liquid crystal-butyl rubber nanocomposites. D. L. Gin, B. J. Elliott, X. Lu, V. Nguyen, X. Zeng, M. Zhou, J. E. Bara

COLL

Section B

Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Electrochemical Reactions Cosponsored by PHYS

11:05 423. Molecular gels for controlled delivery applications: A biocatalytic approach. G. John, P. K. Vemula 11:25 424. Can adverse effects of gold nanoparticles be reversed? T. Mironava, A. Bakhtina, X. Fang, Y. Sun, A. Ramakrishnan, A. Ulman, K. Levon, M. Rafaikwich, N. Pemodet

N. Marzari and A. Wieckowski, Organizers

Section Ε

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Reactive Materials Cosponsored by BIOHW

9:00 406. Modeling electrocatalysis. T.Jacob 9:40 407. Nanoscale investigations of electrocatalysts from first principles. J. P. Greeley 10:20 408. Challenges in first-principles surface electrochemistry. I. Dabo, N. Marzari 11:00 409. Density functional theory/con­ tinuum model approach to surface electro­ chemistry. R. Jinnouchi, A. B. Anderson 11:40 410. ElectrocatalyBc property of PtPb and PtBi intermetallic line compounds via DFT. L-L Wang, D. D. Johnson 12:00 411. In situ electrochemical X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterizations of CoTMPP-based electrocatalysts for ORR applications. S. Mukerjee, J. M. Ziegelbauer, T. S. Olson, P.Atanassov

BCEC 153C

R. Nagarajan, S. Lee, and W. Zukas, Organizers

Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Btosensing and Drug Delivery Biosensor Cosponsored by BIOHW

T. A. Hatton, Organizer, Presiding

BCEC 152

Section C BCEC 153A Processes at Functional Plasmonic and Electronic Interfaces Interfaces in Electronics: Molecules J. D. Batteas, Organizer D. H. Gracias, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 412. Self-assembly of tailored interfaces for unconventional electronics and opto­ electronics. T. J. Marks 9:35 413. Electron transport across mol­ ecules: Lessons from well-defined mono­ layers. D. Cahen 10:10 414. Importance of contacts in molecular electronics. P. S. Weiss 10:45 Intermission. 11:00 415. Metal-molecule interface reac­ tions for silicon-based molecular electronic devices. C. A. Hacker, C. A. Richter, L J. Richter, N. Gergel-Hackett 11:35 416. Size-dependent redox exchange reactions of Au and Pt nanoparticles with Ag(CN)2- Z. Zhang, D. Meisel 11:55 417. Direct in-junctk>n characterization of molecular structure with combined electron tunneling and plasmon enhanced Raman spectroscopies in gold-moleculegold molecular electronic device struc­ tures. M. MaHani, H. Yoon, P. Kao, O. Cabarcos, T. Mayer, D. Allara Section D BCEC 153B Surfactants and Polymers for Personal, Home and Health Care Skin Care P. Somasundaran, R. S. Farinato, K. P. Ananthapadmanabhan, L. D. Rhein, and N. GartJ, Organizers 9:00 418. Specific skin lotion dispersion structure (emulsions, microemulsions, vesicle solutions) irrelevant for the action on the skin. S. E. Friberg 9:30 419. Applications for silicone polymers in skin care products. M. S. Starch 9:50 420. Encapsulation technology for skin care applications using multi-amellar vesicles of ethylene oxide/butylene oxide diblock copolymers. X. Zhang, S. Jordan, K. Harris, G. Rose 10:10 421. Utilization of biopolymers to build novel structures in edible functional materi­ als. D. J. McClements, Y-H. Hong 10:30 Intermission. 10:45 422. Poly(2-oxazoline)s: Potential candidates for personal care applications. R. Hoogenboom, M. W. M. Fijten, H.M.LThijs, U.S.Schubert

D. J. Burgess, Organizer 8:00 425. Monitoring the activity of Tyrosi­ nase by force microscopy: Developing biosensors using dynamic force interac­ tions. A. B. Braunschweig, R. Elnathan, I. Willner 8:20 426. Nanopore-based detection of immune complexes and viruses. J. D. Uram, K. Ke, A. J. Hunt, M. Mayer 8:40 427. Polyethylenedioxythtophene (PEDOT) nanobiointerfaces for fluorescent and electrochemical DNA detection. H-H. Yu, S-C. Luo, H. Xie, N. Chen, J.Y.Ying 9:00 428. Effect of outer membrane on the hysterisis of an implantable glucose sen­ sor. S. Vaddiraju, R. Tipnis, D. J. Burgess, F. Papadimitrakopoulos 429. Withdrawn. 9:20 Intermission. 9:35 430. Sensing with ion channels embed­ ded in solid supported membranes. I. K. Vockenroth, M. Jung, V. Atanasov, P. P. Atanasova, I. Keeper 9:55 431. Site specific labeling of cyto­ chrome c with Au and magnetic nanopar­ ticles. M-E. Aubin-Tam, K. Hamad-Schifferii 10:15 432. Surface functionalizatton of gold with carbohydrate conjugates for applica­ tions to nano- and biotechnology. J. Park, M. Kadalbajoo, A. Opdahl, H. Suda, C. A. Kitchens, J. C. Gamo, J. D. Batteas, M. J. Tarlov, P. DeShong 10:35 433. Secondary and tertiary conforma­ tional changes of adsorbed globular pro­ teins on silica nanoparticle surfaces. X.Wu.G.Narsimhan 10:55 434. Micropatteming of polycarbonate using silica nanoparticles for the prepara­ tion of peptide microarrays. O. Melnyk, V. Souplet, O. Canon, C. Olivier, C. Maillet, Ν. Medard, J-O. Durand 11:15 435. Patterned cholesterol-rich domains in supported lipid bilayers. S. Majd, A. M. Sauer, M. Mayer 11:35 436. Nonfouling, functjonalizable, and biocompatible polycarboxybetaine-grafted surfaces. Z. Zhang, S. Chen, S. Jiang Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Ligand GatedtonChannels Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Imaging of Live Tissue, Cells, and Organelles Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Section C

Section A

BCEC 153A

BCEC 151B

2:00 437. Highly active and stable enzymecoated nanofibers for detection and decon­ tamination. S. H. Kim, J. Kim 2:20 438. Self-detoxifying polymer system for chemical and biological warfare agents. S. Viswanathan, P. Kinlen, D. Landy, V. Ebron, S. Hou, J. Ulyanova, J. Bashkin, K. Koeller, P. Durham, C. Vause, J. U, T. Collin, C. Horwitz, J. McAdams, J. Hampel, J. Walker 2:40 439. Polymer colloids as catalysts for decontamination. W. T. Ford, R. Kamati, Y.Zhu 3:00 440. Self-decontaminating fabrics for comprehensive protection against chemi­ cal nerve and chemical blister agents. Y. Lee, A. Riecker, T. Mendum, C. Gomes, J. P. Puglia 3:20 441. Novel magnetic nanoparticles and dendritic star polymers for neutralizing and detecting chemical and biological threat agents. Y. Gao 3:40 442. Multifunctional polymer support for the hydrolysis and removal of organophosphate compounds from aqueous medium. A. Singh 4:00 443. Interfaces and decontamination: Monitoring chemical reactivity at a liquid/ liquid interface using second harmonic generation. A. B. Oelkers, L F. Scatena, A. M. Slupe, M. W. Hill 4:20 444. Nanoscopic study of bacterial spores from dormancy to death. P. A. Pinzon-Arango, G. Sertoli, T. A. Camesano, C. M. Mello, R. Nagarajan 4:40 445. Decontamination and protection using scanning atmospheric rf plasma. S. H. Kim Section Β BCEC 152 Catalytic Activity and Surface Characterization of Deposited Metal Nanoparticles and Potyparticles on Metal Oxides G. N. Salaita, Organizer 2:00 446. Studies of Au and Pd nanopar­ ticles on crystalline and well-defined amor­ phous silica films. D. J. Stacchkote, M. Baron, S. Kaya, J. Weissenrieder, S. K. Shaikhutdinov, H-J. Freund 2:25 447. Surface characterization of silicasupported bimetallic alloyed nanoparticle catalysts. D. Mott, J. Luo, P. N. Njoki, C-J.Zhong 2:50 Intermission. 3:05 448. The S02 effect on Ag-based catalysts with various supports of AI203, Ti02, and Π02-ΑΙ203 for NO reduction in lean bum condition. J. U, L Wei, J. Hao 3:30 449. Ti nanopattems for directing bone growth. S. D. Puckett, J. Lu, T. J. Webster

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Processes at Functional Plasmonic and Electronic Interfaces Interfaces in Electronics: Thin Films J. D. Batteas and D. H. Gracias, Organizers C. A. Hacker, Presiding 2:00 450. Interfacial interactions of semicon­ ducting polymers in thin film transistors. M.LChablnyc, M.F.Toney, I. McCulloch, M. Heeney 2:35 451. Direct probing of surface polariza­ tion in organic molecular films by Maxwelldisplacement-current and electric field induced optical second harmonic genera­ tion. M. Iwamoto, T. Manaka, E. Lim, R. Tamura 3:10 452. Interfacial and nanostructural enhancements in organic semiconductor sensors and diodes. H. E. Katz 3:45 Intermission. 4:00 453. Molecular characterization of organic semiconductors for thin film tran­ sistors. L J. Richter 4:35 454. SFQ on functional organic inter­ faces. H. Ye, J. Huang, J-R. Park, H. E. Katz, D. H. Gracias 4:55 455. Interface of regtoregular poly(3hexylthiophene) with Ca metal studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission spec­ troscopy. J. Zhu, W. Zhao, W. Zhang, M.Uu, F.Xu, C.T.Campbell 5:15 456. Investigation of trapped charge causing the carrier injection with lightemitting in pentacene field effect transistor by optical second harmonic generation measurement. E. Urn, Y. Ohshima, R. Tamura, T. Manaka, M. Iwamoto Section D BCEC 153B Surfactants and Polymers for Personal, Home and Health Care Bioactive Materials P. Somasundaran, R. S. Farinato, K. P. Ananthapadmanabhan, L. D. Rhein, and N. Garti, Organizers 2:00 457. Dual temperature-and light-re­ sponsive block copolymer blends for controlled release applications. T. A. Hatton, C. Alvarez-Lorenzo, S. Deshmukh, L Bromberg, I. Sandez-Macho, A. Concheiro 2:30 458. Efficacy of coated Ti02 nanopar­ ticles against pnotocatalytic activity from the UV radiation. W. Lee, N. Pemodet, E. Hatchwell, B. U, C. Un, M. Rafailovich 2:50 459. Novel antimicrobial polymeric coatings. S. D. Worley, A. Akdag, J. Liang, L Kou, C. Zhu, X. Ren 3:10 460. Smart hygienic coating for a healthier living environment. W. K. Leung, A.P.S.Lau,K.LYeung 3:30 Intermission. 3:40 461. Effect of novel, water compatible polymers on conditioning properties of cationic polymers in personal care applica­ tions. W. K. U, S. Jordan, X. Zhang, R. Van Voorst, D. Beatty, J. Amos, A. Protonentis, C. Davis 4:00 462. N-Halamine disinfectant coatings. S. D. Worley, J. Liang, A. Akdag, X. Ren, L. Kou, C. Zhu, K. Barnes, R. M. Broughton, H. Kocer, T. S. Huang 4:20 463. Biomimetic polymer-based antimi­ crobial systems. B. F. Brehm-Stecher, H. Weinkauf 4:40 464. Biocompatible poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) coatings for consumer products. S. Chen, G. Cheng, Z. Zhang, S. Jiang

TL : (":i-l-49

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL

Section Ε BCEC 153C Advanced Materials for Conversions and Separations in Energy Applications Separations and Catalysis Cosponsored by PHYS J. R. Kitchin and J. B. Miller, Organizers 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 465. Synthesis and characterization of novel thermoelectric nanomaterials. X. Qiu, J. S. Dyck, C. Burda 2:25 466. A fundamental view at polymor­ phous silicon deposition for solar cell applications. H. Vach 2:45 467. Nanotextured transparent semi­ conductor oxides for energy conversion. Z. Zhou, D-H. Ko, M. J. Earl, S. Williams, B. Cheng, V. Gowrishankar, M. D. McGehee, J. DeSimone, E.T.Samulski 3:05 468. Scalable nonlithograohic approach to fabricate wafer-scale subsurface tex­ tures for improving the conversion effi­ ciency of silicon solar cells. C-H. Sun, N. Linn, B. Jiang, P. Jiang 3:25 469. Effect of support morphology on the nanostructured Au/Si02:3-D oxide overiayer in the CO oxidation. L Guczi 3:45 470. Surface chemistry of gold nanostructures deposited on oxides: Oxidespecific 02 interactions with supported gold and the oxidation state of gold. S. Unie, S. Laursen 4:05 471. Understanding the origin of the correlation of reaction selectivity with the chemical hardness of catalyst A concep­ tual DFT study. W. Xia, H. Wan 4:25 472. Energy storage by modeling a cooling system. F. Abniki, E. Bakhshi, A.Bakhshi 4:45 473. Morphology control of mesoporous silica particles. S. P. Naik, S. P. Elangovan, I. Sokolov, T. Okubo Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Emergence of Function in Molecular

10:20 478. Permeability and filtration effi­ ciency modeling for electrospun nanofiber protective coatings. J. W. Bacon, M. A. Costolo, J. D. Lennhoff, C. M. Middleton 10:40 479. Field study of surface nanolayer antimicrobial. M. J. Kelley, D. G. Hoover, O. Trofimova 11:00 480. Supertow biofouling zwitterionic and mixed charged nanomaterials for chemical and biological defense. S. Jiang 11:20 481. Synthesis of hybrid 1-Dnanostructures. B. P. Khanal, E. R. Zubarev 11:40 482. High surface area carbon materi­ als for the extraction and detection of chemical and biohazards. S. V. Olesik, J. A. Treadway Section Β BCEC 152 Catalytic Activity and Surface Characterization of Deposited Metal Oxides G. N. Salaita, Organizer 9:00 483. Fabrication of phosphated Ti02 through calcination of TOPO-capped nanocrystals. S-M. Chang, C-Y. Hou 9:20 484. Intercalation of gokj nanopartides into layered nanosheets through intercala­ tion of cationic or basic potyelectrotytes. H. Hata, Τ. Ε. Mallouk 9:40 485. Low temperature CO oxidation kinetics by dendrimer templated supported Au catalysts. B. D. Chandler, C. G. Long, J. D. Gilbertson 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 486. Low-temperature synthesis of ordered nanoporous titanium dioxide loaded with platinum nanocatalysts. J. Sarkar, G. Ramanath, V. T. John, A. Bose, C. J. Brooks, J. He 10:35 487. NanopartJcle assemblies for solar to chemical energy conversion. D. Lee, J. Kim, M. Kondon 10:55 488. Peptide-induced patterning of calcium molybdate on silicon-based sub­ strates. H. M. Borteh, D. J. Hansford Section C

Microfluidics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COLL Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 151B Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Nanosize Fibers and Particulates Cosponsored by BIOHW R. Nagarajan, S. Lee, T. A. Hatton, and W. Zukas, Organizers E. Wilusz, Presiding 9:00 474. Fabrication and characterization of Ikjnin-based carbon nanofiber. Q. Shen, T.Zhang 9:20 475. Development of multiplexed nanofiborous membranes for capture of ChenV Bio agents from complex materials. K. J. Senecal, P. Marek, J. Magnone, A. Senecal 9:40 476. Role of surface modifier structure on the optical behavior of biofunctionalized nanocrystalline-ZnO. D. M. Sleeves, J. W. Soares 10:00 477. Nanostructured Chem-Bio nonwoven filter. F. Topper, L. Kaiedin

SO ITCH

BCEC 153A Processes at Functional Plasmonic and Electronic Interfaces Fundamentals of Plasmonics and D. H. Gracias, Organizer J. D. Batteas, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 489. Optical properties of dye mol­ ecules interacting with silver nanopartides. J. Zhao, G. C. Schatz, R. P. Van Duyne 9:35 490. "Hot Electron" photochemistry and single molecule raman scattering on silver nanocrystals. L E. Brus 10:10 491. Plasmonics: A route to optical metamaterials and nanoscale optical devices. H. Atwater 10:45 Intermission. 11:00 492. Plasmon launching using litho­ graphically defined and synthesized Silver nanowires. M. H. van der Veen, J. Merrill, E. R. Dufresne, M. A. Reed 11:20 493. On-demand single photon sources using epitaxial quantum dots. R. P. Mirin, M. J. Stevens 11:55 494. Ught and heat induced photoluminescence-variations in quantum dots. V. Biju, T. Itoh, M. Ishikawa

Section D BCEC 153B Surfactants and Polymers for Personal, Home and Health Care Polymer—Surfactant Interactions P. Somasundaran, R. S. Farinato, K. P. Ananthapadmanabhan, L D. Rhein, and N. Garrj, Organizers 9:00 495. Temperature-and shear-induced phase transitions in polycatkxi-surfactant systems. P. L Dubin, Y. Li, M. Hemon, A. Kumar 9:30 496. Deposition of polyquatemium conditioning agents from clear cleansing compositions. P. Aikens, V. Andre, P.Hoessel 9:50 497. Adsorption on glass powder from cationic potyelectrolyte/anionic surfactant systems. J. O. Carnal!, P. Shah 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 498. Interactions and self-assembly in polymer-surfactant systems. R. Nagarajan 10:55 499. Conformational behavior of hydrophobically modified polymers and its interaction with oppositely charged surfac­ tant in solution. P. Deo, P. Somasundaran 11:15 500. Complex coacervate and simplex formation from cationic polyelectrolytes and anionic surfactants: The role of molecular structure in complex formation for poly(vinylpyridines) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. L R. Gandotfi, R. Lochhead, A. J. Convertine, C. McCormick 11:35 501. Conformation of hybrid silicone polymers at interfaces. S. C. Mehta, P. Somasundaran Section Ε BCEC 153C Advanced Materials for Conversions and Separations in Energy Applications Fuel Cells and Electrocatalysis/ Separations and Catalysis Cosponsored by PHYS J. R. Kitchin and J. B. Miller, Organizers 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 502. First-principles approaches to screening multjcomponent metal alloys and sulfides for hydrogen purification membranes. D. Sholl, L SemkJey-Recha, C. Ling, A. Wechsung 8:55 503. Supported ionic liquid membranes for gas separation. C. R. Myers, J. B. Ilconich, H. W. Pennline, D. R. Luebke 9:15 504. The influence of H2S on surface segregation patterns in a polycrystalline P070CU30 hydrogen separation mem­ brane. J. B. Miller, C. Matranga, B. D. Morreale, A. J. Gellman 9:35 505. Anodic dissolution of Ru and its effect on the electrocatalysis of ORR in a DMFC. S. Mukerjee, V. S. Murthi, B. Huit, T. Arruda 9:55 506. Fuel cell catalysts: Carbon-sup­ ported bimetallic/bimetallic alloy nanopar­ tides. J. liuo, L Wang, P. N. Njoki, D. Mott, C-J. Zhong 10:15 507. Withdrawn. 10:35 508. Pt nanoparticle anode electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells. J. R. Kitchin

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

10:55 509. Thinking small: Composite nanoarchitectures for energy storage. J. C. Lytle, A. J. Barrow, T. N. Zimmerman, M. P. Saunders, C. P. Rhodes, J. W. Long, K. A. Pettjgrew, R. M. Stroud, D. R. Rolison 11:15 510. New nanotube and mesoscopic particle based conducting polymer com­ posites: Preparation and characterization. M. Jiang, L G. Spears, A. Cancino, Y. Li, C.Garza 11:35 511. Preparation of novel swollen porous layered silicates by sequential intercalation and fabrication of nanocomposite membranes for gas separation. S. Choi, J. Coronas, S. Nair, W. Oh, D. F. Shantz, E. Jordan, M. Tsi 1 Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Proton and Chloride Pathways Sponsored by PHYS. Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Emergence of Function in Molecular Molecular Electronics and Electronic and Magnetic Materials Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COLL Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Biomacromolecule Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 151B Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Explosives Cosponsored by BIOHW R. Nagarajan, S. Lee, and W. Zukas, Organizers T. A. Hatton, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 512. The effect of chemicals on the fluorescence of quantum dots. E. Ferrer, R. Feliciano, M. Gonzalez, S. P. Hernandez, M. E. Castro 2:20 513. Molybdenum and tungsten hydro­ gen bronze reagents for the detection and neutralization of improvised explosives. N. Materer, A. W. Apblett, B. P. Kiran, K. K. Rashkj 2:40 514. Near field optical microscopy: A tool for single particle spectroscopy of explosives. M. Gonzalez, R. Feliciano, E. Ferrer, S. P. Hernandez, M. E. Castro 3:00 515. Nanoscale self-assembly derived nanosensors for nerve gas analogs and explosives. S. Muralidharan, A. Weerasinghe, C. Wang, S. Varaganti, W. Lizik, Y. Datar, D. Thimmaraju, N. Srividya 3:20 516. Enhanced Raman scattering of nitroexplosives on colloidal nanopartjcles of Ag/Ti02. S. P. Hernandez-Rivera, E. De La Cruz-Montoya, G. Perez-Acosta 3:40 517. Ultra-trace SERS detection of trinitrotoluene using immobilized silver nanopartides and nanoshells. Y. Han, S. A. Sukhishvili, H. Du 4:00 518. Nanomechanfeal peptide-receptor based chemical sensing platform. D. Raorane, J. Jaworski, A. Majumdar 4:20 519. Chemical sensing by engineered "olfactory" yeast: Identification of olfactory yeast that can detect DNT. V. Radhika, T. Proikas-Cezanne, M. Jayaraman, D. N. Dhanasekaran 4:40 520. Enhanced Raman scattering of TNT on nanopartjcles substrates: Ag and Au colloids and Au-Ag alloys. S. P. Hernandez-Rivera, J. I. Jerez-Rozo, A. M. Chamoun, M. E. Castro, O. M. Primera-Pedrozo

COLL/COMP

Section B BCEC 152 Catalytic Activity and Surface Characterization of Deposited Metal NanoparUcles and PolyparHcles on Metal Oxides G. N. Salaita, Organizer 2:00 521. Atomic-scale study of the Rh/gamma-alumina catalytic system. K.Sohlberg,S.Zhuo 2:20 522. Enhanced catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticle embedded metal oxides in fuel cells. S. J. Yoo, Y-E. Sung 2:40 523. Withdrawn. 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 524. Copper Manganese based mixed oxides for CO oxidation at ambient temperature. G. J. Hutehings, S. H. Taylor, K. J. Cote 3:35 525. Catalyst characterization and carbon dioxide hydrogénation studies on nanoscale Cu/ZnO catalysts synthesized by a hydrothemnal method. L M. Petkovic, H. W. Rollins, D. M. Ginosar, K. C. Burch Section C BCEC 153A Processes at Functional Plasmonic and Materials Design and Applications D. H. Gracias, Organizer C. M. Drain, Presiding J. D. Batteas, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 526. PlasmkJs as monodispersed templates for nanoparticle formation. C. M. Drain, A. Varotto, J. Samson 2:35 527. Functional plasmonic nanostmctures by superionic stamping. Κ. Η. Hsu, P. Schultz, P. Ferreira, N. Fang 2:55 528. Gold nanocages: A new class of plasmonic nanostructures for biomedical applications. Y. Xia 3:30 Intermission. 3:45 529. Nanoparticle directed self-assem­ bly of block-copolymer thin films. A. Karim 4:20 530. Multiscale fabrication of plasmonic metamaterials. T. W. Odom 4:55 531. Soft lithographic approaches to patterning metal nanostructures on sur­ faces. J. D. Batteas 5:15 532. Silver sulfide nanoparticles: A platform for silver and palladium nano­ structures. M. Leon, M. Morales, R. Irizarry, M. E. Castro Section D BCEC 153B Surfactants and Polymers for Personal, Home and Health Care Rheology of Polymers and Surfactants/ Emulsions for Personal, Home and Health Care P. Somasundaran, R. S. Farinato, K. P. Ananthapadmanabhan, L D. Rhein, and N. Garti, Organizers 2:00 533. Stabilization of emulsions against creaming by depletion-induced gelation. C. Kim, Y. Uu, L Mahadevan, D. A. Weitz 2:20 534. Nonlinear rheology of microgel dispersions in confined geometries. P. Emi, C. Clasen, G. H. McKinley 2:40 535. Rheological investigation of the fundamental molecular structure/property relationships for crosslinked poryacrylate thickeners. R. Lochhead, A. Cox, S. F. Foster 3:00 536. Partitioning of surfactants at the oil/water interface and aqueous phase in relation to size of emulsion droplets and total interfacial area. M. A. James-Smith, D.O.Shah

3:30 537. Behavior control of viscoelastic surfactant system using additives. S. Lu, P. Somasundaran, Z. Wei 3:50 538. Modified gum Acacia: A potential emulsifier for oil-in-water emulsions.

10:45 Intermission. 11:00 4. Photoetectron spectroscopy of organic anions. W. C. Lineberger, G. B. Ellison 11:35 5. How insights into bonding of mol­ ecules help explain high temperature evolution of materials. E. A. Carter

Section Ε Section Β BCEC 153C Advanced Materials for Conversions and Separations in Energy Applications Fuel Ceils and Electrocatalysis Cosponsored by PHYS

BCEC 161

Section Ε Advancing Methodology E. X. Esposito, Organizer

BCEC 156B

N. Vaidehi, Presiding

Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions: Experimental and Modeling Analysis

J. R. Kitcnin and J. B. Miller, Organizers 2:00 539. Catalytic properties of MgO (111) nanosheets. R. M. Richards, J. Hu, K. Zhu 2:20 540. Effect of membrane composition of polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films on methanol crossover and fuel cell perfor­ mance. A. A. Argun, J. N. Ashcraft, P. T. Hammond 2:40 541. Electrochemical generation of molecular hydrogen using mixed nanoparticulate titanium dioxide and bismuth oxide coated titanium metal electrodes. H. Park, M. R. Hoffmann 3:00 542. First principles studies of electro­ chemical oxidation reactions at solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. J. Mukherjee, S. Link; 3:20 543. Hydrogen and water on palladium/ gold and palladium/copper surfaces: Structure, spectroscopy, and dynamics. E. C. H. Sykes, A. E. Baber, H. L Tiemey 3:40 544. Photocatalysis of the oxygen reductionreactionat adsorbate-covered silver. J. J. McMahon, K. J. Breen, A. Campbell 4:00 545. Surface chemistry of multifunc­ tional reagents on Pt(111) and Pd(111). J. W. Medlin, A. Loh, C. Horiuchi Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Permeation and Selectivity Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL Emergence of Function in Molecular Molecular Electronics and Electronic and Magnetic Materials Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COLL Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Blomotecular Systems Methods of Single-Molecule Detection Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

COMP Division of Computers on Chemistry J. D. Madura, E. X. Esposito, and A. Roitberg, Program Chairs SUNDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 160B Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon, Organizers, Presiding

9:55 21. Role of molecular anisotropy in electrowetting. D. Bratko, C. D. Daub, K. Leung, A. Luzar 10:15 Intermission. 10:35 22. Equilibrium and ultrafast phenom­ ena at liquid interfaces. K. B. Eisenthal 11:15 23. Solute rotational dynamics at water surfaces. I. Benjamin 11:55 24. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion adsorption at the mineral-water inter­ face. S. Kerisit, S. C. Parker, E. S. Ilton, C.Uu

8:30 6. Application of Ewald summations to long-range dispersion forces. P. J. In't Veld, A. E. Ismail, G. S. Grest 8:55 7. Microscopic analysis of the dielectric effect. E. G.ZoebJsch 9:20 8. Canonical sampling through velocity rescaiing. G. Bussi, D. Donadk), M. Paninello 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 9. Comparison of the simulated prop­ erties of N-methylacetamide and glycine in water obtained using different force fields. M. Kang, P. E. Smith 10:25 10. QTPIE: A new charge model for arbitrary geometries and systems. J. Chen, T. J. Martinez 10:50 11. ReaxFF simulations on reactive processes at the water/metal/metal oxide interface. A. C. van Duin, V. S. Bryantsev, W. A. Goddard III 11:15 12. Simulation of interfacial systems with isotropic periodical sum. X. Wu, J. B. Klauda, R. W. Pastor, B. R. Brooks Section C BCEC 162A Antifreeze Proteins: A Memorial Symposium for Robert Feeney A. Wierzbicki, Organizer 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 13. The quasi-liquid layer involvement in antifreeze function. Y. Yeh, K. Krishnan, W. H. Fink, Y. Duan 9:20 14. A theoretical study of the kinetic effect of AFGP adsorption on ice. E. Yokoyama, S. Zepeda, Y. Furukawa 9:50 15. Antifreeze fundamentals: Explaining the dependence of freezing point upon concentration. C. A. Knight, A. L. DeVries 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 18. Fluorescence microscopy and microfluidic techniques for studying inter­ actions between antifreeze proteins and ice surfaces. I. Braslavsky, N. Pertaya, Y. Celik, A. Groisman, J. WetHaufer, P. L Davies 11:05 17. Behavior of antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins at the ice/solution interface and ice growth kinetics during one-direc­ tional growth. Y. Furukawa, S. Zepeda, H. Nakaya, Y. Uda, E. Yokoyama 11:35 18. Antifreeze Glycoproteins to func­ tion as intrinsically unstructured proteins. K. Krishnan, Y. Yeh, Y. Duan, W. H. Fink Section D BCEC 156C Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Ultrafast Phenomena and Reactions at Interfaces Cosponsored by PHYS

M. R. Mihailescu, Organizer 8:30 25. Two-metal associative catalysis: Phosphodiester cleavage in ribonuclease H. M. De Vivo, M. Dal Peraro, M. L Klein 9:00 26. RNA and protein structural require­ ments in NCp7 chaperoned HIV-1 DIS maturation. J. P. Marino 9:30 27. Structural studies of the RNA aptamer drug, Macugen, bound to the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor. A. Pardi, J-H. Lee, F. Jucker, N. K. Kruse 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 28. Computational prediction of the sequence specificity and binding energy of protein-RNA complexes. G. Varani, T. Robertson, S. Zheng, Y. Chen 10:45 29. Dynamics of the assembling ribosome. J. R. Williamson 11:15 30. U1A-RNA Complex formation: Insights from combining experimental and computational approaches. A. M. Baranger 11:45 31. What can simulation tell us about protein-nucleic acid interactions? Suc­ cesses, failures, and our approach to overcome the deficiencies. T. E. Cheatham III Computational ActJnkte and TransactJnlde Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives ActJnide Chemistry Overview Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Redox Potentials Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? NonadiabatJc Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 160B Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of

E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon, Organizers H. Gray, Presiding 2:00 32. Computational methods for protein design applications. S. L Mayo 2:35 33. Use of protein-ligand clocking meth­ ods to rank order ligand binding affinities. R.I

L. X. Dang, Organizer 9:00 1. First principles approaches to design of materials with applications to catalysis, nanoelectronics, fuel cells, and pharma. W. A. Goddard III 9:35 2. Chemical bonding in very tight places. R. Hoffmann 10:10 3. Electron tunneling through proteins. H. Gray, J. R. Winkler

J. Hemminger, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 19. Dynamics of electrons at interfaces on ultrafasttimescales.C. B. Harris 9:15 20. Modelingreactiondynamics at liquid surfaces. G. C. Schatz, D. Kim

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

"ΪΑ".Η-·:;

;

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COMP

3:10 34. My protein folds faster than yours: Using protein folding rates to test protein folding theory. K. W. Plaxco 3:45 Intermission. 4:00 35. DNA: Not merely the secret of life. N. C. Seeman 4:35 36. Millisecond-scale molecular dynam­ ics simulations of proteins: Algorithms, architectures and applications. D. E. Shaw Section Β BCEC 161

Section D BCEC 156C Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn The Foundations of QSAR Cosponsored by CINF J. H. Block and B. Clark,

Drug Discovery Docking I. Visiers,

Organizer

D. Ryan,

Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 37. A new implicit solvent model for protein-ligand docking. A. R. Ortiz 1:30 38. Explicit and implicit solvation binding free energies of FKBP-12. M. R. Shirts, G. Jayachandran, C. D. Snow, V. S. Pande, R. A. Friesner 1:50 39. All-atom semiempirical LocalSCF quantum-mechanical protein-ligand dock­ ing. V. M. Anisimov, V. L Bugaenko 2:10 40. Improving the accuracy of MMGBSA binding energy predictions through parameter optimization. B. W. Sherman, J. Duan, M. P. Repasky 2:30 4 1 . Using diverse computational approaches to understand protein/ligand binding affinities in structure-based drug design: A cross-docking study. J. H. Voigt, C. Elkin, J. S. Duca 2:50 Intermission. 3:05 42. TAE Augmented scoring functions: Two approaches, atom and surface based. M. D. Ryan, T. Hepburn, N. Sukumar, S. Das, C. M. Breneman 3:25 43. Docking ligands into challenging targets using single interactions and an appropriate metal description. C. Detering, C. Lemmen, M. Lilienthal, M. Gastreich 3:45 44. Development of customized scoring function for the prediction of binding affini­ ties of Aurora Kinase inhibitors. S. N. Rao, B. W. Sherman, R. Farid 4:05 45. Knowledge-based docking for kinases with minimal bias. S. Wittkopp, J. E. Penzotti, R. V. Stanton, S. A. Wildman 4:25 46. Species selectivity of the Urotensin II receptor: Molecular Modeling study. S-K. Kim, Y. Li, C. M. Park, R. Abrol, W. A. Goddard III 4:45 47. Study of antimalarial activity of pyrimethamin and flavonoids by molecular docking. A. Bensegueni, A. Chikhi, M. Bencharif Section C BCEC 162A

A. E. Roitberg, E. R. C h a n ,

Organizers

1:30 54. Philip S. Magee: A life in QSAR. M. Charton 2:00 55. Molecular surfaces, QSAR, QSPR and reactivity. T. Clark 2:30 56. CoMFA investigation of Taft Es values. Y. C. Martin, Κ. Η. Kim 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 57. Conformation independent QSAR Descriptor, scaffold hopping with surface property based eHiTS LASSO. Z. Zsoldos, D. Reid, B. S. Sadjad, A. Simon 3:50 58. Approaches to the use of quantum mechanical modeling in QSAR analysis of agrochemicals. D. W. Boerth, T. C. Andrade, E. Eder 4:20 59. QSAR without arbitrary descriptors: The electron-conformational method. I. B. Bersuker Section Ε BCEC 156B Emerging Technologies Competition Symposium C. M. Breneman,

Organizer

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 60. New approaches to quantitative modeling that span the periodic table: The correlation consistent Composite Approach (ccCA). N. DeYonker, T. R. Cundari, A. K. Wilson 1:35 6 1 . Accurate coarse-grain modeling of biomembranes. J . Michel, M. Orsi, W. Sanderson, J. W. Essex 2:05 62. Reaction path methods based on holonomic constraints. J-W. Chu 2:35 Intermission. 2:50 63. Conformational sampling by selforganization. F. Zhu, D. K. Agrafiotis 3:20 64. Generalization of the Gaussian Electrostatic Model: A molecular density based force field. G. A. Cisneros, J-P. Piquemal, T. A. Darden 3:50 65. Insights into peptide folding from a multiscale coarse-grained model. I. F. Thorpe, J. Zhou, G. A. Voth 4:20 66. Recore: A fast and versatile method for scaffold hopping. P. C. Maass, T. Schulz-Gasch, M. Stahl, M. Rarey 4:50 Award Presentation.

BCEC 156A

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 48. Design of small band gap conju­ gated ladder polymers using acetylenic crosslinks. M. Kertesz, S. Yang 1:55 49. Air-stable, high performance, rigid [:4,5]thieno[2,3-d]thiophene-derivative organic semiconductors. J. Schrier, S. Atahan, L-W. Wang, A. Aspuru-Guzik 2:20 50. Electron transport through carbon nanotubes connected by conjugated molecules. R. R. Pandey, N. A. Bruque, R. K. Lake 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 5 1 . On the acidic properties of conven­ tional and novel zeolitic materials: A DFT investigation. M. Elanany, D. P. Vercauteren 3:25 52. Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotube self-assembly on transition metal catalysts. S. Irle, Y. Ohta, Y. Okamoto, Z. Wang, G. Zheng, K. Morokuma

4:10 7 1 . Structural order and dynamics at water/hydrocarbon and water/surfactant interfaces. B. M. Ladanyi, J. Chowdhary 4:50 72. Dissociation of "buried" water on Pt(111).J.P.Cowin, Y.Lilach, M. J. ledema Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Structure and Bonding Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Electrocatalysis Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Statistical Theories Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP S U N D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Poster Session in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon,

Organizers

7:30-9:30

Section F

Quantum Chemistry

52-TECH

3:50 53. Theoretical studies on phenyl cored thiophene dendrimers. M. E. Kose, K. Kim, S. E. Shaheen, G. Rumbles, N. Kopidakis

Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Ions at Interface Cosponsored by PHYS L. X. Dang, B. D. Kay,

Organizer Presiding

1:30 67. Composition and chemistry at the liquid/vapor interface of aqueous solutions: Comparisons between experiment and MD simulations. J. C. Hemminger, M. A. Brown, M. J. Krisch, D. E. Starr, S. Mun, H. Bluhm 2:10 68. Computational analysis of interfacial sum frequency generation spectrosopy. A. Morita, T. Ishiyama 2:50 69. Is the surface of neat water neutral, acidic, or basic? R. Vacha, V. Buch, A. Milet, J. P. Devlin, P. Jungwirth 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 70. Interfacial reactions in salty glycerol. J. L. DeZwaan, A. H. Muenter, G. M. Nathanson

73. Conversion of a plant chloroplast to a biological fuel cell: 1. Comparison of electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to FAD and a gold electrode. S. P. Walch, J. D. Komadina, F. B. Prinz 74. Exploring conductance switching proper­ ties of molecular scale devices: A compu­ tational approach. B. D. Dunietz, T. Perrine, A. Prociuk 75. A bond energy bond order model for electronic energy. S. Tulyani, G. A. Petersson, P. R. Westmoreland 76. A new generation of model chemistries based on pair natural orbital extrapolations to the CCSD(T)/CBS limit. M. J. Spescha, E. C. Barnes, G. A. Petersson 77. Advanced CCBB-MC method for polymer statistics. J. Sadanobu 78. Application of structure-based pharmaco­ phore screening in ligand docking. D. Zhang 79. Bold advances in force fields: The ReaxFF reactive force field. A. C. van Duin, W. A. Goddard III 80. Coherent electron tunneling through 1-D fullerene channels. G. I. Lee, Y. H. Kim, J. K. Kang 8 1 . Concentration effects in the Wacker process. J. A. Keith, R. J. Nielsen, J. Oxgaard, W. A. Goddard III 82. Cyclic saturated hydrocarbons containing planar tetracoordinate carbon atoms. N. Pérez, G. Merino 83. Defects modifications of ferroelectric PVDF based polymers. Q. Zhang 84. Discovery of new NOx reduction, hydrocarbon SCR catalysts using high throughput technologies. R. J. Blint 85. DNA-dependent RNA polymerases: Common structures of the active sites and possible reaction mechanisms. D. R. Salahub, R. Zhu 86. Electron force field simulation of matter at extreme conditions. J . T. Su 87. Electronic scaling properties in graphene nanoribbons. H. Su, Q. Li, Z. F. Wang, Q. Shi, J-L. Yang 88. High-throughput optical methods for the analysis of chirality. E. V. Anslyn, S. Shabbir

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

89. Hybrid density functional band structure calculations on the cuprate superconductors. J. K. Perry, J. Tahir-Kheli, W. A. Goddard III 90. Hydrated water-soluble dendrimer-grafted polymer membranes for application to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. S. S. Jang, W. A. Goddard III 9 1 . Improved methods for predicting the structure and function of G protein-coupled receptors. R. Abrol, W. A. Goddard III 92. Molecular dynamics simulations of liposomes: From formation to fusion and fission. P. Spijker, A. J. Markvoort, K. Pieterse, A. F. Smeijers, R. A. van Santen, P. A. J. Hilbers 93. Molecular dynamics simulations of surfactant protein C mimic in phospholipid bilayers. S. M. Dutz, Z. Ramjan, P. W. Mobley, L. M. Gordon, F. J. Walther, B. Vovan, J. M. Hemandez-Juviel, M. A. Sherman, A. J. Waring, S. Sharma 94. Molecular-scale understanding and design of low friction and biocompatible surfaces. S. Jiang 95. Multiconfigurational study of tetrasilacyclobutadiene cobalt complex. S. Sok, M. S. Gordon 96. Multiscale simulations of block copolymers. J. Andzelm, F. L. Beyer, J. F. Snyder, P. W. Chung 97. Nature of chemical bonds between glycopeptide antibiotics and bacterial cell walls. J-G. Lee, C. Sagui, C. Roland 98. New assignment of parameters for charge equilibration approach. N. Nakayama, H. Goto 99. Novel adaptive grid for electronic structure calculations. J. I. Rodriguez, D. C. Thompson, P. W. Ayers 100. Oxidation pattern of small silicon oxide clusters. W. Lu, Q. J. Zang, Z. M. Su, C. Z. Wang, K. M. Ho 101. Palladium mediated activation of molecular oxygen: Pd(0) vs. direct insertion. J. M. Keith, J. Oxgaard, W. A. Goddard III 102. Predictions of thermoelectric materials from atomistic simulations. G. Gaili 103. Predicting the properties of hydrated silica at extreme conditions. K. E. Anderson, J. I. Siepmann, M. M. Hirschmann 104. Predicting the structure of family A GPCR TM domains. M. Michino, J. Chen, C. L Brooks III 105. Prediction of Raman spectra in novel [email protected] peapods using dispersion-augmented density-functional-tightbinding. S. Irle, H. A. Witek, H. Shinohara, K. Morokuma 106. Protein unfolding free energy surfaces from Jaryznski's equality. N. Salwen, C-H. Kiang, N. C. Harris 107. QTPIE: A minimal extension of Goddard's QEq model with correct dissociation. J. Chen, T. J. Martinez 108. Quantum chemistry and collisions in planetary atmospheres. D. L. Huestis 109. Quantum mechanical rapid screening of chemical sensing materials. A. V. Shevade, A. Ryan, M. Homer, M. Blanco, W. A. Goddard 110. Spin-orbit ab initio study of excited state of CH2CII cation. J . Kim, H. Ihee, Y. S. Lee 111. Structure-performance relationships for asymmetric carbenes in Pd-catalyzed chiral alcohol oxidations. R. J . Nielsen, W. A. Goddard III 112. Sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT studies of Fe-S bonds in models and protein active sites: Effects of Η-bonds on covalency and redox properties. E. I. Solomon, A. Dey 113. The photoinduced electron transfer on dye-sensitized solar cells: Modified Sakata-Hashimoto-Hiramoto model (MSHH). O. Kitao 114. Ti02 photoreduction of C 0 2 by H20: A plausible C 0 2 sequestration model. A. K. Rappe, K. B. Ford

COMP

Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday Nanotechnology

10:10 Intermission. 10:25 131. Interaction and dynamics in water-AFP-ice interfacial region and the thermodynamic effect on ice growth inhibition. Y. Ba, Y. Mao 10:55 132. Antifreeze protein from Japanese fish: An epoch in biotechnology. S. Tsuda 11:25 133. Molecular dynamics study of growth kinetics of ice-water interfaces in the presence of winter flounder antifreeze protein. H. Nada, Y. Furukawa

E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon,

Section D

MONDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 160B

J . Tahir-Kheli,

Organizers

Presiding

9:00 115. Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations of growth of fullerenes, metallofullerenes and carbon nanotubes. K. Morokuma, S. Irle, Z. Wang, G. Zheng, B. Y. Finck, B. Saha, Y. Ohta, Y. Okamoto 9:35 116. Silicon nanowire thermoelectrics. J. R. Heath, A. Boukai, Y. Bunimovich, J. K. Yu, W. A. Goddard III, P. von Allmen, J. Tahir-Kheli, S. Lee, R. J. Nielsen, Y. Matsuda 10:10 117. Chemical dynamics at metal surfaces: Electronic excitations. N. Shenvi, S. Roy, H. Cheng, J. Tully 10:45 Intermission. 11:00 118. Quantum conductance of silver nanowires and linearization of atomic gold chains. Y. C. Choi, W. Y. Kim, S. K. Min, H. M. Lee, K. S. Kim 11:35 119. Time-dependent density-func­ tional theory for open systems and its calculation of transient currents through molecular devices. G. Chen Section Β BCEC 161 Molecular Mechanics Biological Systems

BCEC 156C Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Liquid Surfaces Cosponsored by PHYS L. X. Dang,

Organizer

T. M. Orlando,

Presiding

8:30 134. The surface of nitric acid solutions: Insights gained from a combined experimental and computational approach. G. L. Richmond 9:10 135. Hydrated protons at interfaces. G. A. Voth 9:50 136. Structure and dynamics of atmospherically relevant aqueous interfaces. J. L. Thomas, A. C. Moskun, L M. Wingen, M. Roeselovâ, B. J. Finlayson-Pitts, D. J. Tobias 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 137. Application of inner-shell photoelectron spectroscopy to aqueous solutions. B. Winter 11:10 138. Computational study of SFG spectra of ice, water and acid solution. V. Buch, G. L Richmond, M. J. Shultz 11:50 139. pH of the liquid water surface: Is hydroxide present at the interface? R. J. Saykally, P. B. Petersen

Section F BCEC 156 A Evaluation of Computational Methods: Insights, Philosophies and Recommendations Focus on Docking A. Nicholls and A. N. Jain,

Organizers

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:15 147. Methodological performance reporting: To confuse or to enlighten. A. N. Jain 9:50 148. Benchmarking sets for molecular docking. J. J. Irwin, N. Huang, B. Shoichet 10:25 Intermission. 10:40 149. Comparison of topological, shape, and docking methods in virtual screening. G. McGaughey, R. P. Sheridan, C. Bayly, J. C. Culberson, C. Kreatsoulas, S. Lindsley, V. N. Maiorov, J-F. Truchon, W. D. Cornell 11:15 150. Insights into the setup of the GSK docking evaluation. N. Nevins, M. S. Head 11:50 151. On how (not) to do an evaluation. P. Hawkins Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Solvation and Spectroscopy Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Charge Transfer Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Water and Solvent Effects Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section Ε E. X. Esposito, Μ. Μ. Layten,

Organizer Presiding

8:30 120. A proposed structural model for human protein Ζ and its putative activated form (Za). V. Chandrasekaran, C. J. Lee, R. E. Duke, L. Perera, L. G. Pedersen 8:55 121. Disruption of membranes by anti­ microbial oligomers: An atomistic view. J. Henin, M. L Klein 9:20 122. An ionic network stabilizes the p53 tetramerization domain. T-Z. W. Lwin, C. Galea, R. W. Kriwacki, D. Bashford 9:45 123. Coupling of fast and slow modes in the reaction pathway of the minimal hammerhead ribozyme cleavage. R. Radhakrishnan 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 124. Gating mechanisms in the ribosomal exit tunnel. P. Pétrone, V. S. Pande 10:50 125. Interaction of a type lia bacteriocin with lipid bilayer and its immunity protein: A molecular dynamics simulation study. K. Kaur, W. Soliman, S. Bhattacharjee 11:15 126. Molecular dynamics study for nitrous oxide in a DMPC bilayer. E. Pinnick, S. Erramilli, F. Wang 11:40 127. Molecular simulation of RNA complexes: Searching for minimum binding sequences. S. Mecozzi Section C BCEC 162A Antifreeze Proteins: A Memorial Symposium for Robert Feeney A. Wierzbicki,

Section A BCEC 156B Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions: Experimental and Modeling Analysis M. R. Mihailescu, T. Evans,

Organizer

Presiding

8:30 140. Deducing the multiple binding modes of p53 tetramer—DNA interaction based on full-site palindrome of p53 response elements. B. Ma, A. J. Levine 9:00 141. How does a protein find its site on DNA? L. Mirny 9:30 142. Fragile X mental retardation syn­ drome: Structure of the KH1-KH2 domains of fragile X mental retardation protein. L. Regan, R. Valverde, I. Pozdnyakova, T. Kajander, J. Venkatraman 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 143. Mechanism of RNA binding by RNA recognition motifs. Κ. Β. Hall 10:45 144. Probing the structure and activity of DNAVRNA-processing enzymes with the 2,4-difluorotoluyl/ribo-2,4-difluorotoluyl (dF/rF) nucleoside, an apolar thymidine/ uridine analog. M. Egli, P. S. Pallan, F. Li, A. Irimia, R. L Eoff, J. Xie, A. Noronha, K. G. Rajeev, F. P. Guengerich, E. Rozners, M. Manoharan 11:15 145. Design of a protein ring sequencer via SMD simulations of RNA translocation. I. Cozmuta, V. Stole 11:45 146. On nucleic acid flexibility using continuum solvent models. Y. J. Bomble, D. A. Case

Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday Homogeneous Catalysis E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon, R. G. Parr,

Organizers

Presiding

2:00 152. Stitching with nitrogen. K. B. Sharpiess 2:35 153. Breakthroughs in oxidizing CH4 and prospects for the 21st century. R. A. Periana 3:10 154. Virtually (im)possible: Computa­ tional design of novel C-H functionalization catalysts. J. Oxgaard, J. Gonzales, R. J. Nielsen, Z. Xu, J. M. Keith, J. A. Keith, S. Pudar, M-J. Cheng, W. A. Goddard III 3:45 Intermission. 4:00 155. Understanding bistable [2]rotaxanes in solid-state devices. J. F. Stoddart, W. R. Dichtel 4:35 156. Using quantum chemical simula­ tions to engineer new homogeneous catalysts. C B. Musgrave, P. Ankan, L. P. C. Nielsen, E. N. Jacobsen Section Β BCEC 161 Drug Discovery Virtual Screening

Organizer

8:30 128. Competing effects in hydrophobic hydration. D. Chandler 9:10 129. Effects of motion and aggregation of AFP segments on water molecules near an ice crystal. Y. Hagiwara, T. Nobekawa 9:40 130. From interfacial structure to antifreeze mechanism of antifreeze protein. X. Y. Liu, N. Du

BCEC 160B

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

I. Visiers, L. Herman,

Organizer

1:20 158. Automated combinatorial align­ ment for 3-D similarity searching. J. H. Nettles, J. L. Jenkins, Z. Deng, A. Bender, J. W. Davies, M. Glick 1:40 159. Distributed docking: An improved structure-based virtual screening combined with ligand-centric shape matching. S. Yoon, H. Lee, J. Choi, Y. Ko 2:00 160. Electrostatic similarity as an orthogonal approach to atom-based meth­ ods. P. Hawkins 2:20 Intermission. 2:35 161. Improving scoring for virtual screening of fragment-sized molecules. B. W. Sherman 2:55 162. Strategies for docking "fragments" and lead-like molecules. D. Joseph-McCarthy, D. C. Thompson, J. Jacob, D. Tsao, C. Humblet 3:15 163. FlexX-Screen: Interactive virtual screening. H. ClauBen 3:35 164. Maximum common binding modes: A novel consensus scoring concept using multiple ligand information. S. Renner, S. Derksen, S. Radestock, T. Weil 3:55 165. Screening very large virtual librar­ ies using structure-based docking. B. W. Sherman, C. Higgs, M. Shelley Section C BCEC 162A Quantum Chemistry A. E. Roitberg, G. D. M. Seabra,

Organizer Presiding

1:30 166. Basis set convergence of correla­ tion energy contributions from connected triple, quadruple, and higher excitations. J. M. Martin 1:55 167. Hidden Jahn-Teller effect. I. B. Bersuker 2:20 168. Ensemble-based electron propa­ gator calculations of electron binding energies. J. V. Ortiz 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 169. Highly accurate ab initio quartic force fields of C 3 H + and H 0 2 + . X. Huang, T. J. Lee 3:25 170. Principles and applications of the general-purpose reactivity indicator: Beyond the classic reactivity paradigms. J. S. M. Anderson 3:50 171. Self-consistent polarization of the boundary in the redistributed charge and dipole scheme for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical calculations. H. Lin, Y. Zhang, D. G. Truhlar Section D BCEC 156C Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn Theory Cosponsored by CINF J. H. Block and B. Clark,

Organizers

1:30 172. QSAR applied in systems biology. D. E. Patterson 2:00 173. The role of alignment in 3-D QSAR. R. D. Clark, R. Crarrier 2:30 174. Realizing Prospective QSAR through data fusion and modern descrip­ tors. C. M. Breneman, N. Sukumar, M. J. Embrechts, K. P. Bennett, C. M. Sundling, M. Krein, T. Hepburn 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 175. QSAR model assessment. D. M. Hawkins, J. J. Kraker 176. Withdrawn. 3:50 177. Proof of the pudding: How predic­ tive are QSAR models? T. I. Oprea, T. K. Allu, D. C. Fara, O. Ursu

Presiding

1:00 157. A novel, efficient virtual screening algorithm using 3-D chemical feature pattern recognition. G. Wolber, F. Bendix, J. Kirchmair, T. Langer

TECH-53

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COMP

Section Ε

TUESDAY MORNING

BCEC 156B

Section A

Computational Science & Engineering Advances Supported by NSF Resource Engineering Sciences Cosponsored by PHYS J. Towns,

Organizer

1:30 178. Multiscale models for biomolecular engineering. Y. Kaznessis 2:00 179. All-atom and multiscale modeling of silicon nanobiodevices. A. Aksimentiev 2:30 180. High-performance, multiscale simulation of engineered tissue mechan­ ics. V. H. Barocas, T. Stylianopoulos, X. Luo, M. S. Shephard 3:00 181. Improvement in structure model accuracy and molecular replacement through high-resolution protein structure refinement. B. Qian, D. Baker 3:30 Intermission. 3:45 182. Performing simulations at the terascale today and at the sustained petascale "tomorrow". J . A. Nichols 4:15 183. Screened hybrid DFT and the Mott transition in MnO. R. L. Martin 4:45 184. Advances in ab initio and density functional approaches: From a method­ ological and basis set perspective. A. K. Wilson

BCEC 160B Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday Theory E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon, Presiding

9:00 191. Reading the map while walking through the minefield: An ab initio excur­ sion into high temperature superconductiv­ ity. J. Tahir-Kheli, W. A. Goddard III 9:35 192. Recent advances and ongoing challenges in accelerated molecular dynamics methods. A. F. Voter 10:10 193. Hypervalency in molecules. T. H. Dunning Jr., D. E. Woon 10:45 Intermission. 11:00 194. A general approach to intermolecular interactions. M. S. Gordon 11:35 195. Revisiting the concepts of chemi­ cal bond, resonance and hyperconjugation. M. A. C. Nascimento, F. P. Fleming, A. G. H. Barbosa Section Β

Section F BCEC 156A

Molecular Mechanics Protein-Ligand Interactions

A. Nicholls and A. N. Jain,

Organizers

1:30 185. Can we use docking and scoring for hit optimization? I. J. Enyedy, W. Egan 2:05 186. RMSD comparisons, enrichment and decoy selection for virtual screening: What can we learn from earlier mistakes? J. Kirchmair, G. Wolber, S. Ristic, K. Eder, P. Markt, C. Laggner, T. Langer 2:40 187. Protein crystal structures: Are they really as precise or accurate as we think? G. L. Warren 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 188. Diverse, high-quality test set for the validation of protein-ligand native and cross-docking performance. P. N. Mortenson 4:05 189. Evaluating docking programs: Keeping the playing field level. J. W. Liebeschuetz 4:40 190. Panel Discussion of Computational Methods Evaluation. M. S. Head Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Relativistic Quantum Chemistry Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Transport Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP

Organizers Section D

R. P. Muller,

BCEC 161

Evaluation of Computational Methods: Insights, Philosophies and Recommendations Focus on Docking

E. X. Esposito,

Organizer

V. Chandrasekaran,

Presiding

8:30 196. The dynamic behavior of some hairpin loops in rRNA upon ligand binding. A. Rakic, P. M. Mitrasinovic 8:55 197. Ligand binding affinity estimate by amoeba polarizable force field. P. Ren, D. Jiao 9:20 198. Trypanosoma cruzi trans-s\a\\dase binding investigated by molecular dynam­ ics simulations. O. Demir, A. Roitberg 9:45 199. A computational approach toward combating pandemic influenza: Molecular dynamics and docking studies of ligand binding with neuraminidase. R. C. Rizzo, R. Chachra, J. E. Shipman, N. A. Carrascal, S. Mukherjee 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 200. Probing flexibility in the activation loop of kinases. B. W. Sherman, J-C. Mozziconacci, S. N. Rao, R. Farid 10:50 201. Computational determination of the binding and insertion of PR3 to mixed lipid membranes. E. Hajjar, M. Mihajlovic, T. Lazaridis, N. Reuter 11:15 202. Specificity in SH2 domain medi­ ated protein-protein interactions: Insights from binding free energy calculations. W. Gan, B. Roux 11:40 203. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest a way to stabilize von HippelLindau tumor suppressor protein and rescue its function. J . Liu, R. Nussinov Section C BCEC 162A

Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Nuclear Quantum Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP

Antifreeze Proteins: A Memorial Symposium for Robert Feeney

M O N D A Y EVENING

A. Wierzbicki,

Section A

8:30 204. Lessons from recent additions to the antifreeze protein portfolio. P. L. Davies 9:10 205. Antifreeze proteins and assorted crystals: The memory effect and remem­ brance. V. K. Walker, H. Zeng, Z. Wu, G. R. Palmer, E. Huva, J. A. Ripmeester 9:40 206. Characterization of Ca2+-dependent herring type II antifreeze protein. Z. Li, Y. Liu, Q. Lin, J. M. Bujnicki, J. Sivaraman, C-L. Hew

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

E. X. Esposito,

Organizer

8:00-10:00 268, 329-346, 349. See subsequent listings.

54-TECH

10:10 Intermission. 10:25 207. Probing the origin of the hyperac­ tivity of the two-domain type III antifreeze protein RD3. N. B. Holland, 0 . Can, S. Tsuda, F. D. Sônnichsen 10:55 208. Significance of non-polar interactions at the water/ice interface for nonequilibrium antifreeze activity. A. Wierzbicki, C. A. Knight, C. N. Henderson 11:25 209. Structural basis of antifreeze protein action. C. S. Strom, X. Y. Liu, Z.Jia

Organizer

BCEC 156C Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Biological Interface Cosponsored by PHYS L. X. Dang,

Organizer

R. B. Gerber,

Presiding

8:30 210. Simulations of water interfacial behavior. M. J. Stevens 9:10 211. Modulating ligand-receptor binding at the lipid membrane interfaces. P. S. Cremer, H. Jung 9:50 212. Calculation of diffusion coefficients of water and alkanes through single-walled carbon nanotubes from simulations. J. K. Johnson, Y. Wang, J-C. Liu, D. S. Sholl 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 213. Insertion, folding and oligomerization of peptides at water-membrane interfaces. C. L. Brooks III 11:10 214. Low-energy electron elastic scattering theory and an experimental description of water and water: DNA interfaces. T. M. Orlando, D. Oh, Y. Chen, A. Alexandrov 11:50 215. Water in nonpolar pores and protein cavities. G. Hummer, J. C. Rasaiah, H. Yin

Section F BCEC 156A Evaluation of Computational Methods: Insights, Philosophies and Recommendations Focus on Ligand-Based Methods A. Nicholls and A. N. Jain,

Organizers

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 224. What do we know and when do we know it: Lessons from information theory. A. Nicholls 9:40 225. Virtual high-throughput screening, enrichment, and the "early recognition" of actives. C. I. Bayly, J-F. Truchon 10:15 226. Ligand-based modeling: To confuse or enlighten. A. N. Jain 10:50 227. Issues in comparing shape simi­ larity methods: KISS helps. R. D. Cramer 11:25 228. Development and use of a small representative benchmark suite for thermochemical kinetics. J. Zheng, Y. Zhao, B. J. Lynch, D. G. Truhlar Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Transactinide Chemistry Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Materials and Processes Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Electronic Structure Theories Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section Ε Section A

BCEC 156B Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions: Experimental and Modeling Analysis M. R. Mihailescu, L. Menon,

Organizer

Presiding

8:00 216. Polyelectrolyte behavior and dynamics of three-way RNA junctions and random RNA sequences. U. Mohanty 8:30 217. Isostructural does not mean isoenergetic: Computational studies of the mechanism of recognition of oxidative DNA damage. C. L. Simmerling, K. Song 9:00 218. Single molecule folding reveals mechanism of ribozyme action. N. G. Walter, C. de Silva 9:30 219. The smn complex: A molecular assembly machine for mps. G. Dreyfuss 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 220. Mechanistic studies of nucleic acid chaperone activity of retroviral nucleocapsid proteins. K. Musier-Forsyth, M. Mitra, K. M. Stewart-Maynard, M-N. Vo, M. Cruceanu, F. Wang, R. J. Gorelick, M. C. Williams, I. Rouzina 10:45 221. Using structural superposition for the analysis of protein-RNA. Y. Shamoo 11:15 222. RNA structural bioinformatics of RNA-Protein interactions. N. B. Leontis 11:45 223. On the dynamics of some small structural motifs in rRNA upon ligand binding. A. Rakic, P. M. Mitrasinovic

BCEC 160B Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday Heterogeneous Catalysis E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon, M. A. C. Nascimento,

Organizers

Presiding

2:00 229. Selectivity issues in ammoxidation catalysis: MoV(Nb,Ta)(Te,Sb)0 System. R. K. Grasselli 2:35 230. Theoretical heterogeneous cataly­ sis, limitations and challenges. R. A. van Santen 3:10 231. Understanding electrochemical systems from first principles. T. Jacob 3:45 Intermission. 4:00 232. Rational design of molecular catalysts applied in hydrogen storage, production and hydrogen fuel cell. W-Q. Deng 4:35 233. Theoretical approaches to actinide complexes and cerium oxide materials using density functional theory. P. J . Hay, R. L. Martin, E. R. Batista, J. Uddin, G. E. Scuseria

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

COMP

Section Β BCEC 161 Drug Discovery Virtual Screening I. Visiers,

Organizer

D. Joseph-McCarthy,

Presiding

1:00 234. FITTED 2.0: A program for flexible protein-flexible ligand docking. N. Moitessier, C. R. Corbeil, P. Englebienne 1:20 235. DOVIS: A high performance com­ puting tool for virtual screening using AutoDock. X. Jiang, K. Kumar, A. Wallqvist, J. Reifman 1:40 236. Finding the best protocol for enzyme activity modeling. S. A. Wildman, R. V. Stanton 2:00 237. Can we improve the structurebased virtual screen hit rate by proposing limited number of VS hits? S-B. Rong, J. van Drie 2:20 238. Identification of weak leads with virtual screening. N. Brooijmans, C. Humblet 2:40 Intermission. 2:55 239. Surflex-dock: Effects of protomol generation and fragment matching on docking results. E. Metwally, J. K. Shepphird 3:15 240. The Shiraz Challenge: The unlov­ able in search of the undruggable. K. Branson, G. L. Warren 3:35 241. TrixX-BMI: Fast virtual screening using compressed Bitmap Index Technol­ ogy for efficient prefiltering of Compound Libraries. J. Schlosser, M. Rarey 3:55 242. Understanding false positives in reporter gene assays: In silico chemogenomics approaches to prioritize cellbased HTS data. M. Glick Section C BCEC 162A Quantum Chemistry A. E. Roitberg,

Organizer

A. J . Campbell,

Presiding

1:30 243. Computation of electron transfer energies for redox proteins by combining QM/MM and classical molecular dynamics simulation. J. Blumberger 1:55 244. Nature of ligand binding in HCV polymerase: Characterization of specific interactions from QM/MM calculations. J. M. Parks, H. Hu, R. Kondru, W. Yang 2:20 245. Exploring QM/MM paths for map­ ping reaction mechanisms. H. L. Woodcock III, M. Hodoscek, B. R. Brooks 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 246. A design atom approach for the QM/MM covalent boundary. Y. Zhang,

C. Xiao 3:25 247. Evaluation of different quantum mechanics methods applied to biological molecules: Potential and free energy surfaces of alanine and glycine dipeptides in vacuum and in water. G. D. M. Seabra, R. C. Walker, A. E. Roitberg 3:50 248. QM/MM study of orotidine-5'monophosphate decarboxylase. I. F. W. Kuo, C. L. Stanton, C. J. Mundy, T. Laino, Κ. Ν. Houk Section D

2:00 250. Application of pharmacophore fingerprint QSAR to 7TM drug design. Z. Yang 2:30 251. Hierarchical QSAR technology on the base of simplex representation of molecular structure. E. N. Muratov, V. E. Kuz'min, A. G. Artemenko 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 252. Informatics-based to structurebased ADME/tox modeling. A. J. Hopfinger 3:50 253. A novel technique for virtual dis­ covery for study of multistage bioprocesses. V. Potemkin 4:20 254. Workflows based quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling. S. K. Dogra, R. Hariharan

BCEC 156B

Organizers

1:30 249. New pharmacophore constrained Gaussian shape/electrostatic/colored force field similarity searching tools: Feeding the synthetic beast with KIN. A. C. Good, A. Tebben, B. Claus

Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Materials and Surfaces Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP

J . Towns,

1:00 255. From megaflops to teraflops: From molecules to cells. K. Schulten 1:30 256. Classical and quantum/classical biological modeling using the TeraGrid. A. E. Roitberg 2:00 257. Biomolecular simulation toward the petascale: Performance, workflow, and application to nucleic acid structure and dynamics. T. E. Cheatham III 2:30 258. Multi-terascale molecular modeling of biological systems. R. DeVane, W. Shinoda, J. Henin, M. Dal Peraro, A. Kohlmeyer, M. L Klein 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 259. Using NSF supercomputer resources to study biomolecular structure and function. J. D. Madura 3:45 260. New discoveries in biomolecular systems enabled by high performance computing. G. A. Voth 4:15 261. Using large-scale computing to investigate dynamic aspects of biomolecu­ lar structure and function. C. L Simmerling 4:45 262. Integrated computational biology: From the molecule to the cell. J . A. McCammon Section F BCEC 156A Evaluation of Computational Methods: Insights, Philosophies and Recommendations Focus on Ligand-based Methods A. Nicholls and A. N. Jain,

Organizers

1:30 263. Computational model validationconducting a fair trial. G. Pearl, S. Bhal, E. Kolovanov 2:05 264. Practicing best practices in devel­ oping predictive QSAR models. A. Golbraikh, A. Tropsha 2:40 Intermission. 2:55 265. Validation and the downside of the law of large numbers. R. D. Clark, M. A. Dolan 3:30 266. Virtual screening enrichment studies: A help or hindrance in tool selec­ tion? A. C. Good, T. I. Oprea 4:05 267. Panel discussion of computational methods evaluation. T. R. Stouch 4:35 Concluding Remarks.

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

M. E.Johnson 287. Computational study of interaction between argadin and acidic mammalian chitinase. H. Gouda, S. Hirono 288. Computer-aided design of vancomycin analogs for efficient binding of both D-AlaD-Ala and D-Ala-D-Lac. S. S. F. Leung, J. Tirado-Rives, W. L. Jorgensen 289. Correction of charge-transfer indices for multifunctional amino acids. F. Torrens, G. Castellano 290. Design of quantum sieves for seperation of hydrogen isotopes. Y. Ping 291. Docking studies of cytochrome P4502D6 inhibitors. R. J. Unwalla, J. Cross, S. Salaniwal, J. Kao, A. Shilling, L. Leung

T U E S D A Y EVENING

292. Downfolding and N-ization of a localized AO or LCAO basis set. E. D. Zurek, J. Autschbach, Ο. Κ. Andersen 293. Efficient parallel Fock matrix construction on the Grid. H. Umeda, Y. Inadomi, T. Watanabe, T. Ishimoto, U. Nagashima 294. Enhancing sampling and relating kinectics rates from all-atom explicit solvent accelerated molecular dynamics simula­ tions. C. A. F. de Oliveira, D. Hamelberg, J. A. McCammon 295. Evaluation of pharmacophore modeling based virtual screening: comparative assessment of catalyst, phase and MOE at the example of HRV coat protein. M. Mangold, G. M. Spitzer, T. M. Steindl, H. G. Wallnoefer, C. Laggner, T. Langer, K. R. Liedl 296. Examining the role of conformational changes in HIV protease drug resistance. M. M. Layten, F. Ding, C. L. Simmerling 297. Experimental and molecular docking simulation studies of Histone deacetylases (HDACs) enzyme inhibitors. K. Yelekci, G. Bora, D. Dayangac-Erden, P. Ayhan, S. Dalkara, A. S. Demir, H. Erdem-Yurter 298. Exploration of the sequence dependent stability of helical content using short alanine peptides. F. Ding 299. How to improve structure-based pharma­ cophores by modeling the binding site shape. S. Grona, P. Markt, J. Kirchmair, D. Schuster, T. Langer, C. Laggner 300. Identification of non-peptidic cell recogni­ tion motifs applying hybrid structural based computational methods: Development of an in vitro validation assay. R. J. Perez 301. Improved multistate empirical valence bond model for aqueous proton transport. H. Chen, Y. Wu, F. Wang, P. Liu, G. A. Voth 302. Inactivation mechanism of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Η-cluster by oxygen. D. Dogaru, S. Motiu, V. Gogonea 303. Interaction analysis between EGF recep­ tor and EGF by fragment molecular orbital calculation. T. Watanabe, T. Ishimoto, Y. Tamura, Y. Inadomi, H. Umeda, U. Nagashima 304. Interactions of antifreeze proteins with ice crystals and cell membranes. 0 . Can, S. Essampally, N. B. Holland 305. Investigation of MDM2-inhibitor interac­ tions by molecular dynamics and free energy calculations. Y. Lu, D. Qin, C-Y. Yang, K. Ding, Z. Nikolovska-Coleska, S. Wang 306. Modeling the flexibility of alpha helices in protein interfaces: Structure based design and prediction of helix mediated proteinprotein interactions. J. R. Apgar, X. F. Stowell, K. N. Gutwin, A. E. Keating 307. Molecular dynamics simulations of bound VEGF. B. A. C. Horta, R. B. Alencastro 308. Molecular mechanics force fields for modeling small, drug-like molecules com­ pared to wave function, density functional, and semi-empirical molecular orbital theo­ ries. B. White, E. A. Amin, C. R. Wagner, D. G. Truhlar 309. Nature of stacking interactions between imidazoacridone intercalators and DNA Base Pairs. I. E. Weidlich, S. G. Tarasov, C. J. Michejda, M. C. Nicklaus 310. New insight into the design of effective Bcl-xl inhibitors. W. J. Novak, G. Krilov 311. New scoring functions for discovery of lead peptides reversible inhibitors of thrombin. C. C. Clement, M. Philipp, J. Gingold

BCEC Ballroom Foyer Poster Session

Organizer

286. Computational study of Bacillus anthracis glutamate racE2. W. Fu, S. Mehboob,

RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC

Section A

Computational Science & Engineering Advances Supported by NSF Resource Molecular Sciences Cosponsored by PHYS

Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn Methods Cosponsored by CINF J. H. Block and B. Clark,

Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Biological Applications Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP

Section Ε

Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives

BCEC 156C

Gas- and Condensed-Phase Actinide Chemistry Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR

J. D. Madura,

Organizer

6:00-8:00 268. Molecular dynamic simulations of peptide nucleic acids modified with cycloalkanes. A. K. Manukyan, J. L. Poutsma 269. A microfludic device to study ice crystal growth and interactions of antifreeze proteins with ice crystals. Y. Celik, N. Pertaya, J. Wettlaufer, P. L. Davies, I. Braslavsky 270. A novel use for protomols in SurflexDock: Searching for binding sites with a global protomol. E. Metwally, J. Begemann 271. Accurate sampling using stochastic dynamics. G. Bussi, M. Parrinello 272. New methods for efficient direct calcula­ tion of drug binding free energies. M. R. Shirts, J. D. Chodera, R. A. Friesner 273. Analysis of protonic and deuteronic basis functions using Gaussian-type functions. T. Ishimoto, M. Tachikawa, Y. Inadomi, H. Umeda, T. Watanabe, U. Nagashima 274. Analysis of solvent-solute interactions and its effect on crystal morphology. C. Acquah, A. T. Karunanithi, L. E. Achenie, J. A. Gascon, S. Sithambaram, S. L. Suib 275. Antiviral drug design: Cross-docking to influenza neuraminidase. J. E. Shipman, R. C. Rizzo 276. Are enzyme active sites built in multiple layers? H. Brodkin, M. J. Ondrechen, D. Ringe 277. Artificial neural network models for pre­ diction of intestinal permeability of oligo­ peptides. E. Jung, J. Kim, M. Kim, D. H. Jung, S-H. Choi, S-K. Kang, M-K. Kim, Y-J. Choi 278. Brownian dynamics simulations of glyco­ lytic enzymes interacting with tubulin. E. N. Njabon, N. Y. Forlemu, K. A. Thomasson 279. Charge-ELF: Addressing conformational dependency of small-molecule atomic charges for biomolecular simulations. D. J. McKay, C. I. Bayly 280. Comparative analysis of the molecular recognition within ATP binding pockets of GHKL-family proteins. M. Song, W. Ying, L Sun 281. Computational analysis of the peptide bond formation mechanism in peptidyl transferase. W. A. Tian, P. M. Kiefer, R. Bianco, J. T. Hynes 282. Computational analysis of the search and recognition mechanism of the formamido-pyrimidine DNA glycosylase. K. Song, C. De los Santos, A. P. Grollman, C. L. Simmerling 283. Computational binding models for ligands with EGFR: Characterizing the basis of resistance. T. E. Balius, R. C. Rizzo 284. Computational characterization of amyloidogenic mutations in protein sequences. J . Choi, H. S. Lee, M. Qinqin, S. Yoon 285. Computational modeling of a crystal structure. M. L Mihajlovic, P. M. Mitrasinovic

TECH-55

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COMP 312. Novel approach to structure-based pharmacophore search using computa­ tional geometry and shape matching techniques. J. 0 . Ebalunode, Z. Ouyang, J. Liang, W. Zheng 313. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening: How to obtain the best enrichment rates. J. Kirchmair, S. Ristic, K. Eder, P. Markt, G. Wolber, T. M. Steindl, C. Laggner, T.Langer 314. Prediction of blood-air and tissue-air partition coefficients: Calculated molecular descriptors vs. experimentally determined properties. D. Mills, S. C. Basak, B. D. Gute 315. Prediction of pH-dependent aqueous solubility of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. S. M. Vadlamudi, F. Bjorkling, I. Kouskoumvekaki, Ν. Τ. Hansen, S. 0 . Jonsdottir 316. Prediction of pKa values for amino acids and peptides. S. Zhang, J. Baker, P. Pulay 317. QSAR approach to modeling membrane permeability. B. D. Gute, J. Riviere, R. E. Baynes, S. C. Basak 318. Quantum effective potentials: An efficient strategy for quantum dynamics. D. Z. Goodson 319. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechan­ ics study of the catalytic mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase. 0 . Demir, A. Roitberg 320. Structure-based virtual screening against SARS-3CLpro: Identification of hits and insights into the process of lead develop­ ment. P. Mukherjee, P. V. Desai, L. Ross, L. White, M. A. Avery 321. Structure-LD50 correlations: DFT study on substituted 3-carboethoxy-4-aminoquinolines. T. C. Cordova de Sintjago, L. Escalante, J. Posada, M. Rodriguez, G. Cabrera 322. Support vector machines and THEMATICS for precise prediction of interaction sites in proteins from 3-D structure. W. Tong, M. J. Ondrechen, R. J. Williams 323. Tautomer generation. pKa based domi­ nance conditions for generating the domi­ nant tautomers. J. Szegezdi, F. Csizmadia 324. The foundation of the approach of Active Thermochemical Tables: The analysis and manipulation of the Thermochemical Network Graph. A. Fernandez, B. Ruscic 325. Theoretical studies on pillared covalent organic frameworks for the hydrogen storage material. D. Kim, D. H. Jung, S-H. Choi, S. B. Choi, J. Yoon, Y. H. Jhon, J.Kim 326. Thermal rearrangement of 2-acetoxy2,6,6 trimethylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane: Theo­ retical elucidation of the mechanism. K. Yelekci, S. Sag Erdem 327. Novel fast adaptive algorithm for 3D-shape analysis of protein (HIV protease)-ligand interactions. V. K. Jalahalli, S. Kumar, X. Zhang, R. Garg 328. Understanding the binding mechanism of a new class of PTEN inhibitors. Q. Wang, M. Mottamal, G. Krilov 329. A classical/quantum chemical approach for quantitative structure activity of flavonoids. I. A. Shehadi, D. K. AI Jayousi, A. AI Mehdi 330. Ab initio molecular dynamics of visual pigment chromophore models. 1. Schapiro, 0 . Weingart, V. Buss 331. Benchmarking a variety of QM methods in the calculation of relative conformational and pair-wise energies: Just how reliable are the "shortcut methods"? A close look at LMP2, RI-MP2 and other correlated methods. K. A. Rossi, D. L. Cheney 332. Brownian dynamics simulations of lactate dehydrogenase isoforms with actin. E. N. Njabon, K. L. Carlson, K. A. Thomasson 333. Comparison of semi-empirical quantum mechanics methods applied to biological molecules: Potential and free energy surfaces of alanine and glycine Dipeptides in vacuum and in water. G. D. M. Seabra, R. C. Walker, A. E. Roitberg 334. Data mining the drug database: Is there such a thing as drug-like space? C. Yang, G. Sun, D. Bower, J. F. Rathman 335. Density Functional Theory studies of the interaction of sulfur oxides with large water clusters. J. M. Standard, R. D. Quinn, M. T. Van der Hoven

56-TECH

336. Evaluation of docking performance: Comparison of Surflex-Dock with five docking algorithms using the Johnson & Johnson data set. T. E. Mansley, J. K. Shepphird, L Wang 337. Investigate the fluorescence quenching and recovering process of beta-cyclodextrin anchored quantum dots. M. Ning, R. E. Brown 338. Investigating the predominant factors which drive receptor-ligand binding for inhibitors selective for MMP-13. N. A. Carrascal, R. C. Rizzo 339. Investigation of the inhibitory pathways of [FeFe]-hydrogenase by means of Quan­ tum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics. S. Motiu, D. Dogaru, V. Gogonea 340. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA-biosensor. N. Le Bouch, J. Brisson, M. Leclerc 341. Molecular dynamics studies of zeolites functionalized with transition metal ions. E. Jaramillo, E. C. Garcia, R. Guzman 342. Molecular mechanisms of gas surface interactions in hypersonic flow. I. Cozmuta 343. Predicting absolute binding free energies in a model binding site. D. L. Mobley, A. P. Graves, J. D. Chodera, A. McReynolds, B. K. Shoichet, K. A. Dill 344. Prediction of the adsorption orientation of Human Serum Albumin on hydrophobic surfaces using theoretical thermodynamic analysis. H-J. Hsu, S-Y. Sheu, R-Y. Tsay 345. QSAR modeling of blood-brain barrier permeability of diverse organic com­ pounds. L. Zhang, H. Zhu, T. I. Oprea, A. Tropsha 346. Topomer CoMFA: Investigation of scope. G. Stahl, R. D. Cramer, B. Wendt 347. Structure-based design of a novel class of beta-secretase (BACE) inhibitors. C. H. Reynolds, B. A. Tounge, A. B. Reitz, E. W. Baxter 348. Trends in ligand efficiency: Where do they come from? C. H. Reynolds, B. A. Tounge, S. D. Bembenek 349. 3-D-QSAR Combined theoretical study of 5-HT1 Α-receptor agonists. E. Bartashevich, V. Potemkin 350. Multiway QSPR analysis of the acidity constant of some phenolic compounds utilizing quantum topological molecular similarity descriptors. B. Hemmateenejad, T. Khayamian, M. Esteki, A. Mohajeri 351. Quantitative structure-retention relation­ ship for the Kovats retention indices of a large set of terpenes: A combined data splitting-feature selection (CDFS) strategy. B. Hemmateenejad, K. Javidnia, M. Elyasi Section Β BCEC Ballroom Foyer Chemical Computing Group Excellence Award A. C. G o o d ,

Organizer

6:00-8:00 352. Development of scoring functions for protein-ligand binding based on frequent geometric and chemical patterns of inter­ atomic interactions at their interfaces. R. Khashan, W. Zheng, A. Tropsha 353. How much experimental data is needed to predict a protein's structure? C. R. Crecca, A. E. Roitberg 354. Improving generalized Bom model in protein side chain and loop prediction. K. Zhu, M. R. Shirts, R. Friesner 355. Novel basis-set free approaches to solving the electronic-Schrôdinger equation. J. S. M. Anderson 356. To be native or not to be native, that is the question: Studies of the unfolded state structure of the Villin Headpiece Helical Subdomain. L. Wickstrom, D. P. Raleigh, C. L. Simmerling

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

10:00 372. Molecular dynamics simulations of antifreeze proteins at a lipid/water interface. E. J. Smith, P. Dalai, J. D. Madura, A. Haymet 10:30 373. Simulations of Type I AFPs at the ice/water interface. J. D. Madura

WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 160B Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday Molecular Dynamics E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon, C. Mailhiot,

Organizers

Section D BCEC 156C Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Ice Surface Cosponsored by PHYS

Presiding L. X. Dang,

9:00 357. Coarse grain models for selfassembling systems. M. L. Klein 9:35 358. Multiscale modeling of deformation and fracture: Integrating chemistry and mechanics. M. J. Buehler 10:10 359. Atomic-level control of chemical doping for nanoelectronics through first principles modeling. G. S. Hwang 10:45 Intermission. 11:00 360. Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian formulations for molecular dynamics simulations in materials chemistry. T. Cagin 11:35 361. Multimillion atom simulations of nanorods, dynamics of wing cracks, hypervelocity impact damage, and planar shock on RDX. P. Vashishta, R. K. Kalia, A. Nakano Section Β BCEC 161

Organizer

G. K. Schenter,

Presiding

8:30 374. Atmospheric reactions in water clusters: Mechanisms, dynamics and rates. R. B. Gerber, Y. Miller, M. A. Kamboures 9:10 375. Growth, structure, and dynamics of nanoscale water films on various sub­ strates. B. D. Kay, G. A. Kimmel, N. G. Petrik, Z. Dohnâlek, R. S. Smith 9:50 376. Structure and dynamics of water near the interface with oligo(ethylene oxide) self-assembled monolayers. A. E. Ismail, G. S. Grest, M. J. Stevens 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 377. Ions at water interfaces. A. Haymet, T. Bryk 11:10 378. Interaction of alkali halides and organic molecules with amorphous solid water. S. Bahr, O. Hôfft, V. Kempter Section Ε

Molecular Mechanics Exploring Proteins E. X. Esposito, S. Sharma,

BCEC 156B

Organizer

Presiding

8:30 362. Coarse master equations for peptide folding kinetics from atomistic molecular simulations. N-V. Buchete, G. Hummer 8:55 363. Exploring folding free energy landscapes of biomolecules via Serial Replica Exchange and Simulated Temper­ ing methods using a distributed computing environment. X. Huang, V. S. Pande 9:20 364. Folding pathways of three-helix proteins. H. Lei, Y. Duan 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 365. Multiscale studies of non-natural peptides. X. Zhu, A. Yethiraj, Q. Cui 10:25 366. To be native or not to be native, that is the question: Studies of the unfolded state structure of the Villin Head­ piece Helical Subdomain. D. P. Raleigh, L. Wickstrom, C. L. Simmerling 10:50 367. Using inter-residue distances to predict protein structure. C. R. Crecca, A. E. Roitberg 11:15 368. Folding of helical structures of alternating pyridinedicarboxamide/M(phenylazo) azobeneze oligomers. P. Tao, J. R. Parquette, C. M. Hadad Section C

Current Techniques in Molecular Simulation of Biological Systems Cosponsored by PHYS and BIOHW N. Rathore and T. A. Knotts IV, Organizers 9:00 379. Continuum solvents in polarizable force fields: A Poisson-Boltzmann approach. R. Luo 9:20 380. Efficient dynamic boundary solva­ tion models for biomolecular simulations. W. Zhu, G. Krilov 9:40 381. Fast polarizable force field for molecular simulations. G. A. Kaminski 10:00 382. Classical CHARMM Drude oscil­ lator polarizable force field for nucleic acid bases. V. M. Anisimov, P. E. M. Lopes, A. D. MacKerell Jr. 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 383. Unraveling the behavior of DNA through multiscale modeling. T. A. Knotts IV, S. Deublein, J. J. de Pablo 10:55 384. Multiproperty parametrization of a coarse grained model for proteins. R. DeVane, W. Shinoda, M. L. Klein 11:15 385. Molecular simulation of supported lipid bilayers on a coarse grained level. C. Xing, R. Faller 11:35 386. Implicit modeling of membranes: How much physics can we incorporate? M. Feig

BCEC 162A

Section F

Antifreeze Proteins: A Memorial Symposium for Robert Feeney

BCEC 156A

A. Wierzbicki,

Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn Applications Cosponsored by CINF

Organizer

8:30 369. Antifreeze glycoprotein adsorption at the ice/solution interface. S. Zepeda, E. Yokoyama, Y. Uda, Y. Furukawa 9:00 370. Antifreeze glycoproteins: Design of mimics and interaction with membranes. J. E. Stok, P. M. Abeysinghe, Y. Han, J. Gamer, S. R. Inglis, M. M. Harding 9:30 371. ATR-FTIR study of the secondary structure of antifreeze glycoproteins adsorbed at the ice/solution interface. Y. Uda, F. Kaneko, S. Zepeda, Y. Matsuura, Y. Furukawa

J. H. Block and B. Clark,

Organizers

8:30 387. Potency and selectivity of hydroxy hydantoins, a novel class of MMP-12 inhibitors: Structure-based QSAR analysis. B. O. J. Nordén, I. Shamovsky, B. Gabos, M. Munck af Rosenschôld, M. Lepistô, G. Carlstrom, J. Evenâs, D. Musil, K. Stenvall 9:00 388. PepT1 substrate QSAR and pharmacophore definition. T. R. Stouch, B. S. Vig

COMP

9:30 389. 3-D-QSAR study of submandibular gland tripeptide FEG and its analogs. E. Metwally, R. D. Mathison, J. S. Davison, R. D. Clark 10:00 390. Inorganic QSAR and imaging. D. E. Reichert 10:20 Intermission. 10:40 391. 3-D-QSAR models and activity predictions of human TRPV1 channel antagonists: Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity analysis (CoMSIA) of cinnamide analogs. V. N. Viswanadhan, Y. Sun, M. H. Norman 11:10 392. Using homology models and structure-based design to improve the MAO-A safety profile of oxazolidinone antibacterials. C. Eyermann, P. Fleming, M. Gravestock, T. Jones, G. Kern, R. Ramsay, F. Reck, F. Zhou 11:40 393. Neural network-based QSAR and the discovery of the next generation spinosyn insecticide: Spinetoram (DE-175). T. C. Sparks, G. D. Crouse, J. E. Dripps, P. B. Anzeveno, J. Martynow, J. Gifford Cheminformatics Techniques in Bioinformatics: Related Applications Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by COMP and BIOHW Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? QM/MM Methods and Applications Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by CQMP WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 160B Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday Biological E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon, R. A. Friesner,

Organizers

Presiding

1:30 394. On the mechanisms of photosyn­ thesis and respiration. P. E. Siegbahn 2:05 395. Computer-aided drug design. J. A. McCammon 2:40 396. Predictions and experimental verification of conformational flexibility and ligand efficacy in G-protein coupled recep­ tors. N. Vaidehi 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 397. Solution theory formulations for biomolecules and interfaces. B. M. Pettitt 4:05 398. Redesigning photoactive proteins from first principles. T. J. Martinez 4:40 399. Dynamics of ternary complex EF-Tu(GTP)aa-tRNA on the ribosome. U. Mohanty Section Β BCEC 161 Drug Discovery Rational Drug Design I. Visiers,

Organizer

A. C. Cheng,

Presiding

1:00 400. A reactivity and recognition com­ ponent-based methodology for computa­ tional prediction of likely sites of CYP 450 3A4-mediated metabolism. J. Zaretzki, C. M. Breneman, C. Bergeron, N. Sukumar, M. Krein 1:20 401. Molecular modeling of drug bind­ ing to CYP 3A4. J . Li, C. H. Reynolds 1:40 402. ACE, a computational tool for virtual screening of asymmetric catalysts. N. Moitessier, C. R. Corbeil, S. Thielges 2:00 403. Bisphosphonates: Teaching old drugs new tricks. E. Oldfield 2:20 Intermission. 2:35 404. Determining a minimum yet suffi­ cient training set size for QSAR modeling. S. K. Dogra

2:55 405. Developing QSAR models for multiple CNS activities. S. Mente 3:15 406. New approach to lead optimization and core hopping. M. Shelley, L L. Frye, B. W. Sherman, S. N. Rao, H. Beard, J-C. Mozziconacci, P. S. Shenkin 3:35 407. Structure-based design of aminohydantoins as highly potent, selective and orally active BACE1 inhibitors. M. S. Malamas, J. Erdei, I. Gunawan, N. Pawel, K. Barnes, M. Johnson, A. J. Robichaud, P. Zhou, J. Bard, J. Turner, Y. Hu, E. Wagner, S. Aschmies, T. Comery, R. Chopra, K. Fan Section C BCEC 162A Quantum Chemistry A. E. Roitberg, L Wickstrom,

Organizer Presiding

1:30 408. Why does the electron density sometimes go down when you add elec­ trons to a molecule? J. Melin, P. W. Ayers, J. V. Ortiz 1:55 409. Peptide bond non-planarity affects vibrational spectra of short peptides. N. S. Myshakina, Z. Ahmed, S. V. Bykov, J. K. Vries, S. A. Asher 2:20 410. Density functional theory study on the protonation of guanine quadruplex. J. W. Gauld, H. Liu 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 411. Multistep cluster chemistry involved in [email protected] reaction systems. M. A. van Bochove, M. Swart, F. M. Bickelhaupt 3:25 412. Reaction mechanism of direct gas phase synthesis of H202 catalyzed by Au3. B. Njegic, M. S. Gordon 3:50 413. Theoretical study on the hydrolysis mechanism of 1-substituted silatranes in the gas phase. S. Sok, M. S. Gordon Section D BCEC 156C Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn Methods Cosponsored by CINF J . H. Block and B. Clark,

Organizers

1:30 414. A new paradigm for pattern recog­ nition of drugs. M. A. Grishina, V. Potemkin, E. S. Pereyaslavskaya 2:00 415. Intrinsic descriptors. G. D. Purvis III 2:30 416. The development of novel frag­ ment descriptors of molecular structure using frequent common subgraph mining approach: applications to QSAR and protein structure function relationship modeling. A. Tropsha 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 417. Molecular topology as a tool for the design of new drugs. J. Galvez Sr. 3:50 418. Evaluation of descriptors and classification schemes to predict drug metabolism in terms of chemical informa­ tion. J. H. Block, D. Henry 4:20 419. Gaussian processes: A method for automatic QSAR and ADME modelling. O. Obrezanova, J. M. Gola, M. D. Segall

Section Ε BCEC 156B Computational Science & Engineering Advances Supported by NSF Resource General Sciences Cosponsored by PHYS J. Towns,

Organizer

1:30 420. Where does it all go? How $70M in NSF cyberinfrastructure is leveraged. J. Towns 421. Withdrawn. 2:00 422. Large-scale simulations of com­ plex flow phenomena. S. Dong 2:30 423. Transforming our understanding and prediction of thunderstorms through dynamic adaptation: People and technolo­ gies interacting with weather. K. K. Droegemeier, M. Xue 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 424. Numerical study of quantum chromodynamics. R. L. Sugar 3:45 425. Petascale computational cosmol­ ogy. T. Quinn 4:15 426. Using the TeraGrid to advance earthquake system science. P. Maechling Section F BCEC 156A Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Liquid Surfaces Cosponsored by PHYS L. X. Dang,

Organizer

J. I. Siepmann,

Presiding

1:30 427. Alkyl bromides at the air/water interface. M. Roeselové, B. Minofar 2:10 428. Specific and nonspecific solvation at liquid interfaces. R. A. Walker, M. R. Brindza 2:50 429. Theoretical study of small water clusters of dicarboxylic acids. F-M. Tao 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 430. Structure and dynamics of charge defects in methanol/water mixtures and at the liquid/vapor interface of NaOH solutions probed by ab initio molecular dynamics. M. E. Tuckerman, J. A. Morrone, H-S. Lee 4:10 431. Influence of liquid structure on interfacial ion distributions. M. L. Schlossman 4:50 432. Liquid-vapor interfaces of hydrogen bonded fluids using density functional theory interaction potentials. C. J. Mundy, S. M. Kathmann, W. I-F. Kuo Cheminformatics Techniques in Bioinformatics: Related Applications Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by COMP and BIOHW Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Free Energies and Sampling Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by COMP THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 160B Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday Theory E. A. Carter,

Organizer

M. S. Gordon, Organizer,

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Presiding

10:45 Intermission. 11:00 436. Accurate density functionals addressing the self-interaction error and potential functional formalism. A. J. Cohen, P. Mori-Sânchez, T. Heaton-Burgess, F. A. Bulat, W. Yang 11:35 437. TDDFT studies of resonance Raman processes: Understanding SERS. L. Jensen, C. M. Aikens, G. C. Schatz Section Β BCEC 161 Molecular Mechanics Material Science E. X. Esposito,

Organizer

A. J . Campbell,

Presiding

8:30 438. Atomistic predictions for clay exfoliation relevant to nanocomposites formation. I. Cozmuta, M. Blanco, W. A. Goddard III 8:55 439. Development of the reaxFF water potential to describe reactions involving proton transfer in the aqueous phase. A. C. van Duin, V. S. Bryantsev, Z. Xu, W. A. Goddard III 9:20 440. Gas sorption and barrier properties of polymeric membranes from molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. I. Cozmuta, M. Blanco, W. A. Goddard III 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 441. Modeling of sulfonated triblock copolymers with metal ions. J. Andzelm, J. M. Sloan, E. Napadensky, D. M. Crawford 10:25 442. Molecular dynamics study of liquids confined to sol-gels and their vibra­ tional spectra. C. M. Morales, W. H. Thompson 10:50 443. Salt permeation in water-filled dipolar nanopores. K. Leung 11:15 444. Single chain in mean-field Monte Carlo simulations of block copolymer self-assembly. J. W. Pitera, G. Srinivas Section C BCEC 162A Quantum Chemistry A. E. Roitberg, Μ. Μ. Layten,

Organizer Presiding

9:00 445. Solvent effects on nuclear shieldings: Frozen-density embedding in large MD generated solutions. R. Bulo, C. R. Jacob, L. Visscher 9:25 446. Accurately computed hydrogen bond energies using density functional theory with dispersion corrected atom centered potentials. J. S. Arey, l-C. Lin, P. Aeberhard, U. Rothlisberger 9:50 447. DFT studies of DP-3 amylose fragments. U. Schnupf, J. L. Willett, W. B. Bosma, F. A. Momany 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 448. DNA replication: Estimating the effects and interplay of solvation, pi-stack­ ing and hydrogen bonding. J. Poater, M. Swart, C. Fonseca Guerra, F. M. Bickelhaupt 10:55 449. Effective fragment potential modeling of substituted benzene dimers. T. Smith, L. V. Slipchenko, M. S. Gordon 11:20 450. IR Spectra by DFT for glucose and its epimers: A comparison between vacuum and solvated spectra. W. B. Bosma, U. Schnupf, J. L Willett, F. A. Momany

9:00 433. New density functionals for making bold predictions. D. G. Truhlar, Y. Zhao 9:35 434. Is the band gap problem truly a problem: Defects in semiconductors. P. A. Schultz 10:10 435. Density functional theory with accurate bond-breaking and band-gaps using generalized valence bond wave functions via the optimized effective potential method. R. P. Muller

TECH-57

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COMP/ENVR

Section D

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

BCEC 156

Section A

Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Ions at Interface Cosponsored by PHYS L. X. Dang,

Organizer

M. Roeselovâ,

Presiding

BCEC 160B Bold Predictions in Theoretical Chemistry: A Symposium in Honor of One of the Boldest, Bill Goddard, on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday Multiscale

2:55 480. Structural, electronic and spectro­ scopic properties of the natural luteolin and apigenin pigments: A DFT/TDDFT investigation. S. Fantacci, A. Amat, C. Miliani, F. De Angelis, A. Sgamellotti 3:20 481. Tautomer stability and pKa evalua­ tion. Z. Zhu, M. Shalaeva, M. P. Pollastri, R. V. Stanton 3:45 482. The reaction mechanism for the organocatalytic ring opening polymeriza­ tion of L-lactide using bifunctional cata­ lysts. H. W. Horn, J. Rice

ENVR Division of Environmental Chemistry G. Coimbatore, Program Chair

O T H E R S Y M P O S I A O F INTEREST: 8:30 451. Ions at interfaces: Thermodynamic consequences and two-state molecular description of accumulation or exclusion. L. M. Pegram, K. VanderMeulen, M. W. Anderson, I. A. Shkel, D. J. Felitsky, R. Erdmann, M. T. Record Jr. 9:10 452. Structure and reactivity on the surface of aqueous electrolyte solutions. D. J . Tobias 9:50 453. EXAFS analysis of aqueous interfaces. G. K. Schenter, C. J. Mundy, L. X. Dang 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 454. Some new nonlinear spectroscopic findings of the aqueous interfaces. H-F. Wang, R-R. Feng, Z. Zhang, H-T. Bian, Y. Guo 11:10 455. Effect of size and polarizability on ion partitioning at the aqueous liquid-vapor interface. J. I. Siepmann, B. L. Eggimann 11:50 456. Interaction of atmospheric oxidants with the air-liquid interface of organic coated electrolytic solutions: A molecular dynamics study. R. D'Auria, E. Knudsen, D. J. Tobias

E. A. Carter and M. S. Gordon, M. L. Klein,

Presiding

2:00 465. Combustion chemistry: The eva­ nescent NCCO radical. H. F. Schaefer III 2:35 466. Elastic properties of DNA under high stretching force at various pulling rates. P. K. Maiti, K. Sen 3:10 467. Atomistic and mesoscale modeling of chemical and thermo-mechanical pro­ cesses in molecular crystals. A. Strachan 3:45 Intermission. 4:00 468. Multiscale modeling in automobile materials research: For engines, door panels and fuel cells. Y. Qi 4:35 469. mW: A coarse-grained model of water with tetrahedral interactions. V. Molinero Section Β BCEC 161

Section Ε

Drug Discovery Rational Drug Design

BCEC 156B

I. Visiers,

Organizer

S. Mente,

Presiding

Current Techniques in Molecular Simulation of Biological Systems Cosponsored by PHYS and BIOHW N. Rathore and T. A. Knotts IV, Organizers 9:00 457. Predicting bound protein-peptide conformations: Application to MHC-peptide complexes. I. Antes, T. Lengauer 9:20 458. Sampling of rare protein aggrega­ tion events in explicit water. M. Chopra, A. S. Reddy, J. J. de Pablo 9:40 459. Bridging timescales between atomistic simulation and experiments with master equation models of protein folding and dynamics. J. D. Chodera, N. Singhal, W. C. Swope, J. W. Pitera, I. Haque, K. A. Dill, V. S. Pande 10:00 460. Studying the activation mecha­ nism of a signaling protein by transition path sampling and umbrella sampling. L. Ma, Q. Cui 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 461. Optimization and convergence metrics for replica exchange molecular dynamics. A. E. Roitberg 10:55 462. Obtaining converged conforma­ tional ensembles for biomolecules in explicit water. C. L. Simmerling 11:15 463. Free-energy landscapes from combined parallel-tempering and metadynamics. G. Bussi, F. L. Gervasio, A. Laio, M. Parrinello 11:35 464. WHAM without histograms: Statistically optimal free energy estimates. M. R. Shirts, J. D. Chodera

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

58-TECh

Organizers

1:00 470. Validating crystallographic ligands. B. Kelley, J. H. Nettles, G. Warren 1:20 4 7 1 . Non-additivity in structure-activity relationships. J . van Drie 1:40 472. Structure-based prediction of small-molecule druggability. A. C. Cheng 2:00 Intermission. 2:20 473. Tackling the cellular drug resis­ tance of thymidylate synthase—disruption of an obligate dimer. O. M. Salo-Ahen, P. M. Costi, R. C. Wade 2:40 474. Analysis and comparison of mul­ tiple sar models from regression and classification methods. R. R. Gupta, E. A. Jamois, K. Subramanian 3:00 475. DNA Minor groove pharmaco­ phores describing sequence specific properties. G. M. Spitzer, B. Wellenzohn, C. Laggner, T. Langer, K. R. Liedl Section C BCEC 162A Quantum Chemistry A. E. Roitberg, G. D. M. Seabra,

Organizer Presiding

1:00 476. Structural and dynamical proper­ ties of hydrogen bonded fluids from first principles molecular dynamics simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble. I. F. W. Kuo, J. Schmidt, C. J. Mundy, M. J. McGrath, J. I. Siepmann 1:25 477. Complexation of copper (II) ion in aqueous solution: New insight from DFT and cosmo solvation model. V. S. Bryantsev, M. Diallo, W. A. Goddard III 1:50 478. Cis-trans isomerization of a small peptidic fragment studied by ab initio and empirical simulation techniques. Y. A. Mantz, D. Branduardi, G. Martyna, M. Parrinello 2:15 Intermission. 2:30 479. DFT studies of hydrated carbohy­ drates: DFT molecular dynamics simula­ tions at the B3LYP/6-31+G* level of theory. F. A. Momany, U. Schnupf, J. L. Willett, W. B. Bosma

Section D Analytical Approaches (see ANYL, Thu)

BCEC 156C Phil Magee Memorial Symposium: QSAR Reborn Applications Cosponsored by CINF J. H. Block and B. Clark,

Organizers

1:00 483. Random forest ensembles applied to MLSCN screening data for toxicity prediction and feature selection. R. Guha, S. Schurer 1:30 484. On the importance of topological descriptors in understanding structureproperty relationships in QSAR and QSPR models. D. T. Stanton 2:00 485. Predicting allergic contact dermati­ tis: alternative statistical approaches to chemical classification. S. C. Basak, D. Mills, B. D. Gute, D. M. Hawkins 2:30 486. A comparison of the chemical properties of drugs and FEMA/FDA noti­ fied GRAS chemical compounds used in the food industry. D. Sprous, F. Salemme 2:50 Intermission. 3:10 487. A QSAR model for hERG based on mulitple 1-D alignments. D. J. Diller 3:40 488. Modeling fluorophilicity: A hybrid method. M. Charton 4:10 489. "Inductive" descriptors: Ten suc­ cessful years in QSAR. A. Cherkasov

New Chemical and Biosensing Approaches for Cellular Analysis (see ANYL, Wed) Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense (see COLL, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu) Classic Chemistry Books of the Twen­ tieth Century: Spectroscopy (see HIST, Mon) Safety in Nanotechnology Research (see CHAS, Mon, Tue) SOCIAL EVENTS: Dinner: Tue Social Hour: Tue BUSINESS MEETINGS: Business Meeting: Sun Executive Committee Meeting: Sun SUNDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm Atmospheric Aerosol Processes

Section Ε K. T. Valsaraj and R. R. Kommalapati, Organizers

BCEC 156B Molecular Mechanics Advancing Methodology E. X. Esposito, L. Wickstrom,

Organizer Presiding

1:00 490. Polarizable force fields for biomolecular simulations: Bulk liquid properties using the CHARMM fluctuating charge force field. S. Patel 1:25 491. Atomistic and continuum modeling of deformation of coiled-coil vimentin intermediate filaments. M. J. Buehler, T. Ackbarow 1:50 492. Caught in atomistic detailed action: Modeling of protein-G monomers forming oligomers. J . M. Bui, J. Gsponer, J. C. Wooley, M. Vendruscolo, J. A. McCammon, C. M. Dobson 2:15 Intermission. 2:30 493. Intricate role of water molecules in protein dynamics. D. Hamelberg, T. Shen, J. A. McCammon 2:55 494. Reducing false-negatives in com­ putational protein design: Moving beyond a single-backbone model. D. F. Green 3:20 495. Tautomers, conformers, and com­ putation of chemical similarity. J. H. Nettles, J. L. Jenkins, Z. Deng, A. Bender, J. Scheiber, J. W. Davies, M. Glick 3:45 496. Extending the scope of relative binding free energy calculations. J. Michel, J. W. Essex

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:50 1 . Photoprocessing of atmospheric targets: Aerosol nucleation and chemistry. V. Vaida 9:10 2. Global modeling of the climatology and optical properties of multicomponent aerosol species. T. Ayash, C. Q. Jia, S. L Gong, T. L. Zhao, P. Huang 9:30 3. Interfacial chemistry in aqueous nanodroplet encounters with a reactive gas. C. D. Vecitis, S. Enami, M. R. Hoffmann, A. J. Colussi 9:50 4. Morphological effects on particle reactivity. E. R. Garland, E. P. Rosen, T. Baer 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 5. Atmospheric deposition of PCBs and the role of soil bioturbation in their fate. L. Thibodeaux, M. D. Rodriguez 10:45 6. Photochemistry of secondary organic aerosol particles formed in oxida­ tion of monoterpenes by 0 3 and N 0 3 . S. Nizkorodov, A. Bateman, S. Mang, X. Pan, J. Underwood, M. Walser, J. Xing, Y. Dessiaterik, A. Laskin, J. Laskin 11:05 7. Pollutant emissions from a biodiesel blend. L. Monti, M. Lu, Z. Liu 11:25 8. Tropospheric aerosol surface oxida­ tion reactions studied by sum frequency generation. G. Y. Stokes, J. M. Gibbs-Davis, A. M. Buchbinder, F. M. Geiger Section Β Boston Park Plaza Beacon Hill Rm Fate of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Urban Systems Sorption, Bioremediation, NY/NJ Harbor D. E. Fennell and L. A. Totten,

Organizers

8:30 9. Strong sorption of phenanthrene by nonhydrolyzable organic matter in soils and sediments. Y. Ran, K. Sun, Y. Yang, B. Xing, Ε. Υ. Zeng

ENVR

8:50 10. Interaction mechanism of nonpolar organic contaminants in natural organic matter: Dominating role of adsorption (micropore-filling). Y. Ran, K. Sun, B. Xing, L. Zhou 9:10 11. Assessing desorption kinetics of native pyrene from contaminated sediment by time-resolved fluorescence spectros­ copy. D. T. F. Kuo, R. Adams, S. M. Rudnick, R. F. Chen, P. M. Gschwend 9:30 Intermission. 9:50 12. In situ capping of contaminated sediments: Biogeochemical characteriza­ tion of sediments and caps and its impact on contaminant fate and transport. D. W. Himmelheber, M. Taillefert, J. B. Hughes 10:10 13. Bioremediation approaches for PCB- and PCDD/F-contaminated sedi­ ments. D. E. Fennell, V. Krumins, B. Ravit, L. A. Totten 10:30 14. Persistent chlordane concentra­ tions in Long Island Sound sediment: Implications from chlordane, 2 1 0 Pb and 13 ' C s depth profiles. L. Yang, X. Li, J. Crusius, U. Jans, M. E. Melcer, P. Zhang 10:50 15. Chiral signatures as a tool for source apportionment of PCBs in the Hudson River Estuary. B. J. Asher, C. S. Wong, L. A. Totten 11:10 16. Modeling atmospheric POP dynamics in urban systems. L. A. Totten, G. Stenchikov, S. Du

2:10 27. Source apportionment of urban PAH contamination using passive sam­ pling devices and multivariate statistics. G. J. Sower, K. A. Anderson 2:30 28. Atmospheric PCB sources to the Delaware River. A. L. Sandy, S. Du, D. M. Kaczorowski, L. A. Totten 2:50 29. Discernment of dietary and inhala­ tion exposure to PCBs from congener profiles in blood. A. K. Norstrom, G. Czub, M. S. McLachlan, P. S. Thome, K. C. Hombuckle 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 30. Brominated diphenyl ethers in the New York/New Jersey Harbor. L. A. Totten, A. Zarnadze 3:50 3 1 . Fate assessment of brominated organic compounds including flame retar­ dants based on physico-chemical param­ eters experimentally measured. K. Kawamoto, H. Kuramochi 4:10 32. Photolytic dehalogenation of decabromodiphenyl ether. C-K. Wang, Y-H. Shih MONDAY MORNING

Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Environmental Geochemistry Cosponsored by GEOC

Section A Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm Atmospheric Aerosol Processes K. T. Valsaraj and R. R. Kommalapati, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 17. Radiative effects of soil dust and sea-salt aerosols. T. Ayash, C. Q. Jia, S. L. Gong 1:55 18. Atmospheric chemistry and fate of perfluorinated compounds at the air-water interface. N. Rontu 2:15 19. Effect of highly concentrated inor­ ganic seed aerosols on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Z. Lu, J. Hao, H. Takekawa 2:35 20. Carbonaceous aerosol processing by clouds and fogs. J. L. Collett Jr., L. Rinehart-Mazzoleni, P. Herckes, X. Shen, T. Lee, A. P. Sullivan, S. Raja, R. R. Kommalapati, Κ. Τ. Valsaraj 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 2 1 . Environmental chemodynamics of sediment pollutants inside homes in New Orleans, Louisiana, following hurricane Katrina. N. Ashley, Κ. Τ. Valsaraj, L. Thibodeaux 3:30 22. Enhancement of corona discharge for toluene decomposition by Fenton-type reaction. Y. Kang, Z. Wu 3:50 23. Fine particle matter (PM2.5) in the ambient air of Chiang Mai—Lamphun basin in northern Thailand. N. Chunram, U. Vinitketkumnuen, R. L. Deming, R. Kamens 4:10 24. Uptake and UV-photo-oxidation of gas phase PAHs on atmospheric water films. J. Chen, Κ. Τ. Valsaraj

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 33. Arsenic in groundwater: From local measurements to regional predictions in southeast Asia. C. A. Johnson, M. Berg, S. Hug, K. Abbaspour, M. Amini, L Winkel, E. Hoehn, H. Yang 9:05 34. Distinguishing natural and anthropo­ genic sources of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons using natural abundance radiocarbon measurements. 0 . Gustafsson, M. Mandalakis, Z. Zencak, C. M. Reddy, J. Klanova, 1. Holoubek, E. G. Stephanou 9:30 35. Evidences for wide influences of incomplete combustion products from biomass burning in the East Asia region: A case study of PM2.5 aerosols at Mt. Halla, Jeju Island, Korea. H. Kumata, N. Kaneyasu, C-H. Kang, Y. Goto, M. Tsuzuki, T. Uchida, K. Fujiwara 9:55 36. Biogeochemical assessment of alkenone export depth in the summertime euphotic zone of the Gulf of California. F. G. Prahl, B. N. Popp 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 37. Long-term studies on a 40-year old oil spill. C. M. Reddy 11:00 38. Sources of polar organic matter in petroleum-contaminated groundwater: New insights into biogeochemical pro­ cesses and fate and transport implications. R. Haddad, C. M. Reddy, R. K. Nelson, LXu 11:25 39. Walter's surfactants as biogeo­ chemical tracers in U.S. estuarine sedi­ ments. B. J . Brownawell, X. Li 11:50 40. Old pollutants never die-they just fade away: The fate of DDT on the Palos Verdes Shelf. R. P. Eganhouse, J. Pontolillo

Recent Developments in Sensors and Sensor Networks for Contaminants in Environmental Systems

Fate of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Urban Systems Source Apportionment, PCBs, BDEs

C. Lee and P. L. Brezonik,

Organizers

1:30 25. Source apportionment of PCBs in the Delaware River and NY/NJ Harbor. S. Du, B. Xiao, T. Belton, D. E. Fennell, L. A. Totten 1:50 26. Source apportionment of POPs in the NY/NJ Harbor. B. Xiao, S. Du, D. E. Fennell, L. A. Totten

Section A

Section A

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm

Sci-Mix

R. P. Eganhouse, J . A. Field, H-P. E. Kohler, and M. J . F. Suter, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 48. Novel approaches for mass spectrometric analysis of endocrine-disrupting compounds in the aquatic environment. P. L. Ferguson, L. Kimberley, B. Englehart 2:00 49. Application of negligible-depletion solid phase microextraction to quantify the interaction between estrogenic micropollutants and bulk organic matter. P. A. Neale, B. I. Escher, A. I. Schâfer 2:25 50. Determination of estrogenic and pharmaceutical chemicals in sewage effluent and receiving river water by spot and passive sampling. Z. Zhang, J. L Zhou 2:50 5 1 . Orbiting around mudPIT reproducibility. M. J. F. Suter, K. Cheshenko, V. J. Nesatyy 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 52. Comprehensive 2-D gas chromatography (GCxGC) in environmental forensics. R. B. Gaines, G. S. Frysinger, C. M. Reddy, R. K. Nelson 3:55 53. Disentangling oil weathering in the environment using GCxGC. J. S. Arey, R. K. Nelson, Ο Μ. Reddy 4:20 54. Quantitative determination of fullerenes in combustion by-products and during toxicological assays. C. W. Isaacson, C. Usenko, R. Tanguay, J. A. Field 4:45 55. Compound specific 8 1 Br/ 7 9 Br analy­ sis by capillary gas chromatography multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-MC-ICPMS). S. P. Sylva, L. Ball, R. K. Nelson, C. M. Reddy 5:10 Concluding Remarks. Section Β Boston Park Plaza Beacon Hill Rm

C. Lee and P. L. Brezonik,

Boston Park Plaza Beacon Hill Rm

D. E. Fennell and L. A. Totten,

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Recent Developments in Sensors and Sensor Networks for Contaminants in Environmental Systems

Section Β Boston Park Plaza Beacon Hill Rm

Section Β

3:25 60. Mass-sensitive microsensor plat­ form for liquid-phase environmental sens­ ing. J. H. Seo, A. Byun, G. T. Dobbs, Y. I. Luzinova, S. Truax, K. S. Demirci, B. Mizaikoff, O. Brand 3:50 6 1 . Continuous carbon monoxide moni­ toring by using a wireless sensor network. C. Chaiwatpongsakorn, T. C. Keener, W. Toruksa, M. Lu, D. Wang, D. Agrawal 4:15 62. Detection of peroxyacetyl nitrate by quartz crystal microbalance. D. Himali, Y. G. Durant

Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Advanced Analytical Methods Cosponsored by GEOC

Section A

R. P. Eganhouse, J . A. Field, H-P. E. Kohler, and M. J . F. Suter, Organizers

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

9:50 44. Development of fouling resistant water treatment membranes with microbial sensing capabilities. C. L. Gruden, I. Escobar, M. R. Coleman, 0 . Mileyeva-Biebesheimer, C. Gorey 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 45. Needle-type sensor array for simultaneous measurement of dissolved oxygen and redox potential in situ. 1. Papautsky, J-H. Lee, Y. Seo, T-S. Lim, P. L Bishop 10:55 46. Comparing dissolved oxygen sensors and developing design criteria for mobile platform monitoring of hypoxia. R. A. Mann, J. S. Bonner, T. O. Ojo, S. M. Islam 11:20 47. Wireless sensor network for envi­ ronmental monitoring based on optical technology. Y. Kostov, U. Ghosh, G. Rao

Organizers

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 4 1 . Inkjet printed biodegradable sensors for environmental monitoring. P. Takhistov 9:00 42. Detection and identification of biospores using infrared spectroscopy. C. V. G. Reddy, C. P. Tripp 9:25 43. BioMEMS device to track Mycobac­ terium in clinical environments. D. B. Oerther, K. Mack, E. Peterson, I. Papautsky, B. Kinkle

Organizers

1:30 56. Microfabricated tuning fork sensors: Chloroform in water. F. Tsow, K. Kruger, N. Tao, E. S. Forzani, P. K. Westerhoff 1:55 57. Real-time nitrophenol detection using single-walled carbon nanotube sensors. Y. Lei, N. Liu, X. Cai, Q. Zhang, M. Chan 2:20 58. Colorimetric sensor arrays for the detection of toxic industrial chemicals. K. S. Suslick 2:45 59. Time resolved impedance spectros­ copy of the protein toxins' adsorption to the nanopattemed surfaces. P. Takhistov, C-H. Chai 3:10 Intermission.

Undergraduate Research Poster Session Environmental Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by ENVR and SOCED M O N D A Y EVENING

G. Coimbatore,

Organizer

8:00-10:00 177-178,181-182,187-188,190-191,194. See subsequent listings. TUESDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Biotransformation and Effects Cosponsored by GEOC R. P. Eganhouse, J . A. Field, H-P. E. Kohler, and M. J . F. Suter, Organizers 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 63. Combining analytical chemistry and toxicology to trace environmental contami­ nants: The start of a beautiful friendship. J. Legler, J. De Boer 9:05 64. Use of microarray analysis in Arabidopsis exposed to RDX as a screening technique for determination of RDX upregulated genes in Populus. S. Tanaka, H-P. Peng, M-C. Shih, B. Van Aken, J. L. Schnoor 9:30 65. Emerging pollutants in coastal environment: From chemical analysis to ecological risk assessment. A. Marcomini, G. Poiana, C. Micheletti, A. Fantinati, L. Canesi 9:55 66. Aerobic soil biotransformation of fluorotelomer monoesters and triesters. J. Liu, L S. Lee 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 67. Microbial metabolism of nonylphenol isomers. F. L. Gabriel, W. Giger, K. Guenther, H-P. E. Kohler 11:00 68. Subsurface alkylphenolethoxylate transformation pathways: Who's respon­ sible and how? M. Reinhard, J. Montgomery-Brown, S. Behrens, J. A. Campbell, W-H. Ding 11:25 69. In vitro enantioselective biotrans­ formation of chiral polychlorinated biphenyls. N. A. Warner, J. W. Martin, C. S. Wong 11:50 70. Elucidating the role of electron transfer mediators in reductive transforma­ tions in natural sediments. H. Zhang, E. J. Weber 12:15 7 1 . Multicompartment analysis of the behavior and fate of metolachlor in the environment. P. D. Capel, R. M. Webb

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-59

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ENVR

Section Β

5:30 Concluding Remarks.

Boston Park Plaza Beacon Hill Rm

Section Β

Recent Developments in Sensors and Sensor Networks for Contaminants in Environmental Systems

Boston Park Plaza Beacon Hill Rm The C. Ellen Gonter Environmental Chemistry Awards Cosponsored by YCC

C. Lee and P. L. Brezonik, Organizers T. A. Anderson, Organizer 8:30 72. Application of microfabrication techniques for the development of a minia­ turized Hg-free ASV system. M. D. Martin, L. Sztaberek, R. P. Baldwin, T. Roussel, R. Keynton, K. Walsh, J. Naber, B. Vaughn, D. Jackson 8:55 73. Scaleable potentiometric nitrate sensors for soil and aquatic observation applications. A. A. Ratko, T. C. Harmon 9:20 74. Chemical sensors and novel data­ base for monitoring marine pollution. 0. A. Sadik, J. Karasinski, S. Kikandi, M. Ogunlesi, W. Okiei, E. Oyewo 9:45 75. Sensor-based investigation of biogeochemical controls on arsenic mobili­ zation in rural Bangladesh. N. Ramanathan, C. Lee, T. Lin, R. Neumann, S. Rothenberg, C. Harvey, T. C. Harmon, E. Kohler, D. Estrin, J. Jay 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 76. NanoLAB, an automatic, field déployable analyzer for nutrient determinations using discrete sample aliquots. C. J. Patton, M. B. Rawlinson, P. J. Pappe 10:50 77. Characterization and evaluation of the cobalt-based phosphate microelectrode for use in in vivo environmental analysis. W. H. Lee, Y. Seo, P. L. Bishop 11:15 Concluding Remarks.

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 87. Atmospheric outflow of anthropo­ genic semivolatile organic compounds from East Asia in spring 2004. T. Primbs, S. L. Simonich, D. Schmedding, G. Wilson, D. Jaffe, A. Takami, S. Kato, S. Hatakeyama, Y. Kajii 2:05 88. Investigation of the photocatalytic degradation pathway of creatinine: The effect of pH. M. G. Antoniou, D. D. Dionysiou 2:35 89. Visible light-mediated Ti0 2 photocatalysis of fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents. T. Paul, P. L. Miller, T. J. Strathmann 3:05 90. Reduction of pentachloronitrobenzene in freshwater sediment porefluids: Role of Fe(ll), dissolved organic matter and pH. J. A. Hakala, Y-P. Chin 3:35 91. Uptake and depuration behaviors of radioactively labeled single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes by Lumbriculus variegatus. E. J. Petersen, Q. Huang, W.J. Weber Jr. 4:05 92. Influence of humic acid on the aggregation kinetics of fullerene nanoparticles in monovalent and divalent electro­ lyte solutions. K. L. Chen, M. Elimelech

Fuel Cell Technology: Biofuel Cells, Enzymatic and Microbial Microbial Fuel Cells Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by ENVR

Fuel Cell Technology: Biofuel Cells, Enzymatic and Microbial Microbial Fuel Cells Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by ENVR

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Section A

Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm

Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm

Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Emerging Contaminants Cosponsored by GEOC

Role of Chemical Technologists in the Area of Environmental Science Cosponsored by Committee on Technician Affairs, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH) and TECH

R. P. Eganhouse, J. A. Field, H-P. E. Kohler, and M. J. F. Suter, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 78. Should we be concerned about the presence of pharmaceuticals in the environment? T. Ternes, D. Lôffler 2:00 79. Utility of crotamiton as a watersoluble persistent molecular marker of pharmaceutical chemicals and sewage. H.Takada, N.Nakada, K.Kiri, H. Shinohara, T. Tanishima 2:25 80. Determination of illicit drugs and biomarkers in raw municipal wastewater influent as a tool for drug epidemiology. A. C. Chiaia, D. L Sudakin, C. Banta-Green, J. A. Field 2:50 81. Persistent intermediates from vitamin C production: Analysis, behavior and possible environmental implications. M. Ahel, S. Terzic 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 82. Occurrence and behavior of the emerging contaminants benzothiazoles and benzotriazoles in wastewater treatment plants. E. G. Stephanou, S. Kargaki, K. Mylona 3:55 83. Stability of water-soluble quantum dots under simulated environmental conditions. K. M. Metz, A. N. Mangham, R. J. Hamers, J. A. Pedersen 4:20 84. Mass flow analysis of endocrine disruptors in the Glatt River, Switzerland. N. Jonkers, H-P. E. Kohler, W. Giger 4:45 85. Mass flow of fluorochemicals in the Glatt River valley. C. A. Huset, A. C. Chiaia, D. F. Barofsky, N. Jonkers, H -P. E. Kohler, W. Giger, J. A. Field 5:05 86. Application of ultrasound for the complete destruction of persistent organic pollutants. M. R. Hoffmann, C. D. Vecitis, B. Mader

60-TECH

G. Coimbatore, Organizer V. Turoski, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:10 93. The color of success. J. J. Conlon 10:00 94. Carbonylation in ionic liquid media. M. K. Moore, J. R. Zoeller, G. C. Tustin, R. M. Moncier 10:30 95. Developing Shut Shoushu Sponge. J. H. Engelman II 11:00 96. It's a partnership. V. Turoski Fuel Cell Technology: Biofuel Cells, Enzymatic and Microbial Enzymatic Fuel Cells Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by ENVR WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm Environmental Contaminants: Low-Level and Complex Mixtures Toxicity and Fate and Transport Processes

2:15 99. Generalized concentration addition model predicts interactions of TCDD with partial agonist AhR ligands. G. J. Howard, J. J. Schlezinger, T. F. Webster 2:35 100. Manganese critical toxic level of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L), tobacco {Nicotiana tobaccum L) and triticale (X Triticosecale W.). M. Lâszlo 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 101. Behavior of organic pollutants in Arctic sediments. J. M. Paul, A. M. Grannas 3:30 102. Vapor pressures and thermodynamics of model mixtures of polycyclic aromatic compounds measured via the Knudsen effusion technique. J. L. Goldfarb, E. M. Suuberg 3:50 103. Characterizing vapor intrusion scenarios using a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) model. O. Bozkurt, K. G. Pennell, Ε. Μ. Suuberg 4:10 104. Preliminary assessment of water quality in the Rio Grande in the LaredoNuevo Laredo region. G. Buelna, R. Riffat 4:30 105. Sensitized photolysis of metolachlor in a temperate eutrophic wetland. T. D. Trouts, Κ. Μ. Cawley, Y-P. Chin Section Β Boston Park Plaza Beacon Hill Rm General Topics G. Coimbatore, Organizer 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:10 106. Adhesion and attraction heteroge­ neity introduced by manganese-oxide nanostructures on rhodochrosite. C. Na, S. Martin 2:30 107. Competition of copper binding between polyethyleneimine and other chelating agents in copper removal from Cu-CMP waste streams. W. K. Maketon, C. A. Zenner, K. L. Ogden 2:50 108. Microbiological responses and adaptation to chemical stress. S. Ray, C. A. Peters 3:10 109. SPE procedures for GC-MS(MS) determination of 1,4-dioxane and other nonpurgeable volatile organic compounds in aqueous samples. M. S. Young, K. Tran 3:30 110. Synthesis and characterization of composite styrene acrylonitrile membranes for the separation of chromic acid. A. Kumar, S. Sachdeva 3:50 111. Microbial decontamination of flood water using modified Fenton's reaction. V. Shah, J. Pinto, A. Angelov, B. J. Dramou WEDNESDAY EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 General Papers G. Coimbatore, Organizer 6:00-8:00 112. Miniflow reactor for long-time aging of aerosols without wall effects. J. P. Cowin, X. Yang, M. J. ledema 113. New method for preparing the nanoscaled T1O2 structure. O. Dong, K. L. Yeung, W. K. Leung 114. Evaluation of the performance of mesoporous aerogel as a catalytic filter for treatment of airborne pollutants. S. Cao, K. L Yeung, J. K. C. Kwan, S. C. T. Yu, W. K. Leung

K. G. Pennell, J. Moffit, Ε. Μ. Suuberg, and R. Vanderslice, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 97. Sensitization and co-exposure synergy of testicular toxicant exposure. J. S. Moffit, B. H. Bryant, S. J. Hall, K. Boekelheide 1:55 98. Environmental toxicant Aroclor 1254 induces preterm birth by affecting amniotic fluid volume regulation and vascular activ­ ity at the maternal-fetal interface. N. Tewari, S. Kalkunte, S. Sharma

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

115. Photocatalytic oxidation for surface disinfection. W. K. Leung, K. L. Yeung 116. Experimental study of the dissolution rates of a simulated borosilicate waste glass as a function of pH and temperature. L. J. Calligan, Ε. Μ. Pierce 117. Biogeochemical processes controlling arsenic speciation and biotransformation in granular ferric hydroxide-coated sand. G. Jegadeesan, P. Pinto, S. R. Al-Abed, C. Impellitteri 118. Bioremediation of oil sludge in Shengli oil field. J. Dong, T-L. Wang, Z-L. Gui, J. Zhang 119. Biosorption of Rhodamine Β onto dried activated sludge: Equilibrium and kinetic modeling. C. H. Lee, D. M. An, J. H. Suh, Κ. Η. Ahn 120. Development of deodorizing apparatus with ozone/Co-catalyst for removing chemically offensive odors. J. H. Suh, W. S. Jeong, J. D. Park, C. H. Lee, Κ. Η. Ahn 121. Coagulation and flocculation conditions on high turbidity water using dissolved air flotation. C. H. Lee, D. M. An, K. H. Ahn, S. S. Kim, S. H. Cho 122. Catalytic oxidation of dimethyl sulfide with ozone and the effect of promoter and physico-chemical properties of metal oxide catalysts. V. Devulapelli, E. Sahle-Demessie 123. Catalytic reduction of carbon tetrachlo­ ride by trimetallic Pd-Fe-AI particles. C-C. Huang, H-L Lien 124. Combination of titanate nanotubes and zero-valent iron for the degradation of mixed contaminants. C-C. Lee, l-L. Kao, R-A. Doong 125. Comparison of California methylmercury bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and trans­ lators with proposed national U.S. EPA BAFs and translators for the lotie environ­ ment. J. R. Sanborn, D. G. Jones, R. K. Brodberg 126. Comparison of organic and inorganic colloidal fouling during ultrafiltration. M. Zhou, J. E. Kilduff, G. Belfort 127. Dechlorination of trichloroethylene by Fe(ll) associated with hematite/CaO. W-H. Kang, I. Hwang, J-Y. Park 128. Decontamination of water using Fentonlike reactions. V. Shah, A. Angelov, K. Loos 129. Determination of optimum conditions for removal of bisphenol A by horseradish peroxidase and their application for removal of other derivatives. K. Yamada, N. Ikeda, Y. Takano, A. Kashiwada, K. Matsuda, M. Hirata 130. Effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide for hydrogen sulfide control and induction of changes in a sulfate-reducing bacterial community. Y-J. Chang, Y-T. Chang, C-H. Hung, C-Y. Lin 131. Effects of peroxone AOP (advanced oxidation process) etching and NOM (natural organic matter) preloading on the adsorption of phenanthrene on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). H-N. Lim, J. E. Kilduff 132. Electricity generation by effective micro­ organisms in microbial fuel cell. Y. Guan, H. Sun, X. Zhang V 133. Evaluation of GAC-based iron-containing adsorbents for selenite removal. N. Zhang, L-S. Lin, D. Gang 134. Fabrication of urease-based biosensors for the detection of heavy metals using S1O2/AU core-shell particles. F-H. Lin, R-A. Doong 135. Formation of organic iodine in soil and sediment by reaction of manganese oxide with iodide. S. M. Steinberg, N. R. Birkner 136. Speciation of iodine in the salt-impacted Black Butte soil series along the Virgin River, NV. S. M. Steinberg, B. Buck, J. Morton, J. Dorman 137. High surface area niobia. A. Hagemeyer, Z. L. Hogan, C. G. Lugmair, M. Schlichter, AF.VolpeJr. 138. Homogenization studies for new soil standard reference materials (SRM) by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). R. Spatz, R. Zeisler, R. Greenberg 139. Hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene over polymer-stabilized Pt and Pd nanocatalysts under mild conditions. M. Liu, F. Gao, M. Han, W. W. Yu

ENVR

140. Investigating potential sources of envi­ ronmental perchlorate contamination. C. S. Higgins, P. R. Bowden 141. Chemical reduction of pentachlorophenol by nanoscale zero-valent iron. M-Y. Chen, Y-H. Shih 142. Linear solvation energy relationship applied to quantify the sorption role of selected volatile organic chemicals on carbon multiwall nanotubes. M-S. Li, Y-H. Shih 143. Sorption of selected volatile organic contaminants into black carbon in water. P-H. Su, Y-H. Shih 144. Mechanisms of heavy metal removal from acid mine drainage using chitin. S. R. ΑΙ-Abed, D. J. Reisman, N. Deshpande, G. Jegadeesan 145. MEMS microelectrode sensor for in situ monitoring of phosphate in biological applications. J-H. Lee, W. H. Lee, P. L. Bishop, I. Papautsky 146. Molecularly imprinted polymer nanospheres for recognition of acetaminophen and acetylsalicylic acid. S-H. Lee, R-A. Doong 147. Obtaining of chemically proof varnishpaint materials from acetylene-containing wastage. A. D. Tillyaev, R. I. Mamajanov 148. Study the catching processes of vapor of the organic solvents in fixing and drying to enamel vamish-paint materials. A. D. Tillyaev, B. Akhmedov, K. F. Khalilov 149. Ozone-activated carbon mixtures to depollute polyphenol wastewater. F. J. Beltran, I. Giraldez, J. F. Garcia-Araya, P. M. Alvarez 150. Perchlorate removal by zero-valent aluminum. H-L Lien, Y-C. Lee, C. C. Yu 151. Performance and mechanism of lead(ll) adsorption on orange peel waste. M. Iqbal, S. Schiewer 152. pH effect on hydrolysis of diazinon and diazoxon in aqueous solution. J . He, U.Jans 153. Photocatalytic degradation of volatile organic compounds and NO for indoor air purification using T i 0 2 thin films coated glass fiber air filter prepared by the reverse micellar method. W-K. Ho, S. C. Lee 154. Photoenhanced HONO production on atmospherically relevant mineral surfaces. R. J. Gustafsson, A. Orlov, P. T. Griffiths, R. A. Cox, R. M. Lambert 155. Physical solubility and diffusivity of N2O and C 0 2 in aqueous 2-amino-2-methyl-1propanol blended with piperazine solution. W-J. Choi, S-S. Lee, J-B. Seo, K-C. Cho, K-J. Oh 156. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Lake Ontario salmonid fillets and eggs. J. J. Pagano 157. PPCPs concentration fluctuations in the WWTP process. S. M. Theberge, M. Church 158. Withdrawn. 159. Protecting drinking water: The use of phytoplankton as a biosensor. J. L. Pinto, H. H. Patterson, J. M. Peckenham 160. Reactivity of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin with humic substances: Effects of solution chemistry. L. Aristilde, G. Sposito 161. Readily applicable method for caffeine detection in surface waters by optimized solid-phase extraction and capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. H. Wijnja, N. A. Gomez, 0 . C. Pancorbo 162. Reclamation of wastewater from the textile industry by nanofiltration. J-J. Qin, M. H. Oo, K. A. Kekre 163. Removal of arsenic and selenium in water using thiol-functionalized mesoporous silica material, MCM-41. P. Pal, J. Rigoli, D. Chalasani, T. Bitterwolf 164. Spectroscopic correlations involving humic substance photochemical reaction rates. R. Dalrymple, A. Carfagno, C. M. Sharpless

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

165. Studies on the lab-scale expanded granular sludge bed reactor for treating rice wine wastewater. X. Guo, W. Hu 166. Study of vertical distributive characters of 0 3 in autumn with 255m meteorological tower in Tianjin, China. S. Han, A. Liu, H. Bian, M. Sun 167. Study on the influence of process condi­ tions on the biodégradation of petroleum in soil. D-Q. Shi, J-M. Sun 168. Synthesizing nanoscale bimetallic Fe/Pd particles by microemulsion for dechlorination of trichloroethylene in water. T. Li, W. Wang, D. Wang, Z. Xiu, Y. Zhang, Z.Jin 169. Use of solar light and iron salts to remove contaminants from water. E. M. Rodriguez, B. Nunez, P. M. Alvarez, F. J. Beltran 170. Using nanomagnetic extradants for removal of uranium from water via magnetic filtration. S. M. Alfadul, A. W. Apblett

182. Effect-orientated analysis of endocrine disruptors in diesel exhaust. D. Wenger, A. C. Gereckel, N. V. Heeb, M. Zennegg, H. Naegeli, R. Zenobi 183. Withdrawn. 184. Sorption of tetracycline, fluoroquinolone and sulfonamide antibiotics to soils. R. A. Figueroa, A. A. MacKay 185. Distribution of macrolides, sulfonamides and trimethoprim in tropical and temperate waters: Comparison between Vietnam and Japan. S. Managaki, A. Murata, A. Takeshita, H. Takada, C. T. Bui 186. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soils of Pearl River Delta, China: Concentration levels, compositional profiles and fate. Y. Ran, M. Zou, J. Gong, B. Mai, E. Y. Zeng 187. Coproducts of carbon nanotube synthesis: Emerging contaminants associated with the nanomaterial revolution. D. L Plata, P. M. Gschwend, C. M. Reddy Section D

Section Β BCEC Exhibit H a l l - B 2

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Fate of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Urban Systems

Recent Developments in Sensors and Sensor Networks for Contaminants in Environmental Systems

D. E. Fennell and L. A. Totten,

C. Lee and P. L. Brezonik,

Organizers

6:00-8:00 171. Bayesian modeling of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) dechlorination in sediment for remediation decision support. A. S. Hughes, J. M. VanBriesen, M. J. Small 172. Atmospheric oxidation mechanism of bromopropane. M. Martinez-Avilés, C. M. Rosado-Reyes, J. S. Francisco 173. Photoactivity of TOPO-capped T i 0 2 nanocrystals toward the degradation of endocrine disrupting chemicals. S-M. Chang, P-H. Lo, C-Y. Hou 174. Proton affinity of methyl nitrite and methyl peroxynitrite: Implications for measuring branching ratios of alkyl nitrate and nitrites from RO + N 0 2 and R 0 2 + NO reactions. R. M. Ravelo, J. S. Francisco 175. Removal characters of disinfection byproducts and formation potential by the bioaugmentation-activated carbon process. W. Li, G. Wang, Y. Gao, J . He Section C BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Cosponsored by GEOC R. P. Eganhouse, J . A. Field, H-P. E. Kohler, and M. J . F. Suter, Organizers G. Coimbatore,

Presiding

6:00-8:00 176. Halogenated methyl bipyrroles in the Northwestern Atlantic Ocean. K. J . Smith, C. M. Reddy, T. Hofstetter 177. Evaluation of the utility of resin acids as molecular markers for tire debris. H. Kumata, M. Mori, S. Takamiya, T. Uchida, M. Tsuzuki, K. Fujiwara 178. Trans-Pacific and regional atmospheric transport of semivolatile organic compounds to Mt. Bachelor Observatory, U.S.A. from Spring 2004 to Spring 2006. T. Primbs, S. L. Simonich, G. Wilson, D. Jaffe, C. Higginbotham 179. In-planta sampling for site characterization. J. G. Burken, E. Sheehan, M. Boyd, P. Mayer, U. Karlson, C. Legind 180. Molecularly imprinted xerogels for selective extraction of tetracyclines from environmental samples. D. S. Aga, F. V. Bright, E. L. Holthoff, S. K. O'Connor 181. Assessment of concentrations and human exposure of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in outdoor and indoor air of homes and occupational settings in Greece. E. G. Stephanou, M. Mandalakis

G. Coimbatore,

Organizers

Presiding

6:00-8:00 188. Application of disposable microfabricated chip sensors for determination of cadmium, lead and zinc in a biowall system. A. Jang, Z. Zou, P-M. Wu, J. Do, J. Han, C. H. Ahn, P. L Bishop 189. Improvement of an autonomous instrument to measure aqueous p C 0 2 . S. E. Cullison, M. D. DeGrandpre, C. M. Beatty 190. Investigating the photophysical characteristics of fluorescent conjugated polymer in the solid state. S. S. Pinnock, C. Malele, W. Gui, W. E. Jones Jr. 191. Real-time monitoring of free chlorine sensor response to microbial contamination in a model distribution system. D. E. Helbling, J. M. VanBriesen 192. Segmented-flow tracer-monitored titration for total alkalinity measurements of seawater. R. Spaulding, M. D. DeGrandpre, B. Hales, J. Beck 193. SLIM spectrometer with a fiber optic sensor: Turbidity determination. W. Chudyk 194. Sonogel-carbon electrode sensor developed for detection of environmental pollutants such as PBT (persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic) chemicals. S. K. Lunsford, M. Richter, A. Yeary, D. D. Dionysiou, H. Choi, M. Palaez Section Ε BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Environmental Contaminants: Low-Level and Complex Mixtures K. G. Pennell, J . Moffit, Ε. Μ. Suuberg, and R. Vanderslice, Organizers G. Coimbatore,

Presiding

6:00-8:00 195. Active carbon as emergency treatment of Songhua River polluted by nitrobenzene. Y. Gao, W. Li, G. Wang, J . He 196. Interspecies approach to the assessment of endocrine disrupting chemicals in low dose or complex mixtures. Ν. Ε. Heger, K. Boekelheide

THURSDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm Environmental Contaminants: Low-Level and Complex Mixtures Fate and Transport Processes K. G. Pennell, J . Moffit, Ε. Μ. Suuberg, and R. Vanderslice, Organizers 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 197. Colloid-facilitated transport of pharmaceuticals in wastewater and natural waters. J. L. Zhou, K. Maskaoui, A. Hibberd 8:55 198. Anaerobic transformation of trichloroethene and trichlorofluoroethene in a continuous flow column study. L. Semprini, M. E. Dolan, M. F. Azizian 9:15 199. Application of a permeable reac­ tive biobarrier for surfactant enhanced soil bioremediation. Y. Seo, W. H. Lee, P. L. Bishop 9:35 200. Fate of synthetic musk fragrances in a conventional drinking water treatment plant with lime softening. W. Wombacher, K. C. Hornbuckle 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 201. Remediation of PFOS and PFOA: Environmental matrix and cocontaminant effects. C. D. Vecitis, H. Park, J. Cheng, Y. Wang, M. R. Hoffmann 10:30 202. Molecular mechanisms of Listeria monocytogenes' adherence to soil through surface biopolymers. N. I. Abu-Lail, B-J. Park 10:50 203. PCDD/Fs formation onto the fly ash matrix from metal-mediated catalysts. C. Lin, Y-H. Wang 11:10 204. Biodégradation of crude oil in seawater by using Pseudomonas aeruginosa. B. Yao, H. Zhang, Q. Meng 11:30 205. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of a bacterial community involved in the biodégradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the presence of nonionic surfactants. Y-T. Chang, J-F. Lee, C-H. Lin, W-Y. Yang THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Stanbro Rm Environmental Contaminants: Low-Level and Complex Mixtures Remediation Techniques and Novel Nanomaterials K. G. Pennell, J . Moffit, Ε. Μ. Suuberg, and R. Vanderslice, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 206. Nanoscale multi-electron transfer catalysts for organophosphorus pesticide degradation. W. Guo, S. O. Obare 1:55 207. Removal of metal mixtures from aqueous solutions with a spouted particu­ late electrode. P. Yao, J. Calo, G. Hradil 2:15 208. Comparison of electrospun and non-electrospun oxidized cellulose and chitosan fibrous mats serving as matrices for adsorption of heavy metal ions. D. Han, G. P. Halada, B. Spalding, S. C. Brooks 2:35 209. Sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) formation of nanocrystalline FeS for arsenic (As 3+ ) removal. R. Vannela, P. Adriaens, K. F. Hayes 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 210. Novel nanomaterial sorbents for vapor-phase mercury capture. S. Manchester, Y. Gao, I. Kulaots, L. Sarin, A. Yan, R. H. Hurt 3:30 211. Porous materials for the co-adsorption/electrosorption of arsenic and chromium species from aqueous solutions. E. Bain, J. Calo 3:50 212. Trichloroethylene remediation using nanoscale iron/silica aerosol par­ ticles. T. Zheng, J. Zhan, J. He, G. Piringer, G. McPherson, Y. Lu, V. T. John

TECH-61

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ENVR/FLUO/FUEL 4:10 213. Preparation of supported nanoscale Fe-Cu bimetallic particles for dechlo­ rination of trichloroethylene. L. Han, Z. Jin, H. Zhang, S. Huang 4:30 214. Preparation of nanoiron/PMMA composite particles with core-shell struc­ ture through emulsion polymerization for nitrate removal. W. Wang, T. Li, Z. Jin

FLUO Division of Fluorine Chemistry

9:45 14. Synthesis and properties of nanostructured fluoropolymer blends. M. Apostolo, M. Albano, G. Comino, M. Stanga 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 15. Fullerenic fluorocarbons: Synthesis, structure and properties. 0 . V. Boltalina, I. E. Kareev, N. B. Shustova, I. V. Kuvychko, A. A. Popov, L. Dunsch, S. F. Lebedkin, K. Seppelt, S. H. Strauss 11:10 16. Supercritical fluids: Ideal solvents for creating nanostructured fluorinated materials? M. A. McHugh 11:35 17. Fluorinated carbon nanostructures: Synthesis, characterization and applications. V. N. Khabashesku

11:30 29. Reactivity of 0 2 A s F 6 with graphitic carbons and the structure of C 1 4 n AsF 6 . F. Okino

11:30 44. Selective two-electron reductive defluorination of M e C B i i F i i ~ : An experimental and computational study. Y. Kobayashi, A. A. Popov, S. H. Strauss

TUESDAY AFTERNOON WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Section A BCEC 252B Novel Bonding and Structural Modalities in Inorganic Fluorine Chemistry

BCEC 252B Novel Bonding and Structural Modalities in Inorganic Fluorine Chemistry

A. R. Tressaud, B. Zemva, H. P. A. Mercier, and G. J. Schrobilgen, Organizers

A. R. Tressaud, H. P. A. Mercier, and G. J . Schrobilgen, Organizers

R. Mews and K. Christe,

H. W. Roesky,

V. A. Petrov, Program Chair MONDAY AFTERNOON SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Section A

BCEC 252B

BCEC 252B Nanostructured Fluorocarbons: Smart Tectons for Self-Assembly From Crystal Engineering and Self-Organization to Function Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW G. Resnati and P. Metrangolo,

Organizers

S. G. K. Prakash and 0 . V. Boltalina, Presiding 12:00 Introductory Remarks. 12:05 1. Fluorous nanodroplets structurally confined in an organopalladium sphere. M. Fujita 12:45 2. Coordination chemistry of fluorine in fluorocarbons. H. Plenio 1:10 3. On the effect of fluorine in mixed crystal formation by organic compounds. J. Hulliger 1:35 4. Fluorophilicity and fluorophobicity in supramolecular assemblage. T. Ono, Y. Hayakawa, H. Uekusa, N. Yasuda 2:00 5. Haloethanes: Pressure freezing, structural studies and development of "Legoland" architecture. A. Olejniczak, A. Katrusiak, A. Vij 2:25 Intermission. 2:45 6. Fluorocarbon microenvironments and phases for catalyst activation and recov­ ery. J . A. Gladysz 3:25 7. Construction of angstrom sized tunnels and their gas adsorption proper­ ties. T. Katagiri 3:50 8. Supramolecular dynamic porous networks resolve mixtures of oligomeric α,ω-diiodoperfluoroalkanes in solution and through gas-solid reactions. P. Metrangolo, G. Resnati, T. Pilati, Y. Carcenac 4:15 9. Fluorine effects on the mesogenic properties of liquid crystals for active matrix LCD. P. Kirsch 4:40 10. Toward shape-oriented separation: Transport of organic cations through fluorous bulk membrane. Q. Chu, D. P. Curran MONDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 252B Nanostructured Fluorocarbons: Smart Tectons for Self-Assembly Polymers and other Nanocarbons Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW G. Resnati and P. Metrangolo, V. A. Petrov,

Organizers

Presiding

8:15 11. Novel nanostructures from selfassembly of fluorocarbon containing block copolymers. T. P. Lodge, M. A. Hillmyer 8:55 12. Opportunities for fluorocarbons as building blocks of new micellar polymers. A. Laschewsky, J. Kristen, J-N. Marsat, M. Pâch, K. Skarabania 9:20 13. Preparation and applications of fluorinated polymeric nanocomposites. H. Sawada

62-TECH

Nanostructured Fluorocarbons: Smart Tectons for Self-Assembly Biomedicinal Nanostructures Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW G. Resnati and P. Metrangolo, J. A. Gladysz,

Organizers

Presiding

2:00 18. Fluorous phase mediated selfassembly of bioinspired functional nanostructures. V. Percec 2:40 19. Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions for molecular imaging and therapy. S. A. Wickline 3:05 20. Mechanism of the fluorinase from Streptomyces cattleya. D. O'Hagan, J. H. Naismith, X. Zhu 3:30 2 1 . Fluorinated amino acids: Modulating the metabolic stability and self-assembly properties of peptides and proteins. M. Salwiczek, T. Vagt, M. Hakelberg, B. Koksch 3:55 22. Teflon proteins: Modulating protein structure and stability using fluorous amino acids. E. N. G. Marsh, H-Y. Lee, L M. Gottler 4:20 Concluding Remarks. TUESDAY MORNING

Presiding

1:30 30. Predicting the composition, structure and surface chemistry of AIF 3 from first principles. N. M. Harrison, C. Bailey, S. Mukhopadhyay, A. Wander . 2:00 3 1 . Nanometal fluorides: Properties and prospectives. E. Kemnitz, S. Ruediger, U. Gross 2:30 32. Low-temperature form of A 2 BMF 6 elpasolites: The first example of a perovskite-derived structure with pentagonal bipyramid in the Β sublattice. A. Tressaud, J. Darriet, F-J. Zuniga 3:00 33. Existence of higher transition metal fluorides. S. Riedel, P. Pyykkô, M. Râsânen, M. Kaupp 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 34. Computational advances in predicting the behavior of metal fluorides. D. A. Dixon, R. Craciun, S. Li, M. H. Matus, D. J. Grant, J. Switzer 4:20 35. Lewis acid properties of XeOF 4 , Xe02F2, and XeO^. K. Matsumoto, H. P. A. Mercier, G. J. Schrobilgen 4:50 36. Structural diversity of coordination compounds containing xenon difluoride as ligand. B. Zemva 5:20 37. Xenon cations. K. Seppelt, S. Seidel, C. van Wuellen WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A

A. R. Tressaud, B. Zemva, and H. P. A. Mercier, Organizers

BCEC 252B Novel Bonding and Structural Modalities in Inorganic Fluorine Chemistry

F. Okino,

R. Hagiwara,

Presiding

A. R. Tressaud, Organizer,

Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 23. Some puzzling aspects of silver fluoride salts and the possibility of superconducting systems involving silver-fluorine networks. N. Bartlett 8:40 24. Tetracoordinated nitrogen-sulfurfluorine species. R. J . Mews, E. Lork, T. Borrmann, W-D. Stohrer, S. Parsons 9:10 25. Approaches to new SF 5 -containing small molecules. M. Khural, J. O. Hauptfleisch, M. D. Hennek, A. Waterfeld, J. S. Thrasher 9:40 26. Pentafluorosulfanyl- and trifluoromethyl-substituted nitrogen heterocycles. J. M. Shreeve, C. Ye, H. Xue, G. L Gard, R. W. Winter, B. Twamley 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 27. Surface structure and charge/ discharge behavior of fluorinated petroleum cokes for secondary lithium battery. T. Nakajima, K. Naga, J. Li, Y. Ohzawa, B. Zemva, Z. Mazej, A. Tressaud, E. Durand, H. Groult 11:00 28. Fluorinating agents for closocarbon clusters: Noble-gas and transitionmetal fluorides. O. V. Boltalina, S. H. Strauss, Ν. Β. Shustova, 1. V. Kuvychko, Z. Mazej, B. Zemva, K. Seppelt, S. Seidel

Presiding

1:30 45. Recent studies on fluorohydrogenate ionic liquids. R. Hagiwara 2:00 46. Fluorine chemistry can lead you in unanticipated directions. D. D. DesMarteau 2:30 47. Electrochemical fluorination (Simons process): A powerful tool for the synthesis of new highly fluorinated compounds. N. V. Ignat'ev, P. Sartori, H. Willner 3:00 48. Electrochemical synthesis and application of NF 3 . A. Tasaka 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 49. Xenon difluoride as a ligand in cadmium hexafluoroantimonate system. G. Tavcar, B. Zemva 4:20 50. Fluoro-organo onium salts of xenon(ll) and iodine(V). H-J. Frohn, V. Bardin, V. Bilir, M. Hirschberg, A. Wenda 4:50 5 1 . Sulfur nitrogen fluoride cations of xenon(ll) and prospects for the syntheses of new Kr-N bonds; the synthesis and structure of FXeON0 2 ; and the fluoride ion donor-acceptor properties of XeOF 2 . G. J. Schrobilgen, D. S. Brock, H. P. A. Mercier, M. D. Moran, G. L. Smith 5:20 Concluding Remarks.

Division of Fuel Chemistry J. J. Helble, Program Chair

Presiding

SOCIAL EVENT: G. J . Schrobilgen, Organizer,

B. Zemva, H. P. A. Mercier, and G. J . Schrobilgen, Organizers

B. Zemva, Organizer,

FUEL

BCEC 252B Novel Bonding and Structural Modalities in Inorganic Fluorine Chemistry

Section A

Presiding

Presiding

8:10 38. Chemical bonding in aluminofluorides through solid state NMR determination and ab initio calculation of 2 7 AI EFG. C. Legein, M. Body, J-Y. Buzaré, C. Martineau, G. Silly 8:40 39. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of xenon and iodine fluorides. M. Gerken, A. Abo-Amer, P. Hazendonk, A. luga, J. P. Mack, J. Nieboer, G. J. Schrobilgen, M. Tramsek, B. Zemva 9:10 40. Structural features of new La and Ce-based mixed anions (F,0,S) systems. A. Demourgues 9:40 Intermission. 10:00 4 1 . Why did all attempts to make (CF 3 ) 2 NO + fail? K. O. Christe, R. Haiges 10:30 42. CaF 2 : The mother of all fluorine compounds. H. W. Roesky 11:00 43. Fluoroalkylated and fluorinated icosahedral C B n ( - ) carborate anions. B. R. King, M. G. Fete, J. Budin, P. J. Schreiber, J . Michl

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Dinner: Tue BUSINESS M E E T I N G S : Business Meeting: Tue Executive Committee Meeting: Sun Program Chairs Meeting: Sun SUNDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production: Perspectives on Hydrogen Generation R. Shandross and B. Wilhite,

Organizers

8:55 Introductory Remarks. 9:00 1. Hydrogen production: Pathways and status. R. Garland, S. M. Schlasner 9:40 2. Distributed reforming of bio-oil for hydrogen production. R. J . Evans, J. R. Marda, S. Czernik, A. M. Dean, R. J. French, M. A. Ratcliff 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 3. Low lifecycle cost natural gas reforming for fuel cell forklift market application. A. K. Sharma 10:45 4. Hydrocarbon reforming for pure H2 production in catalytic membrane reactors. J. H. Meldon 11:10 5. Optimization of anaerobic hydrogen production from organic wastewater: Engineering and microbiology aspects. Y. Sharma, B. Li

FUEL

11:35 Concluding Remarks.

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Section Β

Section A

Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm

Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm

Characterization of Fossil and BioFuels: Challenges and Progress F. Huggins,

Organizer

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 6. Thermodynamic effects of adding heteroatoms to anthracene as measured by the Knudsen effusion technique. J. L. Goldfarb, Ε. Μ. Suuberg 8:55 7. Identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the supercritical pyrolysis of Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel S-8 by means of HPLC/UV/MS and annellation theory. J . O. Ona, M. J. Womat 9:20 8. Preliminary compositional analysis of biodiesel particulate matter. M. Chai, A. Tzillah, M. Lu 9:45 9. Thermochemical conversion: A dual tool for bio-oil production and a solution to environmental waste disposal. F. A. Agblevor, S. Beis, S-S. Kim, R. Tarrant, O. Mante 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 10. Characterization of biodiesels and fossil fuels and correlations between fuel structures and combustion emission. H. R. Zhang, Z. Cha, E. G. Eddings, A. F. Sarofim 10:55 11. Estimation of physicochemical parameters of Brazilian commercial gaso­ line using gas chromatography and partial least square regression. D. L. Flumignan, F. D. O. Ferreira, A. G. Tininis, J. E. de Oliveira 11:20 12. Experimental and mechanism studies on simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification from coal combustion catalyzed by nano-titanium oxide. S. Wang, Y. Zhao 11:45 13. Determination of sulfate and chlo­ ride in ethanol used as a blending agent in gasoline. K. Chassaniol, B. DeBorba

D. Shekhawat, D. A. Berry, and J. J . Spivey, Organizers 1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 22. Deactivation of fuel reforming catalysts. J . J . Spivey 2:10 23. Withdrawn. 2:35 24. Liquid fuel reforming using catalytic membrane reactors. D. S. Jack, J. H. White, J. A. Trimboli, C. G. Burk, S. L. Rolfe, D. H. Anderson, M. V. Mundschau 3:00 25. Catalytic partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels: Structural characterization of Ni-substituted hexaaluminate catalysts. T. H. Gardner, D. Shekhawat, D. Berry, A. Campos, A. D. Roy, M. Smith, D. Haynes, E. L. Kugler, J. J. Spivey 3:25 Intermission. 3:35 26. Catalytic partial oxidation of n-tetradecane on Rh and Sr substituted pyrochlores. D. Haynes, D. Berry, D. Shekhawat, T. H. Gardner, J. J. Spivey 4:00 27. Iso-octane partial oxidation over Ni-Sn/Ceo.75Zro.2502 catalysts. V. Meeyoo, S. Pengpanich, T. Rirksomboon, J. Schwank 4:25 28. Synthesis gas production via catalytic partial oxidation reforming of liquid fuels. P. K. Cheekatamarla, C. M. Finnerty 4:50 29. Hydrogen generation by catalytic reforming of motor oils in an integrated fuel cell processor. K-S. Lin, K-J. Wu, C-T. Yeh, C-C. Shen 5:15 Concluding Remarks. Section Β Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm

Section C Boston Park Plaza Cambridge Rm

BioFuels: Biodiesel Chemistry and Implementation Cosponsored by AGRO

Fuel Cell Technology: Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems J. M. Fenton and V. Ramani,

Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production: Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels Catalytic Partial Oxidation

Organizers

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 14. Proton conductivity of poly(vinylphosphonic acid). G. Wegner, B. Bingôl, Y. J. Lee, W. H. Meyer, H. W. Spiess 8:55 15. Water-free proton conducting polysiloxanes: Combining mobile polymer matrices and weakly basic heterocycles. S. Granados-Focil, R. C. Woudenberg, 0 . Yavuzcetin, M. T. Tuominen, E. B. Coughlin 9:20 16. Molecular design and synthesis of benzimidazole-based model compound for development of regular proton transferring system. P. Totsatitpaisan 9:45 17.4-Vinylimidazole-co-acrylic acid copolymer: An approach to develop nonaqueous proton transferring system in polymer electrolyte membrane. M. Jithunsa, K. Tashiro, S. Chirachanchai 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 18. Novel polysilsesquioxane hybrid membranes for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. G. J. D. Kalaw, J. P. Ferraris, 1. H. Musselman, K. Balkus Jr., D-J. Yang 10:45 19. Nanoscale current imaging of the conducting channels in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. J. R. O'Dea, D. A. Bussian, H. Metiu, S. K. Buratto 11:10 20. Tailoring the structure of composite proton conducting membranes through applied electric fields. D. Liu, X. Wei, Y-G. Kim, M. Z. Yates 11:35 2 1 . Layer-by-layer assembled proton exchange membranes for fuel cells. J. N. Ashcraft, A. A. Argun, P. T. Hammond

N. E. Leadbeater and R. S. Parnas, Organizers 1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 30. Biodiesel production from canola oil and waste fryer grease and conversion of glycerol to value-added liquid chemicals. A. K. Dalai, T. Issariyakul, M. G. Kulkami, K. Pathak, L. C. Meher, Ν. Ν. Bakhshi 1:50 3 1 . Biodiesel from soapstock. E. S. Olson, R. K. Sharma, T. R. Aulich 2:10 32. Kinetics of soybean oil transesterification in a batch system. R. S. Parnas, J. D. Stuart, B. Wilhite, S-Y. li, C. weed, M. Boucher 2:30 33. Evaluation of partially hydrogenated soybean oil methyl esters as biodiesel. B. R. Moser 2:50 34. Testing biodiesel samples according to ASTM methods. J. D. Stuart 3:10 35. Novel heterogeneous esterification and transesterification catalysts for produc­ ing low-cost biodiesel from high-FFA feedstocks. Y. Gao 3:30 Intermission. 3:40 36. Catalytic production of biodiesel from high fatty acid-containing feedstocks. W. Lin, N. A. Zafiropoulos, H. L. Ngo, E. T. Samulski, T. A. Foglia

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

4:00 37. Designing a biodiesel fuel with optimized fatty acid composition. G. Knothe 4:20 38. Study of Mg-AI hydrotalcite derived catalysts for biodiesel synthesis from poultry fat. E. Lotero, Y. Liu, J. G. Goodwin Jr. 4:40 39. Synthesis and characterization of a novel solid acid catalyst for improved biodiesel production. H. F. Webster, S. R. Hash, C. S. Estes 5:00 40. Solid acid catalyst prepared from polysaccharid and glucose. G. Chen 5:20 4 1 . Study on combustion performances of a new rapeseed oil monoester as biodiesel. H. Guo, D. Jiang, G. Li, X. Wang 5:40 Concluding Remarks.

Boston Park Plaza Cambridge Rm Fuel Cell Technology: Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems Organizers

1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 42. Alkaline anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AMFCs). R. C. T. Slade 1:55 43. Effect of relative humidity on the stabilized Nafion/phosphotungstic acid composite membranes during fabrication process. R. Agarwal, N. Mohajeri, D. K. Slattery, J. Baik, J. M. Fenton 2:20 44. SPEEK/functionalized silica com­ posite membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: S. K. Sambandam, V. Ramani 2:45 45. Structure and properties of stretched recast Nafion. J . Lin, P-H. Wu, R. Wycisk, P. N. Pintauro 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 46. Fundamental study of the degrada­ tion of PFSA membrane in Fenton's reagent. H. Zhao, X. Huang, R. A. Weiss 3:45 47. Chemical durability studies of PFSA polymers and model compounds: The proposed mechanism of degradation. D. A. Schiraldi, C. Zhou, A. Guha, T. A. Zawodzinski Jr. 4:10 48. Passive microchannel humidifier for PEM fuel cell water management. W. Tegrotenhuis, C. A. Lavender, V. S. Stenkamp, B. Q. Roberts, S. K. Weil 4:35 49. Self-humidification of PEM fuel cells by internal humidity exchanger. P. Choi, V. Mittal, J. Baik, D. K. Slattery, L. J. Bonville, H. R. Kunz, J. M. Fenton 5:00 50. Nanoacid functionalized silica Nafion composite membranes for PEMFC operating at elevated temperature/low relative humidity. K. Wang, S. McDermid, J. Li, N. Kremliakova, P. Kozak, C. Song, Y. Tang, J. Zhang, J. Zhang Legal and Policy Aspects of Greenhouse Gases Sponsored by CHAL, Cosponsored by FUEL MONDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production: Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels System Analysis D. Shekhawat and D. A. Berry,

Section Β Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm BioFuels: Renewable Liquid Fuels & Chemicals from Biomass Cosponsored by AGRO and PETR

Section C

J. M. Fenton and V. Ramani,

10:25 Intermission. 10:35 55. Direct fuel conversion using a Liquid Tin Anode SOFC. J. Bentley, T. Tao, M. Koslowske 11:00 56. Performance of an integrated SR fuel processor fed with hydrocarbon fuels. S. Specchia, G. J. Fontana, G. Saracco, V. Specchia 11:25 57. Pressure Swing Reforming of liquid fuels for hydrogen production. R. F. Socha, P. J. Berlowitz, F. Hershkowitz, R. P. Lucchesi 11:50 Panel Discussion.

Organizers

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 5 1 . The U. S. Department of Energy Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program: Goals and challenges. W. A. Surdoval 9:10 52. Liquid fuel processor and PEM fuel cell power plant for vehicles. B. J. Bowers, J. L. Zhao, M. Ruffo, D. Dattatraya, V. Sweetland, P-F. Quet, N. Dushman, Y. Shi, J. McAulay, I. Alberti, A. Conti, J-C. Beziat 9:35 53. Multifuel reformer for both PEM and solid oxide fuel cells. P. M. Irving, J. S. Pickles, Q. Ming 10:00 54. JP8 fueled SOFC power system. M. Onischak, C. Sishtla, C. Brown, J. Dueck, F. H. Holcomb

P. O'Connor, C. Leclerc, D. C. Dayton, J . E. Holladay, and J . E. Holladay, Organizers 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 58. Ethanol: A green raw material for the petrochemical industry. A. R. Pinho, J. A. R. Cabrai, L. F. Leite 8:30 59. Alkaline hydrothermal conversion of carbohydrate biomass into formic acid at mild temperatures. F. Jin, J. Yun, G. Li, A. Kishita, H. Enomoto, K. Tohji 8:50 60. Ni-olivine catalysts prepared by direct thermal diffusion of Ni into olivine: Applications for biomass gasification. L. G. Felix, C. W. Choi, R. B. Slimane, D. M. Rue, S. L. Swartz, U. S. Ozkan, J. Kuhn, Z. Zhao 9:10 6 1 . Conversion of gylcerol to gasoline over acidic zeolites and Pd/ZnO catalysts . T. Hoang, T. Danuthai, L L Lobban, D. E. Resasco, R. G. Mallinson 9:30 62. Production of hydrogen from bio­ mass: Integrated biological and thermo­ chemical approach. S. M. Swami, P. Ayyappan, M. Abraham 9:50 63. Sustainable energy and chemical sciences collaboration in biomass conver­ sion research between the US and Brazil. B. Miller 10:10 Winner of the Brazilian poster competi­ tion on bioconversion energy. 10:25 64. Promoter effects on the reactivity of Rhodium based catalysts for conversion of biomass-derived syngas to ethanol. A. A. Egbebi, J. J. Spivey 10:45 65. Renewable FT-Liquids using Fe and Fe-Co catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes with novel catalyst docking stations. U. M. Graham, R. A. Khatri, A. Dozier, N. J. Coville, M. C. Bahome, L. L. Jewell, Β. Η. Davis 11:05 66. Renewable hydrogen and chemi­ cals from polyols. B. Liu, Y. Zhang, J. W. Tiemey, I. Wender 11:25 67. Co-processing in FCC units: Cata­ lytic co-cracking of hydrocarbons and oxygenated biomass compounds. Y. Schuurman, M. E. Domine, A. C. Van Veen, C. Mirodatos 11:45 68. Millisecond catalytic conversion of nonvolatile carbohydrates for sustainable fuels. P. J. Dauenhauer, B. J. Dreyer, J. L. Colby, L. D. Schmidt 12:05 Concluding Remarks. Section C Boston Park Plaza Hancock Rm Fuel Cell Technology: Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems J. M. Fenton and V. Ramani,

Organizers

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 69. New generation carbon-oxide semi­ conductor-noble metal catalysts for PEM fuel cell applications. K. Rajeshwar, N. R. de Tacconi, C. R. Chenthamarakshan, W. Wampler, T. Carlson, W-Y. Lin 8:30 70. Plasma surface modification of carbon catalyst support systems to enhnace PEM fuel cell performance. D. H. Weinkauf, M. Hickner

TECH-63

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

FUEL 8:55 7 1 . The use of polyoxometallates in fuel cell catalyst layers. A. M. Herring, R. J. Stanis, J. R. Ferrell III, M. C. Kuo, J. A. Turner 9:20 72. Nanostructured hybrid electrocatalysts for degradation mitigation in PEFCs. P. Trogadas, V. Ramani 9:45 73. Oxygen reduction reaction kinetics in subfreezing PEM fuel cells. E. L. Thompson, J. Jorne, H. Gasteiger 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 74. Importance of cathode kinetics on membrane material selection. H. R. Kunz, H. Xu, V. Mittal, P. Choi, J. M. Fenton 10:45 75. Analysis of palladium based anode electrode using electrochemical imped­ ance spectra in direct formic acid fuel cells. S. Ha, W. S. Jung, J. Han 11:10 76. Effect of low anode catalyst load­ ings on automotive PEM fuel cell start/stop durability. P. T. Yu, W. Gu, F. T. Wagner, H. Gasteiger 11:35 77. Mitigation of cathode carbon corrosion using sacrificial carbon layer in PEM fuel cells. J. Zhang, J. Owejan, M. Fay, B. A. Litteer, P. T. Yu, W. Gu, H. A. Gasteiger 12:00 78. Novel Bronsted acid-base com­ plexes for PEM fuel cells. A. Chacko, J. P. Ferraris, K. J. Balkus Jr., I. H. Musselman Section D Boston Park Plaza Chartes River Room Coal Conversion to Clean Liquid and Gaseous Fuels Cosponsored by PETR

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production: Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels Steam/dry Reforming D. Shekhawat and D. A. Berry,

Section Β

G. P. Huffman, D. B. Dadyburjor, and R. D. Ernst, Organizers

Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm

8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 79. Effects of supercritical fluid extrac­ tion on the activity and selectivty of Fischer Tropsch catalysts. E. Durham, M. Bordawekar, C. B. Roberts 8:40 80. Thirty years of synfuels research at the CAER. Β. Η. Davis 9:20 8 1 . Upgrading Fischer-Trospch waxes into jet/diesel fuels on anion-modified zirconia. Y. Zhang, Z. Zhou, J. W. Tierney, I. Wender 9:40 82. Gas phase incorporation of palla­ dium onto iron aerogels for water gas shift catalysis. S. Bali, G. C. Turpin, E. Fillerup, E. M. Eyring, R. D. Ernst, R. Pugmire 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 83. Computational design of novel sorbent materials for IGCC H2S removal and process intensification. R. B. Rankin, J. K. Johnson, D. S. Sholl, H. Tian, R. Siriwardane, A. Campos, J. J. Spivey, A. D. Roy 10:30 84. Development of coal-based jet fuel. C. B. Clifford, H. H. Schobert 11:10 85. Direct liquefaction of coal using low hydrogénation levels. Ε. Β. Kennel, A. H. Stiller, J. W. Zondlo, R. C. Svensson 11:30 86. Integrating coal-to-liquid processes into refinery processes. C. E. Burgess, O. Gul, J. M. Griffith, P. Gafarova, G. D. Mitchell, M. M. Escallon, U. Suriapraphadilok, H. Schobert 11:50 87. Improved catalytic activity with gas-phase incorporated palladium on ceria for the water-gas shift reaction. G. C. Turpin, B. C. Dunn, E. Fillerup, Y. Shi, P. Dutta, V. Singh, M. S. Seehra, R. J. Pugmire, E. M. Eyring, R. D. Ernst

Biofuels: Lignocellulosic Biofuels Cosponsored by AGRO

Legal and Policy Aspects of Greenhouse Gases Sponsored by CHAL, Cosponsored by FUEL Sterling Hendricks Memorial Lectureship Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by FUEL and AGFD

Organizers

1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 88. Dry reforming of diesel fuels. S. Roychoudhury, D. Spence, D. Walsh, J. DesJardins, C. Morgan, R. Mastanduno 1:55 89. Ni-alloy catalysts for hydrocarbon steam reforming: Formulation of novel catalysts guided by molecular insights. E. Nikolla, S. Unie 2:20 90. Steam reforming of liquid hydrocar­ bon fuels over noble metal modified Nibased catalysts. D. H. Kim, J. S. Kang, Y. J. Lee, N. K. Park, Y. C. Kim, S. I. Hong, D. J. Moon 2:45 9 1 . Catalysis studies for hydrogen production by metallic heat exchangercoated catalysts. Y. Shi, J. van Plet 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 92. Activity and stability of Molybdenum Carbide for Isooctane steam reforming. S. Ha, O. Marin Flores 3:45 93. Mechanism for steam reforming of aliphatic hydrocarbons with nonthermal plasma. S. Futamura, T. Terasawa, M. Sugasawa 4:10 Concluding Remarks.

L. R. Lynd and R. C. Brown,

Organizers

1:15 Introductory Remarks, R. Brown. 1:30 94. Breaking the chemical and engi­ neering barriers to lignocellulosic biofuels. G. W. Huber 1:55 95. Life cycle evaluation of pretreatment options for lignocellulosic ethanol. S. Spatari, Y. Zhang, H. L. MacLean 2:20 96. Metabolic profile of wild-type and ethanol-adapted Clostridium thermocellum in continuous culture. S. Jujjuri, B. L. Knutson, A. Thakur, B. Lynn, E. Dittert, S. Nokes, H. Strobel 2:45 97. Simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation of paper sludge to ethanol by recombinant xylose-fermenting microbes. J. Zhang, L. R. Lynd 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 Introductory Remarks, L. Lynd. 3:30 98. Maleic acid catalyzed cellulosic biomass hydrolysis: A mechanistic study of catalysis for advanced feedstock fraction­ ation. Y. Lu, N. S. Mosier 3:55 99. Performance of a first-generation, aqueous-alkaline biocarbon fuel cell. M. J. Antal Jr., T. Nunoura, K. Dowaki, C. Fushimi, S. G. Allen, E. Mészâros 4:20 100. Effects of calcium carbonate on the partial oxidation of catechol. J. A. Robles, M. J. Wornat 4:45 101. Can ionic liquids dissolve cellulose but not deactivate enzymes? H. Zhao, G. A. Baker, Z. Song, O. Olubajo, D. Peters, E. Goins, T. Crittle Section C Boston Park Plaza Cambridge Rm Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technology D. A. Dixon and D. L. Thorn,

Organizers

1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 102. Status of vehicular hydrogen storage. S. Satyapal, C. Read, G. Ordaz, G. Thomas, J. Petrovic 2:10 103. Hydrogen storage in azaheterocyclic organic liquids. R. Crabtree, O. Eisenstein, E. Clot

64-TECH

2:50 104. Chemical hydrogen storage at Los Alamos. J. C. Gordon, R. T. Baker, A. K. Burrell, B. L. Davis, H. V. Diyabalanage, C. W. Hamilton, M. Inbody, K. K. Jonietz, K. C. Ott, V. Pons, T. A. Semelsberger, R. Shrestha, F. H. Stephens, D. L. Thorn, W. Tumas 3:30 Intermission. 3:55 105. Direct hydrogénation of aluminum at low pressure. J. Graetz, J. J. Reilly, J. E. Wegrzyn 4:35 106. Discovery of new destabilized hydrides for reversible hydrogen storage using first principles calculations. D. Sholl, S. Alapati, B. Dai, J. K. Johnson Section D Boston Park Plaza Chartes River Room Coal Conversion to Clean Liquid and Gaseous Fuels Cosponsored by PETR G. P. Huffman, D. B. Dadyburjor, and R. D. Ernst, Organizers 1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 107. Conversion of coal and biomass to clean burning DME. N. Reed, J. Clark, G. K. Lilik, Q. Li, C. Wang, A. L. Boehman 2:10 108. DoD Assured Fuels Initiative update. T. Edwards, W. E. Harrison III 2:50 109. An investigation of aviation components material compatibility with blends of a Fischer-Tropsch-derived jet fuel with petroleum-derived jet fuels. J. L. Graham, D. Minus 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 110. Effect of catalysts on carbonassisted water electrolysis to produce H2 at room temperature. M. S. Seehra, S. Bollineni, S. Ranganathan, P. Dutta 3:40 111. Partial oxidation and total oxidation in the reforming of hydrocarbons to hydrogen. T. K. Das, D. B. Dadyburjor, E. L Kugler 4:00 112. Development of dense membranes for hydrogen production from coal. U. Balachandran, T. H. Lee, L. Chen, J. J. Picciolo, J. E. Emerson, S. E. Dorris 4:20 113. Nanoparticle catalysts for the production of CO-free hydrogen and carbon nanotubes by non-oxidative dehydrogenation of methane. W. Shen, N. Shah, F. E. Huggins, G. P. Huffman 4:40 114. Systematic framework for economic evaluation of hydrogen production strategies. K. H. McGlocklin, N. E. Sammons Jr., W. Yuan, J. L. Wilder, M. R. Eden 5:00 115. Characteristics of copper based catalysts for methanol to H2 conversion. P. Dutta, F. Shi, Y. Zhang, I. Wender, M. S. Seehra BioFuels: Renewable Liquid Fuels & Chemicals from Biomass Sponsored by PETR, Cosponsored by FUEL M O N D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Sci-Mix New Developments in Energy and Fuels J. J . Helble,

Presiding

8:00-10:00 9-10, 25, 32, 36, 46, 53, 56, 75, 78, 87, 91-92,109,113. See previous listings. 118,123-124,130,139,143,148,150,187, 192,198-199, 204, 210, 212, 220, 238, 240, 250, 260, 262, 265, 270, 279, 281. See subsequent listings.

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

TUESDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production: Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels Autothermal Reforming D. Shekhawat and D. A. Berry,

Organizers

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 116. Challenges in hydrocarbon reforming for fuel cell applications. M. Krumpelt 8:45 117. ATR Reforming of tetradecane (C14H30): A mechanistic explanation. Mi J. Castaldi, L. Dorazio 9:10 118. Rhodium supported on thermally enhanced zeolite as catalysts fuel reformation of jet fuels. I. C. Lee 9:35 119. Sulfur deactivation of nickel-ceriazirconia catalysts during autothermal reforming of model fuels. J. M. Mayne, A. R. Tadd, J. Schwank 10:00 120. Study on performance of diesel autothermal reforming for solid oxide fuel cell. I-Y. Kang, S-H. Yoon, J-M. Bae, D-H. Lee, Y-H. Song 10:25 Intermission. 10:35 121. Fuel processor system of gasoline for polymer electrolyte membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) Applications. D. J. Moon, J. W. Ryu, K. S. Y00, S. D. Lee 11:00 122. Production of synthesis gas by reforming of gasoline over metal modified ni-based catalyst. J. W. Ryu, D. H. Kim, E. H. Choi, G. T. Gong, H. Lee, B. G. Lee, D. J . Moon 11:25 123. Liquid petroleum-based thermoneutral reforming (TNR) with multicomponent catalysts for hydrogen rich gas production. F. I. Al-Muhaish, S. Ahmed, M. A. Siddiqui, T. V. Pham, B. O. Dabbousi, T. Inui 11:50 124. Washcoating copper catalysts onto microchannel reactors for autothermal reforming of methanol. K-S. Lin, C-H. Leu, C-C. Shen, C-Y. Pan, C-T. Yeh 12:15 Concluding Remarks. Section Β Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm Fuel Cell Technology: Biofuel Cells, Enzymatic and Microbial Microbial Fuel Cells Cosponsored by ENVR P. Atanassov, J . M. Andresen, B. E. Logan, and G. T. R. Palmore, Organizers 8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 125. Systems biology and adaptive evolution approaches to understanding and increasing power output of microbial fuel cells. D. R. Lovley, K. P. Nevin 8:55 126. Isolation and electrochemical activity evaluation of electricity generated bacteria. H. Lee, X. Wang, Y. Yu, F. Gao, Y. Feng 9:15 127. Performance of different strains of the senus Shewanella in a microbial fuel cell. A. C. M. Cheung, O. Bretschger, F. Mansfeld, Κ. Η. Nealson 9:35 128. Enhancing initial bacterial adhe­ sion to electrode materials in microbial fuel cell (MFC). D. Jiang, B. Li 9:55 Intermission. 10:05 129. Progress and challenges in scale up of electrogenic reactors such as micro­ bial fuel cells. B. Logan, S. Cheng, V. Watson 10:25 130. Enhanced power generation of air cathode microbial fuel cells with cloth electrode assembly. H. Liu, Y. Fan, H. Hu 10:45 131. Scalable tubular membrane cathodes for microbial fuel cell applica­ tions. Y. Zuo, S. Cheng, D. F. Call, B. Logan 11:05 132. Single chamber stackable micro­ bial fuel cell with air cathode. J-l. Han, B. Wang 11:25 133. Direct electron transfer in micro­ bial fuel cells via carbon nanotube net­ work. P. Takhistov

FUEL 4:20 150. Low temperature plasma desulfu­ rization of JP-5. J. Hunt, P. Ricatto, H. Ghezel-Ayagh, K. H. Becker, G. Steinfeld 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

Section C Boston Park Plaza Cambridge Rm Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technology D. A. Dixon and D. L. Thorn,

Section Β

Organizers

8:55 Introductory Remarks. 9:00 134. High accuracy computational studies of boron-nitrogen compounds for chemical hydrogen storage. M. H. Matus, D. J. Grant, S. V. Nguyen, K. D. Anderson, M. T. Nguyen, D. A. Dixon 9:40 135. Catalytic dehydrogenation of amine-borane adducts. I. Manners 10:20 Intermission. 10:30 136. New catalysts for dehydrogena­ tion of amine boranes. D. M. Heinekey, D. Mery, M. C. Denney, K. I. Goldberg, B. L. Dietrich, N. A. Bennette, T. Hebden 11:10 137. Toward regenerating ammonia borane from spent fuel. D. M. Camaioni, D. J. Heldebrant, J. C. Linehan, W. J. Shaw, J. Li, D. L. DuBois, T. Autrey Section D Boston Park Plaza Chartes River Room Mercury and Trace Metal Transformations: Modeling S. Niksa and S. Benson,

Organizers

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 138. Thermal desorption and speciation of mercury in fly ash. J. Li, Y. Yuan, M. M. Maroto-Valer 8:55 139. Oxidation of mercury during selec­ tive catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. G.Tong 9:20 140. Modeling bench-scale homoge­ neous Hg oxidation and development of rate constant for HgBr decomposition. B. Krishnakumar, J. J. Helble 9:45 141. Predicting Hg emissions rates from coal-fired utility gas cleaning systems. C. V. Naik, B. Krishnakumar, S. Niksa 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 142. Preliminary estimation of sele­ nium emission from coal combustion in China, 2004. H. Tian, D. Pan 10:45 143. Dynamic behavior of alkali metals during heat treatments of coals. K. Sugawara, T. Kato, T. Sugawara 11:10 144. Arsenic removal by polysilicate aluminum ferric chloride in wastewater. Q. Li, L. Wang

Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm Fuel Cell Technology: Biofuel Cells, Enzymatic and Microbial Microbial Fuel Cells Cosponsored by ENVR P. Atanassov, J . M. Andresen, Β. Ε. Logan, and G. T. R. Palmore, Organizers 1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 151. Bioanode kinetics modeling: Effect of anode potential and substrate concen­ tration. H. Hamelers 1:55 152. Electrochemical impedance spec­ troscopy studies on microbial fuel cells. R. P. Ramasamy, Z. Ren, M. Mench, J. Regan 2:15 153. Continuous flow microbial fuel cells for sustainable energy from wastewater. J. M. Andresen, H. Hu 2:35 154. High hydrogen yield from renew­ able resources using an improved beamr system. S. Cheng, Β. Ε. Logan 2:55 155. Model of microbial fuel cells in which bacteria employ a direct electron transfer strategy. T. Shimotori, D. R. Bond, T. M. LaPara, R. M. Hozalski 3:15 156. Electrochemical and molecularbiological analyses of microbial fuel cells operated at different external resistances. T. Shimotori, E. Marsili, M. P. Drozdowicz, D. R. Bond, R. M. Hozalski, T. M. LaPara 3:35 Intermission. 3:45 157. Toward the naval applications of benthic microbial fuel cells. P. R. Bandyopadhyay, D. Thivierge, A. Fredette 4:05 158. Importance of cathode size in microbial benthic fuel cells equipped with manganese anode. D. Lowy, L. M. Tender 4:25 159. Power output assessment of cellulose-based microbial fuel cells operat­ ing under different external resistances. H. Rismani-Yazdi, A. D. Christy, Ο. Η. Tuovinen 4:45 160. Examining the efficiency and biogeochemistry of plankton-fed microbial fuel cells. C. E. Reimers, H. A. Stecher III, H. K. White, P. Girguis 5:05 Panel Discussion. 5:20 Concluding Remarks. Section C

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Boston Park Plaza Cambridge Rm

Section A

Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technology

Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm

D. A. Dixon and D. L. Thorn,

Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production: Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels Desulfurization D. Shekhawat and D. A. Berry,

Organizers

1:45 Introductory Remarks. 1:50 145. Challenges in developing sulfurtolerant catalysts for low-temperature reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels for fuel cells. C. Song 2:30 146. A compact JP-8 desulfurization process. X. Huang, D. A. King, F. Zheng, V. S. Stenkamp, W. Tegrotenhuis, D. L. King 2:55 147. Oxidative desulfurization of jet fuel with low-cost materials. D. A. Pena, A. S. Chellappa, Z. C. Wilson 3:20 Intermission. 3:30 148. Production of ultralow sulfur con­ centration diesel by reactive sulfur adsorp­ tion on metallic nickel nanoparticles sup­ ported on mesoporous silica. C. H. Ko, J-H. Park, K. B. Yi, S-S. Han, S-H. Cho, J-N. Kim 3:55 149. Desulfurization of commercial gasoline and diesel by adsorption with Cu(l)-Y zeolite and 7-AI 2 0 3 . K-S. Lin, K-J. Wu, C-T. Yeh, C-C. Shen

Organizers

1:10 Introductory Remarks. 1:15 161. Ammonia borane complex thermolysis-borazine capture utilizing solid sorbents. N. Mohajeri, G. Bokerman, Κ. Κ. Ramasamy, A. T-Raissi 1:40 162. Functionalizing and characterizing SWNTs potentially useful in energy stor­ age. D. J. Nelson, H. L. Rhoads, C. N. Brammer 2:05 163. Investigation of new amine-borane adducts with potential hydrogen storage applications. A. Staubitz, M. Besora, G. R. Whittell, J. N. Harvey, I. Manners 2:30 164. Effect of additives on the thermoly­ sis of ammonia borane. D. J. Heldebrant, T. Autrey, J. C. Linehan, D. M. Camaioni, S. D. Rassat, F. Zheng 2:55 165. Factors influencing the ammonia borane thermolysis. Κ. Κ. Ramasamy, G. Bokerman, N. Mohajeri, A. T. Raissi 3:20 Intermission. 3:30 166. Computational study of surface reaction kinetics and poisoning of metal hydrides. B. Dai, D. Sholl, J. K. Johnson 3:55 167. Microporous polymers for hydro­ gen storage applications. C. D. Wood, B. Tan, E. Stockel, R. Kirk, M. J. Rosseinsky, D. Bradshaw, Y. Khimyak, H. Niu, A. Trewin, J. Jiang, F. Su, A. I. Cooper

4:20 168. Effects of pore size on the adsorp­ tion of hydrogen in slit pores of constant width and varying height. J. T. Culp, S. Natesakhawat, M. R. Smith, E. W. Bittner, C. Matranga, B. C. Bockrath 4:45 169. "Naked fluoride" binding sites for physisorptive hydrogen storage. A. Trewin, G. R. Darling, A. I. Cooper 5:10 170. Synthesis and characterization of binary/ternary alloy nanoparticles as fuel cell catalysts. P. N. Njoki, J. Luo, B. Khan, S. Mishra, R. Sujakumar, L Wang, C-J. Zhong 5:35 171. Nitrogen-containing amorphous microporous carbon material preparation for cathode catalyst. A. Kozlov, C. Bamakov, Z. Ismagilov, M. Kerzhentsev Section D Boston Park Plaza Chartes River Room Inorganic Membranes for Energy and Environmental Applications Ion-transport Membranes (ITM), Porous Membranes, Novel Concepts A. C. Bose and Y. H. Ma,

Organizers

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 172. ITM ceramic membrane technol­ ogy to produce synthesis gas. C. F. Miller, M. F. Carolan, C. M. Chen, E. Minford, W. E. Waldron, J. J. Steppan 1:30 173. Joining of ion transport mem­ branes using a novel transient liquid phase process. D. P. Butt, P. G. Callahan 1:55 174. Metal-organic-framework-based membranes for the separation of light gases. M. Schwartz, J. T. Culp, M. R. Smith, B. C. Bockrath 2:20 175. Ceramic composite membrane for hydrogen separation. S. Elangovan, B. G. Nair, J. Hartvigsen 2:45 176. Oxygen production using ITM: Materials and modules. J. F. Vente 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 177. Mechanistic study of methnol/ water/hydrogen separation through ZSM-5 membrane. M. Matsukata, K. Sawamura, T. Izumi, M. Takada, Y. Sekine, T. Osuna, E. Kikuchi 3:55 178. New synthesis routes for thin oriented zeolite membranes. H. Verweij, T. Kuzniatsova, W. V. Chiu, M. L. Mottern, Y. Kim, J. C. White, K. Shqau, P. K. Dutta 4:20 179. A novel sacrificial interlayer-based method for the preparation of silicon car­ bide membranes. B. Elyassi, M. Sahimi, T. T. Tsotsis 4:45 180. Reversible hydrogen storage using a SAPO-34 layer. M. Yu, S. Li, J. L. Falconer, R. D. Noble 5:10 181. Compression of high-purity oxygen in electrically-driven microchannel electro­ chemical separation membranes. K. N. Hutchings, R. A. Cutler, M. A. Wilson, B. Henderson, J. Bai, M. Quist, D. M. Taylor 5:35 182. Preparation of dense, homoge­ neous zeolite L membranes as potential photochemical supports. J. C. White, P. K. Dutta, K. Shqau, H. Verweij WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production Reactor Design, Kinetics and Catalysis A. Shamsi,

Organizer

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 183. Spatial profiles at elevated pres­ sure in millisecond contact times reactors for production of syngas. A. Bitsch-Larsen, R. Horn, B. Michael, N. Degenstein, L. D. Schmidt 8:55 184. Development of ceramic oxide thin film using the tape-casting process. M. Elbaccouch, A. T-Raissi 9:20 185. Effects of activity and deactivation of NiYSZ SOFC anodes on thermal pro­ files during internal reforming of methane. J. J. Strohm, D. L. King, X. Wang, P. Singh, K. Recknagle, Y. Wang

9:45 186. Kinetic and computational model­ ing of methanol steam reforming. C. Bellemare-Davis, J. Pharoah, K. Karan 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 187. Reaction circuitry for H2 produc­ tion via methanol decomposition on Pt(111). S. A. Vilekar, I. Fishtik, R. Datta 10:45 188. Conversion of biofuels to hydro­ gen by catalytic partial oxidation. B. N T . Nguyen, C. Leclerc 11:10 189. Supported metal particle catalysts for sulfuric acid decomposition reaction: How activity depends on nanoparticle structure, size, and composition. S. N. Rashkeev, D. M. Ginosar, L. M. Petkovic, H. H. Farrell 11:35 190. Understanding the mechanism in methanol steam reforming for Cu and PdZn supported catalysts using the tran­ sient kinetic analysis (TKA) approach. R. Disselkamp, Y. Yang, V. La Barbier, L. Cameron, I. Jensen, C. Campbell, C. Peden 12:00 Concluding Remarks. Section Β Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm Fuel Cell Technology: Biofuel Cells, Enzymatic and Microbial Enzymatic Fuel Cells Cosponsored by ENVR P. Atanassov, J . M. Andresen, Β. Ε. Logan, and G. T. R. Palmore, Organizers 8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 191. Biofuel cells based on reconsti­ tuted enzymes. E. Katz 9:00 192. Conversion of a plant chloroplast to a biological fuel cell. S. P. Walch, J. D. Komadina, F. B. Prinz 9:25 193. Enzymatic biofuel cells for micropower source applications. P. Atanassov, C. Apblett 9:50 194. Biocatalysis of carbon nanotubeattached enzymes for biofuel cells. X. Zhao, H. Jia, J. Kim, P. Wang 10:15 Intermission. 10:25 195. Biofuel cells fundamentals: Elec­ tron transfer mechanism in laccase from Trametes versicolor. P. Atanassov, D. Ivnitski 10:50 196. A high-power glucose/oxygen biofuel cell. H. Sakai, T. Nakagawa, Y. Tokita, T. Hatazawa 11:15 197. Redox active molecular sieves as enzyme supports for biofuel cells. K. J. Balkus Jr., M. Macias, R. Huang 11:40 Panel Discussion. 12:00 Concluding Remarks. Section C Boston Park Plaza Cambridge Rm Fuel Cell Technology: High Temperature Fuel Cells, SOFC and MCFC S. Deng, S. Elangovan, and H. C. Maru, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 198. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells: Materials and fabrication options. S. Elangovan, J. Hartvigsen, B. Heck, M. Timper 8:30 199. Anode catalysts for the hydrocar­ bon and carbon solid oxide fuel cell. S. S. C. Chuang, J. Fisher II, Z. Yu, F. Guzman 8:55 200. Carbonate fuel cell power plant using biodiesel fuel. S. Abens, G. Steinfeld, R. Sanderson

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-65

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

FUEL

9:20 201. Fundamental research directions in MCFC and SOFC: A personal view. J. R. Selman 9:45 202. Carbonate fuel cell materials and life updates. C-Y. Yuh, A. Hilmi, G. Xu, J. Colpetzer, M. Farooque 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 203. High temperature fuel cell tech­ nologies and their applications. H. Ghezel-Ayagh 10:45 204. SOFC synthesis using electro­ static spray deposition. R. Losch, J. R. Selman, S. Al-Hallaj 11:10 205. Performance improvement in carbonate fuel cell. A. Hilmi, C-Y. Yuh, M. Farooque 11:35 206. Operation of a carbonate fuel cell power plant on propane. J. Daly, G. Steinfeld 12:00 207. Fuel cell/desalination hybrid systems. G. Albright, S. Al-Hallaj, R. J. Selman Section D Boston Park Plaza Chartes River Room Inorganic Membranes for Energy and Environmental Applications Metal, Metal Alloy Membranes, Novel Concepts M. Matsukata and T. T. Tsotsis,

2:15 219. Breakthrough characteristics of reformates desulfurization using ZnO sorbents for PEM fuel cell application. H. Yang, B. J. Tatarchuk 2:40 220. Application of a novel NaHSNa2S2 desulfurization process. C. Huang, F. Smith, K. Ramasamy, C. A. Linkous, N. Z. Muradov, A. T-Raissi 3:05 221. Removal of sulfur compounds from synthetic natural gas using modified acti­ vated carbon. H. Cui, M. A. Reese, S. Q. Turn 3:30 Intermission. 3:55 222. CO removal from hydrogen-rich reformate gas by Au or Pt supported on cerium and iron oxide catalysts. W. Ddeng, D. Pierre, C. Carpenter, Y. Nan, Y. Zhai, H. Saltsburg 4:20 223. Partial oxidation of methane and the effect of sulfur on catalytic activity and selectivity. A. Shamsi 4:45 224. Development of sulfur tolerant catalyst for jet fuel steam reforming. A. Kataria, S. Chattopadhyay, P. Ayyappan, M. A. Abraham 5:10 225. Hydrogen production by natural gas fueJ processing for residential PEMFC cogeneration systems. D. Lee, H. C. Lee, K. H. Lee, E-Y. Ko, Y. H. Kim, Ε. D. Park 5:35 226. Optimal design and operation of a natural gas trireforming reactor for DME synthesis. W. Cho, T. Song, H. Kim, A. Mitsos, J. T. Mckinnon, T. Park 6:00 Concluding Remarks. Section Β

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 208. Dense hydrogen transport mem­ branes for C 0 2 capture. D. S. Jack, M. V. Mundschau, R. Mackay, C. R. Evenson IV, D. H. Anderson 8:30 209. Inorganic membranes for separa­ tion of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas. M. D. Fokema, Z. Li, J. E. Torkelson 8:55 210. Permeation of composite Pd/Au hydrogen separation membrane prepared by galvanic displacement. C. Chen, Y. H. Ma 9:20 211. Fabrication of unsupported palla­ dium-alloy films by electroless plating. S. K. Gade, P. M. Thoen, J. D. Way 9:45 212. Effect of H 2 S poisoning of Pd/Cu membranes on H 2 permeance and mem­ brane morphology. N. Pomerantz, Y. H. Ma 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 213. Modeling of a stable, high perme­ ability, sulfur resistant B2 phase PdCuTM alloy. S. M. Opalka, R. C. Benn, S. C. Emerson, T. B. Flanagan, W. Huang, Y. She, D. Wang, T. H. Vanderspurt 10:50 214. Hydrogen purification from coal gasification using inorganic membranes in Australia. M. C. Duke, S. Gopalakrishnan, M. Abdel-Jawad, S. Liu, M. Macrossan, J. Diniz da Costa 11:15 215. Fabrication of Pd-membranes: Pd+2/EDTA coordination kinetics in typical electroless plating bath conditions. M. A. Islam, M. M. Basti, S. Ilias 11:40 216. Screening of nanoporous mem­ branes for C 0 2 separations using atomically-detailed simulations. D. Sholl, S. Keskin, S. E. Jee, H. Chen 12:05 217. Permeation of hydrogen mixture-2 perturbed hydrogen permeation of a hydrogen mixture: New phenomena in hydrogen permeation by Pd-membrane. M. H. Rei, C. Y. Hung, S. C. Chen WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production Desulfurization, Catalyst Stability and Systems Design B. Wilhite, R. Shandross, and A. Shamsi, Organizers 1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:50 218. Hot reformate gas desulfurization using lanthanide oxide sorbents. Z. Wang, I. Valsamakis, R. Si, M. Sakbodin, M. Flytzani-Stephanopoulos

66-TECH

Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm ACS/Supergen Joint Symposium on Energy Storage Batteries and Supercapacitors J . M. Calo and P. J . Hall,

Organizers

1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 227. Rechargeable lithium/air battery. A. Débart, G. Armstrong, J. Bao, A. J. Paterson, P. G. Bruce 1:55 228. Structural, ion transport and dopant properties of the lithium-ion battery material LiFePO^ C. A. J. Fisher, M. S. Islam 2:20 229. Carbon based electrode materials for lithium/oxygen batteries. M. Mirzaeian, P. J. Hall 2:45 230. Heteropolymetalate-doped conductive polymer electrodes in supercapacitors. R.C.T.SIade, A. M.White 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 2 3 1 . Resorcinol—formaldehyde gels as electrodes for electrochemical double layer capacitors. F. B. Sillars, M. Mirzaeian, P. J. Hall 3:45 232. The effects of AC current on supercapacitor performance. R. Carter, A. Cruden 4:10 233. Studies on a PEDOT-based cathode for use in a polymer-based battery. S-Y. Kim, G. T. R. Palmore 4:35 234. Radical battery: A paper-like polymer-based rechargeable device. H. Nishide, T. Suga, K. Oyaizu Section C Boston Park Plaza Cambridge Rm Workshop on Oil Shale Samples E. M. Suuberg, R. E. Winans, and R. Pugmire, Organizers 1:55 Introductory Remarks. 2:00 235. Approach to provide samples for basic research: Argonne premium coals. R. E. Winans 3:00 236. Oil shale kerogens: Selected organic structures and their reactivities. M. Siskin

Section D Boston Park Plaza Chartes River Room Inorganic Membranes for Energy and Environmental Applications Metal-Alloy Membranes, Porous Membranes, ITM, Advanced Concepts D. S. Jack and T. H. Vanderspurt, Organizers

11:40 254. Chemical looping reforming Ppocess for the production of hydrogen from coal. L. S. Fan, V-V. Luis G, F. Li 12:05 Concluding Remarks. Section Β Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm Chemistry of Solid, Liquid, and Gaseous

Fuels 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 237. Self-supporting Pd-Cu alloy membranes for production of coal-derived hydrogen. Κ. Ε. Coulter 2:00 238. The effect of external mass trans­ fer on the electroless plating rates and the morphology of the composite Pd mem­ branes. M. E. Ayturk, Y. H. Ma 2:25 239. Overview of recent hydrogen separating membrane research at Los Alamos National Laboratory. S. N. Paglieri, R. E. Buxbaum, M. V. Ciocco, B. Howard, I. E. Anderson, R. L. Terpstra 2:50 240. Characterization of Pd-Ag deposits obtained on porous metal surface using the electroless coplating method. R. M. Bhandari, Y. H. Ma 3:15 241. Preparation of Palladium-mem­ brane by electroplating on AISI 316 porous stainless steel supports and its use for methanol steam reformer. M. H. Rei, S. C. Chen, G. C. Tu, C. Y. Hung 3:40 Intermission. 4:00 242. Toward water-gas shift enhance­ ment and carbon capture in gasification environments. B. D. Morreale, B. Howard, C. Taylor, O. lyoha, R. M. Enick, J. Miller, D. S. Sholl, D. R. Alfonso, M. V. Ciocco 4:25 243. Quantitative predictions of surface resistances in hydrogen transport through metal alloy membranes. D. Sholl, C. Ling 4:50 244. Palladium-based membrane with high hydrogen flux and stability. H. Suda, S. Hara, K. Haraya 5:15 245. Separation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas using nanoporous inorganic membranes. B. L Bischoff, R. R. Judkins, M. V. Ciocco, R. P. Killmeyer 5:40 246. Synthesis and characterization of polyphosphazene materials for advanced lithium-water batteries. M. K. Harrup, T. A. Luther, F. F. Stewart, C. J. Orme, M. L. Stone, W. Bauer 6:05 247. Carbon nanotubes in microwave environment-ignition and reconstruction. M. N. Nadagouda, R. S. Varma

General Hydrcarbon Fuel Chemistry J. J . Helble,

Organizer

8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 255. Mechanisms and rate constants for the pyrolysis of radicals from liquid transportation fuels. W. Tsang 8:45 256. Oxidation of methylcyclohexane in a motored CFR engine. Y. Yang, J. V. Zello, A. L. Boehman 9:10 257. Investigation on 2-butoxy ethyl acetate as a clean diesel fuel additive. H. Guo, S. Liu, G. Li, L. Zhou 9:35 258. Study of the chlorophenols com­ bustion in a laboratory scale spouted bed incinerator. C. Lin, Y-H. Wang 10:00 259. Useful liquid products from the pyrolysis of mixed plastics. M. N. Siddiqui, S. H. Hamid 10:25 Intermission. 10:35 260. Implications of hydrogen addition on the combustion characteristics of CNG. M. K. Fox, A. L Boehman 11:00 261. Deep thermal conversion of demetalized oil. L. M. Corredor, J. A. Carrillo, L. G. Garzon 11:25 262. Partial wet oxidation of unsatur­ ated carboxylic acids for the improvement in the cold flow properties of biodiesel fuel. F. Jin, K. Kawasaki, A. Kishita, K. Tohji, H. Enomoto 11:50 263. Replacement of methane from methane hydrate formed in SDS solution using pressurized C 0 2 . J-G. Sun, Z-Z. Li, X. Q. Guo, G-J. Chen Section C Boston Park Plaza Cambridge Rm Photovoltaic Solar Cells for Energy Applications: Nanomaterials for PV Applications Cosponsored by BIOHW M. Sykora and R. D. Schaller,

Organizers

THURSDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production: Small-Scale Hydrogen Generation Status and Future Challenges B. Wilhite, J . Holladay, and R. Shandross, Organizers 8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 248. Small scale hydrogen production: Status and future challenges. R. Besser 9:15 249. Surface protection coatings for microchannel fuel processors. E. A. Daymo, B. Yang, T. J. Mazanec, S. Perry 9:40 250. Low cost InnovaGen® microchan­ nel fuel processing system. J. S. Pickles, P. M. Irving 10:05 Intermission. 10:25 251. Reducing water demand and improving hydrogen yield of fuel proces­ sors using differential temperature watergas shift. W. Tegrotenhuis, K. P. Brooks, R. A. Dagle, J. Holladay, D. L. King, D. Palo, B. Q. Roberts 10:50 252. Design and numerical modeling of a novel reformer for continuous hydro­ gen production from logistic fuels. S. Chattopadhyay, G. Brunson, D. Patel, G. Lipscomb 11:15 253. Conversion of glucose to hydro­ gen gas by supercritical water within a microchannel reactor. G. L. Rorrer, A. Goodwin

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 264. Semiconductor quantum dotSWCNT architectures for solar energy conversion. P. V. Kamat, I. Robel, A. Kongkanand 9:50 265. PbS QD's doped T i 0 2 nanotubes and nanofibers. C. Xiong, C. Ratanatawanate, K. Balkus Jr. 10:20 Intermission. 10:30 266. Novel photoanode architectures and tunneling barriers. T. W. Hamann, A. B. F. Martinson, J. W. Elam, M. J. Pellin, J. T. Hupp 11:15 267. Photoinduced electron transfer at conjugated polymer/inorganic semiconduc­ tor nanoparticle interfaces. T. Lian 11:45 268. Time-resolved microwave photo­ conductivity study of P3HT: Fullerene bulk heterojunctions for organic photovoltaic devices. A. J. Ferguson, N. Kopidakis, T. J. McDonald, J. Piris, S. E. Shaheen, M. J. Heben, G. Rumbles

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

FUEL/GEOC

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Berkeley Rm Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Production: Small-Scale Hydrogen Generation Status and Future Challenges R. Shandross and J . Holladay,

2:00 285. Generation of multiple excitons from absorption of a single photon in nanocrystal quantum dots. R. D. Schaller, M. Sykora, J. M. Pietryga, S. Jeong, V. I. Klimov 2:30 286. Interfacial energy and charge transfer in assemblies consisting of CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots and Ru-polypyridine complexes. M. Sykora, M. A. Petruska, J. H. Alstrum-Acevedo, J. Leonard, T. J. Meyer, V. Klimov

Organizers

1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 269. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of ethanol at elevated pressure. S. H. Lee, S. Ahmed, R. K. Ahluwalia 1:55 270. Hydrogen generation and purifica­ tion in Pd nanopore hollow fiber mem­ brane reactor. M. P. Harold, S. H. Israni 2:20 2 7 1 . Hydrogen generation with chemi­ cal hydride powder packed bed reactor for use in micro PEM fuel cells. L. Zhu, D. Kim, R. I. Masel, M. A. Shannon 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 272. Hydrogen generation for portable fuel cells by using novel chemical mix­ tures. M. Diwan, V. Diakov, E. Shafirovich, A. Varma 3:30 273. MEMS Based methanol reforming system for small scale hydrogen produc­ tion. J . Morse, H. G. Park, C. Spadaccini, R. Upadhye, R. T. Graff 3:55 274. Microfabricated fuel cell systems: Beyond process synthesis. A. Mitsos, B. Chachuat, P. I. Barton 4:20 Concluding Remarks.

Section Β

raaaa Division of Geochemistry T. Fil ley, Program Chair

SOCIAL EVENT: Social Hour: Sun BUSINESS MEETINGS: Executive Meeting: Sun Membership Meeting & Reception: Mon SUNDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza St. James Rm

B. Johnson and M. Pagani, Chemistry of Solid, Liquid, and Gaseous Fuels Coke and Environmental Issues J. J . Helble,

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Modern Calibrations and Terrestrial Applications of Stable Isotope Paleo Proxies

Boston Park Plaza Arlington Rm

Organizer

1:05 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 275. Delayed coking: Castilla and Jazmin crude oils. J . A. Carrillo, H. J. Picon, L. G. Garzon, L. M. Corredor 1:35 276. Generation of an experimental model for Vr II at Barrancabermeja Refin­ ery (Gcb). L. G. Garzon Marenco, H. J. Picon, D. R. Figueroa, J. A. Buendia, J. A. Carrillo 2:00 277. Microscopic study of cokes obtained from Colombian crude oils. H. J . Picon, J. A. Carrillo, L. M. Corredor, L. G. Garzon 2:25 278. Upgrade of light cycle oil by sol­ vent extraction. D. Karonis, D. Bardakos, S. Stoumas, F. Zannikos 2:50 279. Yields and operational conditions for deasphalting of vacuum bottoms using n-C4 + i-C4, n-C5 + i-C5, n-C6 and n-C7 solvents. L. M. Corredor, J. A. Carrillo, M. J . Parra 3:15 Intermission. 280. Withdrawn. 3:25 281. Oxidation kinetics of calcium sulfite catalyzed by manganese ions. L. Wang, X.Liu 3:50 282. Effects of 0 2 / C 0 2 combustion technology on ESP operation. H. Tian, M.Hu 4:15 283. Mechanism of simultaneous reduc­ tion of NOx and S 0 2 for natural gas rebuming by injecting calcium magnesium acetate. M. Hu, X. Zhao, H. Tian Section C Boston Park Plaza Chartes River Room

Section Β Boston Park Plaza Thoreau Rm The Biogeochemical Cycling of Natural Organic Matter in the Coastal Zone Organizers

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 7. Land-use, landscape and lithologie controls on sources of natural organic matter in river system headwaters. S. Petsch 9:05 8. Salinity effects on recovery and characterization of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic matter. B. J . Dalzell, E. C. Minor, A. Beaudet, R. Bowlds

Organizers

1:30 284. Cadmium-stabilized lead selenide nanocrystals for use in solar cells. J. M. Pietryga, J. L. Casson, R. D. Schaller, V. I. Klimov, J. A. Hollingsworth

Boston Park Plaza St. James Rm Modern Calibrations and Terrestrial Applications of Stable Isotope Paleo Proxies B. Johnson and M. Pagani,

Organizers

1:30 15. A new method for simultaneous CHNS-IRMS analysis. S. Hughes, H. J. Kupka, H. P. Sieper, A. Ro6mann 1:55 16. Interpreting oxygen isotope ratios in fossil wood cellulose. S. L. Richter, A. H. Johnson, M. M. Dranoff 2:20 17. Late Holocene hydrologie changes in the tropical Pacific from lipid D/H ratios. J. P. Sachs, D. Sachse, Z. Zhang, R. Smittenberg 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 18. Natural intramolecular nitrogen isotopic analysis of proteinous amino acids. L. Zhang, M. A. Altabet 3:25 19. Shifts in the 8 13 C of Serripes groenlandicus shell organic matter: A proxy for intra- and interannual changes in primary production in the Arctic? B. Johnson, W. Ambrose Jr., G. Henkes, K. McMahon, M. Carroll 3:50 20. Stable isotopic composition of taxa-specific higher plant compounds in ancient packrat middens: A detailed record of seasonal climate in the Great Basin. D. A. Zinniker, M. Pagani 4:20 2 1 . Western Atlantic Intertropical Con­ vergence Zone variability over the last full glacial cycle. N. J . Drenzek, K. A. Hughen, A. L. Sessions, M. B. Bice, T. I. Eglinton 4:45 49. New proxy for paleosalinity based on the stable hydrogen isotopic composi­ tion of C37 alkenones. M. T. J . van der Meer, M. Baas, W. I. C. Rijpstra, G. Marino, E. J. Rohling, J. S. Sinninghe Damsté, S. Schouten Section Β Boston Park Plaza Thoreau Rm

Photovoltaic Solar Cells for Energy Applications: Nanomaterials for PV Applications Cosponsored by BIOHW M. Sykora and R. D. Schaller,

Section A

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:10 1. Prospects of hydrogen isotope mea­ surement on lipid biomarkers for paleoclimate applications. D. Sachse, G. Gleixner, J. Radke, J. P. Sachs 9:40 2. Hydrologie and taxonomic controls on leaf wax lipid hydrogen isotope ratios. F. A. Smith, K. H. Freeman, B. R. Helliker 10:10 3. Can sedimentary leaf waxes record D/H ratios of continental precipitation? Field, model and experimental assess­ ments. Y. Huang 10:40 Intermission. 10:50 4. Can hydrogen isotopic ratios in plant lipids provide a quantitative proxy for aridity? S. J . Feakins, A. L. Sessions 11:20 5. Eliciting climatic controls on leaf wax carbon and hydrogen isotopic ratios: A field study from the eastern United States. B. J . Tipple, M. Pagani 11:45 6. Calibration of brine shrimp chitin as a paleohydrology proxy. K. E. Nielson, G. J. Bowen

S. Mitra and A. Z i m m e r m a n ,

9:25 9. The evolution of organic matter in the Amazon River system: Trends in radiocar­ bon, amino acid and lignin phenol compo­ sition. A. K. Aufdenkampe, E. Mayorga, J. I. Hedges, C. A. Masiello, T. A. Brown, M. E. McClain, C. A. Llerena, P. Quay, A. V. Krusche, J. E. Richey 9:55 10. Sources and sinks of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the coastal environment: Relation to structure. N. V. Blough, R. Del Vecchio 10:25 Intermission. 10:35 1 1 . Molecular and photochemical characterization of terrestrially-derived DOM in estuarine environments by ultra­ high resolution mass spectrometry and 3-D excitation/emission matrix spectros­ copy. W. T. Cooper, J. D'Andrilli, T. Dittmar, M. Huettel, J. E. Kostka, W. J. Cooper 10:55 12. Compound-class characterization of bulk marine/estuarine DOM using FTIR. H. Abdulla, R. F. Dias, T. Brown, E. C. Minor 11:15 13. Molecular characterization and reactivity of dissolved organic matter along a river to ocean transect by high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrom­ etry. P. G. Hatcher, R. L. Sleighter, Z. Liu, S. A. Hatcher 11:35 14. Characterization of condensed organic matters in soils and sediments from the Pearl River delta, south China. Y. Ran, K. Sun, B. Xing

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

The Biogeochemical Cycling of Natural Organic Matter in the Coastal Zone S. Mitra and A. Zimmerman,

Organizers

1:30 22. Porewater DOC dynamics and organic matter remineralization, transfor­ mations, and preservation in coastal marine sediments. M. J . Alperin

2:00 23. Refractory organic matter in the Ganges-Brahmaputra River complex. S. Mitra, W. Woerner, A. Zimmerman 2:20 Intermission. 2:30 24. Hydroxyl radicals in marine sedi­ ments. A. Skoog, A. Arias-Esquivel 2:50 25. Effect of sediment-surface redox conditions on fluxes of dissolved organic matter, nutrients, iron, and manganese over the sediment-water interface of coastal sediments. V. A. Arias-Esquivel, A. Skoog, S. Sanudo 3:10 26. Ν and Ο isotope tracers of Long Island Sound anthropogenic nitrogen loading. M. A. Altabet, J. Varekamp 3:30 27. Terrigenous organic matter in sedi­ ments from the Fly River delta-clinoform system (Papua New Guinea). M. A. Goni, N. M. Monacci, R. Gisewhite, J. Crockett, A. Ogston, C. Nittrouer, S. R. Alin, R. Aalto MONDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza St. James Rm Modern Calibrations and Terrestrial Applications of Stable Isotope Paleo Proxies B. Johnson and M. Pagani,

Organizers

9:00 28. Identification of maize agriculture on the terraces of the ancient Maya sites of Caracol and Minanha (Belize) using the carbon-isotope compositions of humic substances. E. A. Webb, H. P. Schwarcz, G. W. L Hodgins, G. lannone, P. F. Healy 9:25 29. Carbon isotope studies and lignin analysis of plants and soil organic matter detect vegetation changes in the southern Brazilian highlands. A. Diimig, P. Schad, C. Rumpel, M-F. Dignac, H. Knicker, I. Kôgel-Knabner 9:50 30. Stable isotope reconstruction of Quaternary climates recorded within sedimentary sequences of the central Great Plains. W. C. Johnson 10:15 Intermission. 10:25 3 1 . Terrestrial carbon isotope record across the PETM at the Canadian High Arctic. H. Yang, M. Kraus, B. A. LePage, M. Pagani 10:50 32. Reconstructing paleoaltimetry with D/H isotopic measurements of lipid biomarkers. P. J . Polissar, Κ. Η. Freeman, D. B. Rowley Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Environmental Geochemistry Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by GEOC MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza St. James Rm The Biogeochemical Cycling of Nitrogen at Various Spatial and Temporal Scales G. Michalski,

Organizer

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 33. Anaerobic biodégradation of highly concentrated amine wastewater using packed-bed biofilm reactor. S. Chen, D. Sun, J. Chung 2:00 34. Simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate in dew, rain, snow and lake water samples by high speed ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography. Y. Zuo, C. Wang, J. Drolet, T. Van 2:25 35. Nitrification in the euphotic zone as evidenced by nitrate dual isotopic composition: Yobservations from Monterey Bay, California. S. D. Wankel, C. Kendall, A. Paytan, J. T. Pennington, F. P. Chavez 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 36. Oceanic nitrate Ν and Ο isotopic composition: A comparison of regimes dominated by denitrification and autotro­ phic utilization. M. A. Altabet 3:25 37. Investigations in nitrogen sources and cycling in Biscayne Bay, Florida. C. L. Drayer, K. A. Lamb, P. K. Swart, M. A. Altabet, W. T. Anderson, S. Bellmund

TECH-67

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

GEOC 3:50 38. Ν cycling and stable isotope signa­ tures of the soil microbial community. P. Dijkstra, J. S. Coyle, P. C. Selmants, E. Schwartz, C. M. LaViolette, S. C. Hart, B. A. Hungate 4:15 39. Using oxygen 17 as tracer of atmo­ spheric nitirc acid deposition. G. Michalski Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Advanced Analytical Methods Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by GEOC MONDAY EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

2:20 50. The role of invasive earthworm activity on the chemical alteration trajec­ tory of forest litter. T. R. Filley, S. Crow, C. T. Johnston, M. McCormick, K. Szlavecz 2:45 Intermission. 2:55 51. Biomarkers for photic zone euxinia. M. T. J. van der Meer, S. Schouten, J. S. Sinninghe Damsté 3:20 52. Mud gas isotope logging (MGIL): A bona fide geochemical success story in contemporary hydrocarbon exploration. L. Ellis

3:25 63. Tracking environmentally important inorganic anions and cations at geochemi­ cal interfaces using nonlinear optics. P. L. Hayes, C. T. Konek, M. J. Musorrafiti, J. J. Kruk, F. M. Geiger 3:50 64. Reactivity studies of biogenic nanosized iron sulfide minerals for As (III) removal. R. Vannela, P. Adriaens, K. F. Hayes

Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Emerging Contaminants Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by GEOC

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

M-Y. Ahn and B. J. Dalzell, Organizers

Geochemistry Poster Session

TUESDAY MORNING

Boston Park Plaza St. James Rm The David J. Clifford Memorial Symposium Cosponsored by FUEL J. P. Mathews, P. Hatcher, and Κ. Β. Anderson, Organizers

Section A Boston Park Plaza St. James Rm The David J. Clifford Memorial Symposium Cosponsored by FUEL J. P. Mathews, P. Hatcher, and Κ. Β. Anderson, Organizers 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 40. A new approach for molecular characterization of insoluble organic mate­ rials: Combined use of high resolution NMR and ultrahigh resolution mass spec­ trometry. P. G. Hatcher, Η. Μ. Bialk, R. L. Sleighter, G. McKee, Z. Liu, C. Byrne 9:05 41. Yield and composition of products from pyrolysis of oil shale samples in a tubular reactor with nitrogen sweep. O. Mustafaoglu, S. Eser 9:25 42. In search of the Rosetta Stone. R. E. Botto 9:50 43. Organic matter from deep space and very deep time. G. D. Cody 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 44. Hydrogen cyanide polymers con­ nect cosmochemistry and biochemistry. R. D. Minard, C. N. Matthews 10:55 45. Comparison of MSSV pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis to facilitate the thermal release of bound hydrocarbon biomarkers from immature organic matter. P. F. Greenwood, L. Berwick, W. Meredith, C. E. Snape 11:20 46. Fractionation and characterization of petroleum hydrocarbons using prepara­ tive HPLC and HPLC/Time-of-Flight MS. R. P. Dutta, C. Rechsteiner Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Biotransformation and Effects Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by GEOC TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza St. James Rm The David J. Clifford Memorial Symposium Cosponsored by FUEL J. P. Mathews, P. Hatcher, and Κ. Β. Anderson, Organizers 1:30 47. Geochemistry of amber from the lower Cretaceous (Wealden) of the Isle of Wight. P. S. Bray, Κ. Β. Anderson 1:55 48. Analytical methods applied to study of the oxidation of methylcyclohexane in a motored CFR engine. Y. Yang, J. V. Zello, A. L. Boehman

68-TECH

9:00 53. Characterization of coal- and petro­ leum-derived pitch. U. Suriyapraphadilok, C. Burgess-Clifford, J. M. Andresen, H. Schobert 9:20 54. Assessment of oils derived from the co-coking: Best conditions toward the improvement of the jet fuel thermal stabil­ ity. M. M. Escallon, B. Carlsen, C. B. Clifford, H. H. Schobert 9:45 55. Formation of carbonaceous depos­ its from thermal-oxidative degradation of jet fuel in a flow reactor. R. Venkataraman, S. Eser 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 56. Optimization of lignin conversion into value-added fuels and chemicals: Characterization of Reaction Products. M. A. Hill, J. Pedlow, N. R. Brown, J. M. Griffith, C. Burgess Clifford 10:45 57. Bio-oil conversion of high-lignin containing biomass residues. J. M. Andresen, A. Sanna 11:10 58. Review of the advances in the molecular representations of coal. J. P. Mathews, A. L. Chaffee 11:35 Concluding Remarks. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza St. James Rm Surface and Molecular Geochemistry and Biogeochemistry M-Y. Ahn and B. J. Dalzell, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 59. An AFM study of interaction of ascorbic acid and phospholipid with iron oxide nanoparticles. S. Debnath, D. R. Strongin 2:00 60. Geochromatography and the Origin of Life. J. Cleaves, R. M. Hazen, D. A. Sverjensky 2:25 61. Meteoritic impacts and other sources of novel organic chemistry on Titan. S. H. Abbas, D. Schulze-Makuch 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 62. Detecting biosignatures associated with minerals using GALDI-FTMS. J. R. Scott, J. M. Kotler, N. W. Hinman, B. Yan, D. L. Stoner, C. D. Richardson

Surface and Molecular Geochemistry and Biogeochemistry

9:00 81. TEM investigation of the aqueous dissolution of Galena (PbS) nanoparticles. J. Liu, M. F. Hochella Jr., J. R. Jinschek, D. M. Aruguete 9:20 82. Adsorption of arsenic on granular ferric hydroxide: A macroscopic and micro­ scopic study. X. H. Guan, J. Wang, C. C. Chusuei 9:45 83. ATR-FTIR investigations of NiS2 and FeS2 oxidation in oxidizing gaseous and aqueous environments. D. R. Strongin, C. R. Usher, J. Hao, R. Murphy, M. A. A. Schoonen 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 84. Oxidation kinetics of commingled metal sulfides: Experimental study. R. Laffers, V. Rodriguez Rivera, D. R. Strongin, M. Schoonen 10:45 85. Combined polyferric sulfate coagu­ lation and fenton-like pretreatment for antibiotic fermentation wastewater. D. Sun, Z. Xing 11:10 86. Humidity-induced restructuring of the calcite surface and the effect of diva­ lent heavy metals. D. B. Hausner

Section A

8:00-10:00 13,18, 29, 33-34, 39. See previous listings. 44, 47, 50, 60-62, 82. See subsequent listings.

Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm

Section Β

T. Filley, Presiding

T. R. Filley, Organizer

Section A

WEDNESDAY EVENING

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Sci-Mix

THURSDAY MORNING

6:00-8:00 65. Withdrawn. 66. Estrogenic hormone steroids in aquatic environments and analytical challenge. Y. Zuo, K. Zhang, Y. Lin, Y. Deng 67. Evaluation of toxic chemical degradation rates on solid materials by P-31 and C-13 NMR. D. McGarvey, W. R. Creasy, H. Schreuder-Gibson, J. Walker 68. Formaldehyde degradation by UV/Ti0 2 /0 3 process in a well sealed room controlled by air-conditioning systems. D. Sun, H. Qi, J. Zhang 69. Geochemical controls on surficial uranium transport in a waste-burdened mining district: Navajo Nation, NM. J. L. deLemos, B. C. Bostick, J. L. Durant, J. D. Landis, A. N. Quicksall, D. Brugge, N. L. Slagowski, C. M. George, J. Lewis 70. Molecular comparison of cyanobacteria in two tropical hypersaline microbial mats at the Cabo Rojo solar salterns of Puerto Rico. F. J. Sanchez-Rivera, R. H. Valle-Molinares, L. D. Rodriguez, L. Casillas-Martinez, P. T. Visscher, C. Rios-Velazquez 71. Monte Carlo simulations of water speciation in hydrated silica. Κ. Ε. Anderson, J. I. Siepmann, M. M. Hirschmann 72. Plastics as sources of new global pollut­ ants. K. Amamiya, T. Itagaki, Y. Kodera, S-Y. Chung, O. Abe, N. Ogawa, K. Miyashita, K. Saido 73. Reductive dissolution of birnessite by arsenite: Evidence from in situ AFM. S. Debnath, J. M. Smolen, D. R. Strongin 74. Study on adsorption of phosphate by magnetic hydrotalcite-like compounds in aqueous solution. D. Sun, B. Zhao, X. Cheng 75. Dynamics of lignin and plant aliphatic biopolymers in soil organic matter under elevated atmospheric C02 in the sweetgum Free Air C02 Enrichment (FACE) experiment. T. R. Filley, J. Jastrow, S. O'Brien, T. Boutton 76. Aggregation of OM: Implications for cycling of OM in coastal areas. T-Y. Chen, A.Skoog 77. Lipid biomarker composition of lower Ganges-Brahmaputra River and Bay of Bengal sediments. A. R. Zimmerman, S. Mitra 78. Probing the reactivity of DOM: Determin­ ing the enhanced aqueous solubility of organic compounds by dissolved organic matter in natural waters using stable isotope mass balance. H. Abdulla, R. F. Dias 79. TOC-IRMS: A new analysis. S. Barker 80.13C and 14C isotopic signatures of plant derived biomarkers in forest fine aerosol: Implication for a proxy for photosynthetic carbon isotopic discrimination at ecosys­ tem-scale. M. Uchida, H. Kumata, M. Kondo, Y. Shibata Symposium Honoring Dr. Walter Giger Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by GEOC

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza St. James Rm Surface and Molecular Geochemistry and Biogeochemistry M-Y. Ahn and B. J. Dalzell, Organizers 1:30 87. Effects of sediment-water interac­ tions on bed structure and the distribution of organic matter. J. Birdwell, R. L. Cook, L. Thibodeaux 1:55 88. Influence of a soil enzyme on ironcyanide complex speciation and mineral adsorption. A. R. Zimmerman, D-H. Kang, M-Y. Ahn, S. Hyun, M. Banks 2:20 89. NMR spectroscopic study on the association of dissolved Al(lll) with silicate surfaces. J. R. Houston, S. A. Carroll, J. L. Herberg, R. S. Maxwell 2:45 Intermission. 2:55 90. Potential of wood-decay fungi for Ca enrichment and reduction of Al-induced stress in spruce forests. W. C. Shortle, K. T. Smith, J. Jellison 3:20 91. Self-organization of humic acid in basic solution. G. Chilom, J. A. Rice 3:45 92. Half-nitrosofication in SHARON process using moving bed biofilm reactor. D. Sun, G. Yu, S. Chen

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

HIST/I&EC 4:05 27. "What a wonderful empire is the organic chemistry". A. S. Travis 4:55 Edelstein Award Presentation. Roger Egolf, HIST Chair.

MONDAY MORNING

HIST Division of The History of Chemistry J. S. Jeffers, Program Chair

SOCIAL EVENT:

Section A Seaport Plaza C Classic Chemistry Books of the Twentieth Century: Spectroscopy Cosponsored by Bolton Society R. K. Smeltzer, Organizer,

Presiding

Edelstein Dinner, Dom: Tue BUSINESS M E E T I N G : HIST Business Meeting, 8:30 am: Mon SUNDAY MORNING Section A Seaport Plaza C General Papers J. S. Jeffers, Organizer,

Presiding

8:45 1. Americium: From discovery to the smoke detector and beyond. K. Kostecka 9:10 2. Beilstein, Menshutkin and Men­ deleev: End of an era. D. E. Lewis 9:35 3. You are there: Teaching the history of chemistry where it happened. H. E. Pence 10:00 4. Brief history of the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK. J. S. Jeffers 10:25 Intermission. 10:40 5. Echoes of great deaf chemists. T. Pagano, H. G. Lang 11:05 6. James Young (1811-1883): Chem­ ist, capitalist, and catalyst for the founding of the American petroleum industry. M. D. Saltzman 11:35 7. Napoleon, Berthollet, and the Law of Mass Action. D. F. Martin, B. B. Martin Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST

8:50 Introductory Remarks. 9:00 15. Spectroscopy and the quantum revolution: Old quantum theory gives way to quantum mechanics. K. R. Metz 9:40 16. Spectroscopy and the periodic table: Tribute to Friedrich Hund's Linienspektren und periodisches System der Elemente. W. B. Jensen 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 17. Gerhard Herzberg: Physicist, chemist and astronomer. D. C. Morton 11:15 18. Raising the bar for those who followed: Henry Rowland and the solar spectrum. S. C. Turner MONDAY AFTERNOON

I&EC Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry M. A. Gonzalez, Program Chair

OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Academic Employment Initiative (see ΑΕΙ, Mon) Nanotechnology in Catalysis V (see CATL, Sun) Nanotechnology in Agriculture (see AGRO, Wed) Globalization of the Chemical Enter­ prise (see BMGT, Mon)

Section A

Green Chemistry as an Integral Com­ ponent of Academic Sustainability Centers (see CHED, Sun)

Seaport Plaza C Classic Chemistry Books of the Twentieth Century: Spectroscopy Cosponsored by Bolton Society R. K. Smeltzer, Organizer,

Paradise Lost: Intellectual Property Protection for Pharmaceuticals (see CHAL, Wed)

Presiding

1:30 19. A brief history of light scattering spectroscopy. G. D. Patterson 2:10 20. Vibrational and vibration-rotational molecular spectroscopy 1900-1960. A. Weber 2:50 Intermission. 3:05 2 1 . Chemistry of the stars: Scheiner & Frost's treatise on astronomical spectros­ copy. R. S. Brashear 3:45 22. Two classics of early American solar spectroscopy. R. L. Kremer

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Fate of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Urban Systems (see ENVR, Sun, Wed) BioFuels: Biodiesel Chemistry and Implementation (see FUEL, Sun) Biofuels: Lignocellulosic Biofuels (see FUEL, Mon)

10:15 3. Identifying environmentally friendly chemicals for gas absorption. E. F. da Suva, K. M. Merz Jr. 10:40 4. Acrylic thermosets: A novel catalytic green chemistry alternative to formalde­ hyde resins. B. Weinstein, G. Gapped Nanotechnology in Catalysis V Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by COLL, l&EC, and PETR SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Clarendon Rm Applications of Green Chemistry Environmental Aspects of Green Chemistry Cosponsored by the Green Chemistry and Engineering Sub-Division J. T. Ciszewski and M. A. Gonzalez, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 5. Designing and formulating environ­ mentally benign pressure sensitive adhesives. J . Guo, S. J. Severtson, L. E. Gwin 2:00 6. You are what you measure: Key considerations in the creation of green metrics. K. J. Matus, P. T. Anastas, W. C. Clark 2:25 7. Selective oxidation of cyclohexene to cis-1, 2-cyclohexanediol over MOx(M=V, Nb, Cr, Mo, W) with t-butyl hydroperoxide as an oxidant. Q. Zhang, Y. Wu, D. Lin, X. Zhou, T. Wu 2:50 Intermission. 3:10 8. Water recycling from dyeing effluent using nanofiltration and diverse osmosis membranes. G. Zhang, H. Zeng, Q. Meng 3:35 9. Recovery of valuable components from wastewater in glycine production by solvent extraction. X. Shan, W. Qin, X. Lin, Y. Li, Y. Dai 4:00 Concluding Remarks.

BioFuels: Renewable Liquid Fuels & Chemicals from Biomass (see FUEL, Mon)

MONDAY MORNING

Mechanism in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Epoxidation (see PETR, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu)

Boston Park Plaza Clarendon Rm

Section A

M O N D A Y EVENING Section A Section A Seaport Plaza C

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

General Papers J. S. Jeffers, Organizer,

Material Innovations: From Nanotech to Biotech and Beyond! (see PRES, Sun)

Presiding

1:30 8. Chemical history and the Holocaust. E. Klingsberg 1:55 9. First annual ACS "Institute of Chem­ istry" in 1927: Grand experiment in chemi­ cal education. R. A. Olofson, K. A. Yarmey 2:20 10. History of chemistry resources on the internet. C. J. Giunta 2:45 11. Illustrations of chemical substances in some earlier Chinese writing. B. Ramsay 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 12. Paul Bartlett's mission: Bringing the message of mechanism to industrial research laboratories. S. J. Weininger 3:50 13. Dr. Frankenstein, the lye of blood, and the beginning of chemical synthesis. S. A. Koch 4:15 14. Prolegomena to a science of macromolecules. G. D. Patterson Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

J. S. Jeffers,

Organizer

8:00-10:00 2,10-11. See previous listings.

J. J . Bozell, S O C I A L EVENT: Social Hour: Tue

TUESDAY MORNING Going With the Information Flow: Chemical Abstracts Service 100th Anniversary Presidential Symposium Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by HIST, CINF, and CHED

BUSINESS MEETINGS: Business Meeting: Tue Executive Council Meeting: Mon Programming Meeting: Mon SUNDAY MORNING

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Section A

Boston Park Plaza Clarendon Rm

Seaport Plaza C Edelstein Award Symposium Honoring Anthony S. Travis J. J . Bohning, Organizer,

Being a Responsible Chemist: Ethics, Politics, and Policy (see YCC, Mon)

Presiding

1:45 Introductory Remarks. 1:50 23. Color: Whether pigment or dye, a delight for the eye. M. V. Orna 2:20 24. Madder on the Monacacy: Eigh­ teenth-century Moravian dye works in Pennsylvania. J. J. Bohning 2:50 25. Messages from dye sample books: Technical, commercial, and cultural. M. E. Bowden, E. McLeary 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 26. Dyeing for a tariff: American politics and German chemicals after World War I. K. Steen

Feedstocks for the Future II: Renewables for the Production of Chemicals and Materials Chemical Products from Renewables Cosponsored by the Green Chemistry and Engineering Sub-Division

Applications of Green Chemistry Strategies for Clean Synthesis Cosponsored by the Green Chemistry and Engineering Sub-Division J. T. Ciszewski and M. A. Gonzalez, Organizers 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 1. The discovery of an innovative and very green one-step synthesis of tetronic acid. J. G. Schroer III 9:30 2. Polysulfobetaine-grafted surfaces as environmentally benign nonfouling marine coatings. Z. Zhang, L. Wang, S. Chen, J. A. Finlay, M. E. Callow, J. A. Callow, S. Jiang 9:55 Intermission.

Organizer

8:30 10. Synthesis and characterization of branched-chain derivatives of methyl oleate. O. D. Dailey Jr., N. Prévost, G. Strahan 9:00 11. Synthesis and properties of fatty acid 2-hydroxyl-3-sulfo propyl ester. J. Wang Sr., G. Li Sr., X. Yang Sr., Z. Zhang 9:30 12. Glycerin as a renewable feedstock for epichlorohydrin production. J. R. Briggs, W. J. Kruper, B. D. Hook, J. G. Hippler, R. M. CamRbell, J. D. Schreck, R. Varjian, E. O'Driscoll, C. Theriault, L. Dahuron, B. Bell, P. Gaarenstroom, C. Wolfe, J. Kenney, S. Chambers 10:00 13. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass to fuels: Effect of interactions between carbohydrates and proteins. A. A. Peterson, S. A. Maurer, R. P. Lachance, J. W. Tester 10:30 14. Platform chemicals from cellulose, saltwater and microwaves. J. M. Robinson, A. Arce, S. Barrett, T. Byrd, R. Caudle, S. Davila, J. Phillips, E. Salinas, D. Worth 11:00 15. Production of hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) from glucosamine and glucosamine-rich renewable materials. T. Wu, S. Zivanovic 11:30 16. Stability and friction-reducing properties of epoxidized oleoochemical methyl esters. K. M. Doll, S. Z. Erhan

TECH-69

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

I&EC

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Clarendon Rm Feedstocks for the Future II: Renewables for the Production of Chemicals and Materials Catalytic Conversion of Renewables Cosponsored by the Green Chemistry and Engineering Sub-Division J. J . Bozell,

Organizer

1:30 17. Electrooxidation of ethanol and methanol using heterobimetallic catalysts. L. McElwee-White, M. Correia, C. Hilliard, D. Serra 2:00 18. Olefin metathesis of biorenewable feedstocks: Discussion of commercial applications of these novel compositions. M. A. Giardello 2:30 19. Organometallic carbohydrate chemistry: Metal nucleophiles in the Ferrier reaction. N. C. Tice, J. J. Bozell 3:00 20. A new process for glycerol transformation to acrolein. C. Duquenne, A. Ulgen, S. Sabater, W. F. Hôlderich, J-L. Dubois, J. Kervennal 3:30 2 1 . The reduction of polyols to diols. G. A. Kraus, V. S-Y. Lin 4:00 22. Cracking of oleic and acyl glycerides acid using a superacid or zeolites. R. Hernandez, T. J. Benson, W. T. French, M. G. White, E. G. Alley, W. E. Holmes 4:30 23. Biopetrochemicals made available by gold-catalyzed oxidative esterifications: From biorenewable feedstocks to polymer building blocks. C. H. Christensen, K. Egeblad, E. Taarning, I. S. Nielsen, A. T. Madsen, J. Marchetti, R. Madsen

11:30 30. Recent development of biodegradable network polyesters obtained from renewable natural resources. N. Tsutsumi, W. Sakai, M. Nagata TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Clarendon Rm Feedstocks for the Future II: Renewables for the Production of Chemicals and Materials Biochemical and Chemical Transformations of Biopolymers Cosponsored by the Green Chemistry and Engineering Sub-Division J. J . Bozell,

Organizer

2:00 3 1 . Gamma-valerolactone: A sustainable liquid for energy and chemicals. I. T. Horvath, H. Mehdi, V. Fâbos, L. Boda 2:30 32. Expressing tyrosine-rich peptide genes in poplar: Facilitating lignin removal. N. R. Brown, M. Tien, J. Carlson, H. Liang 3:00 33. D-galacturonic acid catabolism in fungi. P. Richard, S. Hilditch 3:30 34. Cellulose nanoparticles: Can they be a value added coproduct to bioethanol. W. T. Winter 4:00 35. Hemicellulose extraction prior to processing wood-strand composite panels. N. Labbe, D. P. Harper, Y. Çelen, B. Ehrschwender, T. G. Rials 4:30 36. New polymeric processes from lignin using integration of steam explosion and carbonization technologies. J. Gravitis T U E S D A Y EVENING Section A

M O N D A Y EVENING

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Section A

l&EC Poster Session

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

H. K. Jacobs,

Sci-Mix

8:00-10:00 37. Deep desulfurization of model oil using surfactant-type decatungstates as catalysts. X. Jiang, H. Li, W. Zhu, H. Shu, Y. Wang, L. He 38. Oxidative desulfurization of fuels catalyzed by peroxotungsten complexes in ionic liquids. W. Zhu, H. Li, X. Jiang, Y. Yan, L. He, Y. Wang 39. Extending secondary nucleation models to the crystallization of polymorphic systems. P. R. M. Prasanna, G. D. Botsaris 40. Rapid determination of lignin content in lignocellulosic biomass through the use of ionic liquids. L. M. Kline, D. G. Hayes, N. Labbé, A. R. Womac 4 1 . Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of pine trees. Y-H. Park, J. Kim, S-S. Kim 42. Bioethanol analysis of the mixture of gasoline and ethanol using low-level liquid scintillation counter. S-S. Kim, E-S. Yim, S-C. Shin, C-S. Jung 43. Catalytic decarboxylation of naphthenic acid with metal oxide catalyst. J-H. Park, H-Y. Oh, C. H. Ko, K-B. Yi, S-S. Han, S-H. Cho, J-N. Kim, N-S. Nho 44. Biofuel production from com residues by thermochemical conversion. F. Yu, K. W. Hennessy, S. Deng, P. Chen, R. Ruan 45. Liquefaction of com components: Heat transfer and process. B. Zhang, M. von Keitz, K. Valentas 46. Multifunctional epoxy resin/metal oxide nanocompositions for electronics applications. R. Basheer, M. Bouguettaya, D. Workman 47. Investigation of ionic liquids based on diphenyl phosphate. M. Thomas, S. I. Lall-Ramnarine, J. F. Wishart, R. Engel 48. Mass culture of microalgae on wastewater and gases from sludge burning for production of biomass feedstock for biodiesel. Q. Kong, P. Chen, R. Ruan 49. Microwave assisted heterogeneous catalysis with manganese octahedral molecular sieves. E. K. Nyutu, S. Sithambaram, S. L Suib

H. Jacobs and M. A. Gonzalez, Organizers 8:00-10:00 39-40, 44, 46-47, 49, 52, 55, 6 1 , 67, 73. See subsequent listings. TUESDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Clarendon Rm Feedstocks for the Future II: Renewables for the Production of Chemicals and Materials New Polymeric Materials f r o m Renewables Cosponsored by the Green Chemistry and Engineering Sub-Division J. J. Bozell,

Organizer

8:30 24. Synthesis and characterization of higher molecular weight stereo-random poly(D-glucaramides) from 1:1 alkylenediammonium D-glucarate salts. T. N. Smith, T. T. Denton, K. Kramer, J. Zhang, D. E. Kiely 9:00 25. Market situation, need for action and potential capacity from biopolymers. H-J. Endres, A. Siebert, E. Baur 9:30 26. Alkyl and aryl substituted polylactides. G. L. Baker 10:00 27. Polylactides derived from oleic acid and furfural. E. B. Vogel, M. R. Smith III, G. L Baker 10:30 28. Low cost, highly reactive biopolyols for the urethane industry: A coproduct of the emerging biodiesel economy. B. R. Vijayendran, H. P. Benecke, D. B. Garbark 11:00 29. Chemistry and physical properties of melt processed- and solution- cross linked corn zein. D. J . S A. Mohamed, J. A. Byars

70-TECH

Organizer

50. Microwave pyrolysis of corn stover: Process development and reaction kinetics. F. Yu, Z. Le, S. Deng, P. Chen, R. Ruan 5 1 . Removal of ammonium from New York City rejection water using a nitritation/ Anammox process. D. R. Coleman, G. Bowden, B. Bodniewicz, K. Beckmann, A. Deur, N. Phillip 52. Assessing As, Hg and Se speciation and transport in flue gas desulphurization material and drywall. S. R. Al-Abed, G. Jegadeesan, K. G. Scheckel 53. Application of Nickel/Kieselguhr catalysts to C9-aldehyde hydrogénation in trickle bed reactor. Y-K. Park, J-K. Jeon, S-S. Kim 54. Conversion of chlorinated hydrocarbon over mesoporous catalysts. Y-K. Park, K. S. Yoo, S-S. Kim, J-K. Jeon 55. Recovery of lactic acid from model fermentation broth using thermostable amine adsorbents. C. H. Ko, J-G. Na, Κ. Β. Yi, J-H. Park, S-S. Han, S-H. Cho, J-N. Kim 56. Adsorption of sulfur compounds in light cycle oil on activated carbon and multicomponent metal oxide. C. H. Ko, H-J. Jeon, K. B. Yi, J-H. Park, H. Ahn, G. T. Kim, J-N. Kim 57. Study on carbon dioxide absorption into ammonia water using high-efficiency packed column. K. B. Yi, Y. J. Kim, C. H. Ko, J-H. Park, J-K. Park, J-N. Kim 58. Decolorization of crude polysaccharides from Cyclocarya paliurus (Batal.) Iljinsk by ultrasound/H 2 0 2 process. J. Xie, M. Xie, S.Nie 59. Deep desulfurization of oil by extraction with ionic liquids. N. Ko, E. Huh, M. Cheong, H. S. Kim, B. S. Ahn 60. Oxidative carbonylation of aniline with polymer-immobilized alkylselenites. E. H. Jeon, J. S. Lee, H. S. Kim, M. Cheong 6 1 . Polymerized room temperature ionic liquids as gas separation membranes. J. E. Bara, C. J. Gabriel, S. Lessmann, T. Carlisle, D. L. Gin, R. D. Noble 62. Preparation of polyurethane foam from microwave pyrolytic bio-oils. Y. Wang, J. Wu, F. Yu, P. Chen, R. Ruan 63. Separation of olefin/paraffin mixtures using multifunctional zwitterionic com­ pounds as carriers. H. W. Bae, D. K. Choi, H. S. Kim, J. S. Lee, M. Cheong, S. D. Lee 64. Comparison of microwave-assisted extrac­ tion and conventional extraction of poly­ saccharides from Ganoderma atrum. Y. Chen, M. Xie, S. Nie, X. Gong 65. MBR for treatment of wastewater from olefins and polyolefins processes. J-J. Qin, M. H. Oo, G. Tao, K. A. Kekre 66. Pilot studies for reclamation of municipal used water: Comparison of MBR-RO and ASP-MF-RO process. J-J. Qin, K. A. Kekre, M. H. Oo, G. Tao, H. Seah 67. Scale-up process study for aniline bisphosphonates: EBP. F. Gu, J. Mathew, P. Palumbo 68. Scale-up process study for aniline bisphosphonates: EDP. F. Gu, P. Palumbo, J. Mathew, R. Nick 69. Synthesis and characterization of poly(/Visopropylacrylamide) particles in supercriti­ cal carbon dioxide. S. Kwon, K. Lee, K. S. Oh, W. Bae, H. Kim 70. Dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) in supercriti­ cal carbon dioxide and in compressed liquid dimethyl ether in presence of siloxane-based surfactant. K. S. Oh, W. Bae, S. Kwon, H. Kim 7 1 . Optimization of spray-drying conditions for β-mannanase stability by response sur­ face methodology. Y. Liu, Z. Liu, W. Qi, Z.He

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

72. Study on direct electrosynthesis conditions of p-aminophenol from nitrobenzene. J . Zhao Sr., C. Song, L. Wang, H. Xu 73. Kinetic measurements using catalyst coatings. H. Doering, S. Jank, S. Schirrmeister, A. Geisselmann, E. Klemm 74. Synthesis of trimesic acid by catalytic oxidation of mesitylene in a loop bubble reactor. Z. Liu, X. Zhang, W. Cai, Y. Wang, F. Xin 75. Biobased solvents for quick-drying cos­ metics. M. Bandres, S. Thiebaud-Roux, P. De Caro 76. Benzaldehydes from propenylbenzenes and cinnamic acid derivatives. M. L. Wang, V. Rajendran WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Clarendon Rm Green Chemistry and Engineering with Gas Expanded Liquids and Near-Critical Media Thermodynamics and Transport Properties: Experiment and Modeling Cosponsored by the Green Chemistry and Engineering Sub-Division A. M. Scurto, K. W. Hutchenson, and B. Subramaniam, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 77. On the molecular modeling of dilute multicomponent systems in near-critical media: Formal results and thermodynamic pitfalls. A. A. Chialvo, J. M. Simonson 8:30 78. Viewing the cybotactic structure in gas-expanded liquids (GXLs). R. Hernandez, J. L. Gohres, C. L. Liotta, C. A. Eckert 8:55 79. Phase equilibrium, structure and transport properties of carbon-dioxide expanded liquids: A molecular simulation study. B. B. Laird, Y. Houndonougbo, K. Kuczera 9:20 80. Solvation and solvatochromism in C0 2 -expanded liquids. Η. Li, S. Arzhantzev, C. Swalina, M. Maroncelli 9:45 8 1 . Oxygen solubility in C0 2 -expanded acetone, methanol, acetontrile and 1-nhexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide. K. E. Wilbanks, Z. K. Lopez-castillo, J . F. Brennecke 10:10 82. Phase behavior and equilibria of r-134a in room-temperature ionic liquids. W. Ren, A. M. Scurto, M. B. Shiflett, A. Yokozeki 10:35 83. Ion pair association in aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions along nearcritical isotherms. A. A. Chialvo, J. M. Simonson 11:00 84. Switching solvents and surfactants using C 0 2 at 1 atmosphere. P. G. Jessop, C. A. Eckert, C. L. Liotta WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Clarendon Rm Green Chemistry and Engineering with Gas Expanded Liquids and Near-Critical Media Reactions Cosponsored by the Green Chemistry and Engineering Sub-Division A. M. Scurto, K. W . Hutchenson, and B. Subramaniam, Organizers 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 85. In situ alkylcarbonic acid catalysts formed in C0 2 -expanded alcohols. J. P. Hallett, C. L. Liotta, C. A. Eckert 1:30 86. Chemical engineering insights toward carbon-nitrogen bond formation in C0 2 -expanded liquid media. R. P. Ciccolini, X. Y. Mak, R. L. Danheiser, J. W. Tester 1:55 87. Catalytic oxidation reactions in carbon dioxide expanded liquids using the green oxidants oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. D. H. Busch, B. Subramaniam

I&EC/INOR

2:20 88. β-Pinene hydrolysis by in situ acid catalysis in reversible smart solvents. M. Donaldson, D. Vinci, E. A. John, J. P. Hallett, P. Pollet, C. A. Eckert, C. L. Liotta 2:45 89. Hydrogénation of polycyclic aromatic compounds using Ni supported on H/'-zeolite as catalysts in supercritical carbon dioxide. E. Sahle-Demessie, V. Devulapelli 3:10 90. Hydrogénation of C0 2 -expanded liquid terpenes: Phase equilibrium-controlled kinetics. E. Bogel-Lukasik, A. Serbanovic, R. Bogel-Lukasik, A. Banet-Osuna, V. Najdanovic-Visak, M. Nunes da Ponte 3:35 9 1 . Hydroformylation in CCVexpanded media. J. A. Tunge 4:00 92. Catalysis, phase equilibria and mass transport in biphasic ionic liquidcompressed CO2 systems. A. Ahosseini, W. Ren, A. M. Scurto 4:25 93. Sulfur trioxide containing caprolactamium hydrosulfate: An extended ionic liquid for large scale production of caprolactam. I. T. Horvéth, V. Fâbos, D. Lantos, A. Bodor, A-M. Bélint, L. T. Mika, O. Sielken, A. D. Cuiper THURSDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza Clarendon Rm Green Chemistry and Engineering with Gas Expanded Liquids and Near-Critical Media Materials Processing Cosponsored by the Green Chemistry and Engineering Sub-Division A. M. Scurto, K. W . Hutchenson, and B. Subramaniam, Organizers 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 94. Synthesis of polytetrafluoroethylene in carbon dioxide expanded solvents: Practical approaches to avoid the use of pfoa. L. Du, L Chi, J. M. DeSimone, G. W. Roberts 9:00 95. Supercritical fluids: Enhancing polymerization and processing. S. M. Howdle 9:25 96. Green processing for creating low-k metalizable polymer films using supercritical carbon dioxide. T. Koga, B. Kugler, J. Loewenstein, P. Gin, J. Koo, M. K. Endoh, J. Jerome, M. H. Rafailovich 9:50 97. Emulsion-templated porous materials using concentrated carbon dioxide-inwater emulsions and inexpensive hydrocarbon surfactants. B. Tan, J-Y. Lee,

A. I. Cooper 10:15 98. Hollow polymer shells through emulsification/freeze drying followed by near critical solvent processing. W. Yin, M. Z. Yates 10:40 99. Fractionation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles using CCVexpanded liquids: Experiment and theory. M. Anand, S-S. You, C. L. Kitchens, W. R. Ashurst, C. B. Roberts 11:05 100. Nanoparticulate metal complexes prepared with compressed carbon dioxide: Structural correlations and nitric oxide binding. C. A. Johnson, J. G. Nguyen, B. Subramaniam, A. S. Borovik 11:30 101. Development of a novel precipitation technique for the production of highly respirable powders: The atomized rapid injection for solvent extraction (ARISE) process. N. R. Foster, R. Sih

ΗΠ

Division of Inorganic Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert and D. C. Crans, Program Chairs SUNDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 204 A/B Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience Materials and Applications D. C. Crans and C. L. Hill, Presiding

Section D

B. P. Burton-Pye, I. M. Mbomekalle, J. Jing, D. McGregor, M. R. Antonio, W.W.LukensJr.J.M.Poblet Section Β BCEC 206 A/B Frontiers in Organometallic Chemistry Presiding

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 7. Cyclic esters and cyclodepsipeptides: Dynamic combinatorial libraries and chemical amplification. M. H. Chisholm 9:00 8. Enantioselective catalysis based on palladium enolate chemistry. M. Sodeoka 9:30 9. Can a carbene do the job of a metal? G. Bertrand 10:00 10. Ligand design in organogroup 3 metal chemistry. W. E. Piers, K. D. Conroy, A. L Kenward, J. A. Ross, M. Parvez 10:30 11. Magnetic perturbation of the redox potentials of localized and delocalized mixed-valence complexes. C. Lapinte 11:00 12. Synthesis of iron-sulfur clusters in nonpolar solvent: Modeling the active sites of nitrogenase and hydrogenase. K. Tatsumi, Y. Ohki 11:30 13. Alkene metathesis in metal coordi­ nation spheres: The quest for molecular gyroscopes. J . A. Gladysz Section C BCEC 203 Theoretical and Computational Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, R. B. King,

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Organizers,

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:10 1 . Mixed-valence polyoxometalates in molecular magnetism. M. AIDamen, J. M. Clemente-Juan, E. Coronado, A. Gaita-Arino 9:40 2. Polyoxometalates as inorganic acceptor component in conducting and magnetic molecular materials. L Ouahab 10:10 3. Antitumor activity and photoconduc­ tivity of photochemically-induced 12- and 28-electron reduced aggregates derived from [M07O24]6". T. Yamase 10:40 Intermission. 11:00 4. Adsorption of polyoxometalates on metals and corrosion inhibition. L. P. Kazansky 11:30 5. Exploring POM-clusters in Materials Science. D. G. Kurth 12:00 6. Lanthanide and technetium-99 substituted polyoxometalates: Speciation studies and applications. L C. Francesconi, R. C. Howell,

R. D. A d a m s , Organizer,

9:40 16. Macrocyclic isolobal analogy. M. A. Omary, X. Wang 10:00 17. Binuclear metal carbonyl nitrosyls: Comparison with isoelectronic metal car­ bonyl derivatives. R. B. King, H. Wang, Y. Xïe, H. F. Schaefer III 10:20 18. Computational insights into degenerate ethylene exchange with a Grubbs type catalyst. C. E. Webster 10:40 19. Electronic effects of phosphine substituents in cross-coupling processes. C. Gourlaouen, F. Maseras 11:00 20. Nonlinear optical properties of cyclometallated Ir(lll) complexes: A combined experimental and TDDFT investigation. F. De Angelis, S. Fantacci, A. Sgamellotti, D. Roberto, R. Ugo 11:20 2 1 . Novel dithiophosphinic acids as actinide extractants, a density functional theory investigation. M. T. Benson, M. L. Moser, D. R. Peterman

Organizer

Presiding

9:00 14. Mechanism of molecular oxygen insertion in a Pd(ll)-H bond. R. P. Muller, R. A. Kemp, K. I. Goldberg 9:20 15. Ir-Pincer dihydrogen complex cata­ lyzed dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane differs from ethane dehydrogenation. A. Paul, C. B. Musgrave, P. Zimmerman

BCEC 208 Bioinorganic Chemistry: Enzymes and Coenzymes D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and S. L. Michel, Organizers R. P. Doyle,

Presiding

8:30 22. Differential studies of the kinetics, mechanisms, and active site structures for truncated and full-length phenylalanine hydroxylases. G. Anarat, M. S. Chow, S. M. Hertzler, S. Datta, E. I. Solomon, J. P. Caradonna 8:50 23. Dioxygen activation at the nonheme diiron center of the hydroxylase component of toluene/oxylene monooxygenase. L J. Murray, R. Garcia-Serres, M. S. McCormick, S. Naik, Β. Η. Huynh, S. J. Lippard 9:10 24. How H. pylori NikR recognizes DNA: Metal ion requirements and sequence specificity. N. S. Dosanjh, N. A. Hammerbacher, L Stavitskaya, S. L. J. Michel 9:30 25. Structural studies of the Ni traffick­ ing proteins: HypA and Nur. D. C. Kennedy, K. A. O'Brien, M. J. Maroney 9:50 26. X-ray structure of a hydroxylaseregulatory protein complex from phenol hydroxylase, a hydrocarbon oxidizing multicomponent monooxygenase. M. S. McCormick, M. H. Sazinsky, P. W. Dunten, A. DiDonato, S. J. Lippard 10:10 27. Using unnatural amino acids to probe reduction potential tuning of the blue copper center. D. K. Garner, M. D. Vaughan, H. J. Hwang, M. G. Savelieff, S. M. Berry, J. F. Honek, Y.Lu 10:30 28. Insight into the catalytic role of aspartate-97 in the type-l methionine aminopeptidase from Escherichia coli. S. Mitra, K. M. Job, Β. Bennett, R. C. Holz 10:50 29. Metal-citrate complex uptake in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). R. P. Doyle 11:10 30. Cofactor binding and spectroscopy in the HIF-asparaginyl hydroxylase, FIH-1. M. J. Knapp 11:30 3 1 . Crystallographic studies of pyruvate-formate lyase activating enzyme. J. L Vey, J. Yang, M. Li, J. B. Broderick, C. L Drennan 11:50 32. Mixed valent, Fe(ll)Fe(l), diiron complexes reproduce the unique rotated state of the [FeFe]Hydrogenase active site. T. Liu, M. Y. Darensbourg, M. Singleton 12:10 33. Synthetic efforts to structural analogs of C-cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH). J. Sun, L. Deng, R. H. Holm

Section Ε BCEC 213 Synthetic Coordination Chemistry D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W . A. Howard, Organizers 8:30 34. Novel tripodal aminoisoquinolylbased sensors designed for selective Zn detection and luminescence approaching the visible spectrum. R. P. Planalp, D. P. Kennedy, A. G. DiPasquale, A. L. Rheingold 8:50 35. Dinitrogen chemistry at five-coordi­ nate iron centers. N. P. Mankad, M. T. Whited, J. C. Peters 9:10 36. EP-eliminating (E = P, As) niobium complexes as EP synthons, and their use in the synthesis of cyc/o-E 3 complexes. N. A. Piro, A. R. Fox, C. C. Cummins 9:30 37. Functionalization and reactivity of a vanadium carbamate complex. J. S. Silvia, C. C. Cummins 9:50 38. Molecules incorporating a niobium trisenolate platform. B. Cossairt, C. C. Cummins 10:10 39. Homoleptic "crown" N-heterocyclic carbene ligands and their complexes. M. D. Spicer, J. A. Murphy, S. R. Park, S-Z. Zhou, R. McKie, D. Dunwoodie 10:30 Intermission. 10:50 40. Investigations of anion-{pi} interac­ tions between {pi}-deficient aromatic sys­ tems and complex anions. I. D. Giles, B. L. Schottel, H. T. Chifotides, L M. Pérez, K. R. Dunbar 11:10 4 1 . Mixed-ligand complexes by reaction of metal carbonates and carboxylic acids under hydrothermal conditions. G. C. Diaz de Delgado, J. E. Contreras, A. Bahsas B, J. M. Delgado Q 11:30 42. Novel heteroscorpionates featuring Ν and S donor atoms. M. Wagner, K. Ruth 11:50 43. Novel oligotopic poly(pyrazolyl)borate ligands. M. Wagner, T. Morawitz 12:10 44. Osmium (II) complexes based based upon the 2-[(diphenylphosphanyl)methyl]-pyridine ligand. G. D. Phelan, J. B. Benedict, W. Kaminsky, B. Carlson Section F BCEC 212 Organometallic Catalysts Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, T. S. A. Hor,

Organizer

Presiding

8:30 45. Investigations of the catalytic activity of rhodium ΛΑ-heterocyclic carbene com­ pounds. C. Crudden, J. M. Praetorius 8:50 46. N,S-Heterocyclic carbene com­ plexes: Syntheses, structures, catalysis. T. S. A. Hor 9:10 47. N-heterocyclic palladium carbene complexes as catalysts in the MizorokiHeck reaction. M. A. Taige, T. Strassner 9:30 48. Palladacycles vs. chelating N-het­ erocyclic carbene complexes of nickel as catalysts for C-C bond forming reactions. S. R. Foley, J. Chitanda, T. Paulose 9:50 49. Bifunctional complexes with pyrazole-N-heterocyclic carbene ligands. D. Grotjahn, C. A. Schulte, R. E. Hurt 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 50. Metal catalyzed hydroborations: Mechanism and applications. C. Crudden, D. R. Edwards, C. J. Lata 10:40 5 1 . Organometallic fluorides of Pd(ll): Structure and reactivity related to catalytic C-F bond synthesis with benign fluoride sources. D. V. Yandulov, E. Lee 11:00 52. Synthesis and NMR studies with nitrogen-15 labeled ligands used in bifunc­ tional catalysis. E. J. Kragulj, V. Miranda-Soto, D. Grotjahn 11:20 53. Assessing potential energy sur­ faces for M-CH3 functionalization. R. J . Nielsen, J. Gonzales, J. Oxgaard, R. A. Periana, W. A. Goddard III

TECH-71

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

INOR 11:40 54. Atom economical C-N and C-S bond forming reactions catalyzed by monomeric copper(l) complexes with amido and thiolate ligands. S. A. Delp, C. Munro-Leighton, T. B. Gunnoe, J. L. Petersen 12:00 55. Comparison of the catalytic activity of water-soluble molybdocene complexes. T. J. Ahmed, S. R. Finnell, D. R. Tyler

SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 204 A/B Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience Contributed Talks

Section G C. L. Hill and D. C. Crans, BCEC 209

L. Cronin,

Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Energy and Environment Cosponsored by BIOHW Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

H. L. Rhoads and C. N. Brammer, Presiding D. J . Nelson, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 56. Ultra large scale and green synthe­ sis of monodisperse magnetite nanocrystals from edible oils and rust. C. T. Yavuz, J. A. Cox, C. R. Suchecki, A. A. Tran, J. T. Mayo, A. Prakash, J. C. Falkner, E. Quevedo, V. L. Colvin 8:50 57. Direct microwave synthesis of palladium-based formic acid fuel cell catalysts. M. S. Wellons, A. Cisar, E. Heselmeyer, B. Patel, S. H. Withers-Kriby, C. M. Lukehart 9:10 58. New synthetic route to nanosized manganite and its application as a cathode component for a lithium-air battery. V. M. B. Crisostomo, J. K. Ngala, S. Alia, A. Dobley, C. Morein, C-H. Chen, X. Shen, S. L Suib 9:30 59. Polyacrylate-capped Pt nanoparticles assembled in polyelectrolyte: Sur­ face and electrocatalytic characterization. Z. Estephan, M. Z. Markarian, P. Karam, M. El Harakeh, L. Alawiye, L. I. Halaoui 9:50 60. Nanostructured bismuth telluride: Synthesis and characterization of elec­ tronic properties. M. Dirmyer, S. Borkar, J. V. Badding, A. Sen 10:10 6 1 . Laponite/PANI/QD nanophotovoltaic films. M. E. Hagerman, J. D. Kehlbeck 10:30 62. Transition energies, extinction coefficient and oscillator strength in PbS colloidal quantum dots. L. Cademartiri, E. Montanari, A. Migliori, A. Guagliardi, G. Calestani, G. A. Ozin 10:50 63. Effect of α,ω-dithiols on the forma­ tion of Culn1-xGaxS2 nanoparticles. J . S. Gardner, E. Shurdha, L. D. Lau, R. G. Rodriquez, J. J. Pak 11:10 64. Tin sulfide nanocrystals: Synthesis and characterization. D. S. Koktysh, J. R. McBride, S. J. Rosenthal 11:30 65. Effect of surface and lattice vana­ dium ions on the physicochemical and photocatalytic properties of porous Ti02. S-M. Chang, W-S. Liu, P-H. Sung 11:50 66. Synthesis of porphyrin nanopar­ ticles. S. J . Lee, S. T. Nguyen, J. T. Hupp Basic Research Needs for Energy Storage Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by INOR Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Actinide Chemistry Overview Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Preparing for a Successful Transition from Graduate School to Work Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR

Organizers

Presiding

2:00 67. Three weak-acid-type polyoxometalate clusters in solution: A summary and comparison. M. L. Kistler, T. Liu 2:20 68. Characterization and applications of polyoxometallate-protein thin films grown on electrode surfaces using layer-by-layer assembly. C. Shannon, K. Jiang, W. Zhan 2:40 69. Construction of coordination poly­ mers containing polyoxometalate clusters as anions. B. J. S. Johnson 3:00 70. Double helical polyoxovanadate by oxidative coupling reaction. Y. Hayashi 3:20 7 1 . Organic-soluble polyoxometalates: Routes to luminescent devices and rich electrochemistry. B. P. Burton-Pye, J. Jing, M. R. Antonio, L. C. Francesconi 3:40 72. Efficient reduction and stabilization abilities of polyoxometalates for the prepa­ ration of Palladium nanoparticles. J. Zhang, T. Liu, B. Keita, L Nadjo, I. M. Mbomekalle 4:00 73. Electrochemical, in situ spectroelectrochemical and optical luminescence studies of Ln-substituted polyoxometa­ lates. J. Jing, B. P. Burton-Pye, D. McGregor, I. M. Mbomekalle, M. R. Antonio, L. C. Francesconi 4:20 74. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemistry of POM-encapsulated hydroquinones. J . Xin, C. Shannon 4:40 75. Reaction of M 0 4 - with reduced alpha2-[P2W17O61]10- (with M = 99Tc or Re). I. M. Mbomekalle, R. C. Howell, B. P. Burton-Pye, D. McGregor, L C. Francesconi 5:00 76. From virus capsid proteins to poly­ oxometalate macroanions: Similar selfassembly behaviors? J. Zhang, T. Liu 5:20 77. Photochemical synthesis of discrete Cu-ln-S clusters from single source pre­ cursors. P. J. Shapiro, M. Williams, J. Nairn, R. M. Okasha, T. H. Afifi, B. Twamley Section Β BCEC 206 A/B Young Investigator Symposium K. Bowman-James and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizers

K. R. Dunbar, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 78. Synthetic 3-D metal cluster chemis­ try: On the borderline between self-assem­ bly and synthetic control. T. C. Stamatatos, G. Christou 2:00 79. Amide-containing macrocycles as platforms for oxygen activation and anion recognition. I. V. Korendovych, M. Cho, O. Kryatova, R. J. Staples, W. M. Reiff, E. V. Rybak-Akimova 2:30 80. Low-voltage organic and organicinorganic hybrid electronics enabled by ultrathin siloxane-based self-assembled molecular layers and cross-linked poly­ mers as gate dielectrics. M-H. Yoon, A. Facchetti, H. Yan, T. J. Marks

3:00 8 1 . Metal-based turn-on fluorescent probes for nitric oxide sensing. M. H. Lim, S. J. Lippard 3:30 82. Metal-protein interactions and their roles in enzyme structure and function. A. J. Reig 4:00 83. Mimicking the function of redox enzymes with chemically modified elec­ trodes. N. K. Devaraj, R. Decreau, C. E. D. Chidsey, J. P. Collman 4:30 84. Sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT stud­ ies of Fe-S bonds in models and protein active sites: Effects of Η-bonds on covalency and redox properties. A. Dey, Ε. I. Solomon 5:00 85. The role of proton-coupled electron transfer in O—O bond activation. J. Rosenthal, D. G. Nocera Section C BCEC 203 Inorganic Materials: Applications to Environmental and Energy Research Cosponsored by PETR D. J. Nelson and D. Crans,

Organizers

R. B. Little and A. S. Harper-Leatherman, Presiding Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Presiding

Organizer,

1:30 86. Metal borohydrides as hydrogen storage materials: The study of the ther­ mal decomposition of AI(BH4)3. D. A. Knight, G. M. Brown, R. Smithwick III, R. ligner 1:50 87. Gas sensing mechanism in chemiresistive cobalt and metal-free phthalocyanine thin films. F. Bohrer, A. Sharoni, C. Colesniuc, J. Park, I. K. Schuller, A. C. Kummel, W. C. Trogler 2:10 88. Exceptional chemical and thermal stability of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks. B. Wang, A. P. Côté, O. M. Yaghi 2:30 89. Measuring trace level beryllium, lead, and hexavalent chromium in radioactive contaminated samples. L. D. Youmans, M. J. Brisson, M. Bernard, W. Langford, M. A. Jones 2:50 90. Multilayered functional materials for heavy metal water remediation. R. W. Hicks, M. A. Pitt, S. T. Blumberg, D. W. Johnson, J. M. Harris, L. M. Farmen 3:10 9 1 . Fluorescent poly(silolevinylene)s for the rapid detection of high explosives. J. C. Sanchez, W. C. Trogler 3:30 92. DNAzyme and aptamer based biosensors for on-site real time monitoring. D. Mazumdar, J. Liu, M. Yigit, J. H. Lee, Y.Lu 3:50 93. Biodegradable shape memory poly(ester-urethane) nanocomposites strengthened by polyhedral silsesquioxane (POSS) core. J . Xu, J. Song 4:10 94. Metal separations using titaniumbased materials. D. T. Hobbs, M. D. Nyman, D. R. Click 4:30 95. Polynuclear coinage metal complexes: One class of molecular materials with numerous fundamental advances and multifaceted applications. M. A. Omary 4:50 96. Schottky contacts at chemically modified Si(111). S. Maldonado, N. S. Lewis 5:10 97. Water soluble cadmium sulfide quantum dots for latent fingerprint detection. S. K. Gill, R. Sanger, Κ. Η. Cheng, L. J. Hope-Weeks

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

72-TECH

Section D BCEC 208 Inorganic Modeling of Biological Systems D. C. Crans and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers 1:30 98. Basis of hemozoin immunoreactivity. A. C. Schrimpe, D. W. Wright 1:50 99. Bioinspired oxidation reactions with highly preorganized dicopper complexes. F. Meyer, A. Prokofieva, A. I. Prikhod'ko, S. Dechert 2:10 100. DFT studies of NO activation of sGC. A. Barabanschikov, J. T. Sage, N. J. Silvemail, W. R. Scheldt, J. Zhao, W. Sturhahn, E. E. Alp 2:30 101. Dioxygen reactivity of Cu(l) com­ plexes supported by β-diketiminate ligands: Distinguishing between kinetic and thermodynamic control. L. M. R. Hill, W. B. Tolman 2:50 102. Generation and substrate oxygen­ ation reactions by an end-on bound Superoxo Copper(ll) complex. D. Maiti, H. C. Fry, J. S. Woertink, M. Vance, E. I. Solomon, K. D. Karlin 3:10 103. Model complexes of the C u z center from nitrous oxide reductase. L. Yang, R. P. Houser 3:30 104. New models of superoxide reduc­ tase: Reactivity with alkylperoxides. F. Namuswe, G. D. Kasper, Y. Jiang, D. Krishnamurthy, D. P. Goldberg 3:50 105. Novel reactivity of a μ-η .η 2 disulfidodicopper complex supported by a neutral bidentate N-donor ligand. I. Bar-Nahum, J. T. York, W. B. Tolman 4:10 106. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from Mo(VI) centers. P. Basu 4:30 107. Probing the structure and reactivity of Copper(l) bound by histidylhistidine in amyloid {beta} peptide models. G. Y. Park, R. A. Himes, N. J. Blackburn, K. D. Karlin 4:50 108. Reaction of strong nucleophiles with molybdenum-iron-sulfur edge-bridge double cubanes. M. L. Hlavinka, T. Miyaji, R. H. Holm Section Ε BCEC 213 Characterization and Applications of Coordination Compounds D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W . A. Howard, Organizers 1:30 109. Coordination of extended bis(imine-quinaldine) ligands to produce helical Zn(ll) and Ni(ll) complexes. C. J. Levy, D. Prema, J. Desper 1:50 110. Syntheses and characterization of strong and highly soluble reducing agents having ditungsten units. G. M. Chiarella, F. A. Cotton, C. A. Murillo, C. Willkinson, Z.Li 2:10 111. Fluorescence/MRI sensing of zinc with water-soluble porphyrin molecular platform. X-A. Zhang, K. S. Lovejoy, A. Jasanoff, S. J. Lippard 2:30 112. Dastardly d i0 dilemmas: Dodging deception and discerning distribution details. D. C. Bebout, W. Lai, S. M. Berry, R. J. Butcher 2:50 113. Transition metal complexes with a new series of amide-based chelating and macrocyclic ligands. B. Roehm, V. W. Day, K. Bowman-James 3:10 114. Anion and transition metal ion coordination complexes. S. Ghosh, V. W. Day, B. Roehm, K. Bowman-James 3:30 115. Amido-based multicycles: New ligand systems for anions. S. O. Kang, V. W. Day, K. Bowman-James 3:50 Intermission. 4:10 116. Applications of bis- and tris(2seleno-1 -R-imidazolyl)hydroborato ligands to main group and transition metal chemis­ try. V. K. Landry, G. Parkin

INOR 4:30 117. Synthesis and reactivity of molybdenum, tungsten and nickel complexes of p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene and its sulfurcontaining variants. D. Buccella, G. Parkin 4:50 118. Late transition metal bis(thioether) silane complexes. L. I. Lozano-Lewis, K. Heredia, K. A. Kreisel, G. P. A. Yap, R. D. Pike, D. Rabinovich 5:10 119. A comparison of tetrathienylsubstituted boron-dipyrrin sensors: Colorimetric (pink-clear) Cu 2+ indication with 3-(2-thienyl)-4,4-di(2-thienyl)-8-(3-thienyl)4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene. D. G. Churchill, S. H. Choi, K. Kim, K. Pang 5:30 120. Synthesis and reactivity of low valent iron complexes supported by highly substituted tris(pyrazolyl)borate ligand. F. A. Jové, G. P. A. Yap, K. H. Theopold Section F BCEC 212 Organometallic Synthesis B. T. Donovan-Merkert, Organizer L M. Slaughter, Presiding 1:30 121. Nonclassical NHC transfers from the reaction of (IMes)AgCI with osmium carbonyl clusters and some novel reactivity of NHC osmium hydride clusters. C. E. Cooke, R. K. Pomeroy, J. A. C. Clyburne 1:50 122. One-step assembly of chiral acyclic diaminocarbene metal complexes for electrophilic catalysis. Y. A. Wanniarachchi, A. J. Miranda, T. Hajimirzaei, L. M. Slaughter 2:10 123. Bis N-heterocyclic carbene complexes of palladium and platinum. Synthesis, structure and catalytic activity in the CH activation of methane. S. Ahrens, T. Strassner 2:30 124. Tungsten(VI) N-heterocyclic carbene adducts: Synthesis, characterization and theoretical studies. M. D. Spicer, C. A. Dodds, C. D. Abemethy 2:50 125. Stable chiral diaminocyclopropenylidenes. D. Holschumacher, M. Tamm 3:10 126. Synthesis and modification of novel tripalladium sandwich complexes: Pathways to monolayer palladium sheets. S. K. Hurst, F. L. Mulligan, T. Sweigart 3:30 Intermission. 3:40 127. Synthesis and reactivity of new group 4 triamidoamine complexes. R. Waterman, A. J. Roering 4:00 128. New 17-electron, chromium-, molybdenum- and tungsten-centered radicals containing a cyclopentadienylide ligand. J. H. Brownie, M. C. Baird, W. E. Geiger, D. R. Laws 4:20 129. Tapping the potential of Ru ': Reactivity of monomeric and dimeric cases. K. G. Caulton, A. Walstrom, M. Pink, H. Fan 4:40 130. Synthesis and reactivity of cationic iridium silylene complexes supported by a PNP pincer ligand. E. Calimano, T. D. Tilley 5:00 131. Nitrogen fixation chemistry of a molybdenum trisanilide system. J. J. Curley, T. Murahashi, P. Mueller, C. C. Cummins Section G BCEC 209 Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization General Methods Cosponsored by BIOHW D. J. Nelson and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers

2:10 134. Hexagonal-structured self-assem­ bly of nanocrystalline anatase titania templated by cetyltrimethyammonium bromide: Titania nanoskeleton. T. Sakai, S. Dai, H. Shibata, H. Sakai, M. Abe, K. Sakamoto, S. Sano, N. Koshikawa, S. Adachi, T. Kobayashi, T. Tanaka 2:30 135. Highly crystalline rectangular palladium nanoparticles: Colloidal synthe­ sis and electron microscopy studies. Y. Sun, L. Zhang, H. Zhou, Y. Zhu, E. Sutter, M. Rafailovich, J. Sokolov 2:50 136. Highly luminescent and photostable InP/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals. P. Reiss, M. Protière 3:10 137. Real-time sizing of nanoparticles in solution with 3-D single-particle tracking. C. S. Xu, H. Cang, D. Montiel, H. Yang 3:30 138. Size-tunable monodisperse rhodium nanocrystals with catalytically active (111) surface structures. Y. Zhang, M. E. Grass, S. E. Habas, F. Tao, T. Zhang, Y. Borodko, P. Yang, G. A. Somorjai 3:50 139. Studies into the mechanism of the nucleation and growth of FePt nanoparticles. H. Bagaria, C. Srivastava, D. T. Johnson, M. Shamsuzzoha, G. B. Thompson, D. E. Nikles 4:10 140. Syntheses of novel magnetic aluminosilicates and their applications on removal of copper (II) ion. C-F. Chang, Y-L. Wu 4:30 141. Synthesis and characterization of Germanium Chalcogenide nanoparticles via single-source precursors and coprecipitation. M. Caldwell, S. Raoux, D. J. Milliron, H-S. P. Wong 4:50 142. Transition metal salt: Pluronic lyotropic liquid crystalline systems for nanostructured and mesostructured materials. Y. Turker, H. I. Okur, 0 . Dag

Basic Research Needs for Energy Storage Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by INOR Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Structure and Bonding Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Career Perspectives and Insights into Life after Graduate School Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR SUNDAY EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Applications of Materials Energy Research Cosponsored by PETR B. T. Donovan-Merkert and D. C. Crans, Organizers R. B. Little, Presiding D. J. Nelson, Organizer, Presiding

Section H BCEC 211 Bioinorganic Chemistry: DNA and RNA D. C. Crans and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers 1:30 143. Multimetallic artificial oligopeptides as luminescent DNA sensors. L. A. Levine, M. E. Williams 1:50 144. Photophysics of platinum(ll) polypyridines: Effects of DNA binding and carbometalation. M. L Clark, D. R. McMillin, S. Diring, R. Ziessel 2:10 145. Metal-dependent global folding and activity of the 8-17 DNAzyme studied by fluorescence resonance energy trans­ fer. H-K. Kim, J. Liu, J. Li, N. Nagraj, M. Li, C. Pavot, Y. Lu 2:30 146. Light-activated oligonucleotides for controlling gene expression. I. J. Dmochowski 2:50 147. Kinetically-inert organometallic ruthenium arene complexes: A new class of cancer cell cytotoxic agents. S. J. Dougan, A. Mukherjee, A. Habtemariam, P. J. Sadler 3:10 148. How binding of different metals affects the structure of nickel regulator protein NikR. C. M. Phillips, E. R. Schreiter, Y. Guo, C. L. Drennan 3:30 149. Antioxidant inhibition of DNA damage through metal coordination. E. E. Battin, N. R. Perron, R. R. Ramoutar, J. L. Brumaghim 3:50 150. Nature of covalent adducts formed on ds-DNA by dirhodium(ll,ll) carboxylate compounds. S. U. Dunham, S. U. Dunham 4:10 151. Stabilization of quadruplex DNA and inhibition of telomerase by square planar metal complexes. A. Arola, S. Neidle, J. E. Reed, R. Vilar

7:00-10:00 155. "Research for the Classroom BIG PIC­ TURE Project": Tuning the charge transfer absorption bands of common ruthenium solar cell dyes by selected S-donor coligands. H. Martinez, K. Phan, H-W. Kwon, R. Lucente-Schultz, J. Hatcher, W-H. Chen, J. M. Hudson, M. A. Omary 156. Ti-grafted mesoporous silicas: 22 KJ/mol hydrogen storage materials using single site organometallic fragments as σ-Η2 binding sites. A. Hamaed, D. M. Antonelli 157. Hydrogen storage in microporous coordi­ nation solids with unsaturated metal cen­ ters. S. S. Kaye, M. Hartman, V. K. Peterson, Y. Liu, J. R. Long 158. Microporous metal formates for gas storage and separation. K. Kim, H. Kim, D. G. Samsonenko, Y. Sun 159. Soot oxidation properties of LaFe03 synthesized by solution combustion. D. S. Kang, K-H. Bae, Y. Hwang 160. Dye-sensitized solar cell performance of organized mesoporous titanium dioxide with high surface area. C-H. Huang, l-L. Kao, R-A. Doong 161. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on square-planar d8 donor complexes without and with organic acceptors. W-H. Chen, J. M. Hudson, J. Katz, N. S. Lewis, M. A. Omary 162. Mesoporous silica-supported catalysts for the production of biodiesel from high free fatty acid-containing feedstocks. N. A. Zafiropoulos, H. L. Ngo, E. T. Samulski, T. A. Foglia, W. Lin Section Β BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Applications of Organometallic Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizer

T. Sakai, P. S. Billone, and C. S. Xu, Presiding 1:30 132. Converting metals to phosphides: A versatile, solution-mediated strategy for the synthesis of metal phosphides. A. E. Henkes, R. Schaak 1:50 133. Formation of Co nanoparticles using a photochemical method. P. S. Billone, J. C. Scaiano

4:30 152. Importance of carbonate in the mechanism of action of carboplatin. A. J. Di Pasqua, J. Goodisman, D. Kerwood, B. B. Toms, R. L. Dubowy, J. C. Dabrowiak 4:50 153. Programmable platinum antitumor agents for breast and ovarian cancers. E. Kim, R. G. Croy, J. M. Essigmann 5:10 154. DNA Strand cleavage near at mismatch directed by a rhodium complex. M. H. Lim, J. K. Barton

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

7:00-10:00 163. Atom economic synthesis of amides via transition metal catalyzed rearrangement of oxaziridines. R. H. Crabtree, C. H.Leung 164. Withdrawn.

165. Monocyclopentadienyl Ti complexes: Influence of pendant donors on ethylene/ styrène copolymerization. K-S. Son, R. M. Waymouth 166. Novel heteronuclear Al(lll) / Ir(lll) complexes for solution-processed OLEDs. J. O. Huh, J. S. Jeong, C. H. Shin, N. G. Kim, K. Y. Hwang, Y. Do 167. Pyrazole complexes as anion receptors. L Riera, S. Nieto, V. Riera, J. Perez, D. Miguel 168. Synthesis, characterization and silylcyanation reactivity of ^ 5 -C 5 Ph 4 H)MCI 4 (M=Nb, Ta): Group 5 supersize piano stools. W. Tikkanen, D. T. Barrios, T. C. Kwong, P. Lee, J. B. Lepe 169. Synthesis, characterizations, and fluorescence and cytotoxicity studies of rhenium(l) tosylato complexes. S. K. Pramanik, D. A. Hill, G. K. Haynes, M. O. Iwunze, G. E. Greco, D. M. Ho, J. A. Krause, S. K. Mandai 170. Withdrawn. 171. Electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of a soluble silicon phthalocyanine. K. R. Pichaandi, H. Jacobsen, J. Bollinger, K. Duraisamy, R. H. Schmehl, M. J. Fink 172. Withdrawn. 173. New P,N ligands based on the phosphaalkene motif for use in catalysis. J. Dugal-Tessier, D. P. Gates, G. R. Dake Section C BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Bioinorganic Chemistry: DNA and RNA D. C. Crans and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers 7:00-10:00 174. Alternative synthesis, characterization, and DNA-binding of a [Ru(phen)2dppz]2+ phenazine linked dimer. S. Glazier, J. L. Achtyl 175. Arene-Ru-chloroquine complexes as potential antimalarial or antitumor agents: DNA binding and heme aggregation inhibi­ tion properties. R. A. Sanchez-Delgado, C. Rajapakse, A. Martinez, B. Naoulou 176. Designed ruthenium nitrosyls with a coordinated fluorescent dye: 'Trackable" NO donors for delivery of NO to cells. M. J. Rose, P. Mascharak 177. Histone modifications in cisplatin treated cancer cells. M. A. Wallace, S. J. Lippard 178. Ni[HAs03]-loaded polymer-caged lipo­ somes as an effective vehicle for trans­ porting As'" to cancer cells. S-M. Lee, H. Chen, T. V. O'Halloran, S. T. Nguyen 179. Photo-cross-linking and identification of proteins that bind to platinum-modified DNA in cancer cell extracts. E. R. Guggenheim, S. J. Lippard 180. Photoactivated antisense oligonucleotide for regulating gene experession in K562 and zebrafish. X. Tang, J. Swaminathan, J. L. Richards, A. M. Gewirtz, I. J. Dmochowski 181. Pt(ll) Substrates of organic cation trans­ porters and cellular processing of related Pt-DNA adducts. K. S. Lovejoy, S. Zhang, K. M. Giacomini, S. J. Lippard 182. Self-assembly of N2-functionalized guanosines. S. Martic, D. X-Y. Liu, D. S. Wang, D. G. Wu 183. Sensor design and characterization of novel metal-specific DNAzymes. X. Meng, J. Liu, A. K. Brown, Y. Lu 184. Synthesis and characterization of copper complexes with polypyridyl ligands: DNA binding study and biological activity against Leishmania (L.) mexicana. M. Navarro, O. Corona, T. Vargas, E. Marchan 185. Thermodynamic stability of a DNA duplex containing a spiroiminodihydantoin lesion. F. Chinyengetere, E. R. Jamieson

TECH-73

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

INOR

Section D

Section F

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Chemistry of Lanthanides and Actinides General Inorganic Chemistry B. T. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

7:00-10:00 186. Predicting the effects of ligand modifica­ tions on L r r + emission for 2-Hydroxyisophthalamide-based sensitizers. A. P. S. Samuel, J. Xu, Κ. Ν. Raymond 187. Synergistic chemistry of U(VI), transition metal, and lanthanide(lll) complexes in alkaline carbonate-peroxide solutions. G. S. Goff, L. F. Brodnax, M. R. Cisneros, F. L. Taw, K. S. Williamson, W. Runde 188. Nanosized high relaxivity MR contrast agents by conjugation to virus capsids. A. Datta, J. M. Hooker, M. Botta, Μ. Β. Francis, Κ. Ν. Raymond 189. Development of a glovebox for actinide molecular spectroscopy. L. R. Martin, D. R. Peterman, W. F. Bauer 190. Excited state energy transfer in d10-d8 mixed-metal donor systems with rare earth acceptor ions. R. Yson, H. Lu, A. Nicholas, H. H. Patterson 191. Synthesis and characterization of novel f-element complexes in near-neutral and alkaline solutions. G. S. Goff, L. F. Brodnax, M. R. Cisneros, F. L. Taw, B. Scott, W. Runde 192. Synthesis and evaluation of afunctional Gd(lll) chelates for targeted MRI. H. Lee, D. Marell, V. Mohan, H-S. Chong 193. Eu(lll) complexation to sugars. H. B. Silber, T. Pham, T. Guzman 194. High and low valent actinide coordination chemistry with nitrogen and sulfur donor ligands. R. Copping, G. Tian, L. Rao 195. Luminescence studies of lanthanide complexes within room temperature ionic liquids. M. B. Goldey, T. A. Hopkins 196. Nanoscale metal-organic frameworks as potential multimodal imaging agents. W. J. Rieter, K. M. Taylor, H. An, W. Lin, W.Lin 197. Polymetallic lanthanide complexes of multiple azamacrocyclic binding sites incorporating different chromophores. A. J . L. Villaraza, S. Faulkner 198. Structural characterization of uranyl complexes with multidentate schiff base ligands. M. S. Bharara, J. Z. Vilseck, K. L. Strawbridge, Y. Li, A. E. V. Gorden Section Ε BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Environmental Aspects of Inorganic Chemistry B. T. Donovan-Merkert and V. K. Sharma, Organizers

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

7:00-10:00 203. C-X (X = H, F, O) bond cleavage reac­ tions and the denitrogenation of pyridine by a transient titanium alkylidyne. B. C. Bailey 204. Eu(lll) and Eu(lll) phosphonate doped hydroxyapatite: Photostable biological probe for targeting bone cancer. L F. Bensaid-Geyer, F. Yao, R. Z. LeGeros, T. Polenova, L. C. Francesconi 205. Norbomane and fused polynorbornane based receptors for anions. A. J. Lowe, F. M. Pfeffer 206. Coordination of pyridinethiols to gold. M. T. Râisânen, Ν. Runeberg, M. Klinga, P. Pyykkô, M. Kemell, M. Leskelâ, T. Repo 207. NMR study of bis-(hinokitiolato)copper(ll) complexes with amines. L. Boralsky, M. Montgomery, J. Baker, G. Arvanitis 208. Photochemical reactivity of cis and /rans(AupNBT)2: A role for gold-gold interactions? J. B. Foley, A. Herring 209. Ruthenium salen nitro and nitrosyl complexes: Synthesis, characterization and photochemical studies. Β. Τ. Owens, B. Birkmann, S. Bandyopadhyay, E. Tfouni, P. C. Ford 210. Structural analysis of siderophores designed to evade siderocalin. T. M. Hoette, K. Raymond 211. Synthesis and characterization of new Metallocalix[5]arene complexes. B. A. Martinez-Ortega, D. Mendoza-Espinosa, T. A. Hanna 212. Synthesis and characterization of rhe­ nium polyhydride complexes supported by large bite-angle diphosphines. M. L. Parr, C. Perez-Acosta, N. Antunes 213. Ag(l)-bound fluoroionophores: Potential ethylene sensors. D. L. Nutbrown, C. M. Schram, J. N. Burstyn 214. Quinoxaline metal polymers. R. D. Pike, C. Zambrano, R. J. P. Gibson, E. Dueno 215. Spectroscopic response of complexometric indicators with bimetallic enzyme model complexes and their application as dye displacement anion sensor. B. P. Morgan, S. He, R. C. Smith 216. Withdrawn. Section G BCEC

224. Characterization and reactivity of a new SiNP pincer complex. A. M. Christopher, C-H. Chen, B. M. Foxman, O. V. Ozerov 225. Pentafluorophenylcopper: Complexation behavior and supramolecular structures. A. Doshi, K. Venkatasubbaiah, A. Sundararaman, L. N. Zakharov, A. L. Rheingold, R. A. Lalancette, F. Jâkle 226. Reactivity of alkyne substituted transition metal carbonyl clusters with phosphines and amines. M. J. Rosales Hoz, I. Torres Sandoval, Y. Sosa Romero, V. Gonzalez Lopez 227. Study of C-H activation at a ( Me PNP / - pr )lr center. Y. Zhu, C-H. Chen, Β. Μ. Foxman, O. V. Ozerov Section H BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Inorganic Catalysts B. T. Donovan-Merkert and K. Kustin, Organizers 7:00-10:00 228. Spectroscopic investigation of trimethyl gallium reactions on silica and HZSM-5. Z. Taha, S. D. Fleischman, E. Deguns, S. Chattopadhyay, S. L. Scott 229. Comparative studies of the catalytic properties of iron complexes with tetradentate and pentadentate aminopyridine macrocycles. W. Ye, S. Taktak, E. V. Rybak-Akimova 230. Photocatalytic activity of zeolite-sup­ ported Ag and AgFe nanoclusters. R. S. Gomez, H. Lu, R. Yson, H. H. Patterson 231. Porphyrin nanoparticle supramolecular system and their catalytic activities. J. D. Arijeloye, G. Smeureanu, C. M. Drain 232. Preparation and catalytic performance of solid super acid TiO_2/SO_4(2-) sup­ ported on MCM-41. Z. Jianhong, Z. Mingxing 233. Roles of surface and bulk lattice oxygen in forming C 0 2 and CO during methane reaction over gadolinia-doped ceria. T. J. Huang, C-H. Wang 234. Sulfated mesoporous Ta oxides in the shape selective synthesis of linear alkyl benzene. J. Kang, Y. Rao, D. M. Antonelli 235. Tris(2-pyridyl)amine copper (I) com­ plexes: Simple and efficient catalysts for carbene and nitrene transfer reactions. D. Morales, L. A. Garcia, H. Martinez, J. Perez, V. Riera, D. Miguel 236. Understanding CO adsorption and oxida­ tion on silica-supported Au, Pt, and alloyed nanoparticle catalysts. D. Mott, D. Jacobs, J. Galkowski, J. Luo, C-J. Zhong

Exhibit Hall—B2 Section I General Organometallic Chemistry

7:00-10:00 199. Characterization and performance testing of Idaho lab simulated sodium bearing waste (SBW) products from fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process. C. L Crawford, D. R. Best, C. M. Jantzen, D. M. Missimer, A. R. Jurgensen, L. C. Johnson 200. Metal content of an invasive Long Island Sound tunicate. B. L. Westcott, M. Kapper, K. L. Brown, H. Pehratovic 201. Effect of fly-ash on mercury speciation in coal fired power plants. S. D. Fleischman, S. L. Scott 202. Effect of silica and pH on two arsenic adsorbants. T. Moller, P. Sylvester, T. Moura

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

74-TECH

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

7:00-10:00 217. Cyclopentadienyl ring-slippage induced by strongly ir-basic ligands. C. D. Abernethy, E. A. Kysor 218. Early transition metal complexes sup­ ported by PNP ligands. O. V. Ozerov, E. Pelton, L. Gerber, W. Weng, S. R. Parkin, B. M. Foxman 219. Geometries and electronic structures of (2,4-dimethyl-r]5-pentadienyl)Mn(CO)n(PMe 3 ) 3 . n compounds. M. A. Paz-Sandoval, J. I. de la Cruz-Cruz, S. A. Rajapakshe, B. A. Paz-Michel, P. Juarez-Saavedra, D. L. Lichtenberger 220. Mono- and dipyrrolide complexes of tungsten alkylidenes. T. Kreickmann, R. R. Schrock, P. Muller 221. Oxidative addition reactions of methanol to rhodium(ll) porphyrin complexes. S. Li, W. Cui, B. B. Wayland 222. Synthesis and electronic structures of metallo-azulenes. D. J. Bandy, M. F. Mahon, S. Nilsson, P. R. Raithby, P. J. Wilson 223. Synthesis and reactivity of palladapyrrolidinones: Rare endocyclic palladium amide enolates bearing two Csp 3 -Pd bonds. J. C. Hershberger, V. W. Day, H. C. Malinakova

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Main Group Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

7:00-10:00 237. Carbene, alkene and alkane analogs of Indium. R. Pongtavornpinyo, M. S. Hill, P. B. Hitchcock 238. Group 13 amides and alkoxides: Synthe­ sis, reactivity and thermal decomposition. C. J. Carmalt, C. E. Knapp, P. F. McMillan 239. Progress in the regeneration of spent ammonia borane fuels. B. L. Davis, W. Tumas, K. C. Ott, R. T. Baker, J. C. Gordon 240. Use of highly electrophilic silyl cations, stabilized with weakly coordinating anions, as catalysts for C-F bond activation. C. Douvris, V. J. Scott Jr., Β. Μ. Foxman, O. V. Ozerov 241. Novel silole derivatives: Synthesis, char­ acterization, and photoluminescence properties. H. J. Tracy, T. Bozeman, J. Ford, N. Benfaremo, J. L Mullin, D. L Woodall 242. Exploring and exploiting intermolecular bonding in dimethylthallium(lll) alkoxides. G. G. Briand, J. I. McKelvey, D. J. MacDonald, A. Decken

243. Coordination complexes of lead(ll) thiolates. G. G. Briand, M. C. Finniss, L. M. Scott, N. E. Hughes, A. Decken 244. Fluoride complexation to heteronuclear ferrocene based bidentate Lewis acids. R. Boshra, A. Doshi, K. Venkatasubbaiah, R. A. Lalancette, L. Kakalis, F. Jaekle 245. Novel phosphazene rings as liquid elec­ trolytes in lithium-ion batteries. J. S. McNally, M. K. Harrup, T. A. Luther 246. Organoborates containing coordinative covalent B-N bonds. D. M. Schubert, M. Z. Visi, C. B. Knobler, S. I. Khan, K. I. Hardcastle 247. Use of PNP pincer ligands in the forma­ tion of pentacoordinate main group com­ plexes. S. M. Barnett, M. R. Haneline, J. C. DeMott, C-H. Chen, Β. Μ. Foxman, 0 . V. Ozerov 248. Synthesis and characterization of novel group 13 bridged [1]- and [1.1]metallarenophanes. J. Muller, C. L. Lund, J. A. Schachner, J. W. Quail Section J BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Nanoscience: Applications Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR B. T. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

H. L. Rhoads and C. N. Brammer, Presiding D. J . Nelson, Organizer,

Presiding

7:00-10:00 249. Polymeric grid-like metal complexes based on 3,6-di(2-pyridyl)pyridazine selfassembly. R. Hoogenboom, B. C. Moore, U. S. Schubert 250. Synthesis and properties of rigid den­ dritic coagulants: Morphology and charge state effects on carbon nanotube interac­ tions. S. Kabayashi, J. Poler 251. Chemically reduced mesoporous and microporous Ti oxides and alkali fulleride composites as novel materials for hydro­ gen storage. X. Hu, D. M. Antonelli 252. Porous metal-organic molecules and hydrogen storage. C. Pariya, G. Sandi, C-K. Back, F. R. Fronczek, A. W. Maverick 253. Optical memory application for nanoclus­ ters of dicyanocuprate(l) ions doped in alkali halide crystals. H. Lu, X. Li, R. Yson, R. S. Gomez, H. H. Patterson 254. Polyaniline nanofiber composites with metal salts: Chemical sensors for ethylene oxide. R. W. Kojima, S. Virji, J. Fowler, R. B. Kaner, B. H. Weiller 255. Effect of interfacial layer in photovoltaic conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Y. H. Lee, M. H. Jung, M. H. Lee, W. I. Lee 256. Photoresponse of Ti02 nanofiber elec­ trodes for photoelectrochemical water splitting. T-Y. Shie, J-Y. Chen, C. Kuo 257. Formation of efficient electrochromic device with Sb-doped Sn02 nanoparticles. J . K. Seo, Y. J. Kim, H. J. Kim, W. I. Lee 258. Luminescent copper(l) cyanide networks. R. D. Pike, T. A. Tronic, Κ. Ε. deKrafft, A. N. Ley, T. P. Brewster 259. Effect of size and pH on metal ion bind­ ing to surface tethered dendrimers (STD). L. D. Margerum, A. P. Good, C-C. Chang 260. Main features of silver cluster formation under external influence. V. Zakharov, 1. Kudryavtsev, L. Aslanov 261. Actuation of flash welded polyaniline. C. O. Baker, P. C. Innis, G. Spinks, G. G. Wallace, R. B. Kaner 262. Fabrication of ultrathin film of porphyrinic materials and nanoscale polymer patterns. G. Bazzan, C. M. Drain 263. Gold and silver nanoparticles stabilized in polymer hydrogels. S. Marpu, O. Elbjeirami, S. Y. Park, Z. Hu, M. J. Kim, M. A. Omary 264. Hybrid nanoparticles for multimodal imaging. J . S. Kim, W. J. Rieter, Κ. Μ. Taylor, W. Lin 265. Withdrawn. 266. Ti-containing nanoporous organosilicates as phenol hydroxylation catalysts. T. Mehreteab, C. W. Ingram

INOR

267. Self-organization of porphyrins bearing hydrogen bonding motifs. I. Radivojevic, X. Shi, S. Singh, C. M. Drain 268. Controlling self-assembly reactivity in DNA- and protein-nanoparticle systems. M. M. Maye, D. Nykypanchuk, P. Freimuth, D. van der Lelie, 0 . Gang 269. Cytotoxicity of mesoporous silica nanomaterials. A. J. Di Pasqua, Κ. Κ. Sharma, Y-L. Shi, B. B. Toms, J. C. Dabrowiak, T. Asefa 270. A silane coupling agent approach for attaching PEG or biotin to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles. J . A. Nikles, D. E. Nikles 271. Mechanism of catalysis of metalloporphyrin nanoparticles. A. Aggarwal, C. M. Drain Section Κ BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Section L BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Solid State Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

7:00-10:00 289. Crystal engineering of solid solutions: Supramolecular approach to the multicomponent materials. M. Dabros, V. R. Thalladi 290. BaieSii3: A new binary phase with S14 and Si 6 planar rings. Z. Tang, L. Wang, A. M. Guloy 291. Gigantic frameworks from large aromatic building blocks for versatile sensing appli­ cation. G. Huang, X. Zhou, Y. Sun, J. He, Z.Xu 292. Synthetic and kinetic study of novel layered cobalt hydroxide. Y. Du, K. M. Ok, D. O'Hare Section M

Organometallic Catalysts Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Synthesis and Characterization of Materials

7:00-10:00 272. NMR investigation of the role of an aluminum alkyl during zirconocene cata­ lyzed alkene polymerization. J. M. H. Tomasik, C. R. Landis 273. Constrained ligand architectures in late transition metal bisimine polymerization catalysts. D. Leung, X. Shao, Z. Guan 274. Development of a copper catalyst for C-H bond amination with organoazides. Y. M. Badiei, Τ. Η. Warren 275. Fluorinated bis(phenoxyketimine)titanium complexes for the living, isoselective polymerization of propylene: Block copoly­ mers from ethylene and propylene. J. B. Edson, G. W. Coates 276. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of several water-soluble ruthenium com­ plexes. T. J. Ahmed, S. R. Finnell, D. R. Tyler 277. Polymerization of α-olefins with pyridylamidohafnium catalysts: Living behavior and unexpected isoselectivity from a Cs-symmetric catalyst precursor. G. J. Domski, E. Lobkovsky, G. W. Coates 278. Catalytic reactions of N-heterocyclic platinum carbene complexes. M. A. Taige, S. Ahrens, T. Strassner 279. DFT Studies on palladium complexes catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions assisted by N- or P-containing chelating ligands. F-E. Hong, Y-L. Huang 280. Doubly bridged zirconocene ethylene polymerization catalysts. T. Okamoto, Y. Minami, M. Kanamaru, T. Kashiwamura 281. Homogeneous catalyst design allowing for lower quality feed utilization for biodiesel production. C. J. Chuck, M. G. Davidson, M. D. Lunn 282. Isospecific polymerization of epoxides with homogeneous cobalt-based catalysts. W. Hirahata, E. B. Lobkovsky, G. W. Coates 283. Novel synthetic strategy of developing isospecific unbridged metallocene system for propylene polymerization. S. K. Kim, Η. Κ. Kim, M. H. Lee, S. W. Yoon, Y. Do 284. Remote activation of nickel complexes by coordination of B(C6F5)3 to an exocyclic carbonitrile functionality. B. M. Boardman, M. Valderrama, C. Valdebenito, F. Munoz, W. Guang, G. C. Bazan, R. Rojas 285. Synthesis and catalytic activity of cyclic (alkyl)(amino) carbene gold(l) complexes. S. Kousar, V. Lavallo, G. D. Frey, B. Donnadieu, G. Bertrand 286. Synthesis and structural studies of nonsymmetric guanidinato zirconium and hafnium complexes and catalytic behavior for ethylene polymerization. M. Zhou, H. Tong, W. Sun, D. Liu 287. Withdrawn. 288. Synthesis of P-stereogenic heterocyles via palladium-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization. B. J. Anderson, T. J. Brunker, N. F. Blank, D. S. Glueck, A. L Rheingold

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

7:00-10:00 293. Magnetic inorganic-organic polymers. J. E. Mertzman, S. L Stoll 294. Biomimetic synthesis of CaC03 peanut­ like particles with hollow structure in the presence of polyacrylamide. J . Cao, X. Jiang, M. Zheng, J. Liu 295. Sol gel synthesis of silver vanadium oxide. A. C. Marschilok, R. A. Leising, K. J. Takeuchi, E. S. Takeuchi 296. Cobalt-catalyzed copolymerization of aziridines and CO. H. Xu, L. Jia 297. Design of porous solids based on open frameworks of coordination polymers. Y. Wang, J. C. MacDonald 298. Design of porous solids from 2-D and 3-D coordination frameworks utilizing imidazolylbenzoic acids. L. S. Lee, Y. Wang, J. C. MacDonald 299. Metal organic frameworks derived from cavitand ligands. O. Ugono, J. P. Moran, L Katkish, K. T. Holman 300. Stability screening of phosphorescent iridium(lll) complexes. C. Ulbricht, A. Winter, U. S. Schubert 301. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of LiFeP04/C composite cathode material prepared from SBS precursor. Y-H. Nien, J-S. Chen 302. High surface area manganese and iron oxides. A. Hagemeyer, M. Schlichter, A.F.VolpeJr. 303. Preparation of Ti02-based fibrous photocalysts by electrospray. K-W. An, S-G. Kim, S-J. Kim, D-J. Kang Section Ν BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Synthetic Coordination Chemistry D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W . A. Howard, Organizers

7:00-10:00 304. Amine-containing calixarenes for lanthanide coordination. J. L. Fantini, S. A. Williams, J. A. R. Schmidt, M. P. Hertel 305. Withdrawn. 306. Au(lll)/Au(l) and Au(lll)/Pt(ll) double salt compounds. L. H. Doerrer, M. I. Kahn, T. J. Brunker 307. Diruthenium(l) core complexes: Synthe­ sis, reactivity and applications in catalysis. B. E. Weaver, Y. Sevryugina, M. A. Petrukhina 308. Synthesis and characterization of hexanuclear rhenium cluster complexes. J. A. Edwards, J. N. Templeton, L. F. Szczepura 309. Direct observation of Ta(CD 2 Bu l )5 as an intermediate in the formation of the arche­ typical Schrock-type alkylidene complex (Bu , CD2)3Ta=CDBu t . J. K. Covington, Z-L. Xue

310. Formation of a tantalum oxo complex from the reaction of Ta(NMe2)4CI with water. T. N. Williams, S. Chen, H. Cai, Z-L. Xue 311. Oxidation studies of Fe(ll) and Fe(lll) phenolates. L. H. Doerrer, S. A. Cantalupo, A. J. Jiang, T. J. Wojtasiewicz 312. Photoactive manganese nitrosyls: Fac­ tors critical for controlling NO photorelease. A. A. Eroy-Reveles, Y. Leung, P. K. Mascharak 313. Studies of putative high oxidation state copper complexes stabilized by fluorinated phenoxide ligands. L. H. Doerrer, J . S. Lum, A. J. Jiang 314. First solution-phase synthesis of bismuth(ll) carboxylate. M. Napier, A. S. Filatov, E. V. Dikarev, M. A. Petrukhina 315. Main group supramolecular coordination chemistry. V. M. Cangelosi, W. J. Vickaryous, A. C. Sather, L. N. Zakharov, D. W. Johnson 316. Indolylphosphines as anion receptors. J . O. Yu, C. S. Browning, D. H. Farrar 317. Superexchange interactions through dicyanamide. K. J. Heroux, A. G. DiPasquale, A. L. Rheingold, D. N. Hendrickson 318. The syntheses and coordination chemis­ try of the oxycarbahemiporphyrazines. N. V. Barone, W. S. Durfee, C. J. Ziegler Section Ο BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Spectroscopy of Inorganic Systems J. Telser and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers

11:35 328. The inner and outer nanocosm of Mo132 giant balls. M. Henry 12:05 329. Diffractometric 'titration" of giant polyoxomolybdates using synchrotron radiation. T. Ozeki, S. Shishido Section Β BCEC 206 A/B Frontiers in Organometallic Chemistry R. D. Adams, G. Bertrand,

Organizer Presiding

8:30 330. Imido alkylidene bispyrrolyl com­ plexes and the synthesis of known and new high oxidation state Mo and W metathesis catalysts from them. R. R. Schrock, A. S. Hock, R. Singh, T. Kreickmann, S. Arndt, A. J. Jiang, T. S. Pilyugina, A. J. Gabert, K. M. Wampler 9:00 331. Organometallic chemistry and catalysis on gold metal surfaces. R. J. Angelici 9:30 332. New directions for hydrogen acti­ vation and catalytic hydrogénations. R. D. Adams, B. Captain 10:00 333. Discrete sandwich complexes containing palladium chains and sheets. T. Murahashi 10:30 334. Polymetallocenes; Functional organometallic polymers with applications. I. Manners 11:00 335. Is biphenyl metathesis possible using group 9 metal complexes? K. Ruhland, E. Herdtweck 11:30 336. Function through self-assembled coordination architecture. M. Fujita

7:00-10:00 319. "Research for the Classroom BIG PIC­ TURE Project": New copper clusters that exhibit luminescence thermochromism. R. McDougald, K. Kerr, B. Martine, V. DeLeon, J. Determan, M. A. Omary 320. "Research for the Classroom BIG PIC­ TURE Project": Photoinduced Jahn-Teller distortions in 4-coordinate Ag(l) com­ plexes. R. McDougald, K. Destefani, S. Deyoung, M. Eastlund, K. Thompson, L. Taylor, J. Whitten, C. Browning, J. M. Hudson, M. A. Omary 321. Temperature-dependent optical memory for dicyano Ag(l) complexes. H. Lu, S. Hurley, X. Li, M. A. Rawashdeh-Omary, H. H. Patterson, M. A. Omary 322. Torsional and librational dynamics of hydrazinium(+1) and (+2) binary salts by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering and IR spectroscopy. M. A. Haiti, A. I. Acatrinei, L L. Daemen, J. Eckert, M. Roemer, D. Lentz 323. Vibrational spectroscopy of gas-phase uranyl-hydrogen sulfate complex ions. M. J. Van Stipdonk, G. S. Groenewold, G. L. Gresham, M. Kullman, J. Oomens MONDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 204 A/B Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience Giant Polyoxometalates C. L. Hill and D. C. Crans, T. Yamase,

Organizers

Presiding

8:55 Introductory Remarks. 9:00 324. Giant spherical and wheel shaped polyoxometalates: From aesthetics to multifunctionality. A. Miiller 9:45 325. Self-assembly of polyoxometalate macroions in solution. T. Liu 10:15 326. Dynamic structure of ions and water molecules around and inside poly­ oxometalates. C. Bo, P. Miro, J. Bonet Âvalos, F. Leroy, J. M. Poblet 10:45 Intermission. 11:05 327. Ligand exchange inside porous oxomolybdate nanoclusters. I. A. Weinstock, A. Ganini, A. Miiller

Section C BCEC 205C Anion Coordination Chemistry Cosponsored by ORGN K. Bowman-James, F. M. Pfeffer,

Organizer

Presiding

B. P. Hay, Organizer,

Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 337. Oligopyrrole anion receptors. J. L Sessler, J. Pérez, C. W. Bielawski, E. Katayev, H. Martinez-Garcia, D. Morales, D. Gross, D. Coady, P. Melfi, J. T. Lee, N. Barkey 8:35 338. Anion recognition and activation by heterocyclophane and tripodal polyammonium receptors. E. Garcia-Espana, M. T. Albelda, S. Blasco, R. Belda, M. A. Sornosa-Ten, M. P. Clares, J. Gonzalez, J. M. Llinares, C. Soriano, E. Delgado-Pinar, J. C. Frias, J. Alarcon 9:05 339. Ditooic anion recognition with large macrocyclic hosts. E. V. Rybak-Akimova, I. V. Korendovych, M. Cho 9:35 340. Conformational control of anion binding and transport. P. A. Gale 10:05 Intermission. 10:30 341. Multidimensional anion hosts from simple building blocks. K. Bowman-James, S. O. Kang, S. Ghosh, V. W. Day 11:00 342. Investigations on halide encapsulation inside the cavity of polyammonium receptors through (N-H)+*»*halide interactions and beyond. P. Ghosh 11:30 343. Adding functionality to anion receptors. J. H. R. Tucker

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-75

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

INOR

Section D

Section G

BCEC 205B

BCEC 209

Mixed Valency in Chemistry Electronic Derealization in Mixed Valency

Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization General Methods Cosponsored by BIOHW

M. H. Chisholm and C. P. Kubiak, Organizers, Presiding

D. J . Nelson and B. T. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 344. Mixed valence: What happened next? P. Day 9:20 345. Mixed valency and the power of spectroscopy. C. Creutz 10:00 346. What is derealization? The Creutz-Taube ion as Delphic Oracle. N. S. Hush 10:40 347. Mixed valency in manganese cluster compounds: A foundation for high-spin molecules and single-molecule magnets. G. Christou

Y. Z h a n g , L. M. Bronstein, and M. E. Hagerman, Presiding

Section Ε BCEC 213 Thin Films: Chemical Vapor Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition G. S. Girolami and W . L Gladfelter, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 348. Design of precursors for CVD and ALD. R. G. Gordon 9:10 349. Surface activation: True ALD of copper films? J. S. Thompson 9:40 350. Molecular precursor routes to gallium oxide. C. J. Carmalt, S. Basharat 10:10 Intermission. 10:40 351. Pyrazolate-based precursors for the growth of thin films by atomic layer deposition. C. H. Winter, C. L. Dezelah IV, M. K. Wiedmann, M. J. Saly, L Niinisto 11:10 352. Deposition of thin films in super­ critical carbon dioxide. T. Gougousi 11:40 353. Combinatorial chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of mixed metal oxide films. W. L. Gladfelter, T. L Moersch, B. Xia, D. C. Boyd, D. Yu, S. A. Campbell Section F BCEC 210A Molecular Design Toward Atom, Electron, and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer for Energy Conversion Catalysis C. Turro and J . M. Zaleski, Presiding

Organizers,

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 354. Solar photochemistry. J. L. Dempsey, J. R. Winkler, H. B. Gray 9:10 355. Photochemical splitting of CO2. A. Sathrum, C. P. Kubiak 9:45 356. Semiconductor nanocrystal sci­ ence and technology: The importance of optical spectroscopy. M. G. Bawendi 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 357. Recent results concerning the catalytic reduction of dinitrogen to ammo­ nia with protons and electrons. R. R. Schrock 11:10 358. Binucleating hexaanionic cryptand ligands to engender 0 - 0 bond formation. G. E. Alliger, R. Fu, B. Breiner, D. G. Nocera, C. C. Cummins 11:45 359. Reaction pathways for metalcatalyzed dehydrogenation of ammoniaborane: Selectivity dictates extent of hydrogen release. R. T. Baker, V. Pons, C. W. Hamilton, R. J. Keaton

76-TECH

8:30 360. Polymorphism of flame-synthe­ sized Y 2 0 3 nano- and micro-particles: Effects of temperature and particle size. B. Guo, Z. Luo, M. Mukundan 8:50 361. Characterization of capping shell composition of gold nanoparticles with molecularly-tuned sizes. M. Schadt, J. I. Kang, S. Lim, B. Wanjala, D. Mott, C-J. Zhong 9:10 362. Dependence of iron oxide nanoparticle formation on iron oleate complex structure. L M. Bronstein, X. Huang, J. R. Retrum, A. L. Schmucker, B. D. Stein, B. Dragnea 9:30 363. Hydrothermal preparation of nanoscale alcohol synthesis catalysts. H. W. Rollins, L M. Petkovic, D. M. Ginosar, K. C. Burch 9:50 364. Nanocrystals plasma polymeriza­ tion: From colloids to all-inorganic 1 -D, 2-D and 3-D functional architectures. L Cademartiri, A. Ghadimi, G. von Freymann, A. C. Arsenault, Y. Akcakir, U. Kamp, J. Bertolotti, D. S. Wiersma, V. Kitaev, G. A. Ozin 10:10 365. Nitrilotriacetate complexes of lanthanides in nanoscale constructs. M. A. Walters, T. S. Siddiqui, A. Jani, E. Akturk, F. Williams 10:30 366. Stable gold nanoparticles by photolysis of simple gold(l) complexes. M. A. Omary, O. Elbjeirami, R. McDougald, J. Getto, T. H. Lee, S. Y. Park, M. J. Kim 10:50 367. Superparamagnetic colloidal nanocrystal clusters: Synthesis, character­ ization, and applications. Y. Yin, J. Ge, Y.Hu 11:10 368. Synthesis and interconversion of catalytically relevant nanocrystalline intermetallics. R. E. Cable, R. E. Schaak 11:30 369. Synthesis and self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles. N. Shukla, M. M. Nigra, A. J. Gellman 11:50 370. Synthesis of size-controlled and shaped copper nanoparticles. D. Mott, J. Galkowski, D. Ng, J. Luo, C-J. Zhong 12:10 371. The effects of monomer solubility and precursor conversion kinetics on the nucleation of cadmium selenide nanopar­ ticles. J. S. Owen, H. Liu, P. Alivisatos

10:40 377. High oxidation rhodium and iridium disilyldihydride complexes supported by chelating nitrogen-based ligands. J. McBee, J. Escalada, T. D. Tilley 11:00 378. Intramolecular C-H activation in Bi(lll) aryloxides. L Liu, M. Quiroz, X. Kou, A. L. Rheingold, T. A. Hanna 11:20 379. Oxidative addition at a (PNP)Rh center. S. Gatard, M. Puri, C-H. Chen, B. M. Foxman, O. V. Ozerov 11:40 380. Reactivity of group IV, dO metal complexes with redox-active amidophenolate ligands. K. J. Blackmore, A. F. Heyduk 12:00 381. Unexpected structures and reactivity of (PNP)Pd complexes. C. M. Fafard, C-H. Chen, C. Guo, D. Adhikari, B. M. Foxman, D. J. Mindiola, O. V. Ozerov Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Solvation and Spectroscopy Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR MONDAY AFTERNOON

BCEC 205C

BCEC 204 A/B

Anion Coordination Chemistry

Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience Studies of Complex Systems

Cosponsored by ORGN

C. L. Hill and D. C. Crans,

E. V. Rybak-Akimova,

E. Coronado,

Organizers

Presiding

Section Β BCEC 206 A/B

BCEC 211

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

General Organometallic Chemistry

M. Kruk,

S. K. Hurst,

Presiding

9:00 372. Oxidatively induced B-to-Pt and Pt-to-B hydrocarbyl transfer involving CH agostic Pt(IV) dihydrocarbyldipyridylborates. E. Khaskin, P. Y. Zavalij, A. N. Vedernikov 9:20 373. Unprecedented k2 to h2 linkage isomerism of CpFe(CO)(S2CX), where X = NR2, OR, R, and CN, initiated by changes in solvent polarity. T. Bitterwolf, R. Henderson, T. Warwick, W. Thornley 9:40 374. Further investigation into the N-C oxidative addition reaction occurring in (PNP)RhX complexes. A. L Fernandez, O. V. Ozerov, B. M. Foxman 10:00 375. C-H and Si-Η activation with iron(0) dinitrogen complexes stabilized by b/s(carbene)pyridine ligands. D. Pugh, A. A. Danopoulos 10:20 376. Functional group tolerance in bis(imino)pyrdine iron mediated olefin hydrogénation. R. J. Trovitch, E. Lobkovsky, P. J. Chirik

B. P. Hay,

Organizer Presiding

K. Bowman-James, Organizer,

2:00 382. Porous polyoxomolybdates as cellular models for the transmembrane cation transport: A multinuclear NMR investigation. D. Rehder, E. T. K. Haupt, A. Miiller 2:30 383. Interactions of oxovanadates with lipid interfaces. D. C. Crans, B. Baruah 3:00 384. Polyoxometalates in the Study of Confined Water. F. Fernandez-Alonso, H. Thompson, A. Muller 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 385. Study the nature of water inside the self-assembled polyoxometalate blackberries and monitor the ion transportation by fluorescent probes. P. P. Mishra, T. Liu 4:10 386. The role of counter-cations in the strong attraction among highly soluble macroanions and the unique self-assembly process. J. Pigga, T. Liu 4:30 387. Multinuclear NMR of polyoxometalates: An overview. R. Thouvenot

Synthesis and Characterization of Materials

Organizer

5:10 399. Synthesis and hydrogen storage properties of highly-stable pyrazolatebased metal-organic frameworks. H. J. Choi, M. Dinca, J. R. Long Section C

Section A

Section H

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

3:30 394. Diborapolyacenes: synthesis, crystal structures and electronic properties. J. Chen, J. W. Kampf, A. J. Ashe III 3:50 395. Unsaturated organic monolayers on silicon: Surface passivation and reactiv­ ity. Κ. Ε. Plass, Β. Β. Brunschwig, N. S. Lewis 4:10 396. Batteries and a pinch of salt: A simple toolkit for the production of poly(methylsilyne), a precursor to silicon car­ bide ceramics. M. W. Pitcher, U. Sônmez, D. Eroglu, Y. Nur, G. Bayram, L. Toppare 4:30 397. Controlling the crystallization of calcium carbonate: Metastable vaterite formation using a polymer matrix. M. W. Pitcher, A. Neshat, S. Seyyidoglu 4:50 398. Cyclictriphosphazene derivatives as liquid electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries. T. A. Luther, Μ. Κ. Harrup, J. S. McNally, K. L. Gering, D. K. Jamison

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 388. Characterization of the titania nitridation reaction by time resolved in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure (NEXAFS). H. Chen, A. Nambu, W. Wen, J. Graciani, J. C. Hanson, E. Fujita, J. A. Rodriguez 1:50 389. Tailoring of pore size in ordered silicas with very large cylindrical and spherical mesopores. M. Kruk, L. Cao, C. M. Hui 2:10 390. Formation of cellular metals with unusual liquid uptake properties from cyanogel precursors. C. M. Burgess, A. B. Bocarsly 2:30 391. Nonaqueous synthesis of a new compound: vanadium oxide hydrate V7.20i6*4.2H 2 0.1. Djerdj, M. Niederberger 2:50 392. Porphyrin-based hydrogen storage materials with coordinatively unsaturated metal centers. W. Choe 3:10 393. Templated fabrication of 2-D non-close-packed colloidal crystals from inorganic sol-gel precursors. S. Venkatesh, P. Jiang

Presiding

1:30 400. On the role of entropy in artificial receptor design: Some lessons from the calorimetry of abiotic anion hosts. V. D. Jadhav, L. Shamova, F. P. Schmidtchen 2:00 401. Strategies for employing hostguest chemistry in liquid-liquid separation of anions. B. A. Moyer, P. V. Bonnesen, R. Custelcean, L. H. Delmau, T. J. Haverlock, B. P. Hay, C. G. Pham, A. D. Powers, J. L. Sessler, K. Bowman-James 2:30 402. Anion recognition in aqueous solvents using modified guanidinium cations. C. Schmuck 3:00 403. New frameworks with multiple Η-bond donors for anion recognition. F. M. Pfeffer, A. J. Lowe, K. J. Sedgwick 3:30 Intermission. 4:00 404. Steroid-based receptors and transporters for inorganic anions. A. P. Davis 4:30 405. Optimizing the halide recognition properties of amide- and urea-substituted quinolines. M. Albrecht 5:00 406. Pyrrole sulfonamide and dipyrrolyl sulfones: Molecular receptors for selective anion recogniton. Μ. Τ. Huggins, P. Barber, T. Butler Section D BCEC 205B Mixed Valency in Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry M. H. Chisholm and C. P. Kubiak, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 407. Probing electronic communication using multiply bonded dimetal units: A part of the legacy of AI Cotton. C. A. Murillo 2:40 408. Mixed valency in ruthenium-cyanamide systems and non-innocent behavior. R. J. Crutchley

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

INOR

3:20 409. Characterization of a mixed valence iron (11,111) dimer with thiolate, cyanide, and carbonyl donor ligands. D. Y. Melgarejo, J. Haff, M. Millar, S. A. Koch 3:40 410. Mixed-valent copper(l) pseudorotaxanes. A. H. Flood, K. A. McNitt, K. Parimal, A. C. Fahrenbach 4:00 411. IVCT Transitions, pigments and the Arts/Science interface. R. J. H. Clark 4:40 412. Concerning the mechanism and degree of electronic coupling in covalently linked MM quadruply bonded complexes of molybdenum and tungsten in their neutral and mixed valence states. M. H. Chisholm Section Ε BCEC 213 Thin Films: Chemical Vapor Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition G. S. Girolami and W . L. Gladfelter, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 413. Atomic layer deposition in nanotechnology applications. M. Leskela, M. Kemell, M. Lautala, T. Pilvi, V. Pore, E. Santala, M. Ritala 2:00 414. Advanced applications for lowtemperature atomic layer deposition. G. N. Parsons, Q. Peng, J-S. Na, G. K. Hyde, X. Sun, J. C. Spagnola, S. M. Stewart, R. M. VanGundy, J. A. Ayres, K. L. Chandra, R. J. Spontak, C. B. Gorman 2:30 415. Atomic layer deposition as a synthesis method for inorganic mem­ branes. W. J. DeSisto 3:00 Intermission. 3:30 416. Molecular layer deposition of alucone and other hybrid organic/inorganic polymer films. S. M. George, A. A. Dameron, S. D. Davidson 4:00 417. Preparation and characterization of porous SiCOH dielectrics. D. A. Neumayer, S. M. Gates, Μ. Η. Sherwood, A. Grill, X. Wang, M. Sankarapandian 4:30 418. Chemical vapor deposition on aerosolized nanoparticles. J. T. Roberts, J. Holm, Y. He

Section G

TUESDAY MORNING

Section C

BCEC

Section A

BCEC 205C

209 Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Biological Systems Cosponsored by BIOHW D. J . Nelson and B. T. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers

BCEC 210A Molecular Design Toward Atom, Electron, and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer for Energy Conversion Catalysis

J. C. Xu and A. B. Greytak,

Organizers,

1:30 419. Targeting cancer cells with plati­ num compounds. S. J. Lippard 2:05 420. Site specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in the alpha and beta subunits of E. coli ribonucleotide reductase: Probes of proton coupled electron transfer. M. R. Seyedsayamdost, T. Y. C. Chan, S. Y. Reece, J . Xie, P. G. Schultz, D. G. Nocera, J. Stubbe 2:40 421. The physics of frustration on the kagome lattice: The quest for the quantum spin liquid. Y. S. Lee, D. G. Nocera, J. S. Helton, K. Matan, M. P. Shores, E. A. Nytko, B. M. Bartlett, D. Grohol, J. Lynn, Y. Qiu, J. H. Chung, S. E. Nagler, Y. Takano 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 422. A comparative study of 2 n d vs. 3 r d row structure and reactivity: (silox) n M(X/ R) m (M = Mo, W; silox = , Bu 3 SiO). D. S. Kuiper, R. E. Douthwaite, A-R. Mayol, P. T. Wolczanski, T. Cundari, E. B. Lobkovsky 4:05 423. Synthesis of five-coordinate inter­ mediates in lr-catalyzed borylations. A. G. Chotana, B. A. Vanchura, M. R. Smith III 4:40 424. New atom- and group-transfer reactions of two- and three-coordinate nickel. G. L. Hillhouse, C. A. Laskowski, V. M. Hue

Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience

Presiding

2:00 425. Design of functional ferritin-like proteins. J. Swift, C. A. Butts, S-G. Kang, L. Zhang, J. G. Saven, I. J. Dmochowski 2:20 426. DNA-templated nanopore fabrica­ tion. H. A. Becerril, J. T. Stewart, A. T. Woolley 2:40 427. Reversible formation of nanoparticle-cyt c assemblies through conforma­ tional changes. H. Bayraktar, S. Srivastava, C-C. You, V. M. Rotello, M. J. Knapp 3:00 428. Developing new nanomaterials for biological and biomedical applications. W. J. Rieter, K. M. Taylor, J. S. Kim, W.Lin 3:20 429. Electron transfer from gold nanoparticle cores to cytochrome c in selforganized protein superstructures. A. S. Harper-Leatherman, A. N. Capecelatro, C. P. Rhodes, J. W. Long, D. R. Rolison 3:40 430. Free metal nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in water and organic solvents: Size manipulation, easy functionalization and bioconjugation. V. Amendola, M. Meneghetti 4:00 431. Preparation of nanoscale metal oxides via biomineralization. M. M. Henricus, C. Avanzato, J. Follieri, M. R. Regan, K. I. Fabijanic, I. A. Banerjee 4:20 432. Synthesis and characterization of quantum dots coupled to J-aggregate dyanine dyes in water. J. E. Halpert, J. R. Tischler, V. Bulovic, M. G. Bawendi 4:40 433. Synthesis of a perfluorinated porphyrin and its interaction with fullerene. A. Varotto, C. M. Drain, M. V. Vinodu 5:00 434. Incorporation of magnetic nanopar­ ticles and quantum dots into silica micro­ spheres. N. Insin, J. B. Tracy, H. Lee, J. P. Zimmer, R. M. Westervelt, M. G. Bawendi

Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, INOR, BIOL, and PRES M O N D A Y EVENING

C. Turro and J . M. Zaleski, Presiding

Anion Coordination Chemistry Cosponsored by ORGN K. Bowman-James and B. P. Hay, Organizers

New Classes and Reactions of POMS

Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Relativistic Quantum Chemistry Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR

Section F

BCEC 204 A/B

Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Sci-Mix B. T. Donovan-Merkert and D. C. Crans, Organizers 8:00-10:00 155-156,161,163-164,168,171,174,176, 178,180-181,184-187,195,197,199, 201-202, 217, 222, 224, 227, 234, 236, 239, 245, 250-252, 256, 261-262, 268, 273-274, 278, 282, 285, 289, 294, 320, 323. See previous listings. 574, 576-577, 579, 5 8 1 , 583, 587-589, 593-594, 598, 608, 612-613, 615-616, 623, 626, 650, 654, 658, 662-663, 667, 671, 683-684, 687, 694, 702-703, 714715, 717, 719, 723-724, 737, 739-740, 745, 747, 758-762, 765, 767-768. See subsequent listings.

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

C. L. Hill and D. C. Crans, R. Neumann,

Organizers

Presiding

9:00 435. From polyoxometalate-based building blocks to functional nanoclusters and frameworks. L. Cronin 9:30 436. Nitrido derivatives of polyoxometa­ lates and their relevance to N-atom trans­ fer. C. Besson, V. Lahootun, P. Gouzerh, A. Proust 10:00 437. Role of transition metals in polyoxoniobate chemistry. M. Nyman, T. M. Anderson, R. P. Bontchev 10:30 Intermission. 10:50 438. Aqueous reactivity and ion pair­ ing studies of niobium- and tantalum-oxide clusters. T. M. Anderson, M. Nyman, E. Balogh, W. H. Casey, M. R. Antonio 11:20 439. Polyniobates are stable in acidic aqueous solution. W. G. Klemperer, K. A. Marek 11:50 440. Protonolysis and related reac­ tions of alkoxo-hexametalates [(RO) n M' x M 6 . x Oig. n ] z ": Insights into solu­ tion dynamics, steric effects and higher aggregation processes. R. J. Errington, S. S. Petkar, P. S. Middleton Section Β

P. A. Gale and P. Anzenbacher Jr., Presiding 8:00 452. Anion binding by capsule and container assemblies. J. L. Atwood, S. J. Dalgamo, N. P. Power 8:30 453. Metal-organic receptors: Arranging hydrogen-bond donors to bind anions. S. J. Loeb, P. A. Gale, C. R. Bondy, I. El Drubi Vega, M. E. Light, M. Fisher 9:00 454. Metallo-hosts for anion recognition. R. Vilar, P. Ballester, P. Diaz, C. Mendoza, J. Tovilla 9:30 455. Anion coordination and separation with metal-organic and hydrogen-bonded frameworks. R. Custelcean, V. Sellin, B. P. Hay, B. A. Moyer 10:00 Intermission. 10:30 456. Structural criteria for the design of anion receptors: Interaction of anions with electron-deficient arènes. B. P. Hay, V. S. Bryantsev, Ο. Β. Berryman, D. W. Johnson 11:00 457. The influence of anion-ir interac­ tions involving polyatomic anions on the self-assembly of coordination compounds. K. R. Dunbar, B. L. Schottel, I. D. Giles, H. T. Chifotides, L. M. Perez 11:30 458. Highly aromatic receptors for anions. O. B. Berryman, C. A. Johnson II, M. M. Haley, D. W. Johnson

BCEC 206 A/B

Section D

Characterization and Applications of Coordination Compounds

BCEC 210C

D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W. A. Howard, Organizers

Mixed Valency in Chemistry Organic and Organometallic Chemistry

8:30 441. Formation of the heterobimetallic triple-stranded helicate: A molecular switch. M. Offermann, F. E. Hahn 8:50 442. Magnetostructural correlations in trinuclear {Fe'^Ni"} cyanometalate com­ plexes. S. M. Holmes, D. Li, R. Clérac 9:10 443. Synthesis and structural and magnetic characterization of trivalent cyanomaganate {MIII2MII2} complexes. S. M. Holmes, M. Tang, D. Li, R. Clérac

M. H. Chisholm and C. P. Kubiak, Organizers, Presiding

9:30 444. New cyanometalate building units with tungsten and molybdenum: Synthesis, characterization, and assembly of magnetic clusters. H. I. Karunadasa, D. M. Jenkins, J. R. Long 9:50 445. Three-component assembly of the high-spin molecular Prussian blue analogs [(cyclen) 12 Ni 13 M 6 (CN) 36 ] 8+ (M = Cr, Fe). H. J. Choi, L. M. C. Beltran, J. R. Long 10:10 446. Synthesis and magnetic properties of the cyano-bridged clusters [(PY5Me 2 ) 4 V 4 M(CN) 6 ] 5+ (M = Cr, Mo). D. E. Freedman, D. M. Jenkins, J. R. Long 10:30 Intermission. 10:50 447. pH modulated photoinduced electron transfer in a {[ruthenium-adamantyle] [β-cyclodextrin-viologen]} inclusion complex. Y. Pellegrin, R. J. Forster, T. E. Keyes 11:10 448. Photoinduced electron transfer of Zn(salophen) and fluorescence sensing applications. M. E. Germain, M. J. Knapp 11:30 449. Syntheses and characterizations of several metal-organic frameworks with asymétrie ligands. J . Luo, Y. Zhao, H. Xu, T. V. Timofeeva, L. L. Daemen, R. P. Currier, D. Yang, D. D. Hickmott 11:50 450. Synthesis and coordination chemistry of polydentate benzene-o dithiolato ligands: Formation of mono- and polynuclear complexes. B. Birkmann, F. E. Hahn 12:10 451. Synthesis and reactivity of a nacnac chromium(l) complex. W. H. Monillas

8:30 459. Time for diversity of mixed valence complexes. W. Kaim 9:10 460. Neutral organic mixed valence compounds: The evaluation of ET param­ eters by Jortnei^s theory. C. Lambert, A. Heckmann, M. Margraf, S. Dummler, 1. Fischer 9:50 461. Solvent control of charge localiza­ tion in organic mixed valence compounds. S. F. Nelsen, J. P. Telo 10:30 462. Excited state mixed valence spectroscopy. J. I. Zink, J. Lockard, E. Plummer, R. Hoekstra, S. F. Nelsen 11:10 463. A reaction chemistry for multielectron mixed valency of consequence to energy conversion. D. G. Nocera Section Ε BCEC 253B Thin Films: Chemical Vapor Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition G. S. Girolami and W. L. Gladfelter, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 464. Precursor engineering for MOCVD and ALD of high-k oxides and gate elec­ trodes. R. A. Fischer, A. Devi 9:00 465. Multifunctional oxide materials for microelectronic and optoelectronic applica­ tions. J. P. Chang 9:30 466. Reactions of metal amides with 0 2 . Toward an understanding of the path­ ways in the formation of microelectronic metal oxides. Z-L. Xue 10:00 Intermission. 10:30 467. In situ characterization of thin film growth with atomic layer deposition. Y. J. Chabal, J. Kwon, M. Dai, Y. Wang, Z. Li, R. G. Gordon

TECH-77

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

INOR

11:00 468. Quantum simulations of atomic layer deposition. C. B. Musgrave, A. Mukhopadhyay, J. F. Sanz 11:30 469. Fundamental chemistry and modeling of group-Ill nitride MOCVD. J. R. Creighton, G. T. Wang, M. E. Coltrin Section F BCEC 212 Inorganic Modeling of Biological Systems D. C. Crans and B. T. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers 8:30 470. Self-assembly approaches toward synthesis of high nuclearity Fe-S clusters. R. S. Pryadun, R. H. Holm 8:50 471. Supramolecular vanadate recep­ tors as structural and functional models for vanadium haloperoxidase (VHPO). X-A. Zhang, W-D. Woggon 9:10 472. Synthesis and characterization of a planar tetranuclear iron(ll) complex and its conversion into linear triiron and paddlewheel diiron complexes. E. Reisner, S. J. Lippard 9:30 473. Synthesis and characterization of bis- and mono(dithiolene) complexes relevant to the active sites of molybdoand tungstoenzymes. S. Groysman, J-J. Wang, R. Tagore, R. H. Holm 9:50 474. Synthesis and characterization of nonheme iron oxygenase model com­ pounds with chelated fac-N201, cis-N202, and N203-donor ligands. P. J . Cappillino, J. R. Miecznikowski, L. A. Tyler, W. Lo, W. H. Armstrong, J. P. Caradonna 10:10 475. Synthesis, reactivity, and electro­ chemical series of V-Fe-S single and double cubane complexes. T. A. Scott, R. H. Holm 10:30 476. Synthesis, structure, spectro­ scopic and reactivity properties of new thiolate—ligated, nonheme ion superoxide reductase (SOR) model complexes. S. Toledo, J. Freudenthal, J. B. Benedict, J. A. Kovacs 10:50 477. Synthetic analogs for the iron centers in Ni-Fe and the iron-sulfur cluster free hydrogenase enzymes. D. Y. Melgarejo, G. M. Chiarella, S. A. Koch 11:10 478. Synthetic modeling of the heme/Cu active site in cytochrome c oxidase. T. Gandhi, B. Mondai, S. C. Puiu, Κ. D. Karlin 11:30 479. Thermodynamics of cu(l) binding to peptides and proteins. J . V. Schuster, N. E. Grossoehme, D. Huffman, D. E. Wilcox 11:50 480. Unraveling the reactive species of a functional nonheme iron monooxygenase model using stopped-flow UV/vis spectroscopy. G. T. Rowe, E. V. Rybak-Akimova, J. P. Caradonna Section G BCEC 209 Nanoscience: Applications Energy and Environment Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

H. L. Rhoads and C. N. Brammer, Presiding D. J. Nelson, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 481. Synthesis and activation of Ptbased bimetallic nanoparticles for anode catalysts of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Z. Liu, S. Kang, D. F. Reed, M. Shamsuzzoha, D. E. Nikles 8:50 482. Nanochemical approach to a better solar cell. M. W. Pitcher 9:10 483. [email protected] core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) for catalytic H2 oxidation in COcontaminated hydrogen fuel feeds: A potential PEMFC anode electrocatalyst. S. Alayoglu, B. W. Eichhorn 9:30 484. Environment-friendly synthesis of organic-soluble silver nanoparticles toward printed electronics. K. J . Lee, B. H. Jun, Y. I. Lee, I. K. Shim, J. Choi, J. Joung, Y. S. Oh

78-TECH

9:50 485. Mechanical and electronic proper­ ties of semiconductor nanocrystalline tetrapods. J . Schrier, B. Lee, L-W. Wang 10:10 486. Effect of Pd decorated single walled carbon nanotubes by electroless reduction. D. Yuan, J. Liu 10:30 487. Single colloidal quantum dots in electroluminescent layered organic device structures. H. Huang, A. Dorn, M. G. Bawendi, V. Bulovic 10:50 488. Study of carrier multiplication yields in CdSe and CdTe nanocrystals by transient photoluminescence. G. P. Nair, M. G. Bawendi 11:10 489. The application of nanocrystalline and nanostructured metal oxides for chemical sensor development. J . C. Xu, G. W. Hunter, L. J. Evans, R. L. Vander Wal, G. M. Berger, M. Artale, P. Lampard, D. Androjna 11:30 490. Graphitic carbon nanofiber/ polymer brushes as gas sensors. C. M. Lukehart, L. Li 11:50 491. NMR-based sensors using iron oxide nanoparticles. S. Taktak, D. Sosnovik, M. J. Cima, R. Weissleder, L. Josephson 12:10 492. Removal of arsenic by in situ treatment technology. H. J. Shipley, S. Yean, A. T. Kan, M. B. Tomson Section H BCEC 211 Organometallic Catalysts Polymerization, Metathesis, C-H Activation Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, M. Baird,

Organizer

Presiding

8:30 493. Activation of aromatic C-H bonds: Impact of ancillary ligand "L" on catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)R systems. N. A. Foley, M. A. Lail, T. B. Gunnoe, T. R. Cundari, J. L Petersen, P. D. Boyle 8:50 494. Rhodium-catalyzed arylation of heterocycles via C-H bond activation. J. C. Lewis, R. G. Bergman, J. A. Ellman 9:10 495. Mechanistic insights into benzene C-H activation with cyclometallated lr(NNC)(R)(TFA)(L) complexes where NNC is 6-phenyl-4,4'-bis(di-terf-butyl)-2,2·' bipyridine. R. A. Periana, S. K. Ganesh, K. J. Young, J. Oxgaard, W. A. Goddard III 9:30 496. Direct observation of [Cp 2 ZrMe(alkene)] + complexes: Mecha­ nism of formation of allylic complexes during propylene polymerization by zirconocene catalysts. M. Vatamanu, G. Stojcevic, M. C. Baird 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 497. Discovery of new polystyrene catalysts using high-throughput tech­ niques. J. A. W. Shoemaker, X. Bei, J. Klosin, J. Longmire, X. V. Luo, V. Nava-Salgado, J. Zhang 10:20 498. Group 4 metal bis(pyrazolyl)borate hydrocarbyl complexes. C. Chen, H. Lee, R. F. Jordan 10:40 499. Modulated microstructure of polypropene by tethered binuclear pentamethylmonocyclopentadienyl monoacetamidinate zirconium initiators. L. R. Sita, W.Zhang 11:00 500. Cationic molybdenum imido alkylidene complexes supported by alkoxides. A. J . Jiang, R. R. Schrock 11:20 501. Reactions of ruthenium-benzylidyne complexes derived from Grubbs' catalyst. M. J. A. Johnson, S. R. Caskey, M. H. Stewart, J. W. Kampf 11:40 502. Synthesis and activity of new ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts. S. Blechert

12:00 503. Ruthenium-based olefin metathe­ sis catalysts coordinated with thiazol-2ylidene ligands. G. C. Vougioukalakis, R. H. Grubbs Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Transactinide Chemistry Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 204 A/B Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience Catalysis and Catalytic Materials C. L. Hill and D. C. Crans, I. A. Weinstock,

Organizers

Presiding

Section D BCEC 210C Mixed Valency in Chemistry Bioinorganic and Supramolecular Chemistry

1:30 504. Binary catalysts containing poly­ oxometalates that enable aqueous biphasic catalysis and activation of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. R. Neumann 1:50 505. Catalytic oxidations with polyoxo­ metalates. M. Bonchio, M. Carraro, A. Sartorel, G. Scorrano 2:10 506. Stability of polyoxometalates under catalytic turnover conditions. Y. V. Geletii, B. Botar, C. L Hill, D. Hillesheim, K. Morokuma, D. G. Musaev, R. Prabkahar 2:30 Intermission. 2:50 507. Decatungstate-based photocatalytic processes under aerobic conditions and potential use of polyoxometalates as sensitizers in photodynamic therapy. C. Tanielian 3:10 508. POM promoted functionalization of saturated sp3 C-H bonds. Y. Wei, Q. Li, J. Hao, Y. Zhu, L Wang 3:30 509. Sustainable heterogeneous acid catalysis by heteropoly acids. I. V. Kozhevnikov

2:00 522. Mixed valancy in bioinorganic electron transfer. E. I. Solomon 2:40 523. Supramolecular porphyrin prisms and excited-state mixed-valency. J. T. Hupp, S. J. Lee, J. E. McGarrah, C. She, K. L. Mulfort, K-T. Youm, R. A. Jensen, D. M. Tiède, S. T. Nguyen, R. F. Kelley, M. R. Wasielewski 3:20 524. Mixed valency problems in dendrimers. D. Astruc, C. Ornelas, J. Ruiz Aranzaes 4:00 525. Engineering reversible electron transfer reactions within polyoxometalate nanoscale cages. L. Cronin 4:20 526. Solvent dynamics at the class ll/lll borderline of mixed valency. C. P. Kubiak, B. J. Lear, S. D. Glover

Section Β

BCEC 253B

BCEC 206 A/B

Thin Films: Chemical Vapor Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition

ExxonMobil Solid State Chemistry Faculty Fellowship Award

G. S. Girolami and W . L. Gladfelter, Organizers, Presiding

W . E. Buhro and A. K. Cheetham, Organizers

1:30 527. Transparent conducting oxides: New science and new applications. T. J. Marks 2:00 528. Transparent conducting oxides at high aspect ratios. J. W. Elam, A. B. F. Martinson, M. J. Pellin, J. T. Hupp 2:30 529. Sn-based group IV semiconduc­ tors: New platforms for opto- and micro­ electronics on silicon. J. Kouvetakis, J. Menendez 3:00 Intermission. 3:30 530. Tungsten imido and hydrazido complexes as precursors for CVD of WN X and WN x C y thin films. L McElwee-White, L. L. Reitfort, J. Koller, H. M. Ajmera, T. J. Anderson 4:00 531. Conformai and superconformai deposition of metal borides and oxides by CVD. D. Y. Kim, S. Jayaraman, Y. Yang, J. R. Abelson, G. S. Girolami

J. Y. C h a n ,

Presiding

1:30 510. Electrochemical synthesis of inorganic materials with controlled microand nanostructures. K-S. Choi 2:00 511. Hot-injection synthesis of uniform CdSe tetrapods using cationic surfactant ligands. S. Asokan, G. O'Sullivan, Z. Loy, K. M. Krueger, V. L. Colvin, M. S. Wong 2:30 512. Fabrication and characterization of chemical architectures. A. Ivanisevic 3:00 513. Programmable assembly and disassembly of metal chalcogenide nano­ particles. I. U. Arachchige, D. G. Gorgiev, S. L. Brock 3:30 514. Toward band structure engineering in self-assembled 3-D photonic crystals. M. Bartl 4:00 515. Kinetics and mechanism of aggre­ gative nanocrystal growth. W. E. Buhro

M. H. Chisholm and C. P. Kubiak, Organizers, Presiding

Section Ε

Section F BCEC 212

Section C

Chemistry of Lanthanides and Actinides

BCEC 205C

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Anion Coordination Chemistry Cosponsored by ORGN

M. Albrecht,

K. Bowman-James and B. P. Hay, Organizers D. W . Johnson and S. J . Loeb,

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

2:30 518. Preparation of anion receptors able to bind hydrated anionic components of bacterial membranes. D. H. Burns, C. Jayasinghe, A. Jayasinghe, M. Koralegedara, A. Meece 3:00 Intermission. 3:30 519. Pattern recognition based sensing: Anions, chirality, and biologicals. E. V. Anslyn 4:00 520. Design and preparation of turn-on fluorescent arrays for anion sensing. P. Anzenbacher Jr. 4:30 521. Neutral and cationic boranes as anion receptors. C-W. Chiu, T. W. Hudnall, M. H. Lee, F. P. Gabbaï

Presiding

1:30 516. Chloride ion complexation and transport by amphiphilic peptides. G. W. Gokel 2:00 517. Cell recognition using synthetic anion receptors. B. D. Smith

Organizer

Presiding

2:00 532. Synthesis and characterization of polymer-supported reagents with an immo­ bilized diamide ligand: The complexation of lanthanide ions. Y. Yang, S. D. Alexandratos 2:20 533. Structural and spectroscopic studies of the first hetero-bimetallic coordi­ nation polymers consisting of both trans­ uranium and transition metal elements. Z. Assefa, R. Sykora, R. G. Haire

INOR

2:40 534. Homo- and heterodinuclear helicates with lanthanide(lll) ions. M. Albrecht 3:00 535. Actinide hydride complexes as multielectron reductants: Analogous reduc­ tion chemistry from [(CsMes^UHk, [(C5Me5)2UH2]2, and [(C 5 Me5) 2 ThH 2 ]2. K. A. Miller, W. J. Evans, S. A. Kozimor, J. W. Ziller, A. G. DiPasquale, A. L Rheingold 3:20 536. Cationic organometallic and Lewis acid rare earth metal catalysts from simple precursors. B. Hessen, S. Bambirra, N. P. Philipp, A. Meetsma 3:40 537. Effective, selective hydroalkoxylation/cyclization of alkynyl and allenyl alcohols mediated by lanthanide catalysts. S. Seo, X. Yu, T. J. Marks 4:00 538. New multimetallic complexes of thorium and uranium. J. M. Veauthier, E. J. Schelter, B. L. Scott, J. D. Thompson, P. J. Hay, K. D. John, D. E. Morris, J. L Kiplinger 4:20 539. Separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in acidic media using symmet­ ric and asymmetric dithiophosphinic acid extradants. D. R. Peterman, M. R. Greenhalgh, R. D. Tillotson, J. R. Klaehn, M. K. Harrup, T. A. Luther, J. D. Law, L. M. Daniels 4:40 540. Effect of H202 on the chemistry of f-element compounds in the + III and IV oxidation states in near-neutral and alka­ line solutions. G. S. Goff, L. F. Brodnax, M. R. Cisneros, F. L. Taw, K. S. Williamson, W. H. Runde 5:00 541. Investigations of the higher oxida­ tion states of americium. L. R. Martin, B. J. Mincher, N. C. Schmitt Section G BCEC 209 Nanoscience: Applications Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR D. J. Nelson and B. T. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers M. W . Pitcher, B. J . Hinds, and B. P. S. Chauhan, Presiding 1:30 542. Templating gold nanoparticles on self-patterning, self assembling monolay­ ers. X. Wei, M. B. Zimmt 1:50 543. Nanophosphor composites for radiation detection. R. E. Del Sesto, K. C. Ott, T. M. McCleskey, E. A. McKigney, D. W. Cooke, R. Muenchausen, R. D. Gilbertson, M. K. Bacrania, D. S. Ehler, J. F. Smith, B. L. Bennett, L. G. Jacobsohn, A. K. Burrell, B. Scott, C. S. Macomber 2:10 544. Rare earth doped yttria for optical amplifier application. Y. Mao, J. P. Chang 2:30 545. Self-organized FePt magnetic nanoparticles for high density magnetic recording media. D. E. Nikles, J. W. Harrell, G. B. Thompson 2:50 546. Superelasticity and nanofracture mechanics of ZnO nanohelices. P-X. Gao, W. Mai, Z. L. Wang 3:10 547. Assembling nanocomposites of CdTe QDs: Toward lowering the optical gain threshold. M. Emara, S. Burya, P. G. Van Patten 3:30 548. Magnetic ordering induced by molecular spin-valve electrodes. P. Tyagi, S. M. Holmes, B. J. Hinds 3:50 549. Quantitative morphological charac­ terization of multiwall carbon nanotube films via small-angle X-ray scattering. E. Verploegen, B. Wang, R. D. Bennett, J. Hart, R. E. Cohen 4:10 550. Application of polyaniline nanofibers. C. O. Baker, R. B. Kaner 4:30 551. Electron transfer in nanostructured silica materials. E. Johansson, J. I. Zink 4:50 552. Nanoparticle catalysis: Unsatur­ ated poly(siloxanes) obtained via polymer­ ization of functional bis-silanols. B. P. S. Chauhan, A. Sarkar, M. Chauhan, A. Roka 5:10 553. The synthesis of cadmium or Ag doped mesoporous Ti02. S. X. Li, G. E. Fryxell, M. Engelhard, C. Wang

Section H BCEC 211 Organometallic Catalysts Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, G. T. Whiteker,

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 554. Reactivity of chromium(ll) bimetallocycles and their role in ethylene trimerization. J . F. Young, G. P. A. Yap, K. H. Theopold 1:50 555. Gold-catalyzed enantioselective cyclization of allenyl alcohols. Z. Zhang, R. A. Widenhoefer 2:10 556. Scope, diastereoselectivity, and enantioselectivity of the platinum-catalyzed asymmetric alkylation of secondary phosphines. B. J. Anderson, D. S. Glueck 2:30 557. Pharmaceutical applications of Rh-catalyzed hydroaminomethylation. G. T. Whiteker 2:50 558. Coupling reactions of azides with alkynes catalyzed by Cp*RuCI(COD). L Zhang, G. Jia, V. V. Fokin 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 559. Electronic properties of the Ru blue dimer and related compounds to catalyze water oxidation. E. R. Batista, R. L. Martin 3:40 560. Highly efficient regio- and stereo­ selective dimerization of (hetero-)aromatic terminal alkynes by rare-earth metal cata­ lysts. S. Ge, V. F. Quiroga Norambuena, A. Meetsma, B. Hessen 4:00 561. Metalated ligands under pressure: Synthesis, characterization and HP-NMR spectroscopic studies on new precursors for rhodium catalyzed isomerizing hydroformylation of olefins. D. Selent, K-D. Wiese, A. Borner, W. Baumann 4:20 562. Using a tripod as a chiral chelating ligand: Catalysis with 1,1,1-tris(oxazolinyl) ethane (Trisox"). S. Bellemin-Laponnaz, C. Foltz, L. H. Gade 4:40 563. Catalysis by design: Wide bite angle diphosphines by assembly of ditopic ligands for selective rhodium catalyzed hydroformylation. Z. Freixa, P. W. van Leeuwen, D. Rivillo 5:00 564. Two hydrogen-bonds directed 3-D network polymers with catalytic activity. Y. Luan, G. Wang, R. L. Luck, Y. Wang Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Gas- and Condensed-Phase Actinide Chemistry Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by COMP and INOR TUESDAY EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Applications of Materials Environmental Research Cosponsored by PETR B. T. Donovan-Merkert, D. C. Crans, and D. J . Nelson, Organizers R. B. Little and M. Omary,

Presiding

7:00-10:00 565. Microwave assisted synthesis of metal organic framework molecules as catalysis for the oxidation of hardwood lignin. M. P. Masingale, R. C. Francis 566. Phosphorescent golden polymers. M. A. Rawashdeh-Omary, M. Rashdan, O. Elbjeirami, J. M. Lopez-de-Luzuriaga, A. Laguna, U. Bhansali, Β. Ε. Gnade

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

567. Phosphorescent heavy metal ion sen­ sors based on water-soluble, biodegrad­ able Chitosan polymer hydrogels. S. Marpu, C. Yang, Z. Hu, M. A. Omary 568. mete-Terphenyl protected phosphaalkenes: Synthesis, characterization and studies toward NLO materials. V. B. Gudimetla, J. D. Protasiewicz 569. Optical detection and qualification of iron(lll) by osmium polypyridyl-based monolayers. T. Gupta, M. E. van der Boom 570. Synthesis of dense YSZ film by electro­ static spray deposition and its application to SOFC electrolyte. B. Kwon, H. T. Kwon, J.Kim 571. Applications of mixed-ligand coordination species for fine tuning of metal-containing drugs. Z. Ma, B. Moulton Section Β BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Characterization and Applications of Coordination Compounds D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W . A. Howard, Organizers

7:00-10:00 572. Carbon dioxide fixation in mercury(ll) and cadmium(ll) complexes of tripodal ligands. D. C. Bebout, W. Lai, S. M. Berry, R. J. Butcher 573. Cell membrane-impermeable zinc chela­ tors. X-A. Zhang, M. Zhao, S. J. Lippard 574. Chemistry of ruthenium carbonyl cyanide compounds. D. Amarante, S. A. Koch 575. Communication between ruthenium (II) metal centers in asymmetric bimetallic complexes. M. T. Mongelli, E. Friga, J. Friga 576. Coupled copper centers for molecular motion in [3]rotaxanes. K. A. McNitt, K. Parimal, A. C. Fahrenbach; A. H. Flood 577. Development of platinum(ll) lumines­ cence-based probes for the investigation of aptamer folding. E. D. Bernard, M. C. DeRosa 578. Electron-transfer kinetics for a copper(ll/l) complex involving a quinquedentate macrocyclic trithiaetherbipyridine ligand. G. T. Chaka, J. L. Sonnenberg, H. B. Schlegel, M. J. Heeg, G. Jaeger, T. J. Nelson, L. A. Ochrymowycz, D. B. Rorabacher 579. Luminescent solids of iridium and ruthe­ nium for use as crystalline oxygen sen­ sors. K. A. McGee, K. R. Mann 580. New copper (I) precursors from 2,2,7trimethyloctane-3,5-dione, H(tod). K-H. Park, W. J. Marshall, L. M. Longshaw 581. Nonlinear optical chromophores incorporationg redox-switchable c/s-tetraammineruthenium(ll) centres. C. Swanson, B. J. Coe, M. Helliwell, J. A. Harris, Β. Β. Brunschwig, Μ. Β. Hursthouse, P. N. Horton 582. Novel ruthenium-nitrosyl complex: Struc­ ture, electrochemistry, spectroelectrochemistry and multifrequency EPR suggesting conformational isomerism in the Ru"(NO # ) state. P. Singh, J. Fiedler, C. Duboc, W. Kaim 583. Synthesis and characterization of halogenated derivatives of ionophore A23187. T. K. Ellis, K. L. Cox, D. Powell, R. W. Taylor 584. Synthesis and characterization of precur­ sor building block [Os(dpop')(N-N)CI]PF6; (N-N = bpy, bpm, and dpp) complexes. R. R. Ruminski, K. Rita, C. Dean, M. Knobbe 585. Synthesis and characterization of tetrakis(P3-hydroxo)tetrakis(2,2'-dipicolylamine)tetranickel perchlorate, a nickelhydroxy cubane complex. E. V. Rybak-Akimova, J. P. Wikstrom, W. M. Reiff, A. Y. Nazarenko 586. Synthesis and characterization zinc sulfate complexes with pseudoligands acetamide and thiocarbamide. K. S. Tashpulatov, A. M. Nasimov 587. Synthesis, characterization and applica­ tions of Silver(l) cyanoximates. N. N. Gerasimchuk, K. V. Domasevitch, N. K. Dalley, N. P. Rath, G. Glover

588. Two-color reversible photochromic isomerization of a ruthenium disulfoxide com­ plex. N. V. Mockus, J. J. Rack Section C BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Inorganic Catalysts B. T. Donovan-Merkert and K. Kustin, Organizers

7:00-10:00 589. Cofacial ruthenium catalysts for water oxidation. Y. Surendranath, J. Rosenthal, M. V. Childress, D. G. Nocera 590. Investigations of diastereoselective control for bis(salicylaldiminato)copper(ll) cyclopropanation catalysts. R. C. Boyd, S. R. Foley 591. Novel Group 4 catalysts for the formation of polyurethanes: Activity and selectivity studies of model urethane reactions. L. Pachés Samblés, M. G. Davidson, E. Gullo, M. D. Jones, A. A. D. Tulloch 592. Preparation and photo-electrochemical characterization of T i 0 2 containing nitrogen and carbon. D. Imai, M. Kawaguchi 593. Reduction of dinitrogen by protons and electrons at high pressures. D. G. H. Hetterscheid, R. Schrock 594. Targeting peptides with iron-based oxidants. A. Ekkati, J. J. Kodanko 595. Withdrawn. 596. 2-D Double metal cyanide complexes: Highly active catalysts for the homopolymerization of propylene oxide and copolymerization of propylene oxide and carbon dioxide. N. J. Robertson, Z. Qin, G. C. Dallinger, E. B. Lobkovsky, S. Lee, G. W. Coates Section D BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Inorganic Electrochemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

7:00-10:00 597. Photocurrent generators based on ITO electrodes modified with noncovalently assembled porphyrin conjugate. T. Arimura 598. Solvent dynamical control of ultrafast ground state electron transfer: Implications for class ll-lll mixed valency. S. D. Glover, B. J. Lear, C. P. Kubiak 599. Electrochemically modulated intercalation and reduction processes of nanostructured W 0 3 films. H. Redmond, M. Hepel 600. Facile method for the fabrication of nanopillar arrays. Y-C. Ting, S. L. Shy 601. High temperature electrochemical oxida­ tion of sulfide polluted brines. B. G. Ateya, F. M. AI Kharafi 602. Platinum-coated nanoporous gold nanorod array: Synthesis and characterization. S-H. Yoo, Y-K. Park, S. Park 603. 3-D Pt-coated Au nanoparticle array: Applications for electrocatalysis and sur­ face-enhanced raman scattering. Y-K. Park, S-H. Yoo, S. Park 604. Oxidative transformations of bis(2,2'bipyridine)(1 -methyl-1 -pyridin-2-yl-ethylamine)ruthenium(ll). D. Blauch, J. Neill, A. Nam, K. M. Barley, B. Meza 605. [1.1]Metallacyclophanes bridged by heavier group 13 elements: Electrochemis­ try and dynamic studies in solution. J. Muller, J. A. Schachner, C. L Lund, G. A. Orlowski, H-B. Kraatz Section Ε BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Inorganic Modeling of Biological Systems D. C. Crans and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers

7:00-10:00 606. Dramatic increase of DNA cleavage activity of dinuclear metal complexes by introducing ammonium/guanidinium groups. C. Xiaoqiang, P. Xiaojun

TECH-79

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

INOR

607. Investigating the roles of tyrosines 9 and 62 in the dismutation of superoxide by nickel superoxide dismutase using synthetic models. K. A. Higgins, M. J. Maroney 608. Modeling photosystem II with schiff-base manganese complexes. W. Lo, M. Domin, E. V. Rybak-Akimova, W. H. Armstrong 609. Synthesis, characterization, and nuclease reactivity of new binuclear Zn(ll) and Cu(ll) complexes. J . Kim 610. Aromatic hydroxylation at a nonheme iron center. E. V. Rybak-Akimova, 0 . Makhlynets, S. Taktak, M. Flook, R. Mas-Ballesté, L Que Jr. 611. Copper(l) bis(mercaptoimidazolyl)methane complexes. T. A. Pinder, L. A. Graham, K. A. Kreisel, G. P. A. Yap, D. Rabinovich 612. Development of a new class of pyranodithiolene ligands and their metal complexes en route to molybdenum cofactor. P. Basu, B. Serli-Mitasev, B. Hammann 613. Model compounds of galactose oxidase. G. M. Mockler, J. Boge, R. Kanitz 614. Reversible caging of Zn 2 + . H. M. D. Bandara, S. C. Burdette 615. Synthesis and structural characterization of diiron(ll) paddlewheel complexes of the type [Fe2(p-02Ctrp) 4 (L) 2 ] bridged by triptycene carboxylates ("0 2 Ctrp). S. Friedle, J. J. Kodanko, K. L. Fornace, S. Lippard 616. Thermodynamic studies relevant to hydrogen atom transfer in iron imido complexes. I. Nieto, E. Duesler, J. M. Smith 617. Transition metal coordination to the amyloidogenic region of human prion protein fragment. P. F. Soh, J. Shearer Section F BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

H. L Rhoads and C. N. Brammer, Presiding D. J . Nelson, Organizer,

Presiding

7:00-10:00 618. Preparation and characterization of high aspect ratio titanate nanostructure through hydrothermal methods under different conditions. I-L. Kao, C-H. Huang, R-A. Doong 619. Semiconducting nanorods for photovol­ taic applications. N. L. Chevere-Trinidad, S. Gurbuz, S. Yurt, D. Venkataraman 620. Synthesis, characterization, and photocatalytic properties of pyrochlore Bi2Ti207 nanotubes. H. Zhou, T-J. Park, S. S. Wong 621. Fast microwave-assisted purification, functionalization and dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Y. Chen, S. Mitra 622. Bottom-up fabrication from supramolecular hydrogen-bonded scaffolds. S. Kinge, M. Crego-Calama, D. Reinhoudt 623. Studying one of chemistry's "superheroes": SWNTs. H. L. Rhoads, C. N. Brammer, D. J. Nelson 624. Synthesis of 3-D flower-like â-Nickel hydroxide by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. L. Xu, Y. Ding, C-H. Chen, W-N. Li, S. L Suib 625.1-D Zinc oxide nanotubes fabricated by electrospinning. W-S. Chen, C. Kuo 626. Microwave-induced controlled purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes without sidewall functionalization. Y. Chen, S. Mitra

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

80-TECH

627. Synthesis, characterization and application of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) coated mesoporous silica nanosphere. V. S-Y. Lin, P-W. Chung 628. POSS-PDMS Nanocomposites: Using tethered inorganic fillers to modify the mechanical properties of polymeric systems. T. V. Jones, T. S. Wilson, T. F. Baumann, A. Saab, R. Maxwell 629. A facile large-scale synthesis of silver nanomaterials using electron beam irradiation. S. E. Kim, G. Huh, Y. H. Han, B. C. Lee, J-C. Lee 630. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline Mo2C from peroxomolybdenum complexes. B. Zhang, H. Li, H. Shu, W. Zhu, J. Xia 631. Growth of carbon nanoropes on Y203 nanoparticles in a tube furnace. B. Guo 632. Preparation of controlled Au nanostructures in the presence of Gemini surfactants. M. S. Kang, H. I. Lee, S. H. Park, J. M. Kim 633. Preparation of La203 nanotubes by chemical coprecipitation. Z. Le, L. Dai, F. Yu, S. Deng, R. Ruan, P. Chen 634. Preparation of nanometer gold particles by sonochemical synthesis. Y-C. Ting, S. L Shy, L. W. Ping, Z-I. Chen 635. Selective synthesis of T i 0 2 nanoparticles and hollow microspheres. Y. J . Kim, H. J. Kim, W. I. Lee 636. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic Mn1-xZnxFe204 and core-shell nanoparticles. X. Wang, L. Wang, H-Y. Park, P. N. Njoki, S. Lim, C-J. Zhong 637. Synthesis of metallic nanoparticles directed by polymers. W. Cui, M. Fryd, J. H. Park, R. J. Composto, B. B. Wayland 638. Ambient template-directed synthesis of single-crystalline alkaline earth metal fluoride nanowires. F. Zhang, Y. Mao, S. S. Wong 639. Anion effect on the synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous nickel oxide via nanoreplication. J . Yu, J. K. Shon, S. S. Kong, J. M. Kim 640. Converting nanocrystalline metals into intermetallics for applications in catalysis. J. C. Bauer, J. Chen, R. E. Schaak 641. Facile syntheses of transition metal oxides with controlled mesoporosities. J. K. Shon, S. S. Kong, J. A. Yu, J. M. Kim 642. Functionalization of nanocrystalline diamond: Building blocks for functional materials. G. B. Cunningham, O. Shenderova, S. C. Hens, G. McGuire 643. Influence of some parameters on the synthesis of nanosized NiO material. Y. Wu, B. Wu, T. Wu, H. Wan 644. Colloidal GaN nanocrystals: Tuning and narrowing of the size distribution. J. D. Suter II, P. G. Van Patten 645. Nanoframes directed formation of triangular silver nanoplates. W. Yuehui, Z. Qi, Z.Ji 646. Preparation of new organic-inorganic nanohybrids from various metal hydroxides. K. Soeta, H. Tagaya 647. Self-assembly of organic-inorganic nanohybrid from Ca(OH)2. H. Sato, H. Tagaya 648. Synthesis and characterization of octahedral graphite particles. C. Chen, F. Cao, W. Qian, Q. Chen 649. The preparation and assembly of magnetite-PVP core-shell nanocubes. C. Chen, Y. Xiong, Q. Chen 650. Comparing hydrosilylation routes to functionalized porous silicon. L. A. Porter Jr. 651. Aqueous synthesis of vanadium oxide nanoparticles under ambient conditions. W. H. Morris III, M. S. Wellons, C. M. Lukehart 652. Fabrication of color tunable transition metal-doped ZnSe nanocrystal emitters. H-F. Wang, R-A. Doong 653. Synthesis of gold nanocrystals by using biomolecules. Y-C. Yeh, l-J. Chang 654. Sidewall functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with amino acids of different chain length and their aqueous solubility over a wide pH range. L. Zeng, A. R. Barron 655. Templated synthesis of metal-DNA crossover points—unusual stability and dynamic character. H. Yang, H. Sleiman 656. New Cd x Te y Zn z /ZnS alloyed core-shell quantum dots: Control of shape and luminescent properties. A. F. E. Hezinger, J. K. Tessmar, A. M. Goepferich

Section G BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Characterization and Applications of Coordination Compounds D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W. A. Howard, Organizers 7:00-10:00 657. Microwave-promoted insertion of Ni(ll), Pd(ll) and Pt(ll) into free base porphyrins and chlorins. M. L Dean, J. Schminck, C. Bruckner, Ν. Ε. Leadbeater 658. Different reactivity for triphenylmethyland phenyl-thiolato nickel(ll) complexes: Formation of a M-T^-r^-disulfido dinickel(ll) complex and unexpected nickel alkylation. J. Cho, K. V. Heuvelen, G. P. A. Yap, T. C. Brunold, C. G. Riordan 659. Catalytic studies of an Fe(lll) macrocyclic tetradentate triamide complex with hydro­ gen peroxide. E. S. Uffelman, C. M. Diebold, E. A. Binns, C. S. Levin, S. B. Pittman, E. G. Webb, Κ. Μ. Clark 660. Phosphoryl oxygen sensing capabilities of manganese 5,15-di(aryl)-10-(3-vinylphenyl)corrole complexes. K. Kim, N. Maiti, D. G. Churchill 661. Investigation of PNP-Manganese com­ plexes and their reactivity. D. Bacciu, C-H. Chen, B. M. Foxman, O. V. Ozerov 662. Helical vanadium-salen complexes for asymmetric sulfoxidation. S. Barman, C. J. Levy 663. Bacterial spore detection: Ionic radii effects on the stability of lanthanide ternary complexes. M. L Cable, J. P. Kirby, H. B. Gray, A. Ponce 664. Synthesis of microporous coordination polymers by in situ terminal alkyne cou­ pling reactions. S. Han, B. Luisi, B. Moulton 665. Understanding the physical mechanism of a solid-state reaction: Polymerization of metal propynoates. J. P. Reddy, R. B. Sandor, B. M. Foxman 666. Synthesis mechanism of anatase crystal­ line mesoporous titania from industrial titanyl sulfate solution. C-X. Tian, Z. Zhang, J. Shen, M-J. Zhang, N. Luo 667. Polymorphism, polytypism and solidstate reactivity: The "magic" of potassium carboxylate complexes. C-H. Chen, J. B. Heyman, W. Shang, B. M. Foxman 668. In(lll), Ga(lll) and Mn(ll) complexes of A D03A-conjugated triphenylphosphonium cation. C-T. Yang, S. Liu 669. Direct and indirect approaches to group 13 metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraamine ligands. O. Terova, W-C. Lee, E. H. Wong, G. R. Weisman, C. J. Anderson 670. Mechanistic investigation of bifunctional inner sphere transfer hydrogénation catalysts. E. P. Kelson, R. M. Lazik, E. Algarin 671. Metal phosphonates incorporating bipyridine. H. P. Perry, J. Law, A. Clearfield 672. Hemilabile coordination complexes as a tool for small molecule sensing. A. Tomcykoski, W. E. Jones Jr. 673. Heteropoly acids as catalysts for preparation of N-(hydroxyphenyl)maleimide. Z. Le, Y. Huang, F. Yu, S. Deng, R. Ruan, P. Chen 674. Comparative coordination chemistry of two tricyclic bisamidines and synthesis of a C2-symmetric tricyclic bisamidine. J . Li, K. K. Kwan, G. R. Weisman, Ε. Η. Wong, A. L Rheingold 675. Structural characterization and biological activity of ortho-quinone hydrazones' metal complexes. Z. Afrasiabi, E. Sinn, D. Xiao, F. Ahmed, F. Sarkar, S. Padhye Section H BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Organometallic Synthesis Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

7:00-10:00 676. Metalloligands: Iridium(lll) and Rhodium(III) cyclometalated compounds containing multitopological binucleating ligands. S. Lanza, G. Alibrandi, F. Loiseau, F. Nastasi, F. Puntoriero

677. Solution studies of unique tridentate zwitterion ligands and their complexation with lanthanide metals. A. Lalehzari, C. J. Levy 678. Synthesis and characterization of dimeric molybdenum complexes for the prepara­ tion of photodegradable organometallic polymers. G. V. Shultz, B. C. Daglen, D. R. Tyler 679. Synthesis and reactivity of new carbyne osmium complexes: (PNP)OsC-Ar. N. P. Tsvetkov, J-H. Lee, K. G. Caulton 680. Synthesis and structural features of group V and VI metal complexes bearing N.N'-disubstituted 1,8-diaminonaphthalene ligands. N. Lavoie, I. Korobkov, D. Richeson 681. Arene-bridged dichromium(l) invertedsandwich complexes supported by βdiketiminates. Y-C. Tsai, P-Y. Wang, C-F. Lu, S-A. Chen, J-M. Chen 682. Biomimetic organometallic chemistry at paramagnetic nickel(ll) centers. S. K. Chattopadhyay, M. Jensen, J. L. Petersen, H. Ma, T. Deb 683. Exchange reactions as routes to selec­ tively fluorinated metallocenes. C. K. Gren, J. A. Crisp, T. P. Hanusa 684. New pincer (PXP) ligands with σ-donor element in the middle. W. Gu, C-H. Chen, B. M. Foxman, O. V. Ozerov 685. Withdrawn. 686. Reactivity and stability of platinaoxetanes. J . Wu, P. R. Sharp 687. Synthesis of metal clusters containing carbohydrate ligands and antitumor activ­ ity. V. D. Reddy, D. V. Dayal, M. R. Reddy, S. C. Cosenza 688. Tris(polyarene)metalates of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium. R. E. Jilek, J. E. Ellis Section I BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience C. L. Hill and D. C. Crans,

Organizers

7:00-10:00 689. Formation of Tc-99 nanoparticles by reduced POMs. I. M. Mbomekalle, F. Bian, R. C. Howell, L. C. Francesconi 690. Theoretical study of electronic structures of several polyoxometalates. Z-M. Su Sr. 691. The reactivity of the nitride derivative [PW11039RuN]4- with phosphines: A mechanistic study. B. Claire, Y. V. Geletii, A. Proust, C. L. Hill 692. Isolation and characterization of two group IV metal (Zr and Hf) complex substi­ tuted semivacant Wells-Dawson polyoxotungstates. Y. Hou, X. Fang, K. Hardcastle, C. L.Hill 693. Novel peroxodiphosphatomolybdatestructural and 3 1 P NMR study. K. Aoki, K. Iwata, M. Hashimoto, S. Okeya 694. Antibacterial effects of sandwich type polyoxometalates against Salmonella typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. A. V. Sankarraj, S. K. Hussain, 0 . A. Oyarzabal, C. Shannon 695. Catalytic reactivity of polyoxometalatetes adsorbed in microporous carbons. J. Walker, H. Schreuder-Gibson, W. Yeomans, D. Ball, C. Hill 696. Characterization and 3 1 P NMR study of [PMoioC*35(02)]7" with various counter cations. K. Iwata, K. Yamanaka, K. Aoki, M. Hashimoto, S. Okeya 697. Decomposition of [r(SiO 4 )W 1 0 O28(OH) 4 ] 4 " as a pathway to an active catalyst in peroxide based homo­ geneous epoxidations. D. Hillesheim, Y. V. Geletti, C. L. Hill, K. Morokuma, D. G. Musaev 698. Electron transfer reactions of soluble metal nanoparticles: Kinetic interrogation by polyoxometalate cluster anions. 1. A. Weinstock, O. Snir, Y. Tong 699. High ion mobility within a mesoporous "zeolite-like" polyoxometalate framework. L. Cronin, C. Ritchie, C. Streb, D-L. Long

INOR

700. Isolation and characterization of a sandwich tri-palladium structural type, [Pdll3P2W18068]12-, the postulated precursor of a terminal palladium-oxo compound. R. Cao, K. O'Halloran, K. I. Hardcastle, C. L. Hill 701. Microcalorimetric investigation on formation of the ellipsoidal Mo-blue ring coordinated by La 3 + cations. E. Ishikawa, T. Yamase 702. Molecular interaction and energy transfer between a drug carrier protein and polyoxometalates. G. Zhang, B. Keita, J-C. Brochon, L. Nadjo, P. de Oliveira, C. T. Craescu, S. Miron 703. Polyoxometalates as nanoscale building blocks in the preparation of supramolecular materials. W. A. Neiwert 704. 3 1 P NMR study of peroxophosphatotunstates in aqueous/acetonitrile mixed media. Y. Hamamatsu, S. Kitaura, K. Kihara, T. Terada, M. Hashimoto, S. Okeya 705. A disorder-free beta-Keggin monomer: Diiron substituted silicontungstate, (Me2NH2)4H4[FelH2CI2SiW10O38]»9H2O, and ligand exchange reactions on the iron site. C. Yates, R. Cao, K. I. Hardcastle, C. L Hill 706. Withdrawn. 707. A 1-D chain of polyoxometalate polymer bridged by dinuclear copper coordination units with 5-phenyl-2-(4-pyridinyl)pyridine. H. Ma, X. Wang 708. All-inorganic dinuclear cobalt complex with inorganic porphyrin type ligand. S. Inami, Y. Hayashi, K. Isobe 709. Withdrawn. 710. Cation equilibria and kinetics at the surface of a polyoxometalate artificial cell. M. K. Sarker, A. Merca, H. Bôgge, M. Schmidtmann, C. L Hill, A. Millier 711. Characterization and 3 1 P NMR study of [X2{PW309.5(0 2 )3(OH)o.5(OH 2 )} 4 ] 8 -(X=K + , Rb + , NH 4 + ). S. Kitaura, K. Kihara, M. Hashimoto, S. Okeya 712. Withdrawn. 713. Deoxygenation of a terminal palladiumoxo complex: Isolation and characterization of the reduced product, (Me2NH2)7K[PdllP2W20O70(OH2)2]»18H2O. R. Cao, K. I. Hardcastle, C. L. Hill 714. Polyoxometalate-based inorganic-organic hybrid materials: An effective way to prepare highly functionalized polyoxometalates. J. Song, J. Han, C. L. Hill 715. Preparation of mixed-valence Cu'-Cu" di-copper complex in aqueous solution by mixed-valence giant polyoxomolybdate [Mo v , 7 2Mo v 03 7 2 (CH3COO)3o(H 2 0) 7 2 ] 4 2 ·. C. Gu, A. V. Sankarraj, C. Shannon 716. Synthesis of amphiphilic polyoxometalates using SiWnOsg 8 ", P 2 W 1 7 0 6 1 1 0 · , and V3P2W15O596' compounds. R. C. Chambers 717. Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of a new dimeric silicotungstate: K9Na2H[ r Cu2(H20)SiW8031)«39H20. Z. Luo, P. Kôgerler, R. Cao, I. S. Hakim, C. L Hill 718. Template synthesis of a spherical polyoxovanadate(V) by oxidative coupling reaction. S. Kamiya, Y. Hayashi, K. Isobe 719. Supramolecular assembly based on â-[Mo8024]4- polyoxometalate. Z. Han, M.Li 720. Modification chemistry of polyoxometalates by multi-track Cu-N coordination complex chain. J. Peng, J. Sha

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Section J

Section L

Section N

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Synthesis and Characterization of Materials

Thin Films: Chemical Vapor Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition

Bioinorganic Chemistry: Enzymes and Coenzymes

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

G. S. Girolami and W . L. Gladfelter, Organizers

D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and S. L. Michel, Organizers

7:00-10:00

7:00-10:00

740. Chemical vapor deposition of WN x C y thin films using tungsten hydrazido com­ plexes. J . Koller, H. M. Ajmera, T. J. Anderson, L. McElwee-White 741. Chemical vapor deposition of WSe2 thin films: Highly hydrophobic sticky surfaces. C. J. Carmalt, N. Boscher, I. P. Parkin 742. Novel germanium compounds for the low temperature deposition of germanium and germanium chalcogenide thin films. M. Stender, W. Hunks, T. Chen, P. S. Chen, G. T. Stauf, J. F. Roeder, C.Xu 743. Preparation of Graphite-like layered B/C/N thin film on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. S. Kuroda, M. Kawaguchi 744. Transition metal amides and imides as precursors to metal nitride and carbonitride thin films via chemical vapor deposition. C. J. Carmalt, S. E. Potts, H. O. Davies 745. Transition metal interfaces as an indirect structural method for conductivity modula­ tion of conducting polymer thin films. P. N. Kariuki, J. J. Martin, C. J. Timpson, K. Pueschel, A. Sattler, W. E. Jones Jr.

757. Nonheme diiron oxidation catalysts. M. Zhao, B. A. Helms, J. M. J. Frechet, S. J. Lippard 758. Delineating the role of metal ions in the function of TTP (NUP-475), a non-classical zinc finger protein involved in inflammatory response. S. J . Lee, R. C. diTargiani, S. L J. Michel 759. Spectroscopic evidence of the formation of "Goldfingers". M. A. Franzman, A. M. Barrios 760. Structure and mechanism in NiSOD. K. C. Ryan, R. W. Herbst, P. A. Bryngelson, A. I. A. Guce, C. L Doddi, T. C. Brunold, D. E. Cabelli, S. C. Garman, M. J. Maroney 761. Characterizing chromium-containing peptides by mass spectrometry. J. B. Vincent, Y. Chen, J. Gao, D. Pu, C. J. Cassady 762. Biosynthetic studies of the CUA and blue copper protein centers. D. K. Garner, H. J. Hwang, M. G. Savelieff, S. M. Berry, Y.Lu 763. Design and engineering of heme pro­ teins containing heteronuclear metal bind­ ing sites and nonnative metal cofactors. J-L. Zhang, N. Wang, X. Zhao, N. Yeung, T. D. Pfister, Y. Lu 764. Electrochemcial investigation of a multicopper oxidase CueO from Ε coli. T. Ye 765. Electrochemical investigation of cyto­ chrome c peroxidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. C. F. Becker, S. J. Elliott, N. J. Watmough 766. Intermolecular electron transfer reactions of cytochrome c on gold nanoparticles. A. Carver, M. J. Knapp 767. Cysteine dioxygenase: Cys-tyr linkage kinetics and the metal binding site. J. H. Leung, R. W. Herbst, S. Chai, M. J. Maroney 768. Withdrawn.

Organizer

7:00-10:00 721. Using ionic liquids as solvents in the preparation of novel hybrid materials. P. Mahjoor, S. E. Latturner 722. Adsorption of gases and metal ions on internal surface of mesoporous silica. E-K. Park, E-S. Kim, T. Yeu, S-G. Kim 723. Alkyne-containing MOFs targeting hydro­ gen uptake. D. Tranchemontagne, Ο. Μ. Yaghi 724. Derivatives of bis(pyridylimino)isoindoline as building blocks for metal-organic frame­ works. D. M. Baird, R. Wheeler, N. Rampersad, P. Fanwick, P. Blackwelder 725. Experimental and theoretical investiga­ tion of the ternary chalcogenide: Sn 3 . x Bi 2 + x Se 6 (0
Organizer

7:00-10:00 732. Neutral half sandwiches containing five planar tetracoordinate carbon atoms. N. Perez, A. Vela, G. Merino 733. Computational studies on the photophysical properties and NMR fluxionality of the tetranuclear copper(l) complexes [Cu4(mu-dppm)4(mu4-E)]2+ (E = PPh and S). W. H. Lam, E. C-C. Cheng, V. W-W. Yam 734. DFT study on Fe(NO)2P(OCH3)3TCNE, rotational barrier of coordinated olefin. M. A. Camacho-Fernandez, L. Li 735. Modeling of M-DNA using dispersionaugmented density functional tight binding: Benchmarks with RI-MP2 and CCSD(T) as reference. S. Irle 736. The Jahn-Teller effect in [[email protected]]q and [[email protected]]q icosahedral cage clusters as interpreted by Dirac cluster calculations. R. Arratia-Perez, L. Hernandez-Acevedo 737. Computational approach for the compari­ son of the η-acceptor character of N-donor heterocycles in Au(lll) complexes. E. Bordignon, M. Bortoluzzi, G. Paolucci, B. Pitteri 738. Computational analysis of the excited states of tetrachloroferrate. R. B. Yelle 739. Theoretical studies of the mechanism of reduction of N 2 by an iron-phosphine complex. R. B. Yelle, J. L. Crossland, N. K. Szymczak, D. R. Tyler

Section M BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 General Organometallic Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

7:00-10:00 746. Aromatic oxidative addition at a (PNP)Rh center. M. Puri, S. Gatard, C-H. Chen, B. M. Foxman, O. V. Ozerov 747. Catalytic applications of wide bite angle diphosphine complexes. B. P. Morgan, R. J. Gilliard, R. C. Smith 748. Catalytic asymmetric coupling of organic carbonyl compounds with halides. Y. C. Lin 749. Group 15-bridged bis(cyclopenedienyl) ligands and their o° metal complexes. E. D. Brady, K. C. Jayaratne, S. C. Chmely, T. P. Hanusa, V. G. Young Jr. 750. Withdrawn. 751. Measurement of the structure of tetracarbonylethyleneosmium using microwave spectroscopy. S. G. Kukolich, C. Karunatilaka, B. S. Tackett, J. Washington, J. Takats 752. Strontium and barium guanidinate and mixed-ligand, pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-guanidinate complexes. T. M. Cameron, C. Xu, A. G. DiPasquale, A. L. Rheingold 753. Synthesis and reactivity of linear tetra­ nuclear Mo 2 M 2 (M = Ir, Pd) complexes. A. Shima, M. Ohashi, K. Mashima 754. Withdrawn. 755. Synthesis and structural features of novel group VII transition metal carbene complexes. D. I. Bezuidenhout, S. Lotz, D. Liles 756. Synthesis of regioregular polyene oligo­ mers with controlled number of repeating units using Mo-alkylidene compounds. C. Scriban, R. R. Schrock

WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 204 A/B Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience Computational and Physical Studies on Polyoxometalates C. L. Hill and D. C. Crans, M. T. Pope,

Organizers

Presiding

9:00 769. Encapsulation of ions by polyoxo­ metalates. J. M. Poblet, J. A. Fernandez, X. Lopez 9:30 770. Evidence from DFT calculations for a pseudo Jahn-Teller vibronic coupling model as the origin of the cooperative alternating bond length distortions in nominally O/, symmetry Lindquist anions, [ Μ 6 0 1 9 Γ ~ (M = Mo, W). D. C. Duncan, R. Sniatynsky 10:00 771. Formation mechanisms of smallsize polyoxometalates: A combined theo­ retical study using static methods and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. A. Rodriguez-Fortea, L-K. Yan, L. Vila, J. M. Poblet 10:20 Intermission. 10:30 772. Theoretical investigation of struc­ tural isomerism in polyoxoanions. M-M. Rohmer, M. Benard 11:00 773. Polyoxometalates with two vicinal d-electron transition metal centers(-y-M2Keggin complexes): Structural, electronic and reactivity properties. B. Botar 11:30 774. Interaction of Keggin species with oxide surfaces. C. M. Teague, K. Pontarelli, J. Bean, J. Valenstein

TECH-81

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

INOR 11:50 775. Electrocatalytic oxygen reduction using transition metal substituted sandwich type polyoxometalates in pH=5 acetate buffer. A. V. Sankarraj, T. Shvareva, T. E. Albrecht-Schmitt, C. Shannon 12:10 776. Seeing the unseen in polyoxometalate clusters using electrospray and cryospray mass spectrometry. L. Cronin, D-L Long Section Β BCEC 205C Main Group Chemistry B. T. Donovan-Merkert, F. P. Gabba'i,

Organizer

Presiding

9:00 777. Novel silicon compounds for the detection of fluoride in aqueous environ­ ment. M. Kim, B. Carroll, F. P. Gabba'i 9:20 778. Characterization of hydrogen encapsulated type-l silicon clathrate. D. Neiner, N. L. Okamoto, C. L. Condron, S. M. Kauzlarich, N. D. Browning 9:40 779. Synthesis and reactivity of a-silylated carbocations. C-W. Chiu, F. P. Gabba'i 10:00 780. New monomeric saturated N-heterocyclic silylenes and germylenes as racemic mixtures. A. C. Tomasik, R. West, N. J. Hill, W. Li, A. Mitra, G. A. Bikzhanova 10:20 781. Structural characterization of species featuring [R3Si-F->CR3] + and R 3 C-H->SiFR 3 bridges. C. L. Dorsey, F. P. Gabba'i 10:40 782. Ligand stabilized tricoordinate cationic phosphorus centers. J. J. Weigand, N. Burford, T. S. Cameron, A. Decken 11:00 783. Plane hydrolysis of coordinated phosphorus and phosphorus sulphide. M. Peruzzini, M. Di Vaira, S. Seniori Costantini, P. Stoppioni 11:20 784. Carbon-atoms-adjacent and carbon-atoms-apartsupercarboranes. Z.Xie 11:40 785. Cyanide ion complexation by a cationic borane in aqueous media. T. W. Hudnall, F. P. Gabba'i 12:00 786. Toward multiplexed magnetic resonance imaging with functionalized xenon-129 biosensors. P. A. Hill, Q. Wei, G. Seward, N. Kuzma, O-S. Lee, J. G. Saven, I. J. Dmochowski Section C BCEC 205B Synthesis and Characterization of Materials Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, V. R. Thalladi,

Organizer

Presiding

8:30 787. MX chain interactions in binary metallomesogenic mixtures of Pt(ll) and Pt(IV) complexes. R. J. Allenbaugh, C. K. Schauer 8:50 788. Developing strategies for the synthesis of porous metal-organic frame­ works: Reactivity trends and kinetics. S. S. Kaye, M. I. Gibson, J. R. Long 9:10 789. Engineering the H2 sorption prop­ erties of tetrazolate-based metal-organic frameworks via cation exchange and directed ligand design. M. Dinca, C. Tsay, J. R. Long 9:30 790. Isotopically labeled porphyrins for studies of ground-state hole transfer in multiporphyrin arrays. A. Z. Muresan, D. Holten, D. F. Bocian, J. S. Lindsey 9:50 791. Metal-organometallic frameworks using metalated arenecarboxylates ligands. S. A. Kumalah, K. T. Holman 10:10 792. Microwave synthesis of gallium zinc phosphate NTHU-4. J . A. Losilla, D. Coutinho, K. J. Balkus Jr. 10:30 793. Nonplanar liquid crystalline por­ phyrins: Synthesis and their properties. P. Bhyrappa, C. Arunkumar, B. Varghese

82-TECH

10:50 794. Size and morphological control, and spectroscopic characterization of open framework titanosilicate ETS-10 crystals for quantum wire applications. Z. Ji, J. Warzywoda, T. Goodrich, Z. Cai, K. Ziemer, A. Sacco Jr. 11:10 795. Synthesis and characterization of metallo-supramolecular block copolymers. C. Ott, D. Wouters, H. M. L. Thijs, U. S. Schubert 11:30 796. Synthesis of porous metals, metal oxides, and hierachical inorganic nanocomposites by emulsion templating. H. Zhang, A. I. Cooper 11:50 797. Temperature dependence studies of luminescent cyclometalated iridium(lll) complexes with pyrazolyl or N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands. T. Sajoto, A. B. Tamayo, P. I. Djurovich, M. E. Thompson, R. J. Holmes, S. R. Forrest 12:10 798. Shape control and spectroscopy of crystalline BaZr03 perovskite particles. H. Zhou, Y. Mao, S. S. Wong Section D BCEC 208 General Organometallic Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, T. P. Hanusa,

Organizer

Presiding

8:30 799. Redox reactivity of group IV metal complexes containing the bis(arylimino) acenaphthene ligand. Κ. Μ. Clark, A. F. Heyduk 8:50 800. Gold-plated fluorophores. T. G. Gray 9:10 801. Facile Pd-mediated aerobic CH functionalization in protic media. J. Zhang, A. N. Vedemikov 9:30 802. Consequences of the variation of the donor nature in rigid pincer complexes. O. V. Ozerov, L. Gerber, W. Weng, W. Gu, B. M. Foxman, C-H. Chen 9:50 803. Identification and unusual reactivity of a d 9 three-coordinate nickel (I) system. B. C. Fullmer, H. Fan, M. Pink, K. G. Caulton 10:10 804. Organocopper reagents: Struc­ tures and solution equilibria of homo- and hetero-organocuprates. R. P. Davies, S. Hornauer 10:30 805. S-H bond strengths and hydro­ gen abstraction kinetics of M(u-SH)M clusters, for M=Fe,Mo. S-J. Lee, J. A. Franz, A. M. Appel, D. L DuBois, T. A. Bowden 10:50 806. Thermally stable bis(indenyl) complexes of manganese. J. A. Crisp, M. B. Meredith, J. S. Overby, T. P. Hanusa, A. L. Rheingold 11:10 807. Versatile chemistry of pentafluorophenyl copper. F. Jaekle, A. Sundararaman, A. Doshi, K. Venkatasubbaiah 11:30 808. Stoichiometric and catalytic oxidation of ethylene and propylene by hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen using dpms-Pt(ll) and Pd(ll) complexes (dpms = di(2-pyridyl)methanesulfonate). J. R. Khusnutdinova, L. Newman, A. N. Vedemikov

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Section Ε

Section G

BCEC 211

BCEC 209

Characterization and Applications of Coordination Compounds

Inorganic Catalysts

D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W . A. Howard, Organizers 8:30 809. Coupling magnetic bistability to chemical sensing. M. P. Shores, Z. Ni, A. M. McDaniel, E. M. Perrault 8:50 810. Efficient parallel development of diverse imaging probes from a common precursor using click chemistry. T. L. Mindt, T. Ross, T. Muggier, R. Schibli 9:10 811. Functionalized layered metal phosphonates based on bipyridine. H. P. Perry, J. Law, A. Clearfield 9:30 812. Ground- and excited-state acidbase properties of (bis(2,2'-bipyridine) (2-(2-pyridyl) pyrazine) ruthenium(ll). E. Ferloni, H. D. Gafney, J. C. Colis, J. Zambrana Jr. 9:50 813. Interplay between charge transfer and intraligand triplet states in platinum(ll) complexes bearing phenyleneethynylene oligomers. S. Goeb, F. N. Castellano 10:10 814. Platinum(ll) complexes bearing acetylenic terpyridines and terpyridyl acetylides. M. L. Muro, R. Ziessel, F. N. Castellano 10:30 Intermission. 10:50 815. Investigation of the locus of oxidation and spectroscopic features of oxidized metal salen complexes. T. Storr, E. C. Wasinger, R. C. Pratt, T. D. P. Stack 11:10 816. Iron(lll) sequestration by synthetic hydroxypyridinone siderophores and exchange with desferrioxamine B. J. M. Harrington, A. L. Crumbliss, S. Dhungana, S. Chittamuru, H. K. Jacobs, A. S. Gopalan 11:30 817. Luminescent indole based atropisomeric chelating ligands and their coordi­ nation complexes. T. M. McCormick, S. Wang 11:50 818. Metal coordination extends the application of biodegradable polymers to imaging and therapy. K. Saatchi, U. O. Hàfeli 12:10 819. Mixed-valent complexes bridged by a radical anion ligand. B. Sarkar, S. Patra, J. Fiedler, G. K. Lahiri, W. Kaim

B. T. Donovan-Merkert and K. Kustin, Organizers D. Atwood,

Presiding

8:30 826. Exploration of molybdenum-salen complexes: Synthesis, reactivity, and catalysis. G. Du, P. E. Fanwick, M. M. Abu-Omar 8:50 827. Catalytic phosphate ester cleavage with aluminum chelates. D. Atwood, J. Struss 9:10 828. Comparison of the behavior of supported homogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of dimethylcarbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide. M. Aresta, A. Dibenedetto, F. Nocito, C. Pastore 9:30 829. Cofacial ruthenium dimers for water oxidation. M. V. Childress, Y. Surendranath, J. Rosenthal, D. G. Nocera 9:50 830. Decomposition of haloalkanes in NaY and Ti-substituted NaY zeolite. F. P. Arnold Jr., D. C. Doetschman, M-H. Lee, C. Kanyi 10:10 831. Kinetic and mechanistic studies into the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides via fluorinated manganese (III) acacen complexes. E. B. Frantz, D. J. Darensbourg 10:30 832. Preparation and characterization of Cu/ZnO loaded carbon nanotube and nanopowder templated zeolites and their catalytic activity for hydrogenating CO and C 0 2 . L M. Petkovic, H. W. Rollins, D. M. Ginosar, K. C. Burch 10:50 833. Metal iodide catalyzed conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons. J. E. Bercaw, P. L. Diaconescu, R. H. Grubbs, N. Hazari, J. A. Labinger, X. Li, P. Mehrkhodavandi, P. Vagner 11:10 834. Synthesis and characterization of [(HIPTPropyl)N3N]Mo complexes. J. M. Chin, R. R. Schrock, W. W. Weare 11:30 835. Targeting peptides with ironbased oxidants. J. J. Kodanko, A. Ekkati 11:50 836. Understanding the two-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation catalyst C/s,c/s-[(bpy) 2 Ru ,luv ' v OH x ] 2 oy + . X. Yang, M-H. Baik

Section F WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON BCEC 212

Section A

Nanoscience: Applications Biological Systems Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR

BCEC 204 A/B

D. J . Nelson and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers

Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience Materials

Z. R. Tian and J . G. Nguyen,

Presiding

9:00 820. Ceramic nanowires for diagnostic, therapeutic, and regenerative nanomedicines. F. Chen, W. Dong, A. Cogbill, C. Padilla, S. Ali, Z. R. Tian 9:30 821. Manipulating assembly properties in DNA-nanoparticle systems. M. M. Maye, D. Nykypanchuk, O. Gang, D. van der Lelie 10:00 822. Quantum dot-molecule energy transfer systems applicable to multiphoton imaging and quantification of biochemical parameters in vivo. A. B. Greytak, R. C. Somers, E. J. McLaurin, W. Liu, K. A. Tantillo, M. G. Bawendi, D. G. Nocera 10:30 823. Rapid total body clearance of nanosized objects. H. S. Choi, W. Liu, P. Misra, E. Tanaka, B. Itty Ipe, J. P. Zimmer, M. G. Bawendi, J. V. Frangioni 11:00 824. Ratiometric biological imaging of oxygen based on osmium-complexes tethered to quantum dots. E. J. McLaurin, A. B. Greytak, R. C. Somers, M. G. Bawendi, D. G. Nocera 11:30 825. Nitric oxide binding to nanoparticulate metal complexes. J. G. Nguyen, C. A. Johnson, B. Subramaniam, A. S. Borovik

C. L. Hill and D. C. Crans, F. Sécheresse,

Organizers

Presiding

2:00 837. Some unique contributions of polyoxoanions to transition-metal nanocluster self-assembly, stability and kinetics and mechanism. R. G. Finke 2:30 838. Synthesis and characterization of polyoxometalate-protected metal nanoparticles. G. C. Lica, K. P. Browne, Y. Tong 3:00 839. Covalently bonded organic-inorganic hybrids: Synthesis and applications. Z. Peng 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 840. Building block approach to the design of hybrid oxides exploiting polyoxomolybdate clusters and organodiphosphonate ligands. J. Zubieta, W. Ouellette 4:20 841. Polyoxovanadate based materials and their properties. M. I. Khan 4:50 842. Reactivity of polyoxometalate catalysts in fibers, films and carbon substrates. H. L. Schreuder-Gibson, J. E. Walker, W. Yeomans, J. Carlson, J. A. Orlicki, D. Ball

INOR

Section Β BCEC 205C Applications of Organometallic Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, T. J . Burkey,

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 843. Ruthenium aminophosphine cata­ lysts RuCI2(aminophosphine)2 and RuCI2(diphosphine)(aminophosphine) for the hydrogénation of ketones and imines. K. Abdur-Rashid, R. Guo, W. Jia, X. Chen 1:50 844. Stabilities and reactivities of monocyclopentadienyl monoamidinate stabilized group 4 alkyl complexes. L. R. Sita, E. F. Trunkely, P. P. Fontaine, P. Y. Zavalij 2:10 845. Use of alkynylphosphines for the regioselective formation of unsymmetrical zirconacyclopentadienes. A. D. Miller, S. Johnson, K. A. Tupper, J. McBee, T. D. Tilley 2:30 846. Preparation and studies of the first organometallic chromium system that is photochromic and bistable. T. J. Burkey, C. B. Duke III, T. T. To, E. J. Heilweil 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 847. Modifications of diruthenium molecular wires through ancillary ligand exchange. S. L. Bolton, M. B. Sponsler 3:20 848. Cyclopentadienyl/scorpionate hybrid ligands. M. Wagner, K. Kunz 3:40 849. Dinitrogen activation by group 4-6 monocyclopentadienyl, monoamidinate metal complexes: N-N bond cleavage and novel modes of reactivity. L. R. Sita, P. P. Fontaine, M. Hirotsu, A. Epshteyn, P. Y. Zavalij 4:00 850. Novel coordination modes and template effects of binuclear group 6 and 7 transition metal aryl, acylate and carbene complexes. S. Lotz, M. Landman, D. Liles, H. Goerls 4:20 851. Organoboron functionalized transition metal complexes and their applications. S. Wang, Y. Sun, S-B. Zhao, N. Ross Section C BCEC 205B Solid State Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, A. Lachgar,

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 852. Controlled nucleation, growth, and kinetics in ZnO hierarchical nanosyntheses. Z. R. Tian, T. Zhang, M. Keeter-Brewer, Q. Anderson, R. N. Njabon 1:50 853. Drug polymorphs à la carte: Selective growth of stable and metastable polymorphs. V. R. Thalladi, J. R. Cox, M. Dabros 2:10 854. Influence of the inserted species on the framework: Structural analysis of new trivalent element phosphates. A. Guesdon, J. Lesage, L. Adam, M. Hervieu, B. Raveau 2:30 855. Metal-ligand directed assembly of 2-D cluster-based coordination polymer and its solvent mediated structural transformation. A. Lachgar, J-J. Zhang, Y. Zhao, A. S. Gamboa 2:50 856. Spinels via layered double hydroxide precursors. Y. Kobayashi, X. Ke, P. E. Schiffer, T. E. Mallouk 3:10 857. Supramolecularfunctionalization: A method to construct and decorate isoreticular metal-organic frameworks. C. L Mertzenich, G. S. Papaefstathiou, T. Friscic, D. C. Swenson, L. R. MacGillivray 3:30 Intermission. 3:40 858. Defect chemistry, dopant incorporation and oxide-ion migration in strontium ferrites Sr 2 Fe 2 0s and S^FeeC·^. C. A. J . Fisher, M. S. Islam 4:00 859. Exploring crystal form diversity in pharmaceutical salts and co-crystals. R. Hiremath

4:20 860. Synthesis and the Ccystal and electronic structures of ternary rare-earth metal suicide suboxidesla-ioOsSie and Ce-|o03Si 8 . L. Wang, Z. Tang, A. M. Guloy 4:40 861. The ultrarapid microwave synthesis of transition metal carbides. S. R. Vallance, E. J. Cussen, D. H. Gregory, S. Kingman 5:00 862. Correlation of anisotropic magnetic ordering phenomena with crystal structure in a family of flux-grown, ternary Zintl phases of composition Eu-M-As (M = AI, Ga, In). A. M. Goforth, P. Klavins, J. C. Fettinger, S. M. Kauzlarich 5:20 863. Synthesis and characterization of a new Na-Ge zeolite-like framework phase, Nai. x Ge 3 + z . M. Beekman, G. S. Nolas, J. A. Kaduk, Q. Huang, W. Wong-Ng, Z. Yang Section D BCEC 208 Bioinorganic Chemistry: Enzymes and Coenzymes

3:10 878. Preparation of inorganic ruthenium complexes from organometallic rutheniumarene precursors. D. A. Freedman, J. H. Moore, E. Shapiro, L. M. Stafford 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 879. Progress toward increasing anisotropy in single-molecule magnets. B. M. Bartlett, M. W. DeGroot, J. R. Long 4:10 880. Evaluating exchange coupling of bridging ligands in vanadium(ll) binuclear systems. D. M. Jenkins, D. E. Freedman, A. T. lavarone, J. R. Long 4:30 881. Pyrophosphate bridged coordina­ tion complexes. R. P. Doyle, T. F. Ikotun 4:50 882. Synthesis and characterization of an octanuclear cyanometalate complex that exhibits thermally- and light-induced intramolecular electron transfer. S. M. Holmes, D. Li, R. Clérac, C. Mathonière 5:10 883. Synthesis and structural and magnetic characterization of di- and trivalent cyanomaganates. S. M. Holmes, M. Tang, D. Li, R. Clérac

2:40 897. Ligand effects on platinum-oxygen bonding in triarylphosphine-stabilized platinum nanoparticle electrocatalysts. T. L Schull, J. J. Pietron, Y. Garsany, K. Swider-Lyons, D. E. Ramaker, D. S. Gatewood, C. A. Klug, B. S. Zelakiewicz, W. J. Dressick, R. M. Stroud 3:00 898. Mechanistic investigation of electrochemically-promoted catalytic asymmetric hydrogénation. Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, R. P. Cope 3:20 899. Electron-transfer activation of anionic ruthenium(lll) anticancer drugs. E. Reisner, V. B. Arion, B. K. Keppler, A. J. Pombeiro 3:40 900. Electrocatalyzed coupling of unactivated cyclic olefins by [ReCp(CO)3]+. D. Chong, M. P. Stewart, W. E. Geiger 4:00 901. Electrochemically-induced reac­ tions of pybox compounds of Rh and Ir. B. T. Donovan-Merkert, O. Tarkington, A. P. Brooks, Z. Abou Chakra, M. Schwarz THURSDAY MORNING

Section F S. L. Michel and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers 2:00 864. Engineering bioinorganic catalysts for asymmetric catalysis in water: Using myoglobin to control reactivity and enantioselectivity. J-L. Zhang, D. K. Gamer, J. R. Carey, Y. Lu 865. Withdrawn. 2:20 866. Thermodynamics of metal ions binding to metallothionein. C. F. Quinn, D. E. Wilcox 2:40 867. An algorithm for structural refine­ ment based on ab initio simulations of EXAFS spectra: Applications to studies of metalloproteins. E. M. Sproviero, V. S. Batista 3:00 868. Diiron complexes as functional models of hydrogenase stabilized by wide bite-angle diphosphine ligands. R. Kapre, P. W. van Leeuwen 3:20 869. Spectroscopic investigations of mononuclear nonheme iron active sites: Structure/function correlations for pterindependent hydroxylases and studies of activated bleomycin reactivity. M. S. Chow, A. Decker, S. Wilson, B. Eser, P. F. Fitzpatrick, B. Hedman, K. O. Hodgson, E. I. Solomon 3:40 870. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy on nitrogenase. Y. Xiao, Y. Guo, H. Wang, S. J. George, S. P. Cramer 4:00 871. Catalytic roles of Phe103 at the substrate-binding pocket of chloroperoxidase: Remote control of heme chemistry in heme-thiolate proteins. X. Wang, Z. Wang, Y. Jiang, H. Tian 4:20 872. Characterization of bacterial heme receptor and transport proteins. Y. Tong, M. Guo Section Ε BCEC 211 Synthetic Coordination Chemistry D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W . A. Howard, Organizers 1:30 873. Synthesis of copper(ll) pyrazine complexes: Strong bromide-bromide mediated magnetic exchange. M. M. Turnbull, R. T. Butcher, C. P. Landee, J. Ribas, J. J. Novoa 1:50 874. Synthesis, structure and magnetic behavior of bis(2-amino-5-fluoropyridinium) tetrachlorocuprate: A magnetic ladder. M. M. Turnbull, L. Li, C. P. Landee, J. J. Novoa, M. Deumal, J. Jomet, J. L. Wikaira 2:10 875. Synthesis, reactivity and electronic structure of sterically pressured uranium complexes. S. C. Bart, F. Heinemann, K. Meyer 2:30 876. Toward the synthesis of four coordinate iron(lll) bis-pocket siloxylporphyrin. M. Fang, K. S. Suslick 2:50 877. Polyfunctional dithiocarbamates as a bridge between supramolecular chemis­ try and nanomaterials. J. D. Wilton-Ely

Section A BCEC 212

BCEC 204 A/B

General Inorganic Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, M. Guo,

Organizer

Polyoxometalates and Related Clusters in Chemistry and Nanoscience New Materials and Studies

Presiding C. L. Hill and D. C. Crans,

1:30 884. Ethoxy-bridged bipyridine oligo­ mers as selective host ligands for cationic guests. M. A. Harris, K. Houser, T. Garrett 1:50 885. Hydrogen peroxide-sensed "antiFenton reaction". Y. Wei, M. Guo 2:10 886. Biological trivalent metal selectivity in a bacterial transferrin: Gallium-FbpA thermodynamics and kinetics. J. J. Heymann, K. D. Weaver, D. S. Anderson, T. A. Mietzner, A. L. Crumbliss 2:30 887. Primary photochemical reactions of silicon-bridged [1]ferrocenophanes. M. J. Morgan, C. Kutal 2:50 888. Iron-coordination properties of flavonoids. M. Guo, C. Perez, Y. Wei 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 889. Modeling and experimental work on the auxetic and thermal properties of the zeolite natrolite. J. N. Grima, R. Gatt, V. Zammit 3:40 890. Subnanometer gold clusters for aromatic substitution: Effects of oxide substrate on reactivity. F. P. Arnold Jr. 4:00 891. Thermal and photochemical reac­ tivity of Os(HNO)(CO)(CI) 2 (PPh 3 ) 2 : Evi­ dence for photochemical HNO generation. J. Marhenke, C. Joseph, T. J. Dunn, M. Z. Corliss, P. C. Ford 4:20 892. Transformations at a tungsten fris-anilide platform: Terminal nitride, ketimide, and phosphide complexes. A. R. Fox, P. Mueller, C. C. Cummins 4:40 893. Synthesis and structure of metal complexes with imidazole-containing tripodal polyamine ligands. W-Y. Sun 5:00 894. Modular synthesis of multimetallic dithiolene complexes. K. Arumugam, R. Yu, J. T. Mague, J. P. Donahue

M. R. Antonio,

Organizers

Presiding

8:30 902. Chemistry with lacunary Dawson polyoxotungstate. B. Hasenknopf 9:00 903. Polyoxometalates: From molecular to nanochemistry. F. Sécheresse, P. Mialane, C. Mayer, E. Dumas, C. Roch 9:30 904. Tetraalkylphosphonium polyoxometalate ionic liquids: Synthesis and characterization. P. G. Rickert, M. L. Dietz, M. A. Firestone, J. F. Wishart, T. Szreder, K-A. Kubatko, M. R. Antonio 10:00 905. Transition metal substituted heteropoly tungstates as reduction catalysts in nonpolar environments. S. Szczepankiewicz, M. Kozik, M. T. Colvin, K. Coughlin, A. Rinaldi, B. T. Tyler, T. J. Dobmeier, J. Arcadi 10:30 Intermission. 10:45 906. Speciation study of phosphoruscontaining Strandberg type heteropolymolybdate anions. M. Hashimoto, I. Andersson, L. Pettersson 11:15 907. Reduced vanadates and reversed antimonates. R. E. Winpenny, V. Baskar, E. J. L. Mclnnes, S. Khanra, M. Helliwell 11:45 908. Problems and possibilities in polyoxometalate science. C. L. Hill 12:15 Concluding Remarks. Section Β BCEC 205C Applications of Organometallic Chemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Organizer

Section G

L. H. Doerrer,

BCEC 209

9:00 909. Highly activated side-on- or endon-bound dinitrogen and its reactivities in group 4-6 transition metal complexes of monocyclopentadienyl-monoamidinate system. L. R. Sita, M. Hirotsu, P. P. Fontaine, A. Epshteyn, P. Y. Zavalij

Inorganic Electrochemistry Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, W. E. Geiger,

Organizer

Presiding

Presiding

2:00 895. Power fade in lithium-ion batteries: Effect of electrolyte additives. A. Xiao, B. L. Lucht 2:20 896. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and structural characterization of 17 e" cations derived from the oxidation of MnCp(CO)3 and related complexes. D. R. Laws, D. Chong, A. Rheingold, W. E. Geiger

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techproqram/.

TECH-83

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

INOR

9:20 910. Design and synthesis of triazole containing metal chelating systems suitable for the M(CO)3-core (M = 9 9 m Tc, Re), and their incorporation into tumor targeting peptides. H. Struthers, L. Brans, B. Spingler, T. L. Mindt, D. Tourwé, R. Schibli 9:40 911. Highly efficient phosphorescent materials based on tetradentate cyclometalated platinum complexes: Synthesis, photophysics, and OLED application. S. Huo, J. C. Deaton, M. Kondakova, M. Rajeswaran, D. J. Giesen, W. C. Lenhart 10:00 912. Orthometallated platinum(ll) complexes for oxygen sensing. J. R. Burney, K. R. Mann 10:20 913. Polymerization of norbornene derivatives with polar functional groups using a low-coordinated palladium complex. I. Takamiya, M. Yamashita, K. Nozaki Section C BCEC 205B Characterization and Applications of Coordination Compounds D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W . A. Howard, Organizers 8:30 914. GdDTPA-L-Cys functionalized nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents. T. S. Siddiqui, M. A. Walters, F. Yao 8:50 915. Two-color reversible photochromic isomerization of a ruthenium disulfoxide complex. N. V. Mockus, J. J. Rack 9:10 916. A pro-chelator strategy for inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. K. J. Franz, L. K. Charkoudian 9:30 917. Amide, hydrazide, and amidinate complexes of early transition metals: Synthesis, considerations for the preparation of low-valence and low oxidation state complexes, and comparisons about their uses as precursors for the deposition of metal nitride and metal oxide thin films. J-S. M. Lehn, D. M. Hoffman, R. G. Gordon 9:50 918. Applications of electronic dissymmetry in bis(diketonato)titanium(IV) complexes. S. N. Brown 10:10 919. Arc-type trans-spanning diphosphine ligands: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity. D. Gelman, L. Kaganovsky 10:30 Intermission. 10:50 920. Carbon dioxide activation by low-valent pseudo-tetrahedral iron. C. T. Saouma, J. C. Peters 11:10 921. Catalytic hydrogen evolution and hydrogen oxidation by cobalt macrocyclic glyoxime and tetra-imine complexes. L. A. Berben, X. Hu, B. S. Brunschwig, J. C. Peters 11:30 922. Coordination chemistry and reactivity of main group and transition metal Ç3- and pseudo-C^-symmetric amine tris(phenolate)s. M. G. Davidson, C. J. Chuck, A. J. Chmura, M. D. Jones, C. Gilfillan, L. E. Turner 11:50 923. Coordination-driven self-assembly of porphyrin based supramolecular systems for olefin oxidation. S. J . Lee, S. T. Nguyen, J. T. Hupp 12:10 924. Single source precursors for the chemical vapor deposition of ME 2 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, E= S, Se). S. D. Reid, A. L. Hector, W. Levason, G. Reid 12:30 925. Osmium (II) complexes based on an aliphatic phosphine ligand. B. Carlson, J. B. Benedict, W. Kaminsky, G. D. Phelan

Section D BCEC 208 Theoretical and Computational Chemistry Fullerenes, Nanotubes, Materials and Crystallization Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, A. Rodriguez-Fortea,

Organizer

Presiding

9:00 926. Ordered by design: Exploiting surface dynamics to create ordered organ­ ic-semiconductor interfaces via CarParrinello molecular dynamics. R. L. Hayes, M. E. Tuckerman 9:20 927. Density functional studies of magic metal-fullerene clusters. E. D. Zurek, J. Autschbach 9:40 928. Electronic structure and reactivity of trimetallic nitride template (TNT) endohedral metallofullerenes. A. Rodriguez-Fortea, R. Valencia, J. M. Poblet 10:00 929. Numerical design of peapod oscillator and polymerization of multibuckyballs in peapod. H. Su, A. C. van Duin, W. A. Goddard III 10:20 930. X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy and first principles calculation of BCN nanotubes. H. S. Kang, J. Park, S. Y. Kim, J. P. Ahn, J. Q. Hou 10:40 931. Fundamental insights into the driving force for proton ordering in ice phases. G. A. Tribello, B. Slater 11:00 932. Molecular simulation of poly­ morph selection during crystallization. J . Delhommelle, C. Desgranges

11:20 947. Structural characterization and mechanistic investigations of the unique [Col(C8H13)(C4H6)/CS2] 1,2-polybutadiene catalyst. P. C. Crewdson, P. Hofmann

Spectroscopy of Inorganic Systems J . Telser and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers 9:00 933. Bond length and angle changes in charge transfer excited states. R. M. Stephenson, J. I. Zink 9:20 934. Coordination key to specificity in metal ion homeostasis. S. Leitch, J. S. Iwig, M. J. Bradley, J. L. Rowe, P. T. Chivers, M. J. Maroney 9:40 935. Dual-channel ditopic fluoroionophores as prototype probes for zinc ions: Analysis over large dynamic ranges. L. Zhang, L. Zhu 10:00 936. Effect of ligand donor atom on the kinetics of O2 and CO binding in copper(l) complex systems. H. R. Lucas, G. J. Meyer, K. D. Karlin 10:20 937. Multifrequency EPR study of S = 1 vanadium (III) complexes with nitrogen containing ligands. M. Brynda, B. S. Krishnamoorthy, M. Geoffroy, G. Aromi, J. Krzystek 10:40 938. Study of alkali and alkaline earth alanates by inelastic neutron scattering. A. I. Acatrinei, M. A. Hartl, A. C. Stowe, L L Daemen 11:00 939. Synchrotron radiation based nuclear resonant scattering (NRS) of enzymes and model compounds contain­ ing iron and nickel. Y. Guo, Y. Xiao, H. Wang, Y. Yoda, X. Zhang, S. P. Cramer Section F

Organizer

BCEC 209 Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Rods and Fibers Cosponsored by BIOHW

Presiding

8:30 948. Facile control in the synthesis of carbon nanorods and nanoparticles by reduction of supercritical carbon bisulfide. C. Chen, Z. Lou 8:50 949. General room-temperature synthe­ sis of single-crystalline antiferromagnetic perovskite fluoride nanorods. F. Zhang, S. S. Wong 9:10 950. Nanocrystal microrods: Functional and free-standing architectures from colloi­ dal nanocrystals. A. Ghadimi, L. Cademartiri, G. A. Ozin 9:30 951. Probing hydrogen in ZnO nano­ rods using solid-state 1H NMR. L-Q. Wang, X-D. Zhou, C. Yao, C. F. Windisch, L R. Pederson, G. J. Exarhos 9:50 952. Surfactant headgroup-dependent growth of large-aspect-ratio single-crystal­ line gold nanorods and their linear assem­ bly. X. Kou, J. Wang 10:10 953. Synthesis and characterization of tungsten oxide nanorods from W2N and W film. S. Jeon, K. Yong 10:30 954. The preparation and character­ ization of titanate nanorod/polyaniline nanofiber hybrid nanocomposite. B-X. Wang 10:50 955. Fabrication of La0.96Mn0.96O3 micro/nanofibers by electrospinning tech­ nique. L. Wei 11:10 956. Preparation of PVP/Tb(AA)3phen luminescent nanofibers. L. Wei 11:30 957. Graphene growth during sublima­ tion decomposition of SiC: A quantum chemical molecular dynamics investiga­ tion. Z. Wang, S. Irle, K. Morokuma

Section A BCEC 204 A/B Chemistry of Lanthanides and Actinides

J. S. Kingsbury,

Presiding

9:00 940. Molybdenum imido alkylidene complexes supported by pyrrolide ligands: Reactivity and catalysis. R. Singh, R. R. Schrock 9:20 941. Efficient alkyne metathesis with imidazolin-2-iminato tungsten alkylidyne complexes. S. Beer, M. Tamm

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, D. R. Peterman,

Section Β BCEC 205C General Organometallic Chemistry

O. V. Ozerov,

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

BCEC 212

1:50 959. Cationic d/f heterometallic com­ plexes: Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties. C. A. Barta, B. O. Patrick, R. C. Thompson, C. Orvig 2:10 960. f-Element magnetochemistry: From lanthanides to actinides, molecules to materials. E. J. Schelter, J. M. Veauthier, B. Scott, K. D. John, J. D. Thompson, D. E. Morris, J. L. Kiplinger 2:30 961. Formation of aqueous Mg-U(VI)C 0 3 complex and uranyl ion exchange mechanism onto an anion exchange resin. S. C. Brooks, W. Dong 2:50 962. Polyheterometallic lanthanide complexes exhibiting multiple spectro­ scopic signatures. A. J. L. Villaraza, S. Faulkner 963. Withdrawn. 3:10 964. Symmetric and asymmetric dithiophosphinic acids for minor actinide extrac­ tion. J. R. Klaehn, D. R. Peterman, M. K. Harrup, R. D. Tillotson, T. A. Luther, M. R. Greenhalgh, J. D. Law, L. M. Daniels

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

Section G

A. T. Woolley and J . Schrier,

BCEC 211

Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert,

84-TECH

11:00 946. Mechanistic aspects for the polymerization of polar olefins catalyzed by palladium complexes of sulfonated aryl phosphines. K. Skupov, P. Marella, J. P. Claverie

D. J . Nelson and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers

Section Ε

Organometallic Catalysts Polymerization, Metathesis, C-H Activation

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

9:40 942. Synthesis, characterization and olefin metathesis activity of molybdenum imido alkylidenes containing bulky siloxide ligands. K. M. Wampler, R. R. Schrock 10:00 943. Mixed methyl/t-butyl-substituted PCP pincer-ligated iridium catalyst for alkane dehydrogenation. S. Kundu, Z. Gao, R. Warmuth, Y. Choliy, K. K. Jespersen, A. S. Goldman 10:20 944. Water and benzene H/D exchange by a cyclometallated Ir(lll) bishydroxo pyridyl complex. R. A. Periana, S. K. Meier, K. J. Young, W. J. Tenn III, J. Oxgaard, W. A. Goddard III 10:40 945. Inhibitory role of carbon monox­ ide in palladium(ll)-catalyzed non-alternat­ ing ethene/carbon monoxide copolymerizations and the synthesis of polyetheneWodc-poly(ethene-a//-carbon monoxide). D. K. Newsham, S. Borkar, A. Sen, D. M. Conner, B. L. Goodall

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 958. Solvent dependent tunable energy transfer between d10 metal dicyanide nanoclusters and Eu3+ and Tb3+ rare earth ions. Z. Guo, H. H. Patterson

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 965. Ab initio evaluation of 3-halo-1azaallylic anions as synthetic building blocks. B. De Sterck, V. Van Speybroeck, M. Waroquier 1:50 966. Alkali-metal-mediated metallation: A new synthetic concept utilizing intramo­ lecular metal-metal communication. E. Hevia, R. E. Mulvey 2:10 967. Communication in chalcogenophene-based organometallics. M. Jura, G. Kociok-Kohn, P. R. Raithby, E. L Sharp, P. J . Wilson 2:30 968. DFT computational study of S-H bond strengths of M(p-SH)M, M=Mo, Fe clusters. J. A. Franz, M. Dupuis, S-J. Lee, A. M. Appel, D. L. DuBois 2:50 969. Dirhodium(lll) carboxamidates: A general class of dinuclear metal com­ plexes via copper-catalyzed oxidative aryl-transfer from boronic acids. J . M. Nichols, J. Wolf, Y. Wang, M. P. Doyle 3:10 970. Functionalized cycloheptatrienylcyclopentadienyl zirconium sandwich ' complexes. S. Buschel, M. Tamm 3:30 971. Pt(ll) olefin hydrides supported by dimethyldipyridylborate show facile olefin insertion and oxidative addition reactivity. E. Khaskin, A. N. Vedernikov Section C BCEC 205B Organometallic Synthesis Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, M. T a m m ,

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 972. Synthesis of strained ring com­ pounds: Precursors to simple disilynes via molecular Beam methods. K. R. Pichaandi, R. Subramanian, M. Sulkes, M. J. Fink 1:50 973. Mendeleev was wrong: Testing chemical periodicity via "(PNP)Fe" vs. Ru, Os, Co, and Ni analogs. D. Buschhorn, M. Pink, H. Fan, A. Walstrom, K. G. Caulton 2:10 974. Preparation of novel molybdenum complexes as monomers for Acyclic Diene Metathesis polymerization. G. V. Shultz, D. R. Tyler 2:30 975. Nucleophilic carbene carbon with two TT electron-withdrawing groups in a ruthenium complex. X. Yang, M. Pink, K. G. Caulton 2:50 976. New developments in 5f-element chemistry: Uranium (V) organometallics. C. R. Graves, D. E. Morris, B. L. Scott, J. D. Thompson, J. L Kiplinger 3:10 977. C-H Activation of ligand environ­ ment and reaction with small molecules of new pincer Os (II) complex. N. P. Tsvetkov, M. Pink, K. G. Caulton

INOR/MEDI

Section D BCEC 208 Bioinorganic Chemistry: DNA and RNA D. C. Crans and B. T. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers I. J. Dmochowski, Presiding 1:30 978. Dinuclear lanthanide(lll) com­ plexes as catalysts for RNA cleavage. K. Nwe, J. R. Morrow 1:50 979. Inorganic models of nucleic acids: Synthesis and characterization of Cu(dpa)2 complexes. S. I. Kirin, M. E. Williams 2:10 980. Oxidation by DNA charge transport damages conserved sequence block II, a regulatory element in mitochondrial DNA. E. J. Merino, J. K. Barton

3:10 994. Liquid phase oxidation of cyclohexane catalyzed by acid exchanged manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS-2). R. Kumar, S. L. Suib 3:30 995. Montmorillonite-entrapped subnanoordered Pd clusters as a heterogeneous catalyst for allylic substitution reactions. K. Kaneda, T. Mitsudome, T. Mizugaki, K. Jitsukawa 3:50 996. Photoactivation of M-X bonds in bimetallic systems. T. R. Cook, A. J. Esswein, D. G. Nocera 4:10 997. Structure and catalytic activity of POSS-stabilized Pd nanoparticles. S. E. Létant, J. Herberg, L. N. Dinh, R. S. Maxwell, A. P. Saab 4:30 998. Visible light-driven water oxidation at binuclear TiOCr site coupled to Ir oxide cluster in silica nanopores. H. Han, H. Frei Section G BCEC 209

Section Ε BCEC 211

Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Wires, Tubes, and Spheres Cosponsored by BIOHW

Synthetic Coordination Chemistry D. C. Crans, B. T. Donovan-Merkert, and W. A. Howard, Organizers

D. J. Nelson and Β. Τ. Donovan-Merkert, Organizers D. E. Nikles and C. M. Lukehart, Presiding

1:30 981. Oxidative transformations of iridium and rhodium olefin complexes. J-U. Rohde, W-T. Lee 1:50 982. Phosphanyl(organl)boranes: Syn­ thesis, characterization and applications as ligands. C. N. Muhoro, S. G. Thangavelu 2:10 983. A family of high nuclear Fe(lll)phosphonate cluster. S. Konar, A. Clearfield 2:30 984. A new family of tripodal tetramine ligands and their coordination chemistry with first-row transition metal ions. C. E. MacBeth, M. B. Jones 2:50 Intermission. 3:10 985. Design and self-assembly of light-emitting molecular rectangles and cages. K-L. Lu 3:30 986. Discrete and extended porphyrin coordination complexes: Selective and reversible guest inclusion in the solid state. S. Adilov, V. R. Thalladi 3:50 987. Fluorinated alkoxide anions of the late transition metals. L. H. Doerrer 4:10 988. Synthesis and reactivity of hexanuclear cluster complexes. L. F. Szczepura Section F BCEC 212 Inorganic Catalysts B. T. Donovan-Merkert and K. Kustin, Organizers M. Aresta, Presiding 1:30 989.1-Hexene isomerization over sulfated mesoporous Nb oxides: The effects of active sites and pore sizes. Y. Rao, J. Kang, D. M. Antonelli 1:50 990. Characterization of copper/zinc zeolite composite catalysts with bimodal micro/mesoscopic zeolitic structure. L. M. Petkovic, H. W. Rollins, D. M. Ginosar, K. C. Burch 2:10 991. Cofacial porphyrin catalysts for direct and indirect H2 photoproduction. D. Villagrén, D. G. Nocera 2:30 992. First unseeded synthesis of largepore vanadosilicate AM-6 crystals. M. N. Ismail, O. Ozkanat, Z. Ji, J. Warzywoda, A. Sacco Jr. 2:50 993. Investigation of synthetic variations of [HIPTN3N]Mo and direct routes to [HIPTN3N]MoN. B. S. Hanna, R. R. Schrock

1:30 999. Direct synthesis and characteriza­ tion of coaxial SiC-Si02 nanowires and hierarchical SiC-ZnO heteronanostructure. K. Yong, Y. Tak, Y. Ryu 1:50 1000. From orthorhombic Mo03 nanobelts to monoclinic Mo02 nanowires: Synthesis, structure and properties. L. Mai, B. Hu, W. Jin, Y. Qi, Y. Dai, W. Chen 2:10 1001. Growth of aluminum-silicon alloy nanowires on sapphire substrates. Y. K. Liu, W. E. Buhro 2:30 1002. Low temperature growth of ZnO nanowire array and photochemical fabrica­ tion of Co304/ZnO nanowire heterojunction arrays. Y. Tak, K. Yong 2:50 1003. Polymer-like inorganic nanowires. L. Cademartiri, R. Malakooti, S. Petrov, A. Migliori, G. A. Ozin 3:10 1004. Solution-based growth of semi­ conductor nanowire heterostructures. A. Dong, W. E. Buhro 3:30 1005. Synthesis and grafting chemistry of functionalized silicone nanospheres. C. A. Bradley, M. J. McMurdo, T. D. Tilley 3:50 1006. Controlling nanotube dimensions: A correlation between nanotube diameter, energy, and composition. S. Konduri, S. Mukherjee, S. Nair 4:10 1007. Density functional theory studies of the 13C NMR chemical shifts in single walled carbon nanotubes. E. D. Zurek, J. Autschbach 4:30 1008. New, versatile route for chemical modification of carbon nanotubes while preserving intrinsic electronic structure. A. Suri, K. S. Coleman 4:50 1009. On quantum hall effects and relativistic dirac spins for carbon nanotube and nanodiamond formation mechanics. R. B. Little 5:10 1010. Synthesis and probing the sur­ face structure of carbon nanotubeA102 composite on quartz paper matrices. S. Nosheen, S. L. Suib

MEDI Division of Medicinal Chemistry J. R. McCarthy, Program Chair SUNDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 210B

R. W. Harper, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 1. Malaria as a world health problem. S. Nwaka 9:40 2. Synthetic peroxides as antimalarials: Identification of a secondary ozonide (1,2,4-trioxolane) drug development candi­ date. J. L. Vennerstrom 10:20 3. Recent developments in the medici­ nal chemistry of 4-aminoquinoline antima­ larials: Identification of N-tert butyl Isoquine as a next generation 4-Aminoquinoline antimalarial drug. P. O'Neill 11:00 Intermission. 11:15 4. Peroxides for chemotherapy of malaria and cancer. G. H. Posner 11:55 5. Hemozoin formation as a target for antimalarial drug design. M. K. Riscoe, J. X. Kelly, M. J. Smilkstein, R. W. Winter 12:35 Concluding Remarks.

Section Β Section Β BCEC 210A Drugs for Ischemia Treatment of Cerebral Ischemia. Recent Therapeutic Strategies Cosponsored by European Federation of Medicinal Chemistry R. Pellicciari, Organizer 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:15 6. Recent approaches to the treatment of stroke and cerebral ischemia. W. E. Childers Jr., B. L. Harrison 9:50 7. JNK signalling pathway after MCAo: Neuroprotective effect of JNK inhibitor peptide (D-JNKI1). T. Borsello, M. Repici 10:25 8. Design, synthesis and neuroprotec­ tive effects of azulenyl nitrone spin traps in animal models of cerebral ischemia. D. A. Becker 11:00 9. Design and synthesis of novel SHh agonists: SAR and biological evaluation in a cerebral ischemia model. S. N. Haydar, D. Albers, S. brunton, T. Dellovade, B. L. Harrison, W. D. Hirst, R. L. Magolda, M. Pangalos, P. H. Reinhart, L. L Rubin, D. M. Springer 11:35 10. Necroptosis inhibition as a thera­ peutic strategy for cerebral ischemia. G. D. Cuny Drug Reprofiling Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Nucleic Acid Enzymology Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 210B Medicinal Chemistry Award Symposium

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

1:50 12. Protein β-sheet quaternary interac­ tions: From mimicry to molecular recogni­ tion. O. Khakshoor, J. S. Nowick 2:10 13. Peptidomimetic modulators of bacterial quorum sensing. S. A. Fowler, H. E. Blackwell 2:30 14. 3-Hydroxy-4-tridecanone is the quorum sensing small molecule CAM that controls virulence in Vibrio cholerae. D. A. Higgins, M. E. Pomianek, C. M. Kraml, R. K. Taylor, M. F. Semmelhack, B. L Bassler 2:50 15. Inhibition of Hsp47 by triphenylmethylamides induces apoptosis in mela­ noma. B. J. Leslie, P. J. Hergenrother 3:10 16. Inhibitors of the FBP-FUSE interac­ tion as potential anticancer agents. P. N. Wyrembak, M. P. Glenn, D. T. Braddock, A. D. Hamilton 3:30 17. Photocontrol of ionotropic glutamate receptors: From design to in vivo applica­ tion. M. Volgraf, S. Szobota, P. Gorostiza, C. Wyart, E. Y. Isacoff, D. Trauner 3:50 Introduction of Robertson awardee. 4:00 18. Next-generation contraceptives: The discovery of non-steroidal progesterone receptor modulators. A. Fensome, A. Adams, W. Adams, R. Bender, T. Berrodin, R. Chopra, J. Cohen, M. A. Collins, L Deng, H. Fletcher III, P. Gallucci, V. Hudak, C. Huselton, S. Lockhead, K. Malakian, M. Marella, E. Melenski, C. C. McComas, C. Mugford, L. Norlund, A. Olland, D. Ruble, L. Russo, 0. Slayden, K. Svenson, E. A. Terefenko, R. Unwalla, J. Wang, J. Wilhelm, S. Wolfram, D. Yates, M. Yudt, Z. Zhang, P. Zhang, R. C. Winneker, J. Wrobel

D. Rotella, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 11. Substrate Activity Screening (SAS): A fragment-based method for the identifi­ cation of nonpeptidic protease inhibitors. A. W. Patterson, H. Inagaki, W. J. L. Wood, H. Tsuruoka, R. K. Jain, J. A. Ellman

BCEC 210A General Oral Session Cosponsored by Teledyne Isco, Inc J. R. McCarthy, Organizer 1:30 19. Transition state analysis of the chemical and enzymatic prenylation reac­ tions. M. D. Distefano, S. Lenevich, C. J. Cramer 1:50 20. MB07811 : A liver-selective thyroid receptor agonist prodrug for the treatment of hyperlipidemia. S. H. Boyer, H. Jiang, J. D. Jacintho, M. V. Reddy, H. Li, W. Li, W. G. Schulz, J. L. Godwin, S. J. Hecker, E. E. Cable, B. R. Ito, J. Fujitaki, P. D. Finn, B-H. Zhang, J. Hou, P. D. van Poelje, D. Linemeyer, M. D. Erion 2:10 21. Novel small molecule agonists of the integrin CD11b/CD18 as in vivo chemi­ cal biology probes. J. Rosa, M. A. Amaout, V. Gupta 2:30 22. Discovery of potent and selective leukotriene A4 hydrolase inhibitors. C A. Grice, F. U. Axe, S. D. Bembenek, C. R. Butler, F. Coles, P. J. Dunford, J. P. Edwards, A. M. Fourie, L. Karlsson, K. Lundeen, J. Riley, B. M. Savall, K. Tays, J. Wei, K. Williams, X. Xue 2:50 23. Multivalent muscarinic antagonists for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). A. D. Hughes, Κ. Η. Chin, S. S. Hegde, C. O. Husfeld, J. R. Jasper, Y. Ji, K. E. King, T. W. Lee, L Li, M. Mammen, A. J. McNamara, T. K. Mischki, G. P. Obedencio, T. Pulido-Rios, T. Steinfeld, S. M. Sweazey, R. D. Wilson 3:10 24. Discovery of Bl 1356: A highly potent and long-acting DPP-IV inhibitor with a xanthine scaffold. F. Himmelsbach, K. Dugi, M. Eckhardt, H. Fuchs, U. Graefe-Mody, B. Guth, E. Langkopf, R. Lotz, M. Mark, H. Nar, P. Sieger, M. Tadayyon, L. Thomas 3:30 25. Optimized synthesis of 2-methylamino-pyridodiazepines, potent and selec­ tive inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori Murl. P. J. Hill, G. S. Basarab, B. Geng, L MacPherson, G. Mullen, A. Satz 3:50 26. Development of hydroxy hydantoins, a novel class of MMP-12 inhibitors, for treatment of COPD. K. Stenvall, B. Gabos, M. Lundkvist, M. Munck af Rosenschôld, M. Lepistô, 1. Shamovsky

TECH-85

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

MEDI

4:10 27. Discovery of selective and potent T-type calcium channel antagonists. Z-Q. Yang 4:30 28. Synthesis and characterization of dapagliflozin, a potent selective SGLT2 inhibitor for treatment of diabetes. W. N. Washburn, W. Meng, B. A. Ellsworth, A. Nirschl, P. J. McCann, M. Patel, R. N. Girotra, G. Wu, P. M. Sher, S. A. Biller, P. P. Deshpande, D. L. Hagan, J. R. Taylor, M. Obermeier, W. G. Humphreys, A. Khanna, J. G. Robertson, A. Wang, S. P. Han, J. R. Wetterau, E. Janovitz, 0 . Flint, J. M. Whaley Chemical Approaches to Protein Function Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Drug Reprofiling Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Nanostructured Fluorocarbons: Smart Tectons for Self-Assembly From Crystal Engineering and Self-Organization to Function Sponsored by FLUO, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST S U N D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall B2 Poster Session Cosponsored by Eli Lilly and Company J. R. McCarthy,

Organizer

7:00-9:00 29. 3-(Amino)alkoxy indoles: Novel class of centrally acting anti-obesity agents. R. V. S. Nirogi, A. V. Daulatabad, N. V. Gaddiraju, P. Gudla, M. Junnuri, S. Kota, R. S. Kambhampati, A. K. Shinde 30. Nonpsychotropic biaryl cannabinoid ago­ nists. K. Worm, Q. J. Zhou, G. Stabley, R. N. DeHaven, N. C. Conway-James, C. J. LaBuda, M. Koblish, P. J. Little, R. E. Dolle 31. Synthesis of (-^-tetrahydrocannabinol and (-)-A9-tetrahydrocannabivarin metabo­ lites and their regiospecifically deuterated analogs. S. P. Nikas, G. A. Thakur, D. Parish, S. O. Alapafuja, M. A. Huestis, A. Makriyannis 32. Deuterated and tritiated enantiomers of CP55.940 as novel probes of cannabinoid receptors. K. Cheng, K. Gawrisch, K. C. Rice 33. Synthesis of isotopically labeled 2-pyridinyloxyisobubanoic acid, a building block for CB-1 inhibitors as drug candidates for obesity treatment. J . Z. Ho, M. P. Braun 34. Synthesis and biological evaluations of carbamoyl oxime analogs of the cannabi­ noid receptor-1 (CB1) anatagonist SR141716. S-H. Yoon, H-Y. Kim, H-J. Kim, H-J. Jung 35. Synthesis and SAR of Diaryl cyclohexene carboxamides as potent and orally active CB1 antagonists. C. L. Jayne, Y. Xia, H. Vaccaro, S. Chackalamannil, W. Greenlee, G. Boykow, R. A. Duffy, T. Kowalski, X. Cui 36. Synthesis and SAR of derivatives from 2, 3-dihydro-1H-spiro [isoquinoline-4, 4'-piperidine] as MC4R agonists for the treat­ ment of obesity. J . Liu, T. Jian, I. K. Sebhat, R. Tang, D. H. Weinberg, T. MacNeil, A. Cabello, A. S. Chen, H. Y. Chen, C. A. Shepherd, A. Strack, R. Miller, R. Steams, Z. Chen, T. Holt, T. M. Fong, M. J. Wyvratt, R. P. Nargund 37. Optimization of privileged structures for selective and potent melanocortin subtype-4 receptor ligands. Q. Hong, R. K. Bakshi, J. Dellureficio, R. Tang, R. N. Kalyani, T. MacNeil, A. Vongs, C. I. Rosenblum, D. H. Weinberg, Q. Peng, C. Tamvakopoulos, R. R. Miller, R. A. Steams, D. Cashen, W. J. Martin, A. S. Chen, J. M. Metzger, H. Y. Chen, A. M. Strack, T. M. Fong, D. E. Maclntyre, L. H. T. Van der Ploeg, A. A. Patchett, M. J. Wyvratt, R. P. Nargund

86-TECH

38. Potent and orally bioavailable nonpeptidyl melanocortin subtype-4 receptor modula­ tors: Syntheses, SAR and pharmacokinet­ ics. L. Guo, Z. Ye, I. K. Sebhat, F. Ujjainwalla, H. L. Sings, D. H. Weinberg, R. Tang, T. MacNeil, C. Tamvakopoulos, Q. Peng, E. Maclntyre, L H. T. Van der Ploeg, M. T. Goulet, M. J. Wyvratt, R. P. Nargund 39. Aminobenzimidazoles as potent Melanin Concentrating Hormone (MCH)-R1 antagonists. T. K. Sasikumar, L. Qiang, D. A. Burnett, W. J. Greenlee, B. E. Hawes, T. J. Kowalski, K. O'Neill, B. D. Spar, B. Weig 40. Tetrahydro carbazoles: Novel, potent and selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonists. R. S. Kambhampati, J. B. Konda, P. Kothmirkar, T. R. Bandyala, S. N. Yarra, S. Arepalli, A. K. Shinde, R. V. S. Nirogi 4 1 . Novel 1-(arylsulfonyl)-3-(piperidinylmethyl)1H-indoles as potent and selective 5-HT6 antagonists. P. Zhou, Y. Li, B. L. Harrison, G. M. Zhang, D. Smith, M. G. Kelly, L. Schechter, A. J. Robichaud 42. SUVN-504: Potent and selective high brain penetrating 5-HT6 receptor antago­ nist. G. Bhyrapuneni, N. Muddana, K. Mudigonda, V. N. Kandikere, R. V. S. Nirogi 43. Aminoalkyl indoles: Novel, potent and highly selective 5-HT6 receptor antago­ nists. A. K. Shinde, A. D. Deshpande, A. K. Chindhe, R. K. Badange, K. R. Karuturi, N. R. P. Gangadasari, R. R. Katta, R. V. S. Nirogi 44. Conformationally restricted piperazines: Novel class of potent and selective 5-HT6 receptor ligands. R. V. S. Nirogi, A. D. Deshpande, A. R. Dwarampudi, V. R. Bhatta, L. Kota, R. R. V. Vangavarugu, R. S. Kambhampati, A. K. Shinde 45. Small-molecule Y2 receptor antagonists: Identification of a novel and potent series using pharmacophore-based virtual screening. M. Seierstad 46. Discovery and optimization of imidazoline derivatives, a potent, orally active neuro­ peptide Y Y5 receptor antagonist. M. Ando, N. Sato, S. Ishikawa, M. Jitsuoka, K. Nagai, T. Nagase, H. Takahashi, A. Sakuraba, H. Tsuge, M. Hirayama, J. Ito, H. Iwaasa, H. Matsushita, A. Gomori, S. Mashiko, A. Ishihara, N. Fujino, S. Tanaka, T. Ohe, K. Tadano, T. Fukuroda, Y. Ishii, A. Kanatani, T. Fukami 47. Synthesis and SAR of thiophene acidmimetics as PTP1B inhibitors. E. Binnun, Z-K. Wan, B. Follows, S. J. Kirincich, D. Wilson, W-X. Xu, D. Joseph-McCarthy, J. Wu, M. J. Smith, Y. Zhang, M. Tarn, D. Erbe, S. Tarn, E. Saiah, J. Lee 48. Discovery and synthesis of nipecotic amide as novel, potent and selective 113-HSD-1 inhibitors. J.Zhuo, M. Xu, C. Zhang, D. Qian, Y. Li, R. Huber, M. Covington, C. Marando, B. Metcalf, W.Yao 49. Novel analogs as 11 β-HSDI inhibitors. U. Shah, C. D. Boyle, S. Chackalamannil, H. Baker, T. Kowalski, L. Zhang, G. Terracina 50. B-keto sulfonamides as selective inhibitors of the 11b-HSD1. M. Ipek, J. Xiang, L. Chen, N. Huang, J. Li, W. Li, T. Mansour, J. C. McKew, J. Nunez, V. Suri, T. May, S. Tarn, J. F. Tobin, C. Wu, Y. Xing, X. Xu, Y. Zhang 5 1 . Discovery and biological evaluation of novel benzamide derivatives as potent 11{beta}-HSD1 inhibitors for the treatment of type II diabetes. L. D. Julian, T. Bostick, S. Caille, H. Chan, M. Degraffenreid, X. He, R. W. Hungate, J. Jaen, B. Jiang, J. Kaizerman, J. Liu, D. McMinn, J. P. Powers, Y. Rew, A. Sudom, D. Sun, H. Tu, S. Ursu, Z. Wang, X. Yan, Q. Ye 52. Discovery and SAR of novel derivatives as 11 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors. C. M. Lankin, C. D. Boyle, S. Chackalamannil, U. Shah, H. Baker, T. Kowalski, L. Zhang, G. Terracina 53. Synthesis and biologic evaluation of selective inhibitors of 11 β-HSDI as a potential treatment for metabolic disorders. S. F. Neelamkavil, C. D. Boyle, S. Chackalamannil, H. Baker, T. Kowalski, L. Zhang, G. Terracina

54. Syntheses and SAR of piperidin-3-yl ureas as potent and selective 11 β-HSD-l inhibitors. Y-L. Li, L. Bostrom, J. Zhuo, Y. Li, M. Covington, R. Huber, B. Metcalf, W.Yao 55. Discovery and optimization of arysulfonamide as a novel class of 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors. D. Sun, M. DeGraffenreid, X. He, J. Jaen, J. P. Powers, X. Yan, Y. Di, H. Tu, S. Ursu, J. Ma, S. Miao, L Tang, Q. Ye, A. Sudom, Z. Wang 56. Azapaullones: GSK-3 inhibitors activating beta cell protection and proliferation. H. Stukenbrock, R. Mussmann, M. Austen, M. Geese, S. Kegel, O. Lozach, L. Meijer, C. Kunick 57. Synthesis, SAR and evaluation of C-aryl glucosides as sodium-glucose cotransporter inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. W. Meng, W. N. Washburn, B. A. Ellsworth, R. N. Girotra, P. J. McCann, P. P. Deshpande, A. J. Pullockaran, M. Patel, P. M. Sher, G. Wu, S. A. Biller, D. L Hagan, S. Han, A. Khanna, J. R. Taylor, L. Xin, J. R. Wetterau, J. M. Whaley 58. Influence of selective fluorination on the biological activity and proteolytic stability of glucagon-like peptide 1. H. Meng, K. Kumar 59. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 3-aryl-3-(4-phenoxy)-propionic acid as a novel series of G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) agonists. F. Song, S. Lu, J. Gunnet, J. Z. Xu, P. Wines, Y. Liang, C. Baumann, J. Lenhard, W. V. Murray, K. T. Demarest, G-H. Kuo 60. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors incorpo­ rating fused azoles as effective amide isosteres. H. Dong, W. T. Ashton, R. M. Sisco, K. A. Lyons, H. He, B. Leiting, R. A. Patel, J. K. Wu, X. Zhang, N. A. Thornberry, A. E. Weber 6 1 . Withdrawn. 62. Synthesis, SAR, and in vivo efficacy of novel GPR119 agonists with a 4-[3-(4methanesulfinylphenoxy)propyl]-1-Bocpiperidine core. M. C. T. Fyfe, A. J. Babbs, L. S. Bertram, S. E. Bradley, S. M. Doel, S. Gadher, W. T. Gattrell, R. P. Jeevaratnam, J. F. Keily, J. G. McCormack, H. A. Overton, C. M. Rasamison, C. Reynet, P. J. Rushworth, C. P. Sambrook Smith, V. K. Shah, D. F. Stonehouse, S. A. Swain, J. R. White, P. S. Widdowson, G. M. Williams, M. J. Procter 63. Af-methanesulfonyl-lysine as a nonhydrolyzable functional surrogate for Af-acetyllysine. N. Jamonnak, D. G. Fatkins, L. Wei, W. Zheng 64. Design, synthesis and bioactivity of novel inhibitors of E. coli Aspartate Transcarbamoylase. J. Eldo, S. Heng, E. R. Kantrowitz 65. Thermal stability and activity of fluorinated single-isoleucine mutants of chlorampheni­ col acetyltransferase. N. Voloshchuk, M. X. Lee, W. W. Zhu, I. C. Tanrikulu, J. K. Montclare 66. Analogs of orotidine monophosphate (OMP): Their effect on the activity of OMP decarboxylase. S. Thirumalairajan, S. L. Bearne 67. Assessing the role of tyrosine 190 in the catalytic mechanism of hamster N-acetyltransferase 2 by site-directed mutagen­ esis, pre-steady state and steady state kinetic studies. X. Zhou, L. Liu, P. E. Hanna, C. R. Wagner 68. Development of C2-symmetric, active site-directed inhibitors for Cystathionine beta-Synthase. C. D. McCune, W. Shen, W. J. Chung, D. B. Berkowitz

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

69. Discrimination of carbonic anhydrase isozymes by the excited-state lifetimes of polymerized liposome incorporated lanthanide ions. A. Elegbede, M. Haldar, S. Manokaran, S. Mallik, D. K. Srivastava 70. Design, synthesis and chemical reactivity of 1,4-naphtoquinone derivatives as cyste­ ine protease irreversible inhibitors. C. Valente, R. Moreira, R. C. Guedes, J. Hey, M. Jaffar, K. T. Douglas 71. Synthetic approaches to amino acid cyclobutanone derivatives. P. Kataria, N. Armoush, D. P. Becker 72. Phosphonosulfonates are potent inhibitors of dehydrosqualene synthase and staphyloxanthin biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus. Y. Song, G. Liu, F. Yin, V. Nizet, E. Oldfield 73. Modeling, synthetic, crystallographic, and activity studies of novel bisphosphonates as inhibitors of famesyl pyrophosphate synthase. J. M. Hogan, S. Deprele, B. A. Kashemirov, B. Barnett, A. Evdokimov, J. Dunford, R. G. G. Russell, F. H. Ebetino, C. E. McKenna 74. Structure-based design of reversible peptides inhibitors of Factor Vll-a. C. C. Clement, L Gingold, M. Philipp 75. 7-Fluoroindazoles as potent and selective factor Xa inhibitors. Y-K. Lee, T. Lu, D. J. Parks, T. V. Thieu, T. Markotan, W. Pan, D. F. McComsey, K. L Milkiewicz, C. Crysler, N. Ninan, M. C. Abad, E. C. Giardino, B. E. Maryanoff, B. P. Damiano, M. R. Player 76. Discovery of N-{(1 R,2S,5S)-2-{[(5-chloroindol-2-yl)carbonyl]amino}-5-[(dimethylamino)carbonyl]cyclohexyl}-5-methyl-4,5,6,7tetrahydrothiazolo[5,4-c]pyridine-2carboxamide hydrochloride (DT-831J): A novel, potent and orally active direct inhibi­ tor of factor Xa. T. Nagata, T. Yoshino, N. Haginoya, K. Yoshikawa, M. Nagamochi, S. Kobayashi, S. Komoriya, A. Yokomizo, R. Muto, M. Yamaguchi, K. Osanai, M. Suzuki, H. Kanno 77. Induced polarization in drug-receptor binding: Contribution to the binding affinity of a meta-chlorobenzyl side chain in the S1 pocket of thrombin. M. Mohamed, B. Baum, M. Freindorf, G. Klebe, D. G. Hangauer 78. Drug target validation using transcription profiling and reverse-engineered gene networks. M. M. Dominguez, E. Cosgrove, Y. Zhou, E. D. Kolaczyk, S. E. Schaus, T. S. Gardner 79. Imidazole-acetamide substituted piperazinylbenzimidazole antagonists of the Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone recep­ tor. J. T. Lundquist IV, J. F. Mehlmann, L Garrick, J. C. Pelletier, J. Wrobel, J. E. Cottom, L. Shanno, M. V. Chengalvala, C. Huselton, I. B. Feingold 80. Simultaneous biological optimization and structural simplification of a pendant het­ erocyclic thiobenzimidazolone on a series of 2-phenyl-4-(piperazin-1 -yl)benzimidazole antagonists of the Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor. J. C. Pelletier, M. V. Chengalvala, J. E. Cottom, L. Garrick, J. Jetter, W. Kao, L Shanno, J. Wrobel 8 1 . Design, synthesis and SAR of uracil diamines as potent GnRH receptor antagonists. C. Huang, W. Wade, Y-F. Zhu, C. Chen, Z. Guo, Y. Chen, S. Struthers, M. W. Rowbottom, J. Rueter, D. Wu, J. Xie, J. Saunders 82. Parallel synthesis of substituted pyridones for use as Gonadotropin Releasing Hor­ mone (GnRH) antagonists. D. Green, J. C. Pelletier, M. V. Chengalvala, J. E. Cottom, L. Shanno 83. Substituted 5-oxopyrazoles as HCV poly­ merase inhibitors. T. Wang, D. Li, G. W. Shipps Jr., K. E. Rosner, P. Curran, Y. Deng, J. Popovici-Muller, A. B. Cooper, V. Girijavallabhan 84. HCV NS3 serine protease inhibitors: Discovery of carbamate derived new P4 capping moieties with improved profile. A. Arasappan, A. I. Padilla, F. Bennett, S. L. Bogen, K. X. Chen, S. Hendrata, Y. Huang, E. Jao, W. Pan, R. E. Pike, S. Ruan, M. Sannigrahi, S. Venkatraman, B. Vibulbhan, W. Wu, W. Yang, A. K. Saksena, V. Girijavallabhan, X. Tong, K-C. Cheng, N-Y. Shih, F. G. Njoroge

MEDI 85. Molecular docking and 3-D-QSAR studies on benzimidazole series of Hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase inhibitors. P. D. Patel, T. T. Talele 86. Discovery of new P4 (esters, acids, ketones) extended ketoamide inhibitors of the HCV NS3 serine protease with improved potency and PK profile. S. L Bogen, W. Pan, S. Ruan, A. Arasappan, F. Bennett, K. Chen, S. Hendrata, Y. Huang, E. Jao, Y-T. Liu, R. Lovey, L Nair, A. I. Padilla, R. Pike, P. Pinto, M. Sannigrahi, F. Velazquez, S. Venkatraman, B. Vibulbhan, W. Wu, W. Yang, A. K. Saksena, V. Girijavallabhan, X. Tong, K-C. Cheng, N-Y. Shih, F. G. Njoroge 87. Novel HCV protease inhibitors: Using acyl-sulfamides to form P1-P1' macrocycles. J. P. Shanley, H-J. Chen, C. W. Hutchins, D. J. Kempf, L. L. Klein, K. Kurtz, A. Konstantinidis, K. F. McDaniel 88. Discovery of Novel P4 capped sulfon­ amide derived inhibitors of HCV NS3 protease. S. Venkatraman, W. Wu, M. Blackman, A. Arasappan, F. Bennett, S. L. Bogen, K. X. Chen, S. Hendrata, Y. Huang, E. Jao, L Nair, A. I. Padilla, W. Pan, R. Pike, P. Pinto, S. Ruan, M. Sannigrahi, F. Velazquez, B. Vibulbhan, W. Yang, A. Saksena, V. Girijvallabhan, X. Tong, K-C. Cheng, N-Y. Shih, F. G. Njoroge 89. Synthesis and anti-HIV-RT activity of a series of indole alkyl sulfones. X. Zhang, V. Munshi, D. diStefano, L. Ecto, P. J. Felock, M. Feng, J. A. Flynn, M. Lai, Y. Liang, M. Lu, M. Miller, G. Moyer, R. A. Poehnelt, S. Prasad, R. I. Sanchez, W. Schleif, M. Torrent, S. Touch, B. Wan, T. M. Williams 90. Design and synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating oxazolidinones as P2/P2' ligands in pseudosymmetric dipeptide isosteres. G. S. K. K. Reddy, A. Ali, M. N. L Nalam, S. G. Anjum, H. Cao, R. S. Nathan, C. A. Schiffer, T. M. Rana 91. Potent HIV integrase inhibitor with excel­ lent pharmacokinetics. M. Egbertson, M. Kuo, D. Perlow, M. Langford, J. Melamed, J. Wai, J. Vacca, A. Wallace, Y. Leonard, D. J. Hazuda, P. J. Felock, K. Stillmock, W. Schleif, L. J. Gabryelski, G. Moyer, J. Ellis, L Jin, S. D. Young 92. Molecular modeling, synthesis, and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of 1,4-dihydropyridine, pyrrole, and benzopyran analogs as HIV-1 RT inhibitors. T. T. Talele, D. Manvar, K. Raval, V. N. Pandey, A. Shah 93. Phthalimide-containing hydrazides and amides as diketo acid-class HIV-1 inte­ grase inhibitors. X. Z. Zhao, E. A. Semenova, B. C. Vu, C. Liao, M. C. Nicklaus, S. H. Hughes, Y. Pommier, T. R. Burke Jr. 94. Design, synthesis, and biological evalua­ tion of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporat­ ing phenyloxazolidines as novel P2 ligands. A. AM, G. S. K. K. Reddy, H. Cao, S. G. Anjum, M. N. L Nalam, C. A. Schiffer, T. M. Rana 95. Discovery of novel HIV-1 integrase inhibi­ tors by pharmacophore search. I. E. Weidlich, C. Marchand, Y. Pommier, M. C. Nicklaus 96. Synthesis and anti-HIV activities of fatty acyl derivatives of 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine. H. K. Agarwal, M. Hanley, G. F. Doncel, K. Parang 97. Synthesis and evaluation of bis(fatty acyl-glycol)phosphate triester derivatives of 3'-fluoro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine. H. K. Agarwal, G. F. Doncel, K. Parang 98. Water-soluble prodrugs of lopinavir, ritona­ vir and new investigational HIV Pis. D. A. DeGoey, W. J. Flosi, D. J. Grampovnik, K. C. Marsh, L. L Klein, M. A. Long, D. J. Kempf

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

99. Non-hydrolysable glycosylated porphyrins and chlorins: Potential new photodynamic therapy agents and applications in vivo imaging. S. A. Thompson, D. Samaroo, M. Vinodu, C. M. Drain 100. Gd(lll)-based bile acid conjugates for dual magnetic resonance and fluores­ cence imaging. S. Lim, X. Ma, H-S. Chong 101. pH-Sensitive cyanine dyes for optical imaging of acidic environments. S. A. Hilderbrand, R. Weissleder 102. The preparation of the stable substrate for imaging HSV1-TK expression and its biological study. G. An, K. Lee, T. Choi, H. Rhee, H. Ahn, K. Chun, G. Cheon, S. Lim, B. Moon 103. Synthesis of novel technetium-99m-PIB complex as SPECT imaging agent for CNS disease. K. Gao, C. Wu, Y. Wang 104. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) FRET agents for imaging gene expression. B. Y. Oquare, H. Fang, J-S. Taylor 105. Decaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibi­ tors activate gamma delta Τ cells. F. Yin, Y. Zhang, R. Cao, C. T. Morita, E. Oldfield 106. Impact of secondary structure of ago­ nists of Toll-like receptor 9 on immune stimulatory activity. D. Yu, M. R. Putta, L. Bhagat, D. Wang, M. Dai, J. X. Tang, E. R. Kandimalla, S. Agrawal 107. Synthetic agonists of Toll-like receptor 9: Impact of linkers. M. R. Putta, D. Yu, D. Wang, L. Bhagat, M. Dai, J. X. Tang, E. R. Kandimalla, S. Agrawal 108. Synthetic oligoribonucleotides containing secondary structures activate Toll-like receptor 8 and induce immune responses. T. Lan, L. Bhagat, M. Dai, J. X. Tang, E. R. Kandimalla, S. Agrawal 109. Synthesis and biological evaluation of NETA and NETA analogs as iron deple­ tion agents. X. Ma, H-S. Chong 110. Synthesis of a reactive linker for the construction of antibody-drug hybrid mol­ ecules. J. D. Thomas, T. Hofer, C. Rader, T. R. Burke Jr. 111. Synthesis and use of cocaine-based MRI contrasting agents to detect the concentra­ tion of DAT. G. R. Naumiec, B. DeBoef 112. Noncovalent cellular delivery of phosphopeptides by amphipathic peptides. G. Ye, N. H. Nam, A. Kumar, K. Parang 113. Bisphosphonates targeting geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase: A QSAR inves­ tigation. R. Cao, Y. Zhang, F. Yin, M. P. Hudock, E. Oldfield 114. Study of solvent interactions in solvolytic reactions of several common pharmaceuti­ cal intermediates. M. J. D'Souza, Z. H. Ryu, D. N. Kevill, B-C. Park 115. Drug-receptor binding affinity: The strength of hydrophobic binding can be increased by adding hydrogen bonds. L. Muley, M. Smolinski, B. Baum, C. Gerlach, M. Freindorf, G. Klebe, D. G. Hangauer 116. Hemostatic effects of liposomes carrying fibrinogen gamma-chain dodecapeptide and encapsulating adenosine 5'-diphosphate as a platelet substitute. Y. Okamura, I. Maekawa, M. Handa, Y. Ikeda, S. Takeoka 117. From SAMs to drugs: Application of the Pharmacomer Technology Platform to small molecule drug discovery. B. M. Cole, P. Sweetnam, E. Kim, D. Duffy, J. Ellis, D. Casalena, A. Bartolozzi, Y. Yang, H. Foudoulakis, B. Kirk, E. Mak, E. Wong, S. McGonigle, S. Campbell, 0. Schueller, J. Ferkany, W. Prince 118. Conjugated porphyrin dimers with large two-photon absorption cross section for photodynamic therapy. M. Balaz, H. A. Collins, M. K. Kuimova, E. Dahlstedt, K. Suhling, D. Phillips, H. L. Anderson 119. Review of various classes of organic compounds for optimal purification on RediSep Rf Diol media. V. D. Thomason 120. Examination of secondary conformational constraint in the design of macrocyclic Grb2-SH2 domain-binding ligands. F. Liu, K. M. Worthy, L Bindu, R. J. Fisher, T. R. Burke Jr. 121. Synthetic efforts toward the development of She SH2 domain-binding peptides. W. J. Choi, A. G. Stephen, R. J. Fisher, T. R. Burke Jr. 122. Multimodal nanoagent for the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis. J. R. McCarthy, E. Korngold, F. Jaffer, R. Weissleder

123. Withdrawn. 124. Anodized nanotubular titanium as novel drug eluting orthopedic implants. C. Yao, T. J. Webster 125. A structure- and NMR-based approach for the discovery of novel agents against Influenza A virus. W. H. Bisson, M. Pellecchia 126. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide syn­ thase expression by structural analogs of pterostilbene. C. S. Mizuno, S. Paul, N. Suh, A. M. Rimando 127. Design and synthesis of novel cyclic oxyguanidines as potential iNOS inhibitors. G-H. Chu, M. Gu, B. Le Bourdonnec, C. W. Ajello, L. K. Leister, J. A. Cassel, R. N. DeHaven, R. E. Dolle 128. Design and synthesis of novel imidazolepyrimidines as potent iNOS dimerization inhibitors—Part I. G-H. Chu, B. Le Bourdonnec, M. Gu, C. W. Ajello, L. K. Leister, P. A. Tuthill, I. Sellitto, H. O'Hare, J. A. Cassel, R. N. DeHaven, R. E. Dolle 129. Releasing of nitric oxide from elastic electrospun nanofibers. P. Kampeerapappun, M. Lopez, P. Lopez-Jaramillo, D. J. Smith 130. Design and synthesis of novel imidazolepyrimidines as potent iNOS dimerization inhibitors. I. F. Sellitto, B. LeBourdennec, G-H. Chu, M. Gu, C. W. Ajello, L. K. Leister, P. A. Tuthill, H. O'Hare, J. A. Cassel, R. N. DeHaven, R. E. Dolle 131. Potential applications of fendiline NONa in coronary health. M. K. Carnahan, W. Flores, D. J. Smith 132. Synthesis, pharmacological and toxicological studies of nitric oxide releasing analog of acetaminophen. T. R. Bhardwaj, M. Kumar, N. Mehta, N. Dhingra 133. Preclinical pharmacokinetic study of Zaltoprofen in rats. N. Muddana, G. Bhyrapuneni, K. Mudigonda, V. N. Kandikere, R. V. S. Nirogi 134. Discovery of orally active mGluRI recep­ tor antagonists for the treatment of chronic pain. S. Cooke, P. Korakas, L. S. Silverman, J. Matasi, D. Tulshian, D. Burnett, W. J. Greenlee, A. Reggi