234TH ACS NATIONAL MEETING - C&EN Global Enterprise (ACS


the keynote symposium to be hosted by ACS President Catherine T. (Katie) Hunt—supports the meeting's overall theme, "Biotechnology for Health and We...
2 downloads 0 Views 108MB Size

TECHNICAL PROGRA THREE YEARS OLD The Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, with its dramatic roof, is accessible from all major highways and secondary streets.

ce

ο χ

(< ce hζ

ο ζ

ο hζ



ο ο

00

00 Χ ϋ


Supramo4ecular Polymers Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW

Promises, Problems and Successes for Label-Free BiodetectJon Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Cantilever and Nanotube Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Energy and Environment Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nucleic Acid Enzymotogy Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Physicochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Btomotecular Systems Methods for Single-Molecule Detection Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL. and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Wotfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST SUNDAY AFTERNOON Chemical Approaches to Protein Function Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

Wotfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST Zebrafish in Drug Development and Chemical Toxicology Sponsored by TOXI, Cosponsored by BIOHW SUNDAY EVENING General Papers: Polymers in Nanotechnology Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience: Applications Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR MONDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 203 Genomics of Obesity Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC J. W. Finley, Organizer 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 1. A role for mTOR in the fuel sensing pathways in the CNS that regulate energy balance. R. Seeley

Drug Reprofiling Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Emerging Technologies: Nanobiotechnology Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOHW General Papers: Polymers in Nanotechnology Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

BIOHW 9:20 2. Comparison of gene expression in primary human adipocytes and LS14 cells: A novel human adipocyte cell line. N. Ben-Jonathan, E. Hugo 10:05 Exercise Break. 10:15 3. Human Adenovirus 36 induces adipogenesis in human adipose derived stem cells. P. Magdalene 11:00 4. From genetics to functional genom­ ics in obesity. K. Clement

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 203 Genomics of Obesity Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC J. W. Finley, Organizer

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Macromotecular Architectures Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Emerging Technologies: Nanobiotechnotogy Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOHW GalectJns: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Organometallic Polymers, Metallopoiymers and NanoparUcles Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 5. Brain regulation of nonexercise activity thermogenesis and obesity resis­ tance. C. M. Kotz, J. A. Teske, C.J. Billington 2:15 6. Estrogen: The "other" adiposity signal. D. Clegg 2:55 Exercise Break. 3:05 7. Genome-wide analysis in human adipose tissue of transcriptional responses to caloric restriction or isoenergetic carbo­ hydrate reduction. L M. Mangravrte, K. Dawson, R. R. Davis, J. P. Gregg, R. M. Krauss 3:45 8. Identification of depot-specific human fat cell progenitors through distinct expres­ sion patterns, developmental gene profiles, and function. J. KirMand, T. Tchkonia, M. Lenburg, T. Thomou, N. Giorgadze, T. Pirtskhalava, A. Cartwright, M. Cartwright, N. Gerry, A. Forse, Y. Tchoukalova, M. Jensen, C. Pothoulakis

Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Advances in Btobased Nanostructures and Nanomaterials Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Drug Delivery Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biomarker Discovery Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BTEC and BIOHW Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Nanostructured Materials and Nanocomposltes Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

W«»ln«»««—II.J« Maul fWn*«iIr» llmiiin-lmln

rorypepuGe ana rroiein Materials Characterization Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Btomotecu Motor Proteins Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromotecutes for Emerging Nanotechnotogies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Undergraduate Research Poster Session Nanotechnotogy Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by SOCED and BIOHW MONDAY EVENING

ι Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 203 Genomics of Obesity Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC J. W. Finley, Organizer

General Methods Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and

Tectons for Setf-AssemWy

Organometallic Polymers, Metallopoiymers and NanoparDctes Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Murray Goodman Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by John Wiley & Sons, ANYL, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

Analytical Technology for Drug Discovery High Throughput, High Content Screening Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL

Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Pore Generation Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL

Nano-Btochemistry and Technology Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOT, BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL Nanomaterials and Biological

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Hybridization of Nanomaterials Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biosensing and Drug Delivery Gene Delivery Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

GatectJns: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Porous Materials Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and

Pathogen Detection Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Pfizer Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Phystoochemtoal Aspects of Biopoiymsrs in Food and Nutrition Protein-Polysaccharlde Interactions on Interfaces Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOHW Polypeptide and Protein Materials Synthesis Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Safety in Nanotechnotogy Research Sponsored by CHAS, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biological Systems Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomoiecuiar Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

Nanostructured Ruorocarbons: Smart Tectons for Setf-Assembty Btomedicinal Nanostructures Sponsored by FLUO, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW

Synthetic and Biological Macromotecutes for Emerging Nanotechnotogies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Novel Targets and Therapeutic Approaches Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN

The Emerging Technologies and Capabilities of Metabotomics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL

Phystoochemtoal Aspects of Btopolymera in Food and Nutrition Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Polymers and Liquid Crystals New Concepts in LC/ Polymer Systems Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Gatectins: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Structure and Function Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN

Nanoscience: Applications Energy and Environment Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR

Polypeptide and Protein Materials Properties Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience: Synthesis and

Sponsored by FLUO, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW

Chemical and Biological Defense Nanoparticulates Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 9. OverconsumptJon of fat: Circulating lipids and brain neurochemicals in a vicious cycle. S. F. Leibowitz 9:05 10. Polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of hepatic gene transcription. D. B. Jump, D. Botolin, Y. Wang, J. Xu, B. Christian 9:50 11. Rote of bone morphogenetjc pro­ teins in brown adipogenesis and energy homeostasis. Y-H. Tseng 10:35 12. Smc1, a non-abc protein involved in transport of xenobiotjes. S. Yadav, S. S. Singhal, J. Singhal, K. Drake, S.Awasthi 11:20 13. Proopiomelanocortin neurocircuits underlying feeding behavior. M. J. Low

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Infrared and Fluorescence Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Imaging Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Materials with Special Properties Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Diffusion, Adsorption, and Reaction Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomoiecuiar Systems Novel Imaging Methods Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Btotogical Macromotecutes for Emerging Nanotechnotogies Session V Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 203 Genomics of Obesity Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC J. W. Finley, Organizer 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 14. Enhanced metabolicflexibilitywith weight toss facilitates weight regain. P.Maclean 2:20 15. Metabolic phenotype of prediabetes in childhood obesity. S. Caprto 3:05 Exercise Break. 3:15 16. The unique delivery rote of cystine/ cysteine coupling the importance of the sulfydryl (SH) in detoxifying oxyradicals to preserve cell, gene, and immune health. A. B. Crum 4:00 17. Synaptic plasticity in energy balance regulation. T. L Horvath Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Serf-Assembly and Thin Rims Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Fast Preparative Chromatography in Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Gatectins: Structures, Functions and Therapeutic Targets Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW Mechanism of Action of Natural Products Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials with Special Properties Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

Visualization of Biological Processes at the Molecular Level Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, PHYS, and BIOHW

TECH-3

Chemjobs CAREER FAIR Brought to you by C&EN Chemjobs and ACS Career Management & Development

ACS 234th National Meeting August 19-22, 2007 HallC Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Boston, MA

8:00 AM-5:30 PM Are you interested in speaking with employers to discuss employment opportunities? Perhaps you would like to brush up on your interviewing skills, find out how to write a winning resume, or get valuable information on various career management and development topics. The Chemjobs Career Fair can provide all of these things and more! For additional information on all services provided at the Chemjobs Career Fair, please visit http://cen-chemjobs.org/careerfair. Job seekers and employers must sign up June 25 — August 22 to participate.

All workshops will be held in Rooms 053 and 054 of the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. IMPORTANT: Workshop times are subject to change. Please consult the Web version of the workshop schedule http://chemistryorg/careers/workshops.html or the Chemjobs Career Fair onsite brochure for final workshop times. S U N D A Y , A U G U S T 19

MONDAY, AUGUST 20

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Mock Interview Demonstration. Room 053

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Mock Interview Demonstration. Room 053

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Finding A Position in Industry. Room 054

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

First Year on the Job. Room 054

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Communication Skills for Chemical Professionals. Room 053 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Résumé Preparation for Recent Graduates. Room 054

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Finding A Position in Industry. Room 053 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Overcoming Barriers: Current Issues Facing Foreign-Born Chemical Professionals. Room 054

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Chemical Professionals. Room 053

2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Chemical Professionals. Room 053

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Résumé Preparation for Experienced Chemical Professionals. Room 054

2:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Negotiation Techniques. Room 054

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Recent Graduates. Room 054

3:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Career Strategies: Critical Steps to Success. Room 053

ICHEMJDBS.ORG

L i f e begins with chemistry. Your f u t u r e begins with

©toKryJofeSo©^

T U E S D A Y , A U G U S T 21 8:00 A M - 9 : 3 0 AM

Mook Interview Demonstration. Room 053

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Starting a Chemical Consulting Business. Room 054

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Finding A Position in Industry. Room 053 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Communication Skills for Chemical Professionals, Room 054 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Navigating the Federal Employment Process. Room 054

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Academic Employment Initiative: How Do I Get That First Job? Room 053

3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Writing Excellent Research Proposals. Room 054

4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Academic Positions. Room 053

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22 8:30 A M - 1 0 : 0 0 AM Mock Interview Demonstration. Room 053 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM Preparing Your Academic Application Package. Room 054 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Communication Skills for Chemical Professionals. Room 053 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Résumé Preparation for Recent Graduates. Room 054 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Which Path Should I Take—Industry or Acàdemia? Room 053

1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Negotiation Techniques. Room 054

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Effective Interviewing Techniques for Academic Positions. Room 053

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

First Year on the Job. Room 054

d f c t r ©®ρ©©ρ-^®0®δ@(ο];

^MmmMmE^m^mmmm^^ Please consult the online technical program at http://chemistry.or9/meetings/boston2007 or the onsite program distributed during the meeting for final details on this programming. S U N D A Y , A U G U S T 19 Finding Your Catalyst — Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry. Sponsored by CHED and co-sponsored with WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC and INOR. Career Perspectives and Insights into Life After Graduate School. Sponsored by CHËD and co-sponsored with WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC and INOR. The Role of Cultural Diversity on Global Teams. Sponsored by SCHB and co-sponsored with CEPA. MONDAY, A U G U S T 20 Being a Responsible Chemist — Ethics, Politics, and Policy. Co-sponsored with Committee on Ethics, CEPA, and PROF. Pre-Retirement Considerations: Financial and Otherwise. Sponsored by SCHB and co-sponsored with CEPA. T U E S D A Y , A U G U S T 21 Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry. Sponsored by WCC and co-sponsored with Committee on Chemists with Disabilities, Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, YCC, and PROF.

American Chemical Society

BIOHW/AEI Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Pore Generation Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanomaterials and Biological Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Diagnostics Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Panel Presentations Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience: Applications Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR Polymers and Liquid Crystals Lyotropic and Amphiphilic LC/Polymer Systems Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Applications Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Safety in Nanotechnotogy Research Sponsored by CHAS, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Biomacromolecule Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW TUESDAY EVENING Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Poster-Session Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR Polymers and Liquid Crystals Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Scaffolds and Matrices for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromotecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW WEDNESDAY MORNING Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Cheminformatfcs Techniques in Bioinformatics: Related Applications Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by COMP and BIOHW Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Structure-Property Relationships Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Current Techniques in Molecular Simulation of Biological Systems Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS and BIOHW Eli Lilly Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, CARB, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW

TECHNICAL PROGRAM Emerging Technologies: Systems Biology Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials & Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Low-k Materials Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW Applications: Diagnostic, Imaging, Biosensing and Drug Delivery Biosensor Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Barrier Materials Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Biological Systems Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR Nanotechnotogy in Agriculture Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by BIOHW New Chemical and Biosensing Approaches for Cellular Analysis Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW and BIOL Polymers and Liquid Crystals Elastomeric and Network LCs Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Scaffolds and Matrices for Tissue Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Imaging of Live Tissue, Cells, and Organelles Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Biological Applications of Nonlinear Optics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL, BIOHW, and BIOL Cheminformatics Techniques in Bioinformatics: Related Applications Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by COMP and BIOHW Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Fabrication and Devices Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Emerging Technologies: Systems Btotogy Sponsored by BIOT, Cosponsored by BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials & Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems NanopartJcles and Mlcropartictes Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Btotogtoal Defense Reactive Materials Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Detection—Explosives Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanotechnotogy in Agriculture Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Wires, Tubes, and Spheres Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Polymers and Liquid Crystals LC Polymers Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Scaffolds and Matrices for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Symposium in Honor of Perry Frey Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Methods of Slngte-Motecute Detection Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

ΑΕΙ Academic Employment Initiative J. A. Bell, M. C. Caserio, and C. Kuniyoshi, Program Chairs

THURSDAY MORNING Antibiotics Discovery, Biosynthesis, and Resistance Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Biorelated Concepts Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Current Techniques in Molecular Simulation of Biological Systems Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS and BIOHW Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Dendrimers, Hyperbranched Systems, Stars and Others Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Nanoscience and Nanotechnotogy for Chemical and Biological Defense Nanosize Fibers and Particulates Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Rods and Fibers Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW Photovoltaic Solar Cells for Energy Applications: Nanomaterials for PV Applications Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by BIOHW Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Biomacromolecule Dynamics Sponsored by PHYS, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW Understanding Drug Action and Toxicity Sponsored by TOXI, Cosponsored by BIOHW THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Photovoltaic Solar Cells for Energy Applications: Nanomaterials for PV Applications Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by BIOHW

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromotecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Materials Processing Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW General Papers: Polymers in Nanotechnotogy Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by BIOHW

MONDAY EVENING SecttonA BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Academic Employment Initiative Cosponsored by Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, WCC, and PRES J. A. Bell and C. Kuniyoshi, Organizers 8:00-10:00 1. Synthesis and fluorescent responses of highly water-soluble zwitterionic boronic acid-grafted poly(p-phenylene ethynylene) to biological species. Z. Chen 2. Metabolic phenotypes for MCF-10A cancer cell lines. M. Ctobanu, D. E. Cliffel 3. Development of fluorescent tags for label­ ing newly synthesized proteins. J. D. Fisk, K. E. Beatty, J. M. Baskin, C. R. Bertozzi, D. Tirrell 4. Correlating DNA adduct levels and gene expression using LC-MS/MS and DNA microarrays for a foodbome heterocyclic aromatic amine procardnogen. J. Glick, R. Sullivan, H. Zarbl, P. Vouros 5. Study of inner filter effects. Q. Gu 6. Structure elucidation of microgram quanti­ ties of heparin oligosaccharides important for protein binding. A. K. Korir, J. F. K. Limtiaco, C. K. Larive 7. Development of a novel soft ionization aerosol mass spectrometer (SIAMS). J. A. Lloyd, M. V. Johnston 8. Development of analytical separation meth­ ods for actinide materials. D. Peterson 9. Development of novel spectroscopic tech­ niques and their application to environ­ mental science. J. E. Thompson 10. Metabolic profiling of pancreatic islets via scanning electrochemical microscopy. J. P. Wilbum, M. Ciobanu, D. E. Cliffel 11. Novel nanostructure architectures: How surface topography relates to materials' properties. X. Zhang, J. A. Rogers 12. Understanding proteins and their com­ plexes using small angle X-ray/neutron scattering. F. Ashish, J. Krueger 13. Molecular recognition and sensing with designed biomimetic systems: From betahairpins to lipid bilayers. S. M. Butterfteid, S. Matile, J. Rebek Jr., M. L Waters 14. Structure-based design, synthesis and structure-activity relationship of peptide libraries containing Phe analogs as revers­ ible inhibitors for thrombin. C. Clement, P. Chimieze, J. Gonzalez, M. Philipp 15. Improved cellular delivery of peptides and proteins by encodable structured motifs. D. S. Daniels, A. Schepartz

ΑΕΙ 16. Advances toward the development of small molecule transcriptional activators. J-P. Desaulniers, A. Wands, A. K. Mapp 17. Fe(ll) and a-ketoglutarate-dependent halogenases in natural products biosynthe­ sis. D. P. Galonic, S. Hrvatjn, E. W. Barr, J. M. Bollinger Jr., C. Krebs, C. T. Walsh 18. New insights into the mechanism of cleav­ age of sarcin ricin loop (SRL) RNA. S.S.JaJn.T. D.Tullius 19. Quinocarmycin analog DX-52-1 inhibits cell migration and targets radixin, disrupt­ ing interactions of radixin with actin and CD44.A.W.Kahsal 20. Perturbation of endogenous retinoid levels and retinoid metabolism by ethanol. M. A. Kane, A. E. Folias, C. Wang, N. Chen, J. L Napoii 21. Inhibition of translation by peptide ligands targeting the stem-loop H18 in 16S rRNA. B. Uanc-Sotelo, D. Klepacki, A. S. Mankin 22. Intracellular delivery of biologically active multivalent ligands. Ε. Ε. McElroy, L. L Kiessling 23. Structure function studies on the gluta­ mate racemase enzyme from Bacillus anthracis. S. Mehboob, M. E. Johnson 24. Controlled assembly of functional and structured DNA-multiprotein complexes at nanoscale. G. E. Sroga, J. S. Dordick 25. Transport of metal ions across ion chan­ nels in lipid membrane. V. Vijayvergiya 26. Application of click chemistry in ghycobiology. P.Wu 27. Folding and insertion of melittin in mem­ brane mimics. M. R. Hartings, H. B. Gray, J. R. Winkler 28. Affinity adsorption of viruses. C. L HeWt, P. V. Gurgel, L-A. Jaykus, R. G. Carbonell 29. Sensor-aided bioprospecting. K. M. Polizzi 30. Quantitative analysis of a web-based math tutorial for general chemistry and the student response. M. D. Barker, J. Heppert, B. A. Barker 31. Chemistry conceptions and misconcep­ tions of undergraduate organic chemistry students. J. M. Duis 32. Hypothesis driven assessment of an integrated NMR laboratory curriculum. K. C. Earnheart, Κ. Τ. Mueller 33. Predicting products in main-group inor­ ganic chemistry: A study of performance and implementation of a pedagogical tool. E. C. Gustafson, G. M. Bodner 34. Multisensory learning for blind or low vision learners in the chemistry laboratory. C. Supalo 35. Organometallic and chemical education research: An NMR investigation of the role of an aluminum alkyl during zirconocene catalyzed alkene polymerization and the development and evaluation of an online nanoscience course for teachers. J. M. H. Tomaslk, C. R. Landis, J. W. Moore 36. Kinetically controlled nanorod assemblies. J. W. Ciszek, L. Huang, Y. Wang, C. A. Mirkin 37. Fluorinated gold thiolate nanopartfcles by Brust synthesis and ligand exchange. A. Dass, R. W. Murray 38. Dynamic restructuring of au(111). W. Gao, L. Zhou, D. S. Pinnaduwage, B. K. Min, M. Biener, C. M. Friend 39. Synthesis of mono- and bimetallic nanopartjcle catalysts utilizing solid phase dendrimer templates. J. D. Gilberteon 40. Dual mode imaging and selective functionalization of multimaterial nanopyramids. J. Lee, W. Hasan, T. W. Odom 41. Synthesis and structure of an ultrathin aluminosilicate film. D. J. Stacchiola, S. Kaya, J. Weissenrieder, S. K. Shaikhutdinov, H-J. Freund

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

42. Dynamic reconstructuring during surface compound formation on Ag(111): Incorpo­ ration of metal atoms in the adsorbate structures on close-packed surface. LZhou, R.J.Madix 43. Development of novel computational methods for simulation of biological sys­ tems. V. M. Anisimov 44. DNA Structural motifs identified by con­ served OH radical cleavage signature (CORCS) Analyses. K. S. Byun, T. Tullius 45. Generalization of the Gaussian electro­ static model: A molecular density based force field. G. A. Cisneros, J-P. Piquemal, T. A. Darden 46. The correlation consistent Composite Approach: Efficient thermochemistry across the periodic table. N. DeYonker, A. K. Wilson, T. Cundari 47. Examining the role of conformational changes in HIV protease drug resistance. M. M. Layten, F. Ding, C. L. Simmerling 48. Investigate the fluorescence quenching and recovering process of beta-cydodextrin anchored quantum dots. M. Ning, R. E. Brown 49. Simulating nanostructure photovoltaics from atoms to devices. J. Sender 50. New methods for efficient direct calcula­ tion of ligand binding free energies. M. R. Shirts, J. D. Chodera, R. Friesner 51. Insights into peptide folding from a multiscale coarse-grained model. I. F. Thorpe, J. Zhou, G. A. Voth 52. Molecular-level interactions of tetracycline with oligomers of a model humus constitu­ ent and soil organic matter. P. Kulshrestha, R. F. Giese Jr., T. D. Wood 53. Hexavalent chromium and oxytetracycline binding to environmental interfaces studied by second harmonic generation. A. L Mifflin, C. T. Konek, M. J. MusorrafitJ, F. M. Geiger 54. Sustainable alternatives for chemical syntheses. J. P. Haltett 55. MX chain interactions in binary metallomesogenic mixtures of Pt(ll) and Pt(IV) complexes. R. J. Allenbaugh, C. K. Schauer 56. Synthesis, reactivity and electronic struc­ ture of stericalry pressured uranium com­ plexes. S. C. Bart, F. Heinemann, K. Meyer 57. Strategies for increasing the spin-reversal barrier in single-molecule magnets. B. M. Barttett, T. D. Harris, H. J. Choi, M. W. DeGroot, J. J. Wilson, J. R. Long 58. Modifications of diruthenium molecular wires through ancillary ligand exchange. S. L Bolton, M. B. Sponsler 59. Synthesis and grafting chemistry of functionalized silicone nanospheres. C. A. Bradley, M. J. McMurdo. T. D. Tilley 60. Kinetic resolution of α-olefins using Cr and C^-symmetric zirconocene polymer­ ization catalysts. J. A. Byers, J. E. Bercaw 61. Nanosized highrelaxivityMR contrast agents by conjugation to virus capsids. A. Datta, J. M. Hooker, M. Botta, Μ. Β. Francis, Κ. Ν. Raymond 62. Biophysical characterization of inorganic systems in biology utilizing spectroscopic techniques. J. J. Heymann, A. L Crumbliss 63. Employing PY5-type ligands in the investi­ gations of the magnetic properties of dinuclear and larger complexes. D. M. Jenkins, D. E. Freedman, H. I. Karunadasa, J. R. Long 64. It really is a small world after all: The joys of fabricating and characterizing nanoarchitectured materials. J. C. Lytle, A. J. Barrow, T. N. Zimmerman, J. W. Long, D. R. Rolison 65. Synthesis and C 0 2 reactivity of alkylaminozinc complexes. R. L McDonnell 66. Magnetic inorganic-organic polymers. J. E. Mertzman, S. L. Stoll 67. Mechanistic studies of dbxygen activation and substrate oxidation by model com­ plexes and metalloenzymes. L M. Mirica 68. Inorganic and chemical education research: Ethylene sensors from Ag(l)boundfluoroionophoresand the develop­ ment, beta-test, and assessment of sum­ mer chemistry camps. D. L Nutbrown, C. M. Schram, J. N. Burstyn, J. W. Moore 69. Fluid-processed tetraazaporphyrin-based photovottaics. B. D. Pate, J. E. Rogers, B. E. Taylor, B. A. Minch, J. R. Deneault, A. P. Smith, M. F. Durstock

70. PRINT: Nanomaterials for biological applications. R. A. Petros, J. M. DeSimone 71. Unsaturated organic monolayers on silicon: Surface passivation and reactivity. K. E. Plass, B. B. Brunschwig, N. S. Lewis 72. The use of metal boride precursors and nanoparticles for carbon nanotube growth. J. V. Romero, J. T. Spencer 73. Inorganic and solid state materials for energy applications. M. Schwartz 74. Metal-organic frameworks based on group 13 metal dipyninato complexes. J. Stork, V. S. Thoi, S. M. Cohen 75. Heteroleptic Ruthenium tris-bipyridyl complexes as photosensitizers for overall photocatalytic water splitting. W. J. Youngblood, M. Eguchi, A. E. Kaintz, S-H. Lee, Τ. Ε. Mallouk 76. Fluorescence/MRI sensing of zinc with water-soluble porphyrin molecular plat­ form. X-A. Zhang, K. S. Lovejoy, A. Jasanoff, S. J. Lippard 77. Synthesis and testing of novel dioxolanebased compounds with antiplasmodial activity. D. C. Martyn, M. J. Beattie, A. Ramirez, J. Cortese, V. Patel, K. A. Woerpel, J. Clardy 78.1. Synthesis of novel β-cyclodextrin deriva­ tives and their use as chiral stationary phases for GC; II. From student to scien­ tist: writing assignments in the chemistry lab. T. R. Turner, C. M. Gamer 79. Stereoselective synthesis of 2,3,4,5 tetrasubstjtuted tetrahydrofurans: Application to the total synthesis of (+)-Virgatusin and b) asymmetric radical additions to chiral sulfinimines. T. AMndele, S. P. Marsden, J. G. Cumming, K-l. Yamada, K. Tomtoka 80. Palladium-catalyzed haJocarbonyl-alkene coupling and mechanistic investigations of the beta-hydride elimination of transition metal enolates. E. J. Alexanian, J. F. Hartwkj 81. Exotic and highly-ordered bistable [n]rotaxanes. I. Aprahamian, J. F. Stoddart 82. Origins of selectivity in Pd-catalyzed C-N bond-forming reactions using biaiylphosphine ligands. M. R. Biscoe, T. E. Barder, S. L. Buchwald 83. Catalytic hydrogen transfer Synthesis of protected cyclic enamines. A. D. Bolig, M.Brookhart 84. Boron Lewis acids in organic synthesis. G. W. Kabalka, M-L Yao, S. Borella 85. Chemoselective probes for metabolite enrichment and profiling. Ε. Ε. Carlson, B. F. Cravatt 86. A) Using molecules to build molecules; B) Active transport of organic cations through fluorous bulk membranes by nanohosts. Q. Chu, L R. MacGillivray, D. P. Curran 87. Highly efficient syntheses of mechanically interlocked molecules. W. R. Dichtel, O. S. Miljanic, I. Aprahamian, W. Zhang, A. B. Braunschweig, J. M. Spruell, M. A. Oteen, J. R. Heath, J. F. Stoddart 88. Simocyclinone D8: Exploring a new mechanism of topoisomerase II inhibition. K. C. Ellis 89. Microcalorimetry to investigate biologicallike function of synthetic macromolecules. G. J. Gabriel 90. Understanding rotary motion in crystalline solids and developing high school curricula based on green chemistry principles. S. L Gould, M. Garcia-Garibay, A. A. Russell 91. Synthesis of a small library of (-)-dysiherbaine analogs as ionotropic glutamate receptor ligands. S. A. Habay, A. R. Chamberlin 92. Natural product synthesis via targetoriented and biomimetic approaches. G. H. Hanson, T. R. Hoye, S. D. Burke 93. Probing subunit interactions in Ribo­ nucleotide Reductase (RNR). A. Q. Hassan, Y. Wang, L Plate, J.Stubbe 94. Nanocrystalline ti02 solar cells based on variable band gap poly(arylene ethynylene) conjugated poiyelectrolytes. H. Jiang, X. Zhao, K. S. Schanze 95. Rapid-Injection NMR studies of carbonyl functionalities with organolithium reagents. K. J. Kotonko, H. J. Reich, M. M. Biddle 96. A natural products research program for implementation at a primarily undergradu­ ate institution. K. N. Maloney, W. Fenical, J. Clardy

97. Propargylic oxidation catalyzed by dirhodium caprolactamate: Rapid access to α,β-acetylenic ketones. E. C. McLaughlin, M. P. Doyle 98. From kinetic to thermodynamic control in the synthesis of donor-acceptor [2jcatenanes. O. S. Miljanic, W. R. Dichtel, S. I. Khan, J. F. Stoddart 99. Synthesis of tetrasubsitituted phthalocyanines and their application in pv devices. B. A. Minch, A. P. Smith, J. R. Deneault, Β. Ε. Taylor, M. F. Durstock 100. Spectroscopic characterization of organic reactive intermediates in cryogenic matri­ ces and development and testing of an interactive website to introduce current research into middle and high school classrooms. C. R. Pharr, R. J. McMahon, J. W. Moore 101. Synthetic studies of oroidin derived natural products: Ageliferin and palau'amine. S. Rasapalli, C. Lovely 102. Synthesis of tetrasubsitituted phthalocyanines and their application in pv devices. A. P. Smith, B. E. Taylor, J. R. Deneault, M. F. Durstock 103. Incorporating perfluoroanthracene units into organic semiconductors. J. F. Tannaci, M. Noji, J. McBee, T.D. Tilley 104. Indium-catalyzed enantioselective allylatJon of nonconventional nucleophiles. D.J.Weix.J. F. Hartwig 105. Reaction optimization from palladium to organo-catalysts. S. L Wiskur, G. C. Fu 106. Efficient kinetic resolution of diols through catalytic asymmetric silylation. Y. Zhao, J. Rodrigo, A. W. Mitra, A. H. Hoveyda, M. L. Snapper 107. Crosscoupling reactions of alkyl halides, H/D exchange of olefins and N-H activa­ tion. J. S. Zhou 108. A Chemical Physicist seeks teaching and research position in an undergraduate institution that calls for experience and commitment to teaching. J. K. Agbo 109. Artificial enzymes: In silico design and QM/MM characterization. A. N. Alexandrova, W. L Jorgensen, D.Baker 110. Dielectric functions for gold cluster thtolates. M. Alvarez, J. T. Khoury, T. G. Schaaff, R. L. Whetten 111. Dynamics of molecular systems: (1) Vibrational energies from ab initio semiclassical dynamics; (2) Proton conduction in nanoconfined polymer electrolyte mem­ branes for fuel cells. S. Atahan 112. Application of coarse-grained simulation techniques to ion channel kinetics. M. H. Cheng, R. D. Coalson 113. Ionization mechanisms and pathways in liquid water. C. G. Elles, R. A. Crowell, I. A. Shkrob, S. E. Bradforth 114. Pseudo-steady state kinetic model of laccase-catalyzed oxidation of aqueous phenol. S. Kumiawati, J. A. Nicell 115. Revealing the nature of solvation via cluster-ion techniques. L R. McCunn, J. R. RosckXi, J. M. Headrick, M. A. Johnson 116. Moving toward a better understanding of chemical reactions using fundamental quantum-chemistry concepts. J. Melin 117. The role of quantum coherence to energy transfer efficiency in molecular systems: Characterization, simulation, and control. M. Mohseni, A. Aspuru-Guzik 118. Understanding vibrational spectra of confined fluids. C. M. Morales, W. H. Thompson 119. Electronic and optical properties of nanostructures: (1) Optics of biosensing nanostructures; (2) Non-local density functional theory. A. Najmaie, J. E. Sipe, A. Aspuru-Guzik 120. Theoretical studies in extracting essential features and dynamics of molecular motions by advanced mathematical meth­ ods of fiber bundles on topolgical spaces and other methods. N. Panahi 121. Novel energy conversion and storage materials and in situ spectroelectrochemical studies. Q. Shi 122. Post-functjonalization of polymer brushes for pattemable nanoparticle adsorption. S. DiamantJ, S. Arifuzzaman, A. M. Elsen, S. Wargacki, R. Naik, J. Genzer, R. Vaia 123. Designing superoleophobic surfaces. A. Tuteja, W. Choi, J. M. Mabry, G. H. McKinley, R. E. Cohen

ΠΚΉ-S

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AEI/AGFD 124. Designing biocompatible and activatable nanoscale carriers for bioactive agents. A. Almutairi, R. Rossin, M. Berezin, S. Achilefu, M. J. Welch, K. L Wooley, J. M. J. Fréchet 125. Synthetic trivalent haptens that aggregate Anti-2,4-DNP IgG into complexes. B. Bilgteer, D. T. Moustakas, G. M. Whitesides 126. Polymer monolayer dynamics. C. Kim 127. Sequential formation of nanopores in thin films of block copolymer mixtures. H. Mao, T. P. Russell 128. Synthesis and applications of polymeric materials. M. J. Nasrullah

AGFD

8:55 12. Formation and syneresis of protein stabilized foam formed in a continuous shearing apparatus. L Indrawati, G. Narslmhan 9:20 13. The influence of protein on selfassembly and solubilization in microemulsions. J. Y. Kim, S. R. Dungan 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 14. Calcium-induced supramolecular structures in the calcium caseinate sys­ tem. P. X. Qi, P. M. Tomasula 10:25 15. Interfacial properties of raw and roasted peanut oils as related to emulsification. J. P. Davis, T. H. Sanders 10:50 16. Encapsulation and controlledrelease of polyphenols using protein/ polysaccharide complex coacervates. Y-W. Wang, X. Wang, Q. Huang

Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry

Analysis of Chemical Contaminants in Foods and Food Contact Substances Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by AGFD

B. S. Patil, Program Chair

SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A

BUSINESS MEETINGS: Executive Committee Meting: Sun :Mon

BCEC 255 Plant Genomics Cosponsored by BTEC

SUNDAY MORNING

J. Finley and J. N. Losso, Organizers

Section A

1:00 17. Significance of plant genomics for human health. R. Rivlin 1:20 18. Important aspects of authenticating medicinal plants. N. Techen, V. Joshi, B. Avula, Z. Pan, I. A. Khan, B. Scheffler 1:40 19. Effects of chitosan and methyl jasmonate treatments on induction of phytochemicals and vitamin Ε in sweet basil. H-J. Kim, F. Chen, X. Wang, Z. U 2:00 Intermission. 2:15 20. Genetic and environmental regula­ tion of carotenoid, tocopherol, and glucosinolate form and concentration in sweet com and broccoli. J. A. Juvik, H. S. Kim, K. Ibrahim 2:35 21. Analysis of the CBF pathway in grapes and its role in enhancing abiotic stress tolerance. A. Nassuth, M. Siddiqua, H.Xiao 2:55 22. Functional characterization of novel fatty acid desturases likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of the allelochemical sorgoleone from Sorghum bicolor. Z, Pan, S. R. Baerson, A. M. Rimando, S. O. Duke

BCEC 255 Characterization and Bioavailability of Flavonoid Glycosides A. E. Mitchell and J. Hammerstone, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 1. An improvement of the DPPH antioxidant assay. C. L. Wommack, W. L. Whaley 8:35 2. Effect of glycosylation and acytation on the chemoprotectJve effects of anthocyanins. M. M. Giusti 9:00 3. Characterization of flavonoids: Effects of structures on the analysis, bioavailability and bioactivity. R. H. Uu 9:25 4. Absorption of anthocyanins from berries: Metabolic products and influence of glycoside. R. Prior, X. Wu. T. Hager, L. Howard 9:50 Intermission. 10:05 5. Distribution of anthocyanins in pig tissues after long-term blueberry feeding. P. E. Milbury, W. Kalt 10:30 6. Bioavailability, distribution and clearance of cranberry flavonol glycosides. N. Vorsa, A. P. Singh, E. Shabrova, K. M. Schaich, H. Jin, L Quadro 10:55 7. Urinary isoflavone excretion: A comparison of fermented and unfermented soy products. A. E. Mitchell, E. Koh 11:20 8. Identification of flavonoid glycosides using metal complexation and tandem mass spectrometry. B. D. Davis, M. Pikulski, J. Zhang, P. W. Needs, P. A. Kroon, J. S. Brodbelt 11:45 9. Flavonol glycosides from melon de olor (Sicana odorifera) fruit peel and evaluation of their antioxidant activity. C. Osorio, K. Jaramillo, C. Duque, Y. Fujimoto Section Β BCEC 256 Physteochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Cosponsored by BIOHW Q. Huang, D. J. McClements, and P. L. Dubin, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 10. Stabilization of emulsions with protein-polysaccharide complexes. D. J. McClements 8:30 11. Adsorption behavior of flaxseed gum on whey protein-stabilized emulsion droplets. S. Khalloufi, H. D. Goff. M. Corredig, M. Alexander

6-TECH

Section Β BCEC 256 Physicochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Protein-Polysaccharide Interactions in Solutions Cosponsored by BIOHW Q. Huang, D. J. McClements, and P. L. Dubin, Organizers 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 23. Dilute solutions of amphiphilic polyanions to protect proteins against aggregation and unfolding. C. Tribet, J. Ruchmann 1:30 24. Molecular dynamics simulations of polyampholyte-polyelectrolyte complexes in solution. A. Dobrynin, J. Jeon 1:55 25. Protein conformation and oligomerization as determinants of interaction with anionic polysaccharides: ESI MS of heparinoid-antithrombin binding. I. A. Kaltashov, R. Abzalimov, P. L Dubin 2:20 26. Light scattering study of metastable complexes of proteins with ionic or neutral polymers in aqueous systems. E.Kokufuta 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 27. Heparin-protein interactions. R. J. Linhardt, F. Zhang, B. Li, M. Kemp 3:25 28. Frontal analysis continuous capillary electrophoresis for the rapid measurement of polyelectolyte-protein interactions and drug-plasma binding. J. Gao 3:50 29. Nuclesome as an example of protein-polyelectrolyte interations from cell biology. G. S. Manning

Tandem LOMS and GC-MS Solutions for Food Safety Analysis Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by AGFD

Section C BCEC 257A

MONDAY MORNING » between Taste, Smell and SecttonA BCEC 255

P. Breslin, J. V. Leland, T. Hofmann, and W. Meyerhof, Organizers

Plant Genomics Cosponsored by BTEC

8:00 43. Sensory interactions within the oral perceptual system. B. G. Green 8:45 44. Odor quality coding and experiencedependent recoding in the human brain. J. Gottfried 9:25 45. Neural coding and integration of multimodal flavor Animal models. J.V.Verhagen 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 46. Convergence of olfaction, taste, somatic sensation, and vision in the orbital cortex of primates. J. L Price 11:00 Panel Discussion.

J. Finley and J. N. Losso, Organizers 8:00 30. Genetic control of color and texture in fruits. G. Hrazdina, D. Zheng 8:20 31. Genetic regulation of carotenoid metabolism during tomato fruit ripening. J. J. Giovannoni 8:40 32. How the antimalarial artemisinin is made in plants. P. S. Covello, K. Teoh, D. R. Polichuk. D. W. Reed, G. Nowak 9:00 Intermission. 9:20 33. Integrated functional genomic stud­ ies of natural product biosynthesis in the model legume, Medicago truncatula. M. Farag, B. Deavours, L. W. Sumner 9:40 34. Plant genomics: Resources for investigating cell wall biosynthesis and fiber development. C. J. Nairn, D. M. Lennon, A. Wood-Jones 10:00 35. The barley coordinated agricultural project: Intersection of genomics, breeding and gene discovery. G. Muehlbauer

Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, ΒΙΟΤ, MEDI, and BTEC Sterling Hendricks Memorial Lectureship Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by FUEL and AGFD MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Section Β BCEC 256 Physicochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Protein-Polysaccharide Interactions on Interfaces Cosponsored by BIOHW Q. Huang, D. J. McClements, and P. L. Dubin, Organizers 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 36. Direct determination of structures of polyelectrolyte-protein complexes by small-angle neutron scattering: From gels to globules. F. Cousin, F. Boue, J. Gummel 8:30 37. Structure, dynamics, and interac­ tions of protein/porysaccharide complexes. Q. Huang 8:55 38. Time-resolved SAXS-studies of the interaction of proteins with polyelectrolyte brushes. M. Ballauff, K. Henzler, S. Rosenfeldt, A. Wittemann, T. Narayanan 9:20 39. Polymer-protein multilayers: Equilib­ rium and dynamics. S. A. Sukhishvili, E. Khariampieva, I. Erel-Unal 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 40. Interactions between proteins and polyelectrolytes: Fundamental studies and use of polypeptide multilayer films to induce crystal growth. V. Ball, J. Hemmerié, M. Michel, J. Voegel 10:25 41. Effect of temperature on the density profile and the reorientational dynamics of proteins in polyelectrolyte brushes. C. Czeslik, O. Hollmann 10:50 42. Biofunctjonalization of materials with polyelectrolyte multilayers. P. Schaaf, J. Voegel, N. Jessel, P. Lavalle, D. Mertz

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

BCEC 255 Advances in Biobased Nanostructures and Nanomaterials Cosponsored by BIOHW P. X. Qi and M. H. Tunick, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:40 47. Protein nanomaterials and their applications. X. S. Xun, X. Mo 2:10 48. Chemically self-assembled protein nanostructures. C. R. Wagner 2:40 49. Bioengineered nanostructures from silk proteins. A. Murphy, O. S. Rabotyagova, R. Juma, P. Cebe, C. C. Perry, D. L. Kaplan 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 50. Design of functional nanostructured materials. A. Joshi, P. Asuri, S. Punyani, J. Dordick, R. S. Kane 3:55 51. DNA-based self-assembly of nano­ structures. H. Yan 4:25 52. Polymeric nanosystems responding to tumor pH. Y. H. Bae Section Β BCEC 256 Physicochemical Aspects of Biopolymers in Food and Nutrition Cosponsored by BIOHW Q. Huang, D. J. McClements, and P. L. Dubin, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 53. Complexation and coacervation of serum albumin and chitosan. P. L Dubin, A. B. Kayitmazer, S. P. Strand 2:00 54. Protein-polysaccharide complexa­ tion to control texture and produce func­ tional ingredients. S. L Turgeon 2:25 55. Gelation of gelatin with sugar sub­ stitutes. S. Gunasekaran, T. Tau 2:50 56. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin on carrageenan surfaces: Effect of carrageenan linear charge density. Y. Un, Q. Huang 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 57. Starch fine structure and form related to nutritional effect. B. R. Hamaker, G. Zhang, Z. Ao, S. Maghaydah 3:55 58. Hydrophobically modified chitosan: Synthesis, characterization and food related applications. T. Wu, S. Zivanovic 4:20 59. Fabrication of chitosan/lipid multilayered films through layer-by-layer approach. X.Wang, Y. Un, Q.Huang

AGFD

Section C

Section Β

BCEC 257A

BCEC 256 ι between Taste, SnteH and

Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide D. S. Mottram, Organizer

P. Breslin, J. V. Leland, T. Hofmann, and W. Meyerhof, Organizers 1:30 61. Murttsensory processing in the gustatory system. S. A. Simon 2:10 62. Roles of Merkel cells in sensory transduction. Ε A. Lumpkin, H. Haeberle 2:50 63. TRPA1 is the primary target of pungent compounds from garlic and mus­ tard. D. M. Bautista, A. Hinman, D. Julius 3:45 64. New developments in the chemistry of cooling compounds. S. M. Furrar, J. P. Slack, S. McCkJSkey, A. T. Daniher, K. Bell, P. Krawec, L Cote, K. Gray 4:25 65. Discovery of taste modulators by means of a molecular sensory science Ί.Τ.Γ Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, andBTEC TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 255

M. Friedman, Organizer, Presiding 8:50 Introductory Remarks. 9:00 77. Review of the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of acrylamide. L M. KamenduKs, J. E. Ktaunkj 9:30 78. Genotoxfcity of gryckjamide in comparison to N-nitroso compounds and interactions of acrylamide with food matrix components. M. Baum, N. Boehm, R. N. Loeppky, S. Thieten, G. Eisenbrand 9:55 79. Molecular mechanisms of neurotox­ icity: Acrylamide targets thiolate sulfhydryls of catalytic triads. R. M. LoPachm Jr. 10:20 Intermission. 10:45 80. Neurotoxic mechanism of acryl­ amide: Correlation of Type-2 alkene-thiol reactivity with parameters derived from quantum mechanical calculations. T.Gavin 11:10 81. Dietary acrylamide and cancer risk estimation on the basis of toxicotogical data M. A. Tomqvtet B. E. Paulsson, A. Vikstrom, F. Granath 11:35 82. Acrylamide intake through diet and human cancer risk. L A. Mucci, K. Wilson Section C BCEC 257A

B. S. Patil, Organizer ι between Taste, Smell and G. Jayaprakasha and K. N. ChkJambara Murthy, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 66. Antimicrobial food packaging mate­ rial based on chitosan coated-paper. Reduction of water sensitivity by chemical modifications of chitosan. N. Bordenave, S. Grelier, V. Coma 8:35 67. Bulk and template-free synthesis of silver nanowires using caffeine at room temperature. M. N. Nadagouda, R. S. Varma 9:00 68. Competitive reactions that control wine oxidation. A. L Waterhouse, R. J. Bias 9:25 69. Stability d the plamajitimicrobial carvacrol in edible tomato/pectin puree films. M. Friedman, C. E. Levin, R. J. Avena-Bustillos, C. W. Oteen, T. H. McHugh 9:50 70. Use of deltatocopherolagainst oxidation of model flavor compounds in medium chaing triglycerides and sunflower oil. S. Lederoq, G. A. Reineccius 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 71.(>)mparativethernfK>analytical study of soybean, sunflower, olive, peanut and linseed oils of Indian origin. R. K. Verma, L Verma, K. Mallick 10:55 72. Identification of aroma compounds in food grade Argan oil. M. Zahar, G. Reineccius, J-P. Schirle-Keller 11:20 73. Process induced changes in resveratrol in peanuts. L L Dean, T.H. Sanders 11:45 74. Response of soil sulphur on trirjcale (X Triticosecale W.) sulphur contents. D.M.Làszlo 12:10 75. The evaluation of silica based self-assembling matrices for flavor encapsulation. S. Krishnan, G. Reineccius 12:35 76. Verification of isotope analysis method by HRGC-MS for the discrimination of citrus essential oils from afferent origins. T. T. Nguyen, M. Sawamura

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/

P. Breslin, J. V. Leland, T. Hofmann, and M. Wolfgang, Organizers 8:00 83. Neural representation of flavor in the human brain. D. M. Small 8:40 84. Experience-dependent odor/taste/ somatosensory interactions. J. Prescott 920 85. Odor-taste integration in espresso coffee. T. E. Acree, A. Chirlertpong, K.J.SieberLE.H.Lavin 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 86. Studying flavor cross modality through combined analyses of flavor stimuli and sensory perception. A.J.Taytor,J.Hort 10:55 87. Learned integration of subthresh­ old odors and tastes: An fMRI perspective. P. Breslin 11:35 Discussion. Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, andBTEC TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 255 Food BtoacrJves and Nutraceuticals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and neann Bnects Symposium Honoring rerskfoon Shahkti A. M. Rimando, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 88. Food btoactives in health promotion and disease risk reduction. F.Shahldl 1:40 89. Chemopreventjve potential of some anti-inflammatory and antioxidative spice ingredients. Y-J. Surh 2:00 90. Oxidative reaction of pofyphenolic. compounds in food. C. T. Ho, S. Sang 2:20 91. Georgia pecans: Examination of their nutritional and functional attributes. R. B. Pegg, R. Amarowicz, E-C. Shin, R. R. Eitenmiller

2:40 Intermission. 2:55 92. Challenges in the isolation and identification of key aroma components of complex functional foods. K. Cadwalteder, P. R. Lozano, H. Kim 3:15 93. Cranberry phytochemicals: Isolation, structure elucidation, and their anticancer activity. R. H. Uu 3:35 94. Fish oil processing, stabilization and concentration, for delivery into foods. C. J. Barrow 3:55 95. Healthy eating for life with omega-3 functional foods. S. Spurvey 4:15 96. Hydroryzed flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L) proteins and their putative biological activities. H. K. Marambe, P. J. Shand, J. P. D. Wanasundara Section Β BCEC 256 Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide M. Friedman, Organizer D. S. Mottram, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 97. Inhtortton of lop proteins and not DNA adducts drive acrylamide risk assessment. M. A. Friedman, D.W. Sickles 1:55 98. Acrylamide metabolism, elimination kinetics and hemoglobin adducts. T. R. Fennell, M. A. Friedman 2:20 99. PBPK/PD modeling of acrylamide: Integration of kinetic and bkxnarker data for use in risk assessment. D. R. Doerge 2:45 Intermission. 3:10 100. Cross-sectional study on acryl­ amide exposure, using hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers: Results from the EPIC study. H. W. Vesper, N. Slimani, G. Hallmans, A. Tjenneland, U. Stromberg 3:35 101. Acrylamide adduction with bfomacromotecules at environmental dose levels and its inhibition studied by accelerator mass spectrometry. H. Sun, Q. Xie, Y. Liu, Y. Uu, X. Ding, D. Fu, K. Uu 4:00 102. Acrylamide: Human metabolism and exposure. J. Angerer Section C BCEC 257A Thermal Generation of Flavors and

C. T. Ho, Organizer S. Raghavan and R. J. McGorrin, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 103. Thermal generation of flavors and off-flavors: An overview. R. J. McGorrin 1:30 104. What makes coffee taste that bitter? T. Hofmann, O. Frank, S. Blumberg, C. Kunert, G. Zehentbauer 1:55 105. Key aroma compounds in cooked and deep-fried onions. P. Schieberie, M. Granvogl 2:20 Intermission. 2:35 106. Comparison of isolation methods used in conjunction with GC-NPD for analysis of volatile Maillard reaction prod­ ucts. M. J. Morello, B. Vastano, S. Feng 3:00 107. Analyticaltechniquesin thermally generated flavors and off-flavors. S. Raghavan, C.T. Ho 3:25 108. klentification of polar compounds in a range of cooked meat and fish. J. K. Parker, M. Adamou, S. J. Gough, D.S. Mottram 3:50 60.2, 5-Diketopiperazines (cyclic dipeptides) in various foods: klentification, synthesis, and sensory evaluation. M.Z. Chen, N.C. Da Costa, M.Dewis, LReiber, LTrinnaman

Section D BCEC Exhibit HaH-B2 General Posters B. Patil, G. Jayaprakasha, and K. N. ChkJambara Murthy, Organizers 1:00-3:00 109. Determination of acrylamide in some Caribbean foods by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. G-A. Bent, P. Maragh, T. Dasgupta 110. Fatty acid composition and tocopherol content of pumpkin seed oil. D. G. Stevenson, F. J. Eller, L Wang, J. L Jane, T. Wang, G. E. Inglett 111. Progress in research on the environmen­ tal behaviors of aluminum in plant rizosphere. P.Wang, S.BI 112. A novel sweet mogroside from Siraitia grosvenorii. Z. Jia, X. Yang 113. Effect of damaged starch in wheat flour on Chinese noodle quality. Q. Lu, L Li, S. Guo, B. U, G. Uu 114. Effect of gluten in wheat flour on noodle quality. Q. Lu, L U, S. Guo, B. U, G. Uu 115. Effect of high-pressure microfluioization on the functional properties of soy protein isolate. Z. Tu, J. Wang, C. Uu, R. Ruan 116. Effect of surfactants on aggregation of Alzheimer Amyloid 13(1-40) peptide. Y.Wang, M.Cao 117. Effect of ultrasonic treatment on the rheotogical property of wheat gluten. LZnao,G.Uu, L L i , B.Li 118. Study on supercritical C02 extraction of flavonokJs in Eucommia ulmoktes leaves. F. Guiming ST., W. Yin, Ζ Shuo, Z. Zuowei 119. Thermal degradation of flavor compo­ nents in dentrifices. M. S. Staniforth 120. Effect of cold storage and packaging material on the major aroma components of sweet cream butter. P. R. Lozano, E. R. Miracle, A. J. Krause, M. Drake, K. R. Cadwallader 121. Pressure enhanced solvent extraction of naturally occurring materials on both the Laboratory and Pilot-scale. K. J. James 122. A novelfluorescentprobe for Hg2+ containing in food. S. Sun, T. Zhang, J. Fan, X. Peng 123. An improvement on current DPPH anti­ oxidant capacity assays. C. L Wommack, W.LWhaley 124. Analysis of 6-gingerol, 6-shogaol, and 6-gingerdiol in ginger rhizome powder and in physiological fluids by HPLC, GC/MS, and LC/MS. H. A. Schwertner, S. Valtier, M. L Edwards, S. B. Kong 125. Analysis of aroma components of Tibet Ghee by GC-MS. Y. Shi, W. Zheng, H. Xtong, J. U, W.Zhao 126. Analysis of furan in human blood using solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS). Y-K. Lee, T-K. Kim, S. J. Lee, K-G.Lee 127. Analysis of sulfonamide and quinotone antibiotic residues in milk using microbial assays and high performance liquid chro­ matography (HPLC). J-B. Lee, Y-M. Back, J-Y. Her, K-G. Lee 128. Analysis of usnic acid from Usnea sp. dispersed in rodent diet by HPLC. R. L Evans, P. H. Siitonen 129. Antidepressant and anti-stress activity of GC-MS characterized lipophilic extracts of Ginkgo bitoba leaves. S. S. Kalkunte, A.P.Singh, F.C.Chaves, T. J. Gianfagna, V. S. Pundir, A. K. Jaiswal, N. Vorsa, S. Sharma 130. Antioxidant and neuroprotective activity of Pueraria miriflca extracts against gluta­ mate toxicity in neuronal cells. A. Sucontphunt, S. D. Dimitrijevich, U. Nimmannit, W. De-Eknamkul, R. W. Gracy 131. Antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activities of Brown Seed Coated Soybean (Glycine max L). T. J. Ha, N. S. Kang, D-Y. Suh, S-H. Shin, J-D. Seong, l-Y. Baek, K-Y. Park 132. Antioxidants from Berberis vulgaris (Barberry). H. Tomosaka, H. Chai, Y-W. Chin, A. A. Salim, W. J. Keller, A. D. Kinghom

Τ ί1 C M - 7

Join the American Chemical Society's

wmrnrmmmsm®w!MigMmMimtÉM® at the

34th ACb t-ail National Meeting

BOSTON, MA AUGUST 19-23, 2007

SUNDAY, AUGUST 19

MONDAY, AUGUST 20

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21

CMA Communications Subcommittee Meeting

Many Faces of Chemistry: ACS Scholars' Contribution to the Chemical Sciences

Many Faces of Chemistry: The Role of Two-Year Colleges in Changing the Face of Chemistry

&00AM-1040AM

INDEPENDENCE W E S T SHERATON BOSTON CMA Education Subcommittee Meeting fcOOAM-lfcOOAM BERKELEY B— SHERATON BOSTON

CMA Local Section/Divisions/ Regional Meeting Interactions Subcommittee Meeting &00ΑΜ-10Λ0ΑΜ FAIRFAX B—SHERATON BOSTON

CMA Executive Session 12:00 PM-4.-00 PM INDEPENDENCE WESTSHERATON BOSTON

The Many Faces of Chemistry: International Opportunities for Chemists 1:00 P M - 2:10 PM BERKELEY A/B, ORALSHERATON BOSTON Sponsor: YCC Cosponsors: CMA and WCC

CMA Open Meeting 4.-00 P M - 5:00 PM INDEPENDENCE EASTSHERATON BOSTON

CMA Networking Social Hour and ACS Scholars Reunion &ΟΟΡΜ-&ΟΟΡΜ INDEPENDENCE WESTSHERATON BOSTON Sponsor Committee on Minority Affairs

& 3 0 A M - 1 1 : 3 0 AM LIBERTY A/&-SHERATON BOSTON Sponsor Committee on Minority Affairs

& 3 0 A M - 1 1 : 3 0 AM LIBERTY A/B—SHERATON BOSTON SponsorCMA Cosponsors: PROF, WCC and YCC

Many Faces of Chemistry: The Merck Index Women in Chemistry Award Symposium

Henry Hill Award Recipient Howard Peters—An Alternative Career of Service to the Profession

MOAM-11:50 AM 9:15 A M - 1 1 5 0 AM BEACON G, ORAL—SHERATON BOSTON REVERE, ORAL—WESTIN BOSTON WATERFRONT Sponsor WCC Cosponsors: CHED, PROF and CMA Sponsor PROF Cosponsors: CHAL, CEPA and CMA

Henry Hill Award Recipients Ted & Arlene Light— Careers of Service to the Profession

CMA Luncheon/Reception 11:30 A M - 1 : 3 0 PM BALLROOM D—SHERATON BOSTON Ticket #SE07/$50 Sponsor Committee on MinorityAffairs

Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront

2HW P M - 4 : 1 0 PM BEACON G, ORAL—SHERATON BOSTON Sponsor PROF Cosponsors: CEPA and CMA

Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry

1:30 P M - 4 3 0 PM

2:10 P M - 4 2 0 PM BACK BAY BALLROOM B, ORALSHERATON BOSTON Sponsor WCC Cosponsors: CWD, CTA, PROF, CMA, YCC and PRES

REVERE, ORAL—WESTIN BOSTON WATERFRONT Sponsor WCC Cosponsors: BIOL, INOR, CMA and PRES

20th Anniversary of National Chemistry Week: The Many Faces of Chemistry 130PM-4&5PM PLAZA B, ORAL—SEAPORT Sponsor CCA Cosponsors: CTA, CMA and PRES

Many Faces of Chemistry: Stories from ACS Scholars

Joint Subcommittee on Diversity Reception 5:00 P M - £ 3 0 PM BACK BAY BALLROOM D—SHERATON BOSTON HOTEL, Sponsored by CMA, CTA, CMA, and WCC

2:00 PM-4.-00 PM LIBERTY A/B—SHERATON BOSTON SponsorCMA Cosponsors: WCC and YCC

Academic Employment Initiative IfcOOPM-lfcOOPM EXHIBIT HALL C, SCI-MIX— BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER SponsorAEI Cosponsors: CWD, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA CPT, SOCED, WCC and PRES

AnMrtcen Gfi#intcM Society

nUMr

Meet Roald Hoffmann Professor Hoffmann, winner of the 1981 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, the 1983 National Medal of Science, and the 1990 Priestley Medal will be reading a selection of his poetry at the C&EN/ACS Publications booth in Boston. A limited number of autographed commemorative booklets containing a selection of his poems will be available.

Monday, August 2 0 , 2 0 0 7 11:00 a.m. Booth 4 5 2 7

C&EN C H E M I C A L & E N G I N E E R I N G NEWS

ACS National Meeting Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

lilliU

BiiH

AGFD 133. Antiplatelet constituents from Artocarpus communis. J-R. Weng, S-C. Chan, Y-H. Lu, O N . Un 134. Aroma active sulfur volatiles in raw and roasted Arabica coffee beans. K. Mahattanatawee, P. Ruiz Pérez-Cacho, Ν. Rattanapanone, R. L Rouseff 135. Bitter peptides from enzymatically-produced hydrolysates of commercial shrimp processing waste. I. W. Y. Cheung, E. C. Y. Li-Chan 136. Comparison of calcium-induced firmness in mushroom, fruit and vegetable by in vitro binding. X. Deng, S. Zivanovic, C. E. Sams, R. B. Beelman 137. Composition of forage and grain from second generation insect-protected com MON 89034 is equivalent to that of con­ ventional com. S. M. Drury, T. L Reynolds, W. P. Ridley 138. Withdrawn. 139. Correlation of urinary furan with plasma 7-glutamyltranspeptidase levels in healthy men and women. H. J. Jun, T-K. Kim, Y-K. Lee, S. J. Lee, K-G. Lee 140. Cranberry proantnocyanidins sensitize ovarian cancer cells to Platinum Drug. A. P. Singh, R. K. Singh, S. S. Kalkunte, R. Nussbaum, K. Kim, H. Jin, M. S. Tones, LBrard, N.Vorsa 141. Deterioration in quality of "Yuzu" essen­ tial oil according to long preservation and development of new preservation method of the oil. T. Kashiwagi, M. Sawamura, H.Sakamoto 142. Determination of authenticity of sake by 13C/12C isotope ratio analysis. V. R. Klnton, J. Ammann 143. Dihydrolipoic acid inhibits tetrachlorohydroquinone-induced tumor promotion through prevention of oxidative damage. S-Y. Ho, M-H. Pan, Y-J. Wang 144. Effect of different amylase on the struc­ ture of cornstarch granules. Q. Huang, X.Fu 145. Effect of germination on blue com phe­ nolic compounds. H. Hernandez-Sanchez, D. Nava-Arenas 146. Effect of microwave radiation on theo­ logical properties of waxy com starch pastes. L Chen, F.Zou, X . U . L U 147. Effect of the decontamination process on the nutritional quality of fresh-cut veg­ etables. I. V. T. J. Vandekinderen, J. Van Camp, F. Devlieghere, P. Ragaert, J. Debevere, B. De Meutenaer 148. Effects of isoflavone position in SDS micelles on lipkJ-phase antioxidant activity. C. L Wommack, J. D. Rummel, N. Kastrapeli, W. L Whaley 149. Electrospun nanofibers of Chrtosan blends. K. Desal, K. Kit 150. Granule structure and paste properties of waxy potato starch. F. Luo, Q. Huang 151. Hyroxypropylation and crosslinking modification effects on the stability of potato starch. L U, Q. Huang, X. Fu 152. Identification of the chemical compo­ nents in the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma atrum. M. Shen, M. Xie, S. Nie 153. Identification of the unusual hexadecatrienoic acid starter unit for the biosynthe­ sis of the allelochemical sorgoleone. A. M. Rimando, Z. Pan, S. R. Baerson 154. In vitro antioxidant activity of different extracts of Cyclocarya paliurus (Batal.) Iljinsk. C. Dong, M. Xie, C. U, S. Nie 155. Influence of ecological factors on immune system of large homed livestock. A.O.Urazov 156. Inter-laboratory trial of new detection procedure for irradiated spices using thermal luminescence (TL method). M. Miyahara, E. Sugi, H. Sunaga, T.Maitani 157. Isoflavone aglycone contents in different parts of soy plant. I-Y. Baek, J. H. Lee, J-M. Ko, H-T. Kim, W-Y. Han, N. S. Kang, K-Y.Park 158. Isolation and determination of anthocyanins from Black Seed Coated Soybean (Glycine max L) and their antioxidant activities. T. J. Ha, N. S. Kang, D-Y. Suh, S-H. Shin, J-D. Seong, S-G. Lim, S-O. Shin, K-Y. Park 159. Kinetic-catalytic determination of iron with a new reaction system and its appli­ cation to certain agricultural products. Q-L Feng, L Feng

3-TECH

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 160. Kinetics and mechanism of effectordriven oxyhalogen reactions for the inactivation of foodborne microorganisms by chlorine dioxide. C. Doona, F. Feeherry, K. Kustin, M. A. Curtin, J. Barcus 161. Lipoxygenase-1 inhibitory activity of polyphenol» acids and acyglycerylgalactosides from Perilla frutescens. N. S. Kang, T. J. Ha, J. H. Lee, C-S. Jung, M-H. Lee, D-Y. Suh, J-D. Seong, K-Y. Park 162. Mechanism of action of menthone in ameliorating oral cavity malodor caused by consumption of garlic. G. Carrasco, K. Cadwallader 163. Mutation of Acetobacter xylinum for high-yield production of bacterial cellulose. F. Hong, K. Y. Qiu 164. Novel antioxRJative and angtotensin-lconverting enzyme inhibitory peptides from Pacific hake (Merlucdus productus) fish protein hydrolysates. A. G. P. Samaranayaka, C. Hu, D. D. Kftts, E. C. Y. Li-Chan 165. Optimization the activity of immobilized cellulase in the three-phase magnetically fluidized bed reactor. B. U, L Kou, S. Guo, L U 166. Polyphenols and antioxidant capacity of coffee fruits Arabica. Β. V. Nemzer, V. Miljkovic, S. Stanley, J. V. Drunnen 167. Withdrawn. 168. Radical scavenging activity of coumarin derivatives from Angelica dahurica. K. C. Jang, S. C. Kim, Ε. Υ. Song, N. Y. Ro, D. Y. Moon, Κ. Η. Kang, Κ. Η. Park 169. Resveratro^-Jactoglobulin interaction studied by circular dichroism and fluores­ cence. L Liang, M. Subirade 170. RheoJogical behaviors of cloud carrot juices. J. He, H. Huang, W. Fan, Z. Tu 171. Rheotogy of extruded whey protein isolate. M. H. Tunlck, C. I. Onwulata 172. Some properties of a glycoprotein puri­ fied from green tea (Camellia sinensis). S. Nie. M. Xie, Ζ. Fu 173. Starch sodium octenylsuccinate as wall material for encapsulation of lemon oil. Q. Huang, L U, F. Luo 174. Structure and targeting controlled-release property of resistant starch film. X. U, L Chen, L U 175. Study on preparation and emulsifying properties of rice residues protein-malt dextrin. J. Wu, W. Zheng, W. Zhao, J-H. U, M.Xie 176. Study on the bactericidal effects of longan seed extracts. C. Un, R. Huang, Q. Deng 177. Surface properties of chitosan/PEO blend films as affected by film preparation method. J. U, S. Zivanovic, M. Davidson, K.Kit 178. Susceptibility of native and denatured bovine hemoglobins to pepsinolysis: Identi­ fication and release kinetics of peptides. R. Su, W. Qi, Z. He 179. Synthesis of a dimethylfuran-containing macrolide insect pheromone. R.J.PetrosW, R.J.Bartelt 180. Taste preference forflavonokJlevels amongst smokers and nonsmokers before and after oxidative insult C. L Wommack 181. Time-dependent nature in pancreatic hydrolysis of casein micelles: Identification and release kinetics of peptides. W. Qi, R. Su, Z. He 182. Trypsin inhibitor activity and isoflavones in soymilk processed by different methods. S. Yuan, S. K. C. Chang, Z. Uu, B. Xu 183. Ultrasound effects on the structure and chemical reactivity of cornstarch granules. L U, Q. Huang. X. Fu

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

184. Use of DDGS as a biocomposite layered fabrication material. B. J. Gilbes, F. T. Halaweish, J. Visser, Κ. Rosentrater 185. Volatile composition of Korean soybean pastes using simultaneous distillation and extraction (SDE) and headspace solidphase microextraction (HS-SPME). S-J. Lee, E-H. Kim. S-Y. Choi

10:40 198. Interactions of acryiamide with other food constituents. M. Granvogl, L Latzer, P. Koehler, P. Schieberle 11:05 199. Formation of acryiamide during roasting of coffee. M. Murkovic 11:30 200. Contribution of oxidized lipids to the formation of acryiamide in thermally processed foods. F. J. Hidalgo, R.Zamora

Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD. BIOL. BIOT. MEDI. andBTEC

Section C

TUESDAY EVENING Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition

BCEC 257A

Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by AGFD

Thermal Generation of Flavors and Off-flavors Precursors and Model Reactions

WEDNESDAY MORNING

R. J. McGorrin, Organizer

Section A BCEC 255

S. Raghavan and C. T. Ho, Organizers, Presiding

Food Bioacuves and NutraceutJcals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and

C-T. Ho, Organizer F. Shahidi and R. H. Liu, Organizers, 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 186. Development and testing of an anti-inflammatory formulation based on nutragenomics. J. W. Fintey 8:25 187. "Green" high-pressure fluid extrac­ tion of health-beneficial compounds from Swedish byproducts and wastes. M. Co, P. Koskel, C. Turner 8:45 188. Anthocyanin extraction with super­ critical C02 from two Colombian tropical fruits. C. Osorto, J. Barrios, B. Acevedo, F. Parada, M. L Gonzàlez-Miret, F. J. Heredia, A. L Morales 9:05 Intermission. 9:20 189. Investigating the interactions of black tea thearubigins with bovine serum albumin using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. M. Chitpan, Q. Huang, C-T. Ho 9:40 190. LC/MS determination of phytosterote in NIST standard reference materials comprised of saw palmetto. M. Bedner, L C. Sander, K. S. Sharpless 10:00 191. Effect of pH, sugar and phenolic compounds on the color and antioxidant capacity of caramel. P-J. Tsai, C-C. Liu, T-Y.Yu.CT. Ho 10:20 192. Effect of soaking, cooking and steaming on antioxidant properties of cool season food legumes. B. Xu. S. K. Chang 10:40 193. Vitamin C protection against aluminum stress. E. S. Shaker. H. M. Helmy

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 201. Molecular studies on the storageinduced degradation of odor-active thiols in coffee beverages. C. MOIIer, T. Hofmann 8:25 202. Free amino acids and dipeptides in meat as precursors of thermally gener­ ated aroma. M. J. Oruna-Concha, D. S. Mottram 8:45 203. Precursors of flavor formation in meat and yeast extract. L J. Farmer, M. Aliani, K. Mahadevan, T. D. Hagan, J. T. Kennedy 9:05 204. Importance of sulfur amino acids in the formation of aroma volatiles in cooked salmon. L Methven, D. S. Mottram 9:25 Intermission. 9:45 205. Formation of volatile components from the thermal interactions of theanine with reducing sugars. S. Y. Kim, Y-S. Kim 10:05 206. Identification of key thermallyderived odorants in cooked chicken liver. S. Cook, K. Cadwallader, H. Kim 10:25 207. Thermal generation of tomato flavor compounds. M. Sucan, G. F. Russell 10:45 208. Thermal generation of volatile compounds from reactions of cysteine, N-acetylcysteine or S-methylcysteine with glucose or pyruvaktehyde. Y. Wang, S. Raghavan, C-T. Ho WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 255 Food Btoactives and NutraceutJcals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and

Overview

Section Β

C-T. Ho, Organizer

BCEC 256

F. Shahidi and R. H. Liu, Organizers, Presiding

Chemistry and Toxicology of Acryiamide

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 209. Procyanidins: Effects of source and extrusion conditions on structure, degradation and absorption/metabolism. R. L Prior, L Howard, L. Gu, A. Hager, L Rooney 1:30 210. A comparison of the antioxidant components in commercial organic and conventional marinara pasta sauce. Α. E. Mitchell. E. Koh. K. M. S. Wimalasiri. E. N. C. Renaud 1:55 211. Prevention of cancer with fruit phytochemicals. R. H. Uu 2:20 Intermission. 2:40 21Ζ The multiple beneficial properties of fruits and vegetables in brain aging: Turning back the ravages of time. J. A. Joseph. B. Shukitt-Hale, D. Fisher 3:05 213. Polyphenols in nuts, cereals, pasta and snacks: Unexpected sources of anti­ oxidants with potential health properties. J. A. Vinson, Y. Cai, J. Z. Marchegiani 3:30 214. Cholesterol-lowering nutraceuticals and functional foods. Z-Y. Chen

D. S. Mottram, Organizer P. Schieberle, Presiding 8:30 194. The Maillard reaction and its role in the formation of acryiamide in foods. D. S. Mottram. B. Wedzicha 9:00 195. Heat and pH induced generation of acryiamide from N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1yl^'-aminopropionamide. V. A. Yaylayan. C. P. Locas 9:30 196. Modeling the kinetics of the forma­ tion and fate of acryiamide in food. B. Wedzicha, J. Mojtea Lazaro. G. KoutskJis, J. S. Elmore 9:50 Intermission. 10:15 197. Acryiamide formation under mild conditions: The promoting effect of ammo­ nium bicarbonate and detection of acryi­ amide in dried fruit T. M. Amrein, L Andres, G. G. Manzardo, F. Escher, R.Amado

AGFD/AGRO Section Β BCEC 256 Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide D. S. Mottram, Organizer M. Friedman, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 215. Human exposure to acrylamide: A brief history. D. E. Marroni 1:55 216. Extraction of acrylamide from foods. EV.Petersson 2:20 217. Analysis of evaporated acrylamide from food products and biological materi­ als. L S. Eriksson, P. Karlsson, M. A. Tomqvist 2:45 Intermission. 3:10 218. Acrylamide analysis in a complex matrix. T. Shibamoto 3:35 219. Heat derived toxicants in f o o d somefindingsof a collaborative European research project K. I. Skog 4:00 220. Rapid screening of acrylamide formation in a model matrix reactor under different compositional and processing conditions. G. A. Channell, A. J. Taylor

8:45 230. Interactions of functional foods and age-related macular degeneration. J.N.Losso 9:05 Intermission. 9:25 231. Inhibitory effects of chitooligosaccharides on tumor growth and metastasis. Y-J. Wang, K-T. Shen, Y-S. Ho 9:45 232. Reactive carbonyl species and tea components: Dicarbonyl compounds and 5-(hydroxymethyt)-2-furfural in beverages containing high fructose com syrup. C-Y. Lo, S. U, Y. Wang, C-T. Ho 10:05 233. Amadori compounds may have cancer prevention potential. V. V. Mosslne, T. P. Mawhinney 10:25 234. The source and biological activity of hydroxylated polymethoxyfiavones. S. U, C-Y. Lo, M-H. Pan, I. N. Sergeev, S. Dushenkov, C-T. Ho Section Β BCEC 256

A. J. Taylor, Presiding 8:30 235. Risk-benefit assessment of foods containing heat-induced carcinogens. J.R.Coughlin 9:00 236. Dietary exposure estimates for acrylamide intake. C. Mills, C. Tlustos, R. Evans, W. Matthews 237. Withdrawn. 9:25 Intermission. 9:50 238. Overview of possible approaches to reducing the acrylamide content of the diet M. Friedman 10:20 239. European regulatory perspective on the acrylamide issue. W. Matthews 10:45 240. The acrylamide "Toolbox" approach of the European Food & Drink Federation (CIAA). R. H. Stadler 11:10 241. Agronomic and genetic approachestoreducingacrylamide precur­ sors in wheat and potato. N. G. Halford, N. Muttucumaru, T. Curtis, P. R. Shewry, M. A. Parry, J. S. Elmore, D. S. Mottram

R. J. McGorrin and C. T. Ho, Organizers, 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 221. Monitoring the effect of process conditions on Maillard products and inter­ mediates using a film reactor coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry. G. A. Channell, A. J. Taylor 1:30 222. Role of hydroxycinnamic acids on the generation of Maillardreactionflavor compounds in whole grain wheat bread. M. R. Moskowitz, D. G. Peterson 1:55 223. Thermal generation of process contaminants: Furan, chbropropanols, acrylamide, and other undesired vinylogous compounds. R. H. Stadler 2:20 Intermission. 2:40 224. Impact of roasting process and cooling method on flavor formation and flavor stability of coffee. J. Baggenstoes, R. Kaegi, L Poisson, R. Perren, F. Escher 3:05 225. Thermal generation of volatile off-aroma compounds under high hydro­ static pressure. M. Qian, P. Vazquez-Landaverde 3:30 226. Effects of naturally occurring phenolic compounds in coffee on the formation of Maillard aromas. Y. Wang, C-T.Ho 3:55 227. Flavor generation from cooked beef bone marrow at high moisture condi­ tion. B. Choudhury, S. Raghavan, H. Daun, C-T. Ho THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 255 Food Bioactives and Nutraceutteals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and Health Effects R. H. Liu, Organizer F. Shahidi and C-T. Ho, Organizers, 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 228. Inhibitory effect of phenolic acids on 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and its molecu­ lar mechanism. G-C. Yen, C-L Hsu 8:25 229. Effect of wheat antioxidants on oxygen diffusion-concentration products in liposomes and its cholesterol-lowering property. L Yu, Z. Cheng, H. Zhou, J-J.Yin

BCEC 256 Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide M. Friedman, Organizer D. S. Mottram, Organizer, Presiding

D. S. Mottram and M. Friedman, Organizers

BCEC 257A

S. Raghavan, Organizer

Section Β

Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide

Section C

Off-flavors Processing Effect

3:00 247. Pomegranate fractions may pre­ vent prostate cancer. K. Chidambara Murthy, J. R. Patil, G. Jayaprakasha, B. Patil 3:20 248. Isolation and characterization of twoflavonoidsfrom Sophora flavescens roots, and their antiproliferative and COX-2 inhibitory properties. Z. Cheng, H. Zhou, LYu 3:40 249. Kagzi lime (Citrus aurantJfolia Swingle) volatile oil: A potential source for colon cancer prevention. J. R. Patil, G. Jayaprakasha, Κ. Ν. Chidambara Murthy, S. E. Tichy, M. B. Chetti, B. S. Patil

Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by AGFD andBTEC THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 255

1:30 250. The effects of sulfur nutrition on acrylamide and aroma compounds in cooked wheat and potato. J. S. Elmore, N. Muttucumaru, N. G. Halford, M. A. Parry, D. S. Mottram 1:55 251. Raw material variability: Atoolto minimize acrylamideformationin baked cereal products? C. G. Hamlet, P. A. Sadd, L Liang 2:20 252. Effectiveness of methods for reducing acrylamide in bakery products. P. A. Sadd, C.G.Hamlet 2:45 Intermission. 3:10 253. Simulation of acrylamide formation in French fries and potential strategies for mitigation. V. Gôkmen, T. K. Palazogju 3:35 254. Chemical pretreatments of potato products: Mechanisms of acrylamide mitigation and effects on the sensorial quality. F. Mestdagh, J. Maertens, T. De Wilde, T. Cucu, K. Delporte, C. Van Peteghem, B. De Meulenaer 4:00 255. Mitigation and resulting reductions in the dietary exposuretoacrylamide. P. Boon, J. D. van Klaveren 4:25 Concluding Remarks. Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition Sensory Issues in Food Packaging Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by AGFD andBTEC

AGRO

Food Bioactives and Nutraceutteals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and

Division of Agrochemicals

Cancer Prevention and AntHnflammatJon

J. J. Johnston, Program Chair

8:40 Introductory Remarks. 8:45 1. Application of immunoassay in agricultural biotechnology. G. Shan 9:10 2. Molecular breeding of medicinal plant using single chain Fv gene. Y. Shoyama, W. Putalun, H. Tanaka 9:35 3. Evaluation of a high-throughput magnetic-particle triclosan immunoassay andresultsof their application for continental waters monitoring in the Mediterranean area, M. Farre, F. Rubio, D. Asperger, S. Lacorte, M. Petrovic, W. L Sbetver, D. Barcelo 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 4. Use of EUSAtoaid management of the invasive gall wasp, Quadrasticus erythrinae Kim on native and landscape trees, Erythrina spp. Q. X. U, T. Xu, C. Jacobsen, A. H. Hara 10:45 5. Development of sensitive immunoassay formats for algal toxins. F. Rubio, L Kamp, J. Church, R. Slawecki 11:10 6. Immunoassays and immunoaffinity purification for persistent organic pollutants. J. C. Chuang, J. M. Van Emon 11:35 7. Aprjlication and validation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers immunoassay for environmental and food matrices. W.LSherver, F. Rubio 12:00 Concluding Remarks. Section Β BCEC 259B Chemistry J. J. Johnston and D. Smith, Organizers T. A. Wehner, Organizer, Presiding 8:55 Introductory Remarks. 9:00 8. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of firocoxib in horses after oral administration. V. Kvatomick, M. Pollmeier, P. D. Hanson, J. B. Fischer 9:20 9. Tissue residue depletion of firocoxib in horses after oral administration. V. Kvatomick, B. KunkJe, A. Khunachak 9:40 10. Distribution and residues of orally administered 2,4,6-trinitro-14C-toluene in ruminating sheep. D. J. Smith, A. M. Craig, J. M. Duringer, R. L Chaney 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 11. Determination of chlorophacinone in prairie dogs by microwave extraction and ion-pairing reversed-phase high per­ formance liquid chromatography with confirmation by HPLC/MS. T. M. Primus, C. R. Wermager, J. J. Johnston 10:40 12. Determination of organochlorine pesticide residues from eggs and liver. D. A. GokJade, D. L Griffin, J. J. Johnston 11:00 13. Analysis of nitrofuran residues in shrimp, channel catfish, and milk using liquid chranatography-tandern mass spectrometry. P-S. Chu, M. I. Lopez, A. Abraham, K. R. El Said, S. M. Plakas

F. Shahidi, Organizer C-T. Ho and R. H. Liu, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 242. Acylation as an approach to increase the bioavailability and enhance the cancer preventive effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate. S. Sang, J. D. Lambert, C-T. Ho, C.S. Yang 1:25 243. Potential of crtrus limonoids in pancreatic cancer prevention. K.N. Chidambara Murthy, G. Jayaprakasha, S. H. Safe, B. S. PatJI 1:45 244. Volatile oil from Sour oranges (Citrus aurantjum L) has potential benefit in colon cancer prevention. G. Jayaprakasha, K. N. Chidambara Murthy, S. E. Tichy, B. S. Patil 2:05 245. Studies on the molecular mecha­ nisms of Phloretin-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell. C-H. Wu, Y-S. Ho 2:25 Intermission. 2:40 246. Polymethoxyflavonokte (PMFs) suppressed TPA-induced up-expression of iNOS and COX-2 and tumor promotion in mice. M-H. Pan, OS. Lai, Y-J. Wang, C-Y. Lo, S. U, C-T. Ho

SOCIAL EVENTS:

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

AGRO Awarde/Boctal Banquet (6:00-ft30 PM): Tue

Section A

(12:15-1:15 PM): Tue

BCEC 259A

3UMMIIU HenUilLlLi kwmu LSLUIIS

Reception (11:30-1:30 PM): Mon Food Safety Applications n u e · & Brews (5:00-6:30 PM): Wed W. L Snelver and J. Van Emon, Organizers (5:30-10 PM): Sun SUNDAY MORNING Section A

1:50 Introductory Remarks. 1:55 14. From biosensors to dip-sticks, immunochemical based methods are being employed in every aspect of food protection. T. A. Grace

BCEC 259A Immunochemistry Biotechnology & Environmental

W. L Sherver and J. Van Emon, Organizers

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Ί'ί:α-ΐ-9

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGRO 2:20 15. Immunochemicaltestsforthe deter­ mination of nitrofuran metabolites. M. Franek, M. Vass, I. Diblikova, K.Hruska 2:45 16. Preparation of antibodies and devel­ opments of EUSA test kitsfordrugs used in animal husbandry. R. Xi, S. Lu, Y. Zhang, C. Zhao, W.Uu 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 17. Red fluorescent dyes for immuno­ chemical detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin Α. Μ. Β. Medina 3:55 18. Cloning, expression, and character­ ization of recombinant antibodies with affinity for deoxynivalenol and related mycotoxins. P. J. Doyle, M. Arbabi-Ghahroudi, N. Gaudette, G. Furzer, M. E. Savard, S. C. Gleddie, H. Tong-Sevinc, T. Hirama, C. R. MacKenzle, J. C. Hall 4:20 19. Comparison of the skerritt and R5 antibodies in gluten detection by EUSA. B.W.Ritter, LrCAIIred 4:45 Concluding Remarks. Section Β BCEC 259B

Chemistry J. J. Johnston and T. A. Wehner, Organizers D. Smith, Organizer, Presiding 1:45 Introductory Remarks. 1:50 20. Use of crop protection product global regulatory magnitude and decline of residue data on produce for residue pre­ diction purposes. C. M. Kennedy, S. F. McEuen, J. J. Anderson 2:10 21. Methods for measuring worker exposure to pesticides during seed treat­ ment. M. E. KroteM, J. R. Hudson, T.J. Gould 2:30 22. Influence of azinphos-methyl metabolites in apples on orgaxttphosphate pesticide exposure estimates. A. H. Ackerman, K. A. Anderson 2:50 23. Possibility of groundwater contami­ nation by endosulfan leaching in different types of soils. T.Jindal 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 24. Mechanistic studies of formetanate hydrochloride decomposition under aquatic conditions. C. N. Muhoro, C. B. DrvHo, S.Masoudi 3:50 25. Fate of methyl parathfon in natural sulfkJic water. X. Guo, U. Jans 4:10 26. CataboKc network and protein profiles of Mycobaterium sp JS19b1 during degradation of aromatics. Q. X. U, Y-S. Keum, J-S. Seo, S-E. Lee 4:30 Concluding Remarks. BioFuels: Biodiesel Chemistry and Implementation Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by AGRO MONDAY MORNING

Section Β BCEC Exhibit Han—C Agroc hemic al Education Awards For Graduate Student Travd

J. J. Johnston, Presiding 8:00-11:00 28. Molecular-level interactions of tetracycline with oligomers of a model humus constitu­ ent and soil organic matter. P. Kulshrestha, R. F. Giese Jr., T.D.Wood 29. Method development for multiresidue pesticide extraction from natural and processed foods. R. E. Hunter Jr., A. Riederer, P. B. Ryan 30. Molecular cloning of sodium channel and identification of point mutations putatlvefy associated with fenpropathrin resistance in Tetranychus urticae. D. H. Kwon, B. R. Choi, S. W. Lee, Η. Μ. Park, J. M. Clark, S. Lee 31. Degradation of sulfonamides in aqueous solution by membrane anodic Fenton treatment K. Neafsey, A. T. Lemley 32. Kinetics of carbaryl degradation by anodic Fenton treatment in a humic acid amended soil slurry. P. Ye, A. T. Lemley 33. Assessing pesticide exposure from treated turf. J. J. Doherty, R. A. Putnam, J. M. Clark 34. Binary mixtures of pyrethrokJs crosstalk between voltage-sensitive calcium and chloride channels in isolated presynaptic nerveterminalsfrom rat brain. H. E. Hodgdon, R. K. Frisbie, J. M. Clark 35. Resistance to dichlorodipneriyftrichloroethane (DDT) in resistant (91-R) and suscep­ tible (Can-S) Drosophila melanogaster. J.P.Strycharz,J.M.CIark 36. Analysis of DNA adducts from herbicide interactions. T. C. Andrade, D. W. Boerth, E. Eder, P. Wanek 37. Effects of some rnonoterpenoids on [^J-tbob binding to mouse gaba receptor. F. Tong, J. R. Coats 38. Fate of sulfamethazine in surface water microcosms. K. L Henderson, T. B. Moorman, J. R. Coats 39. Mosquito repeitency of Amyris and Sianv wood essential oHs. G. E. Paluch, J. R. Coats 40. Nitrate and oxytetracydine: Agricultural residues and antibiotics at environmental interfaces studied by nonlinear optics. P. L Hayes, J. J. Kruk, F. M. Geiger 41. Role of reduced sulfur species in promot­ ing the degradation of organophosphate pesticides in aqueous solution. J. He, U.Jans 42. Toxicity and mode of action of the anion transporter blockers against the European com borer. D. R. Borna, J. R. Bfoomquist 43. Clomazone sorption and desorption to soils. A. S. Gunasekara, R. S. Tjeerdema Section C BCEC Exhibit Had—B2 New Developments and IBBUOI in

Section A BCEC 259 A/B stieriing nenoncKS Momonoi Leciuresnip Cosponsored by FUEL and AGFD M. H. Tunick, Organizer J. N. Seiber, Organizer, Presiding 11:30 Introductory Remarks. 11:45 27. Award Address (Sterling Hen­ dricks Memorial Lecture, sponsored by USDA/ARS). Why ceHulosic ethanol Is nearer than you think: Creating the btofuels future. B.E. Dale 12:30 Panel Discussion. 1:00 Reception.

J. J. Johnston, Organizer, Presiding 8:00-11:00 Ayroc hemic al Residue & Metabolism 44. LC-MS-MS analysis of imkJactoorid and metabolites in hemlock trees. F. B. Cook, A. F. Lagalante 45. Investigations into physiological differ­ ences between grypnosate-resistant and -susceptible horseweed biotypes from Mississippi. V. K. Nandula. K. N. Roddy, D. H. Poston, K. R. Reddy 46. Study on pesticide residues in imported food in Japan. M. Toda, M. Yamamoto, K. Tanaka, T. Sugita, C. Uneyama, K. h 47. A high-sensltlvity immunoassay for the detection of ruminant muscle protein in meat and feeds. B. W. Rtttsr, E. S. Park, I

190tecg

K AllraH

48. Monitoring Bt proteins in soil using bkxnimetJc extraction technology. G. Shan, S. K. Embrey, R. A Herman, R. W. McCommick 49. A sensitive immunoassayforthe detection of spinosyns in industrial water. G. Shan, T. Sparks, G. D. Crouse, M. Abraham, C. Fees, T. S. Fan, B. A. Skoczenski 50. Detection of hen's egg white lysozyme in food: Comparison between a sensitive HPLC and a commercial EUSA method. B. Kerkaert, B. De Meulenaer 51. Explosives detection by HPLC-based immunoextraction coupled with LC-MS and CE. R. Burks, D. D. Snow, D.S.Hage 52. Selection and expression of recombinant single domain antibodies (VHHs) against a tow molecular weight hapten. S. Makvandi-Nejad, C. R. MacKenzie, J. C. Hall 53. Quantitative EUSA validation for GE crop expression. V. A. Korjagin, G. Shan, S. K. Embrey, A D. Thomas 54. Use of laboratory automation in GE crop regulatory expression trials. V. A. Korjagin, P. Song, A. M. Phillips, A D.Thomas Modem ChiraJ Agrochemicals. 55. Development of a single chiral HPLC method for the separation of brodifacoum enantjomers. R. S. Stahl, J. J. Johnston 56. Ena/rtiomerization of pyrethroid insecti­ cides in solvents. S. Qin, J. Gan 57. Eriantiosetective endocrine disruption effects of synthetic pyrethroids. M. Nillos, G. Rodriguez-Fuentes, D. Schlenk, J. Gan 58. Separation and aquatic toxicity of enantiomers of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalcothrin. G. Sheng, C. Xu, J. Wang, W.Uu 59. Chiral and isomer-specific chfordane signatures for stormwater runoff represent­ ing various land use categories. W. Lao, K. A Maruya. J. Peng, K. Schiff, J. Gan Nanotechnology in Agriculture. 60. The antioxidants in natural plants affecting formation of alpha synuctein nanobiopartjcles. N. A. Hodges, B. Tonjanika, S. Han Issues in Integrated Pest ManagmenL 61. Overcoming mutations in fp25k bacutovirus gene on the way to continuous btopestickJe production in insect cell culture. L Girl, D. W. Murhammer, B. Bonning, M.Feiss Developments & Issues In Agrochomlcal Sciences. 62. Bioactive materialsfororganophosphorus pesticides decontamination and protection. A. Mansee, W. Chen, A Mulchandani 63. Abraham descriptors relating to agrochemical transport processes. E. D. Clarke, J. Delaney. P. J. JurgutJs, P.Japertas 64. Agrochemicals and log Ρ octanol: Evalua­ tion of structure based predictions. E. D. Clarke, J. Delaney, P. Japertas, P. J. Jurgutls 65. Insecticideformulationsfor improved control of sand flies and mosquitoes in severe environments. F. Shi, Y. Kim, L Kagumba, A Giaya 66. Hydrolytjc enzymes produced by a bfoherbicidal strain of Myrothecium verrucaria. R. E. Hoagland, C. D. Boyette, M. A. Weaver 67. Molecular overlay as a tool to model biospecificity: A case study with mosquito repellents. R. Natarajan, S. C. Basak, W. Nowak, P. Miszta 68.5-Thioalkyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-carboxylic acid derivatives as nematicktes. W.Zhang, Y.Bethel 69. Performance of a new organic herbicide based on d-Kmonene. M. E. Koivunen, L E. Fernandez, B. J. Campbell, J. Versman, P. G. Marrone 70. The contents of organic carbon and prob­ lems of soil fertility. Τ. Κ. OrUkov 71. The influence compost is on agrochemical qualities of soil. S. B. Pardaev 72. Production of beauvericin by Fusarium sp. F-1.K.Zhong, F.Hong 73. Influence of mulching by polyethylene film on the content of rolling nutrients in soil and chemical composition of plants.

74. Bioconversion of humic substances as a promisingtoolforobtaining beneficial plant growth-stimulators. B. M. Hudaibergenova, S. Jorobekova, K. A. Kydralieva 75. Withdrawn. 76. A novel antifungal agent ilicicoJin H pro­ duced by Fusarium sp. F-4. C. Deng, Y. D. Chen, Z. Y. Shao, F. Hong 77. Application of optical properties of the (3-methoxypropyl)silsesquioxanes hybrid films for green house. L Hu, W. Wang, Y.Uu 78. Field investigation of stimulating effect for bamboo vinegar as potential plant growth regulator. B. Bao, Z. Shen, J. Ma, P. Wang, Q. Zhang, L Ye 79. Bioactivity laboratory screening of bamboo vinegar as potential plant growth regulator. B. Bao, P. Wang, Z. Shen, Q. Zhang, L Ye, J. Ma 80. Selection of an effective fungicide against rhizoctonia soteni, sphaerotheca fuliginea and pseudoperonospora cubensis. L Zhang, J . Ma, P. Wang, Y. Sun, L Ma 81. InsectjckJal activity of camptothecin iso­ lated from camptotheca acuminate against aphids on cabbage, chHo suppressalls and planthopper on rice. J. Ma, Y. Sun, P.Wang, LZhang, L M a 82. Discovery and optimization of novel 2-aryf5-thienyloxadiazoles as nematicides. W. Zhang, Y.Bethel BioFuels: Renewable Liquid Fuels & Chemicals from Biomass Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by AGRO and PETR MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 259 A/B Investigating VOCs from Pesticide and Fumigant Applications: State of the Science and New Approaches to Protect Air Quality B. L Bret, Organizer P. G. Green and L L McConnell, Organizers, Presiding 1:45 Introductory Remands. 1:50 83. Development of pesticide volatile organic compound (VOC) emission adjust­ ment factors. T. A. Barry, R. Segawa 2:15 84. Estimating fumigant emissions from agricultural soils. S. R. Yates, W. Zheng, D.Ashworth 2:40 85. Research strategy for achieving emissions reduction in a regulatory frame­ work. J. A. Knuteson 3:05 86. Overview of methods to estimate emissions from agricultural fumigants. D. A. Sullivan 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 87. Alternative methods for evaluation of VOCs. R. M. Bennett, V. Srinivas, D. A. Sullivan 4:15 88.2006 methyl isothiocyanate nearfield air assessments: Implications for air quality in south Franklin County, Washing­ ton. V. R. Hébert, J. LePage 4:40 89. Use of chain_2d to model the effect of fumigant application mitigation strategies on volatilization from soil. I. J. van Wesenbeeck, S. A. Cryer 5:05 Concluding Remarks.

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consentfromACS.

AGRO MONDAY EVENING Section A BCEC ExMbitHaH-B2

J. J. Johnston, Organizer, Presiding

2:55 101. Preparing the next generation for IPM roles in industry. N.C.Leppla, P. G. Koehter 3:25 Intermission. 3:45 102.ThelPM-PIPE:Whatdoesitdoto enhance IPM. D. E. Hershman 4:15 103. Transgenic crops and IPM: Reassessing our icon. K. LSteffey, M.E.Gray,R.A.Weinzierl 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

8:00-10:00

45,47-50,56-57,59,63-64,67,69,76. See

Section Β

previous listings. BCEC TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 259A

International Award for Research In Agrochemicals in Honor of Dr. Frederick J. Perlak Cosponsored by BASF Corp

Investigating VOCe from Peettekte and

W. P. Ridley, Organizer

State of the Science and New Approaches to Protect Air Quality

J. M. Clark, Presiding

P. G. Green, Organizer L L McConnell and B. L Bret, Organizers, Presiding 8:10 90. Evaluation of a themwgravimetric analysis (TGA) method for assessing volatile organic compound (VOC) emis­ sions potential for crop protection prod­ ucts. D. J. Unscott, I. van Wesenbeeck, B. L Bret, K. Swayze 8:30 91. PestkAlal VOCs and the formation of ozone: An academic perspective. P. G. Green 8:50 92. Photochemical ozone formation potential of pesticide solvent W.Yang, P. G. Green 9:10 93. Relationship between the evapora­ tionrateand vapor pressure of moderately ami highly volatile chemicals. I. J. van Wesenbeeck, D. J. H. Driver, J.Ross 9:30 94. VOC testing of agricultural EC formulations. A. K. Viets Section Β BCEC 259B imernauonai Awara for iiosoarcn in Agrochemicals in Honor of Dr. Frederick J. Perlak Cosponsored by BASF Corp

1:45 104. DNA screening to monitor pink boNworm resistance to Bt cotton. J. A. Fabrick, S. Morin, Y. Carrier, T. J. Dennehy, B. E. Tabashnik 2:10 105. Priytochemicals for pest control. S.O.Duke, K. K.Schrader, C.LCantreN, K. M. Meepagala, D. E. Wedge. F. E. Dayan 2:35 106. Evolution of safety assessment and regulatory approval processes for insect protected crops. R. L Fuchs 3:00 107. Environmental fate and effects of Si proteins in the environment J. R. Coats, K. R. Prihoda, B. W. Clark 3:45 108. Unusual challenges, unusual rewards: Introduction of BoHgard IKB> in Burkina Faso, West Africa. J.T.Greenptate 4:10 109. Yield effects of genettoally-rnodh fied crops in developing countries. D. Zilbennsn 4:35 110. Adoption, challenges, and future prospects for insect protected crops in India, R. D. Kstkar 5:00 Concluding Remarks. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 259A

W. P. Ridley, Organizer Cosponsored by BIOHW J. M. Clark, Presiding 10:00 Introductory Remarks. 10:10 95. Award Address (ACS Interna­ tional Award for Research in Agrochernicals, sponsored by BASF Corporation). BoHgard* Cotton: A decade of success and a glimpse of the future of cotton. F.J. Perlak 10:45 96. Protein dtecovery, design, and mechanistic analysis of Cry3Bb1. L English, K. S. Gkkfngs, J. W. Seale 11:10 97. Peptidergic regulation of an innate behavioral sequence. M. E. Adams 11:35 98. Insect resistance management in GM crops: Past, present, and future. R.T.Roush TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 259A

S. T. Ratcliffé and A. Herbert, Organizers, Presiding 1:40 Introductory Remarks. 1:55 99. Chemical and biological control: 100 Years of research and adoption in the US. LP.GianeesI 2:25 100. Endangered species and their implications to IPM programs. P.B.Goodell

N. Scott, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 111. Nanotechnotogy opportunities in agriculture and food systems. N. Scott 8:55 112. Plant power electrochemical energy conversion using photosystem I. D. E. Cliffs!, M. Ciobanu. G. K. Jennings, Y.Xun.M.Krim 9:15 113. Storage and delivery of aquatic microorganisms in emulsions stabilized by surface-modified silica nanoparticles. J. S. VanderGheynst, H. B. Scher, H. Guo 9:35 114. DNA with zip codes: Addressable DNA molecules and their applications in agriculture and biotechnology. J. B. Lee, Y. Cui, H. Funabashi, N. Park, Y.F. Chang, D.Luo 1020 115. Societal Dimensions of agrifood nanotechnotogy: Project overview. J. V.Stone 10:40 11&P^cogrritionofcorifbrmational changes in β-iactogtobulin by moteculartyimprinted thin films. D. W. Brltt, N. Turner, X. Uu, S. Piletsky, V. Htady 11:00 117. Carbon nanotubes as nearinfrared agents for photothermal narco­ therapy of bacterial infections. J-W. Kim, V.P.Zharov 11:20 118. Single molecule analysis of bacterial 16s rdna per products in subml· crometerflukflcchannels. S. Stavis, S. C. Corgié, B. R. Cipriany, H. G. Craighead, L P. Walker

Section Β

Section Β

BCEC 259B

BCEC 259B

l l m l . — ι ) binding to human serum albumin: Insights from computa­ tional studies. K. Paal, A. Shkarupin, L. Beckford 201. Withdrawn. 202. Structural dynamics of the cooperative binding of organic molecules in the human Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). D. Fishelovitch, C. Hazan, S. Shaik, H. Wolfson, R. Nussinov 203. High affinity InhA inhibitors with activity against drug-resistant strains of Mycobac­ terium tuberculosis. T. J. Sullivan, C. am Ende, J. J. Truglio, F. Johnson, A. Lenaerts, R. A. Slayden, C. Kisker, P. J. Tonge 204. Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis malate syn­ thase. J. P. Roberts, I. Kriger, Q. Sun, E. McKee, T. R. loerger, J. S. Freundlich, J. C. Sacchettini 205. Synthesis and optimization of a library of novel benzimidazole leads for antitubercu­ losis drug discovery. K. Kumar, S-Y. Lee, I. Zanardi, R. A. Slayden, I. Ojima 206. Synthesis of novel optically active 2-aminobenzothiazole derivatives as antitubercular agents. B. A. Bhongade, M. N. Noolvi, A. K. Gadad, G. Singh MONDAY MORNING Section A

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 210 B/C Heroes of Chemistry Cosponsored by ORGN D. P. Rotella, Organizer 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:40 212. Captopril: A look back. E. W. Petrillo 2:20 213. The birth of Risperdal®. L. E. J. Kennis 3:00 214. Discovery of Singulair® and its impact on treatment of asthma in children and adults. R. N. Young 3:40 215. The discovery and development of imatinib, a new paradigm for small mol­ ecule targeted cancer therapy. U. B. Pfaar 4:20 216. Discovery and development of Zetia®: Serendipity and design in the discovery of ezetimibe. D. A. Burnett Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC Murray Goodman Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by John Wiley & Sons, ANYL, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Nanostructured Fluorocarbons: Smart Tectons for Self-Assembly Biomedicinal Nanostructures Sponsored by FLUO, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Novel Targets and Therapeutic Approaches Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN

BCEC 210 B/C

Undergraduate Research Poster Session Medicinal Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by MEDI and SOCED

Smissman Award Symposium

MONDAY EVENING

D. Rotella, Organizer

Section A

9:00 207. Addiction and brain mechanisms. B. Hoffer 9:40 208. Serendipity rediscovered — an oxymoron or rational drug design: Studies on subtype selective BzR/GABAergic ligands. J. M. Cook, H. June, E. Weerts, M. L Van Linn, D. Piatt, T. DeLorey, M. Savic, T. Clayton 10:20 209. Ligand based structural biology of the endocannabinoid system. A. Makriyannis 11:00 210. Development of potential drug abuse medications derived from the hallu­ cinogenic natural product salvinorin A. T. E. Prisinzano 11:40 Introduction of Smissman awardee. 11:50 211. Medicinal chemistry in drug abuse research. K. C. Rice

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Sci-Mix

Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC Nanostructured Fluorocarbons: Smart Tectons for Self-Assembly Polymers and other Nanocarbons Sponsored by FLUO, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Structure and Function Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN Pfizer Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical caccinno

J. R. McCarthy, Presiding 8:00-10:00 29, 31, 36, 40, 45, 47-48, 55, 57-58, 63-64, 66-70, 73, 96,104,106,110,122, 202. See previous listings. 277, 288, 298, 302, 308, 317-318, 323, 332, 350, 352, 354, 358, 362, 365, 367, 400, 409. See subsequent listings. TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 210B Beyond Tryptans Cosponsored by Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc G. M. Dubowchik, Presiding 9:00 217. Migraine: An overview beyond triptans. C. M. Conway 9:30 218. Selective iGluR5 antagonists for the treatment of migraine. P. L. Ornstein, S. A. Filla, K. J. Hudziak, S. Iyengar, D. Bleakman, K. H. Ho, D. K. Dieckman, A. C. Smith, K. W. Johnson 10:00 219. Calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists for the treatment of migraine. T. M. Williams, C. S. Burgey, D. V. Paone, A. W. Shaw, I. M. Bell, J. Z. Deng, J. deSolms, S. N. Gallicchio, D. N. Nguyen, C. M. Potteiger, C. A. Stump, A. G. Quigley, C. R. Theberge, B-L Wan, C. B. Zartman, X-F. Zhang, P. Kunapuli, S. A. Kane, K. S. Koblan, R. A. Bednar, V. K. Johnston, J. J. Mallee, S. D. Mosser, R. Z. Rutledge, C. Salvatore, D. R. McMasters, J. C. Hershey, H. Corcoran, B. Lyle, B. Wong, S. Roller, C. M. Miller-Stein, J. F. Rowe, S. Yu, S. L. Graham, J. P. Vacca

MEDI

10:30 220. Design and synthesis of potent cgrp antagonists for migraine. P. Chaturvedula, G. M. Dubowchik, A. P. Degan, X. Han, C. M. Conway, D. Cook, C. Davis, R. Denton, R. Macci, N. R. Mathias, S. Pin, L Signor, G. Thalody, R. Schartman, K. A. Widmann, C. Xu, J. E. Macor 11:00 221. Thermally-generated aerosol prochlorperazine as a fast-acting treatment for migraine. J . V. Cassella Section Β BCEC 210A Drug Safety Cosponsored by TOXI S. Ashwell and P. Galatsis,

Organizers

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:10 222. Evaluation of reactive metabolites in pharmaceutical discovery and develop­ ment. S. D. Nelson 9:50 223. Bioactivation and drug design: Challenges in predicting the occurrence of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions in early discovery. A. S. Kalgutkar 10:30 224. Predicting the toxicological con­ sequences of drug-derived reactive metabolites: Nitric oxide synthase as a model. Y. Osawa 11:10 225. Modeling and informatics support for safety and metabolism studies in early drug discovery projects. S. Boyer 11:50 Concluding Remarks. Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC Repligen Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC TUESDAY AFTERNOON

2:10 233. Discovery and chiral synthesis of potent c-Met (HGFR) aminopyridine inhibi­ tors. P-P. Kung 2:30 234. New perspectives on the medicinal chemistry of the somatostatin receptor agonist SOM230.1. Lewis, R. Albert, J. Pless, R. Kneuer, H. A. Schmid, A. P. Silva, D. Hoyer, G. Weckbecker, C. Bruns 2:50 235. Modulation of peripheral serotonin levels by enzyme inhibitors for the poten­ tial treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Z'C. Shi, R. Devasagayaraj, K. Gu, H. Jin, S. D. Kimball, B. Marinelli, L. Samala, S. Scott, A. Tunoori, Y. Wang, Y. Zang, C. Zhang, T. Stouch, J. Liu, D. Powell, W. Sun, M. Yang, A. Nouraldeen, A. Wilson, X-Q. Yu 3:10 236. Substituted-pyridine 2-amino-3,5dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-ones as highly potent, and selective BACE1 inhibitors. M. S. Malamas, K. Barnes, Y. Hui, P. Zhou, A. J. Robichaud, J. Bard, J. Turner, Y. Hu, K. Y. Fan, R. Chopra, M. Johnson 3:30 237. 8,8-Disubstituted-2,3,4,8-tetrahydroimidazo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-6-amines as highly potent, selective and orally active BACE1 inhibitors. M. S. Malamas, K. Barnes, Y. Hui, J. Erdei, I. Gunawan, N. Pawel, A. J. Robichaud, J. Bard, J. Turner, Y. Hu, E. Wagner, S. Aschmies, K. Fan, R. Chopra, M. Johnson 3:50 238. Synthesis and discovery of tropane derivatives as nociceptin receptor agonists for the management of cough. G. D. Ho, A. Bercovici, A. Fawzi, X. Fernandez, W. Greenlee, E. Y. Kiselgof, R. L. McLeod, F. Ng, A. Smith Torhan, Z. Tan, D. Tulshian, S-W. Yang, H. Zhang 4:10 239. Benzoxazepinones: The discovery of a novel SARM template. S. Rafferty, R. Gampe, B. Han, S. A. Randhawa, E. L. Stewart, Ο Μ. Yates 4:30 240. Peptide cyclodimerization by the Cu(l)-mediated azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. R. Jagasia, J. M. Holub, M. Bollinger, K. Kirshenbaum, M. Finn Drug Safety Sponsored by TOXI, Cosponsored by MEDI Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC

Section A BCEC 210B

Mechanism of Action of Natural Products Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW

Drug Delivery B. R. Peterson and D. H. Thompson, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 226. Comparative performance of folate-targeted transfection complexes derived from a family of bisvinyl ether cationic lipids. J. Van den Bossche, D. H. Thompson 2:10 227. Folate receptor-targeted therapies for inflammatory and autoimmune dis­ eases. P. S. Low, C. M. Paulos, B. Varghese 2:50 228. Intraliposomal stabilization of anticancer drugs. D. C. Drummond 3:30 229. Mechanism of the translocation of guanidium-rich peptides into cells. J. Rothbard, P. A. Wender, T. Jessop 4:10 230. Synthetic mimics of mammalian cell surface receptors: New tools for drug delivery. B. R. Peterson

Molecular Imaging Visualization of Biological Processes at the Molecular Level Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, PHYS, and BIOHW RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC

10:25 243. Discovery of high affinity betasecretase inhibitors using fragment-based lead generation and structure-based design. J. S. Albert 10:55 244. BACE (Beta-Amyloid site Cleav­ ing Enzyme; β-Secretase) inhibitors for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. E. W. Baxter, R. S. Alexander, S. A. Ballentine, F. P. Bischoff, R. E. Boyd, M. Braeken, D. E. Brenneman, S. J. Coats, K. A. Conway, A. L. Darrow, H. De Winter, Y. Huang, S. E. Ilyin, A. D. Jordan, L. E. J. Kennis, C. Luo, M. H. Mercken, S. M. A. Pieters, J. Qu, J. A. Piesvaux, C. H. Reynolds, M. J. Schulz, M. K. Scott, C. A. Teleha, B. A. Tounge, A. B. Reitz 11:25 245. Optimization of the in vivo activity of potent, Notch-sparing gamma secretase inhibitors. A. Kreft, B. L. Harrison, M. Abou-Gharbia, J. Afragola, A. Alimardinov, M. Antane, S. Aschmies, K. Atchison, T. Caggiano, M. Chlenov, D. Cole, T. Comery, G. Diamantidis, J. Ellingboe, K. Fan, C. Gonzalez, D. Hauze, M. Hoke, Y. Hu, X. Huang, D. Huryn, U. Jain, M. Jin, G. Khafizova, D. Kubrak, K. Kutterer, M. Lin, P. Lu, J. Lundquist, R. L. Magolda, C. Mann, R. Martone, M. May, S. Mayer, J. Mehlmann, W. J. Moore, K. Morris, A. Oganesian, M. Pangalos, A. Porte, P. Reinhart, L Resnick, D. R. Riddell, J. Schmid, J. Sonnenberg-Reines, J. Stock, R. Sun, E. Wagner, Z. Wang, K. Woller, Z. Xu, M. M. Zaleska, M. Zhang, H. Zhou, J. S.Jacobsen Section Β BCEC 210A

Section A BCEC 210B/C Hot Topics in Medicinal Chemistry Cosponsored by Merck Research Laboratories J . Zablocki,

Section Β

S. Tarn,

BCEC 210A

Organizer

8:30 246. The pathobiology of asthma and COPD: Targeting new pathways for treat­ ment. W. M. Abraham 9:10 247. Protease inhibitors for treating pulmonary inflammatory disorders: Focus on chymase and cathepsin G. B. E. Maryanoff, M. N. Greco, M. J. Hawkins, Ε. Τ Powell, L De Garavilla, H. R. Almond Jr. 9:50 248. Discovery of AMG 009: A CRTH2 and DP dual-antagonist. J . C. Medina, J. Liu, Z. Fu, M. Schmitt, Y. Wang, Μ. Ο Derek, H. L. Tang, T. Sullivan, G. Tonn, T. Collins 10:30 249. Structure activity relationships of a series of thiazolopyrimidine based CXCR2 antagonists with additional CCR2b activity. I. A. S. Walters 11:10 250. Discovery of R411 : A VCAM/ VLA-4 antagonist for the treatment of asthma. J. W. Tilley, A. Sidduri, L. Chen, J. P. Lou, G. Kaplan, G. Cavallo, N. Tare, L. Renzetti, H. Welker, A. Rames Eli Lilly Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, CARB, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW

BCEC 210B/C Abeta Production Inhibitors: Progress Toward a Clinical Test of the Amyloid Hypothesis

Presiding

1:30 251. Beta-substituted carboxylic acids as potent, orally bioavailable agonists of GPR40. J. Houze, W. Qiu, A. Zhang, R. Sharma, L Zhu, Y. Sun, M. Akerman, M. Schmitt, Y. Wang, J. Liu, J. Liu, J. Medina, J. Reagan, J. Luo, G. Tonn, J. Zhang, J. Lu, M. Chen, Ε. Lopez, Κ. Nguyen, L Yang, L. Tang, H. Tian, S. Shuttleworth, D. Lin 2:00 252. Endogenous kinase conforma­ tional switching pockets: A new general strategy for small molecule kinase inhibi­ tion. D. L Flynn, P. A. Petillo, M. Kaufman, W-P. Lu, S. C. Wise, M. Clare, L. Stewart, R. Clark, M. Feese, L Chun 2:30 253. Novel aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 inhibitors as a potential treatment of alco­ hol addiction. J. Zablocki, M. Abelman, M. G. Organ, Y. Bilokin, G. Cao, D. Malik, W. M. Keung, G. Tao, D. Overstreet, D. Soohoo, N. Chu, J. Hao, K. Leung, H. Genin, M. P. Arolfo, L. Yao, P. Fan, I. Diamond 3:00 254. Small molecule inhibitors of macro­ phage inhibitory factor (MIF). T. Sielecki 3:30 255. Sodium and calcium channels as drug targets for neuropathic pain. A. Termin

New Approaches for the Treatment of Pulmonary Inflammatory Diseases

WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Palliative Approaches to the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease A. J . Robichaud,

Presiding

1:30 256. Design and synthesis of potent 5-HT6 ligands for cognitive impairment. H. Elokdah, K. Liu, D. Cole, R. C. Bernotas, R. L. Magolda, L. E. Schechter, G. M. Zhang, D. Smith, A. J. Robichaud 2:05 257. Novel potent and selective inverse agonists at the GABAA a5 receptor sub­ type. A. W. Thomas, T. M. Ballard, F. Blasco, T. Buttelmann, H. Fischer, M-C. Hernandez, F. Knoflach, H. Knust, R. Moog, H. Stadler, G. Trube, P. Waldmeier, M. Wooley 2:40 258. Design, synthesis, and SAR of azabicyclic aryl amides as a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizo­ phrenia and Alzheimer's disease: Discov­ ery of PHA-543,613. D. G. Wishka 3:15 259. 5-HT 1A Antagonists as cognitive enhancers: The discovery of lecozotan. W. E. Childers Jr., B. L. Harrison 3:50 260. Histamine H3 receptor antago­ nists: Potential to address CNS deficits of memory, cognition, and attention. M. D. Cowart Section C

Section Β L. A. T h o m p s o n , Organizer, BCEC 210A General Oral Session J. R. McCarthy,

Organizer

1:30 231. KX01 : The first non-ATP competi­ tive Src inhibitor for clinical development in oncology applications-1. D. G. Hangauer, I. Gelman, L. Dyster, A. Barnett, M. Smolinski, T. Hegab, L. Gao 1:50 232. K X 0 1 : The first non-ATP competi­ tive Src inhibitor for clinical development in oncology applications-2. D. G. Hangauer, I. Gelman, L. Dyster, A. Barnett, M. Smolinski, T. Hegab, L. Gao

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 241. Session introduction: Abeta pro­ duction inhibitors. C. F. Albright 9:50 242. Pharmacodynamics of highly potent BACE-1 inhibitors in both Pgpdeficient and normal mice. L. A. Thompson III, L R. Marcin, J. Shi, M. A. Higgins, R. E. Olson, A. C. Good, C. R. Burton, D. M. Barten, J. K. Muckelbauer, J. H. Toyn, K. A. Lentz, J. E. Grace, J. J. Herbst, A. M. Marino, J. E. Meredith, C. F. Albright, J. E. Macor

BCEC 213 Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors N. Terrett,

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Organizer

1:30 261. Overview of the biology of the PDE family. E. Karran 2:00 262. Development of PDE4 inhibitors for CNS indications. A. T. Hopper 2:30 263. Discovery of selective PDE7 and PDE7 and 4 dual inhibitors and their role in Τ cell activation. W. J. Pitts 3:00 264. Inhibition of the striatal phosphodi­ esterase PDE10A: Biochemical, behavioral and pharmacological predictors of antipsy­ chotic potential. C. J. Schmidt

TECH-89

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

MEDI

3:30 265. Scaffold-based discovery of selec­ tive PDE4 inhibitors. K. Y. J . Zhang, G. L. Card, J. Liu, L. Blasdel, B. P. England, C. Zhang, Y. Suzuki, S. Gillette, B. Lee, D. Fong, B. Powell, D. Hsieh, J. Neiman, M. V. Milbum, B. L. West, P. N. Ibrahim, D. R. Artis, G. Bollag 4:00 266. Structure based design of second generation long-acting PDE5 inhibitors. M. J . Palmer, A. S. Bell, D. N. A. Fox, D. G. Brown 4:30 267. The development of PDE4 inhibi­ tors with improved therapeutic index for the treatment of COPD and asthma. N. J. Press, C. McCarthy, R. Taylor, R. Hersperger, T. Keller, J. Fullerton, N. Arnold, L. Brown, J. Hatto, M. Mercer, H. Oakman, C. Ritchie, P. Gedeck, M. Gosling, A. Hankin, D. Head, A. Smith, R. Stringer, B. Everatt, L Dalrymple, J. Maas, E. Schaeublin, K. Butler, J. R. Fozard, L. Mazzoni, N. Beckmann,

277. Design and characterization of dimeric ligands cross-linking two identical modula­ tory AMPA receptor sites. Β. Η. Kaae, K. Harpsoe, A. Contreras Sanz, D. S. Pickering, P. Sauerberg, R. P. Clausen, J. S. Kastrup, T. Liljefors, U. Madsen 278. Mechanism of interaction of multivalent antimicrobial peptide with model mem­ branes. A. Young, Z. Liu, C. Zhou, N. R. Kallenbach 279. Novel water-soluble nocathiacin analogs as potent antibacterial agents. L Xu, K. Liu, A. Farthing, S. Debenham, F. Zhang, G. Q. Shi, J. F. Dropinski, P. T. Meinke, C. McCallum, E. Hickey 280. Withdrawn. 281. ESI/MS study on sulfur containing β-lactams and their interactions with glutathione. M. Kostova, C. J. Myers, M. Konaklieva 282. Synthesis and SAR of 4-(benzylideneamino)benzenesulfonamides as selec­ tive COX-2 inhibitors. S-J. Lin, L-M. Yang

F. Bernard, O. Bonneau, D. Farr, D. Hynx, M. Tweed, D. Wyss, T. Buhl, M. Azria, B. Vogel, A. Trifilieff

283. Synthesis and biological profile of substi­ tuted quinolines as potent 5-Lipoxygenase inhibitors. M. Gagnon, C. Brideau, E. Cauchon, A. Chateauneuf, Y. Ducharme, R. Frenette, R. W. Friesen, S. Guiral, P. Hamel, J. A. Mancini, M. Ouellet, D. Percival, A. Styhler, E. Wong 284.1,3,5-Triazine derivatives with improved solubility for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. B. Zacharie, D. Fortin, S. D. Abbott, J-F. Bienvenu, A. Cameron, J. Cloutier, J-S. Duceppe, A. Ezzitouni, K. Houde, C. Lauzon, J. Lechasseur, N. Moreau, V. Perron, N. Wilb, M-È. Fafard, D. Gaudreau, L. Geerts,

Symposium in Honor of Perry Frey Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW W E D N E S D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Poster Session Cosponsored by Nature Reviews Drug Discovery J. R. McCarthy,

Organizer

7:00-9:00 268. Periodic classification of human immuno­ deficiency virus inhibitors. F. Torrens, G. Castellano 269. 99mTc-Labeled SDF as a target-specific molecular probe for noninvasive imaging of myocardial infarction. P. Misra, A. D. Schecter, D. Lebeche, H. Ly, R. J. Hajjar, J. V. Frangioni 270. Synthesis of Littorachalcone. G. L. Kumar, G. Kraus 271. Synthesis of structural probes for the PDE4 catalytic site. B. Lindsay, D. R. Adams 272. Two-photon excited photodynamic therapy using water-soluble porphyrin dimers. M. Balaz, H. A. Collins, M. K. Kuimova, E. Dahlstedt, M. Khurana, A. Karotki, D. Phillips, B. Wilson, H. L. Anderson 273. Design and synthesis of some multitargeted ligands as potential antihypertensive agents. B. S. Chouhan, M. R. Yadav, R. Giridhar 274. Discovery and synthesis of novel /V-(hetero-biaryl)piperazine adenosine A 2 a recep­ tor antagonists. J . M. Harris, H. Liu, J. Hao, B. Neustadt, H. Zhang, J. Lachowicz, M. Cohen-Williams, G. Varty, K. Cox, A. W. Stamford, W. J. Greenlee 275. Toward multivalent GPCR signaling from poly(amidoamine) dendrimer conjugates. Y. Kim, A. M. Klutz, B. Hechler, C. Gachet, K. A.Jacobson 276. Hit to lead optimization of a series of 2-([2-amino]-4-phenyl-thiazole-5-carboxylic acid ethyl ester)carboxamides identified as A2A antagonists. G. Mikkelsen, A. G. Sams, M. Larsen, B. Bang-Andersen, M. Langgaard, T. J. Schroeder, L Thorup

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

90-TECH

B. Grouix, F. Sarra-Bournet, L Gagnon, C. Penney 285. [1,4]Diazepine[7,8,1-hi]indole derivatives as antipsychotic and antiobesity agents. H. Gao, G. Stack, B. L. Harrison, H. Mazandarani, J. Zhang, S. Kalgonkar, S. Rosenzweig-Lipson, J. Dunlop, T. Andrée, L. Schechter 286. Synthesis and structure activity relationship of novel azaurazil and pyridopyramidine derivatives of arylpiperazine as potential and selective 5-Ht1a receptor agonists. V. J. Majo, J. Prabhakaran, L. Savenkova, J. J. Mann, J. S. D. Kumar 287. Synthesis of D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors and their effects on the plasma and brain levels of D-serine. B. Duvall, D. Ferraris, Y-S. Ko, A. Thomas, P. Majer, C. Rojas, T. Tsukamoto, K. Hashimoto 288. Design, synthesis and in vivo results of chemically-modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNA-122. G. A. Kinberger, S. Propp, S. Davis, S. Freier, C. Esau, E. E. Swayze, C. F. Bennett, B. Bhat 289. Multifunctional proligands for Alzheimer's disease therapy. L. E. Scott, D. E. Green, T. Storr, M. L. Bowen, M. Merkel, G. H. Tansley, H. Schugar, C. L. Wellington, C. Orvig 290. Solid-phase synthesis of isotope-labeled 2-propyloctanoic acid, a therapeutic agent for stroke and Alzheimer's disease. J . Z. Ho, C. Tang, M. P. Braun 291. Discovery and SAR study of a novel anti-Alzheimer compound family acting on APP. S. Burlet, B. Grasland, M-A. Debreu-Fontaine, M-E. Grosjean, A. Delacourte, P. Melnyk 292. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel, potent mixed lineage kinase (MLK) inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease. M. Tao, C. H. Park, R. Dandu, A. Zulli, K. Josef, J. L. Diebold, D. E. Gingrich, M. Curry, J. Husten, G. Gessmen, T. Angeles, R. L. Hudkins 293. Withdrawn. 294. Pyridinylaminohydantoins as small molecule BACE1 inhibitors: Exploration of the S3 pocket. P. Zhou, J. Bard, R. Chopra, K. Y. Fan, Y. Hu, Y. Li, R. L Magolda, M. S. Malamas, M. Pangalos, P. Reinhart, J. Turner, Z. Wang, A. J. Robichaud 295. Design, synthesis and SAR of potent statin-based β-secretase inhibitors: Explo­ ration of P1 phenoxy and benzyloxy resi­ dues. M. Back, J. Nyhlén, I. Kvamstrom, Â. Rosenquist, B. Samuelsson

296. Pyrrolidines as conformationally constrained diaminopropanes: A versatile scaffold for potent inhibitors of BACE-1. J. M. Guernon, L. A. Thompson III, J. E. Macor, A. J. Tebben, A. Good, C. R. Burton, D. M. Barten, J. Marcinkeviciene, J. H. Toyn, C. Albright, J. K. Muckelbauer, D. Camac, T. Zvyaga, J. Grace, K. Lentz, K. M. Boy 297. Synthesis and SAR of hydroxyethylamine-based phenylcarboxyamides as BACE-1 inhibitors. Y-J. Wu, Y. Zhang, A. Good, L. A. Thompson, C. R. Burton, J. H. Toyn, C. F. Albright, J. E. Macor 298. Bradykinin B1 antagonists: Biphenyl SAR studies in the cyclopropanecarboxamide series. C. N. Di Marco, R. M. DiPardo, R. K. Chang, K. L. Murphy, R. W. Ransom, D. Reiss, C. Tang, T. Prueksaritanont, D. Pettibone, M. G. Bock, S. D. Kuduk 299. Development of alpha-hydroxy amides as a novel class of Bradykinin B1 antagonists. J . J . Kim, M. R. Wood, K. Schirripa, M. G. Bock 300. Bradykinin B1 receptor antagonists: SAR studies of the aryl-piperidines on the cyclopropane carboxamide scaffold. J . Wai, S. D. Kuduk, M. R. Wood, R. K. Chang, D-M. Feng, K. L. Murphy, R. W. Ransom, C. Tang, T. Prueksaritanont, R. M. Freidinger, D. Pettibone, M. G. Bock 301. Synthesis and SAR study of a new series of Bradykinin B1 receptor antagonists containing allylic amines. Q. Liu, W. Qian, J. J. Chen, C. Fotsch, N. Han, A. Li, C. Yuan, G. Biddlecome, E. Johnson, C. V. Staden, D. Lester-Zeiner, G. Ng, G. Kumar, R. W. Hungate, B. C. Askew 302. Inhibitors of NF-Kappa Β derived from thalidomide. B. Pandit, E. Carcache de Blanco, Z. Hu, P. K. Li 303. Identification of a peptoid inhibitor of the proteasome that targets Sug2/Rpt4 Subunit. H-S. Lim, C. T. Archer, D. Cai, D. Brekken, T. Kodadek 304. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 2-arylthiazolidine-4-caboxylic acid amides for melanoma and prostate cancer. Y. Lu, Ζ. Wang, C-M. Li, W. Li, J. T. Dalton, D. D. Miller 305. Trisubstituted isoalloxazines: A new class of G-quadruplex binding agents. M. Bejugam, P. Shirude, S. Sewitz, R. Rodriguez, S. Balasubramanian 306. Novel tricyclic compounds having acet­ ylene groups at C-8a and cyano enones in rings A and C: Highly potent anti-inflam­ matory and cytoprotective agents. T. Honda, C. Sundararajan, H. Yoshizawa, X. Su, Y. Honda, K. T. Liby, M. B. Spom, G. W. Gribble 307. Nick-containing oligonucleotide as human Topoisomerase I inhibitor. M. Li, T.Li 308. PMSA antibody-toxin conjugates as antiprostatic agents. D. Falcone, G. J. Bubley, G. Jones 309. Regulation of the topoisomerase II alpha gene using polyamides that binds to the inverted CCAAT box present in the pro­ moter. J. Sexton, H. Mackay, T. Brown, M. Kotecha, C. O'Hare, J. Kluza, D. Hochhauser, J. Hartley, B. Nguyen, D. Wilson, M. Lee 310. New N-substituted phenoxazines as specific inhibitors of Akt in cancer cells. P. B. Hanumesh, B. Pulluru, Κ. Ν. Thimmaiah, Ν. Μ. Made Gowda 311. Synthesis and characterization of N-hexylamino phenoxazines as potential anti­ cancer drugs. B. Pulluru, P. B. Hanumesh, Κ. Ν. Thimmaiah, Ν. Μ. Made Gowda 312. Discovery of YM155, a novel survivin suppressant for the treatment of cancer. I. Kinoyama, A. Matsuhisa, T. Nakahara, M. Takeuchi, K. Shirasuna, T. Minematsu, N. Asai, S. Matsumoto, K. Kawaguchi, J. Kazami, A. Toyoshima, A. Kita, F. Tominaga, M. Okada, M. Ohta 313. Enhancement of the anticancer activity of cladribine by application of the phosphoramidate protide approach. R. Valente, C. Congiatu, E. Walsby, K. Mills, C. McGuigan 314. Experimental and systems biology stud­ ies of the radioresistance of prostate carcinoma cells. A. Niciforovic, J. Djordjevic, M. Adzic, V. Vucic, P. M. Mitrasinovic, M. B. Radojcic

315. Lead identification to generate isoquinolinedione inhibitors of insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) for potential use in cancer treatment. S. C. Mayer, A. L Banker, F. Boschelli, L. Di, M. Johnson, C. H. Kenny, G. Krishnamurthy, K. Kutterer, F. Moy, S. Petusky, M. Ravi, D. Tkach, H-R. Tsou, W.Xu 316. Lead identification to generate triazine inhibitors of insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1 R) for potential use in cancer treatment. S. C. Mayer, F. Boschelli, J. A. Butera, L Di, M.Johnson, C. H. Kenny, G. Krishnamurthy, F. Moy, S. Petusky, M. Ravi, J. E. Sabalski, D. Tkach, W. Xu 317. Microwave-expediated synthesis of 5-aminosubstituted camptothecin analogs: Inhibitors of hypoxia inducible factor HIF1/N. B. T. Lapointe, J. Torregrossa, K. Bailey, C. Barone, R. T. Coccia, C. Y. Cote, C. P. Davem, T. A. Dunstan, B. J. Durant, N. U. Gajadeera, D. A. Garcia, D. I. Gotleib, A. I. Lebed, Ε. A. Lewis, S. L. Mathieu, M. L. McNeel, S. E. Muser, C. M. Norwood, S. M. Rupert, T. F. Siclari, J. M. Silverberg, Z. P. Thompson, D. Falcone, G. J. Bubley, G.Jones 318. Novel duocarmycin-analog based anti­ body drug conjugate for targeted cancer therapy. V. Guerlavais, Q. Zhang, K. Horgan, S. Boyd, B. Sufi, L. Chen, L. Green, D. Passmore, J. Sung, R. Vangipuram, L. Thevanayagam, M. Srinivasan, M. Do, R. Dai, E. Kwok, C. Chong, C. Soderberg, C. Pan, M. Huber, P. Sattari, C. Rao, S. Deshpande, P. Cardarelli, D. J. King, S. Gangwar 319. Pyrimido[4,5-b][1,4]diazepines as novel multitargeted inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases. Z. Ji, V. Gracias, I. Akritopoulou-Zanze, D. H. Albert, K. B. Glaser, P. M. Marcotte, P. Lori, N. B. Soni, K. D. Stewart, S. W. Djuric, S. K. Davidsen, M. R. Michaelides 320. Synthetic methods for the preparation of novel ARQ501 human metabolites. R-Y. Yang, D. Kizer, H. Wu, E. Volckova, X. Miao, K. Nguyen, S. Ali, M. Tandon, R. Savage, M. A. Ashwell 321. Design and synthesis of carbocyclic nucleoside analogs as anticancer and antiviral drugs. N. K. Sunkara, K. L. Seley 322. Design, synthesis and preliminary evalu­ ation of an antiestrogen-mitomycin C hybrid agent. R. N. Hanson, E. Y. Hua, D. C. Labaree, R. B. Hochberg, J. M. Essigmann, R. G. Cray 323. Mechanism of action of bioactive tamoxi­ fen conjugates. E. L. Rickert, X. Long, A. C. Peterson, J. P. Trebley, M. M. Morrell, K. P. Nephew, R. Weatherman 324. Synthesis and biological evaluation of cytotoxic decapeptide macrocycles. M. R. Davis, T. J. Styers, R. A. Rodriguez, S. R. McAlpine 325. Synthesis and cytotoxicity studies of novel sansalvamide A derivatives. Y. S. Mostofi, S. Ravula, S. Lapera, M. R. Davis, W. S. Disman, K. Otrubova, E. Signh, S. R. McAlpine 326. Synthesis and application of fluores­ cence-labeled biotin-taxoid conjugate for the investigation into efficacious tumortargeting drug delivery system. X. Zhao, S. Chen, J. Chen, J. Chen, I. Ojima 327. Novel disulfide linkers for tumor-targeting drug delivery. X. Zhao, J. Chen, S. Chen, S. Jaracz, M. Das, I. Ojima 328. Synthesis and evaluation of functionalized SWNT as transporter for tumortargeting drug delivery. S. Chen, J. Chen, X. Zhao, S. S. Wong, I. Ojima 329. Rational design, synthesis, and bioassay of small molecules for inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway. J. Y. Choi, E. S. Selinger, L. M. Ballou, R. Z. Lin, D. G. Drueckhammer 330. Design, synthesis and evaluation of tumor-targeting folate-taxoid conjugate. M. Das, I. Ojima 331. Withdrawn.

MEDI

332. Synthesis of 17-alpha-substituted arylvinyl estradiols and evaluation as ligands for the estrogen receptor ligand binding domain (ER-LBD). R. N. Hanson, S. Olmsted, P. Tongcharoensirikul, E. McCaskill, D. C. Labaree, R. B. Hochberg 333. Histone deacetylase inhibition activity of resveratrol and its analogs. D. Dayangac-Erden, P. Ayhan, G. Bora, K. Yelekci, S. Dalkara, A. S. Demir, H. Erdem-Yurter 334. Discovery, optimization and biological evaluation of novel, potent and selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. N. D. Namdev, M. Tandon, R. Akireddy, H. Orgueira, D. Vensel, M. Kung, H. Wu, P. Hutchins, M. Moussa, J. Link, Y. Liu, R. Nicewonger, C. Bruseo, J. Gorenstein, E. Nakuci, D. McSweeney, K. Bresciano, Y. Wang, D. France, M. A. Ashwell 335. Design, synthesis and evaluation of the first highly selective sigma-2 receptor ligand. S. Narayanan, C. Mesangeau, J. Shaikh, R. R. Matsumoto, J. H. Poupaert, C. R. McCurdy 336. Discovery of 2-arylbenzoxazole carboxamides as 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. C. M. Beer, L H. Borden, K. L. Christensen, S. Dobritsa, D. J. Fairfax, S. Isaacson, J. P. Lindsay, J-H. Maeng, D. D. Manning, L Masih, V. V. Mozhaev, D. A. Razzano, W. M. Rennells, J. Richardson, T. Rust, A. Usyatinsky, Z. Yang, J. V. Zaremba 337. Novel indole-3-carbinol-derived antitumor agents. J-R. Weng, C-H. Tsai, S. K. Kulp, D. Wang, C-H. Lin, Y. Ma, C-S. Chen 338. Lipophilic antitumor drug compounds: Cholesterol-modified camptothecins. Y. Zhang, L. B. Brungardt 339. Study of conformational^ biased oligodeoxyribonucleotides designed to induce bending and/or novel secondary structures in DNA. H. Saneyoshi, V. E. Marquez 340. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent class of spiroindoline pyrrolopyrimidines targeting Akt as anticancer agents. G. S. Kauffman, J. T. Arcari, C. Autry, D. Baker, G. Barbacci, V. Bernardo, M. Boehm, G. Borzillo, D. Briere, C. Chen, T. Clark, K. G. Coleman, M. Corbett, K. Freeman-Cook, C. Hulford, J. Jakubczak, S. Kakar, L. Knauth, C. Li, J. Lin, B. Lippa, Y. Lu, M. Luzzio, E. Marr, G. Martinelli, M. A. Marx, J. Morris, K. Nelson, G. Pan, J. Pandit, K. Rafidi, S. Robinson, E. Soderstrom, K. Tsaparikos, P. W. Vincent, L. Wei 341. Increase in oxidative stress via glutathi­ one reductase inhibition as a novel approach to enhance cancer sensitivity to radiation. Y. Zhao, T. Seefeldt, W. Chen, L. Carlson, A. Stoebner, S. Hanson, R. Foil, S. Palakurthi, X. Guan 342. N-Acetyl-S-(p-chlorophenylcarbamoyl)cysteine and its analogs as a novel class of anticancer agents. W. Chen, T. Seefeldt, Y. Zhao, Z. Zhang, A. Young, X. Guan 343. Evaluation of the effect of 2-acetylamino3-[4-(2-acetylamino-2-carboxyethylsulfanylthiocarbonylamino)phenylthiocarbamoylsulfanyljpropionic acid (2-AAPA) on doxorubicin induced cardiotoxicity. S. Hanson, T. Seefeldt, Q. Liang, X. Guan 344. Increase in oxidative stress via glutathi­ one modulation as a novel approach to enhance cancer sensitivity to doxorubicin. T. Seefeldt, Y. Zhao, W. Chen, L. Carlson, A. Stoebner, S. Hanson, R. Foil, S. Palakurthi, X. Guan 345. Interference of echinacea on cancer chemotherapy. J. Jensen, F. T. Halaweish, C. Chase 346. Synthesis and characterization of pyrroli­ dine dithiocarbamate-copper complex: Proliferation inhibition, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction activities on cisplatinresistant neuroblastoma cells. H. Zhang, F. Peng 347. Synthesis and evaluation of novel afunc­ tional ligands for antibody targeted radia­ tion cancer therapy and MRI. H. Song, H-S. Chong 348. Synthesis of 9-substituted Tryptanthrin derivatives and their activity against differ­ ent cancer cell lines. B. V. Bhagwat, G. S. Chen, M-L. Chen, P-Y. Liao, J-W. Chern

349. Synthesis, characterization, and antican­ cer activity of new copper thiosemicarbazone compound holding ONNS quadridentate system. H. Zhang, F. Peng 350. Targeting cancer cells with boronated cyclic peptides for BNCT. E. J . Ziolkowski, K. A. Jolliffe, L M. Rendina 351. Toward "best-in-class" Hsp90 inhibitors: Design, biosynthesis and preclinical pro­ files. C. J. Martin, S. Gaisser, W. A. Vousden, L. S. Sheehan, T. Foster, R. M. Sheridan, M. Nur-E-Alam, N. Coates, S. J . Moss, C. Beckmann, B. Wilkinson, M. A. Gregory, C. Prodromou, L. Pearl, T. Greiner, N. Bausch, M. Q. Zhang 352. One-pot synthesis of dihydro-imidazo and imidazo-phenanthridinium DNA inter­ calating platforms as promising anticancer agents. L. Cronin, A. D. C. Parenty 353. Development of potent inhibitors of B-Raf kinase. J . Wei, R. Wolin 354. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of 3,4-disubstituted pyrazole analogs as antitumor CDK inhibitors. R. Lin, P. Connolly, G. Chiu, Y. Yu, S. Li, S. Emanuel, L. Greenberger 355. Aurora kinase inhibitors: Lead structure identification from the Tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene class. A. C. Backes, M. Baumann, T. Brandstetter, D. Hafenbradl, R. Kostler, L. Neumann, J. Vogt, P. C. Sennhenn, G. Miiller, G. Zybarth 356. P38 MAP kinase naphthyridinone inhibi­ tors. R. Ruzek 357. Design and SAR of pyrimidine-based inhibitors targeting the ABL-T315I muta­ tion. E. Dneprovskaia, J. Cao, C. P. Chow, R. Fine, E. Hanna, J. Hood, X. Kang, B. Klebansky, D. Lohse, C-C. Mak, A. McPherson, G. Noronha, M. S. S. Palanki, V. P. Pathak, J. Renick, R. Soil, B. Zeng, H. Zhu 358. Design and SAR of thiazole-based inhibitors for the ABL-T315I enzyme. C. P. Chow, J. Cao, E. Dneprovskaia, R. Fine, E. Hanna, J. Hood, L Hwang, X. Kang, B. Klebansky, D. Lohse, C-C. Mak, A. McPherson, G. Noronha, M. S. S. Palanki, V. P. Pathak, J. Renick, R. Soil, B. Zeng, H. Zhu 359. Strategies involved in the construction of two series of novel potent inhibitors of ABL-T315I. B. Zeng, J. Cao, C. P. Chow, C-C. Mak, E. Dneprovskaia, R. Fine, H. Gu, E. Hanna, J. Hood, X. Kang, B. Klebansky, G. Li, D. Lohse, A. McPherson, G. Noronha, J. Renick, M. S. S. Palanki, V. P. Pathak, R. Soil, S. Tang, H. Zhu 360. Azaindazole ureas as potent VEGFR/ PDGFR multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Y. Dai, K. Hartandi, D. H. Albert, J. J. Bouska, G. T. Bukofzer, C. K. Donawho, K. B. Glaser, J. Guo, J. Li, P. A. Marcotte, A. M. Olson, D. J. Osterling, L J. Pease, N. B. Soni, K. D. Stewart, P. Tapang, D. R. Reuter, S. K. Davidsen, M. R. Michaelides 361. Design and synthesis of c-met kinase inhibitors based on an in silico screenderived lead. S-E. Kim, Z-D. Shi, M. Peach, A. Giubellino, M. C. Nicklaus, D. Bottaro, T. R. Burke Jr. 362. Design and synthesis of luminescent terbium(lll) chelates: Application for kinase assay development. G. G. Yi, S. Bhattacharyya, A. Boge, F. Ramirez, J. R. Sportsman 363. Discovery and SAR of a series of 3-[(6piperidine-4-yl)-4-methyl-1H-benzimidazol2-yl]-1 H-pyridin-2-ones as IGF-1 receptor kinase inhibitors. P. Liu, U. Velaparthi, M. D. Wittman, M. G. Saulnier, K. Zimmermann, X. Sang, D. B. Frennesson, F. Y. Lee, J. Carboni, A. Greer, A. Li, R. Attar, M. Gottardis, Z. Yang, D. M. Vyas

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

364. Synthesis of cis-fused indolocarbazole pyran derivatives as multikinase inhibitors. F. M. Perron-Sierra, R. Golsteyn, N. Kucharczyk, P. Casara, C. Boucley 365. Discovery of β-sulfonamide piperidine hydroxamates as potent and selective HER-2 sheddase inhibitors. D. M. Burns, C. He, Y. Li, P. Scherle, M. Covington, M. Pan, R. Wynn, S. Turner, J. S. Fridman, S. Friedman, B. Metcalf, W. Yao 366. Identification of multikinase inhibitor using a multistep computer aided approach. S. Dakshanamurthy, M. Paige, T. Hansen, S. Shah, S. Byers, M. Brown 367. Nanomedicinal chemistry: Preparation of novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor-targeted linkers for nanoparticle targeting. R. N. Hanson, K. Bailey, M. Elston, J. A. Hendricks · 368. Potent and selective PKC-Θ inhibitors: Advancement from LI to LO. A. S. Prokopowicz III, C. L. Cywin, G. Dahmann, E. R. R. Young, R. L. Magolda, M. G. Cardozo, D. A. Cogan, D. DiSalvo, J. D. Ginn, M. A. Kashem, J. P. Wolak, C. A. Homon, T. M. Farrell, H. Grbic, H. Hu, P. V. Kaplita, L. H. Liu, D. M. Spero, D. D. Jeanfavre, K. M. O'Shea, D. M. White, J. M. Woska Jr., M. L. Brown 369. Novel pyrimidine alkynyl phenyl ureas as potent Tie-2 inhibitors. C. D. Jones, K. Blades, M. Box, L. Campbell, P. Daunt, R. Grant, A. Griffen, L. Hassall, B. Hayter, K. Johnson, D. Jones, J. Kendrew, K. Lennon, R. W. Luke, W. McCoull, L. Ruston, M. L. Swain, A. Wright, J. A. Stawpert 370. Evolution of selective, potent, and orally bioavailable small molecule Tie-2 kinase inhibitors. P. R. Olivieri II, S. D. Geuns-Meyer, P. E. Hughes, B. K. Albrecht, S. Bellon, J. Bready, S. Caenepeel, V. J. Cee, S. C. Chaffee, A. Coxon, M. Emery, J. Fretland, P. Gallant, Y. Gu, B. L. Hodous, D. Hoffman, R. E. Johnson, R. Kendall, J. L. Kim, A. M. Long, M. Morrison, V. F. Patel, A. Polverino, P. Rose, P. Tempest, L. Wang, D. A. Whittington, H. Zhao 371. Withdrawn. 372. Pyridyl-pyrimidine benzimidazole deriva­ tives as potent, selective, and orally active inhibitors of Tie-2 kinase. K. Romero, S. Geuns-Meyer, P. Hughes, A. Bak, S. Bellon, J. Bready, S. Caenepeel, V. J. Cee, S. C. Chaffee, A. Coxon, H. L. Deak, M. Emery, J. Fretland, P. Gallant, Y. Gu, B. L Hodous, D. Hoffman, R. E. Johnson, R. Kendall, J. L Kim, J. Lin, A. M. Long, M. Morrison, H. N. Nguyen, P. R. Olivieri II, V. F. Patel, A. Polverino, D. Powers, P. Rose, M. K. Stanton, L. Wang, H. Zhao 373. Design and synthesis of dihydroindazolo[5,4-a]pyrrolo[3,4-c]carbazoleoximes as potent dual inhibitors of VEGF-R2 and TIE-2 receptor tyrosine kinase. R. Dandu, A. L. Zulu, E. Bacon, T. Underiner, C. Robinson, H. Chang, S. Miknyoczki, J. Grobelny, B. A. Ruggeri, T. S. Angeles, L. D. Aimone, R. L. Hudkins 374. The impact of physicochemical proper­ ties on sensorial dynamic: The cooling sensation. S. M. Furrer 375. Pharmaceutical applications of cooling agents. S. Encisco, A. Jain 376. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 2,4-diaminoquinazoline derivatives and related compounds as novel CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) antagonists. N. Kawano, T. Kontani, N. Masuda, Y. Koganemaru, W. Hamaguchi, H. Kaizawa, K. Kato, S. Igarashi, H. Nagata, H. Inami, T. Terasaka, N. Ishikawa, K. Yokoyama, S. Ogino, M. Kondo, M. Takeuchi, M. Ohta 377. Synthesis and SAR investigation of 3, 4-diamino derivatives of thiadiazole-1oxides as CXCR1-CXCR2 dual antago­ nists. P. Biju, Y. Yu, C. Aki, J. Zheng, J. Chao, M. P. Dwyer, R. Diane, R. Bond, J. Jakway, H. Qiu, R. W. Hipkin, J. Fossetta, W. Gonsiorek, H. Bian, X. Fan, C. Terminelli, J. Fine, J. R. Merritt, Z. He, G. Lai, M. Wu, A. Taveras

378. Synthesis and structure-activity relation­ ships of heteroaryl-substituted 3,4-diamino-3-cyclobut-3-ene-1,2-dione CXCR2/ CXCR1 receptor antagonists. Y. Yu, M. P. Dwyer, J. Chao, C. Aki, J. Chao, B. Purakkattle, D. Rindgen, R. Bond, R. Mayer-Ezel, J. Jakway, H. Qiu, R. W. Hipkin, J. Fossetta, W. Gonsiorek, H. Bian, X. Fan, C. Terminelli, J. Fine, D. Lundell, J. R. Merritt, Z. He, G. Lai, M. Wu, A. G. Taveras 379. Imidazole derivatives as potent CXCR3 antagonists. X. Du, X. Chen, J. Mihalic, J. Deignan, J. Duquette, A-R. Li, B. Lemon, J. Ma, S. Miao, G. Tonn, T. Collins, J. Medina 380. Mono- and bicyclic small molecule antagonists of CXCR3. A-R. Li, M. G. Johnson, J. Liu, X. Chen, X. Du, J. Mihalic, J. Deignan, D. J. Gustin, J. Duquette, Z. Fu, L. Zhu, A. P. Marcus, P. Bergeron, T. Collins, T. Sullivan, J. Danao, J. C. Medina 381. Pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-ones as potent CXCR3 antagonists. J. Duquette, X. Du, J. Chan, B. Lemon, T. Collins, G. Tonn, J. Medina, X. Chen 382. Identification of potential back-ups for clinical candidate CCR3 antagonist DPC168. Q. Shi, U. T. Kim, B. J. Vargo, P. K. Welch, M. Covington, N. C. Stowell, E. A. Wadman, P. Davies, K. A. Solomon, S. Yeleswaram, D. Graden, I. Kariv, P. H. Carter, S. S. Ko, G. V. De Lucca 383. Discovery of novel dopamine D3/D2 ligands for the treatment of schizophrenia. G. Domâny 384. Design and synthesis of potent and selective fluorinated dopamine D 3 receptor ligands. Z. Tu, S. Li, M. Taylor, R. R. Luedtke, R. H. Mach 385. Anabolic activity and pharmacokinetic profiles of secreted frizzled-related protein-1 (SFRP-1) antagonists. W. J. Moore, J. C. Kern, T. J. Commons, M. A. Wilson, G. S. Welmaker, E. J. Trybulski, K. Pitts, G. Krishnamurthy, B. Stauffer, R. Bhat, S. Fukayama, A. L. Upthagrove, P. V. N. Bodine 386. Design, synthesis and biological activity of modulators of secreted frizzled related protein-1 (SFRP-1), an antagonist of the Wnt signaling pathway. T. J. Commons, R. P. Woodworth, M. B. Webb, W. J. Moore, J. C. Kern, E. J. Trybulski, K. Pitts, G. Krishnamurthy, B. Stauffer, R. Bhat, S. Fukayama, A. L. Upthagrove, P. V. N. Bodine 387. Diaryl sulfone sulfonamides as secreted frizzled-related protein-1 (SFRP-1) antagonists: SAR and optimization. J. C. Kern, W. J. Moore, T. J. Commons, R. P. Woodworth, M. A. Wilson, G. S. Welmaker, E. J. Trybulski, K. Pitts, G. Krishnamurthy, B. Stauffer, R. Bhat, P. V. N. Bodine 388. Biophysical methods to interrogate the interactions of secreted frizzled-related proteins with small molecule antagonists. G. Krishnamurthy, K. Pitts, W. J. Moore, M. A. Wilson, G. S. Welmaker, A. Gopalsamy, P. V. N. Bodine 389. Design and synthesis of fluorescent probes for the development of a binding assay for the identification of secreted frizzled-related protein-1 (SFRP-1) antagonists. G. S. Welmaker, M. A. Wilson, W. J. Moore, J. C. Kern, E. J. Trybulski, R. L. Magolda, K. Pitts, G. Krishnamurthy, B. Stauffer, R. Bhat, P. V. N. Bodine 390. Design, synthesis and biological activity of indane derivatives as modulators of secreted frizzled related protein-1 (SFRP1), an antagonist of the Wnt signaling pathway. R. P. Woodworth, T. J. Commons, W. J. Moore, J. C. Kern, E. J. Trybulski, K. Pitts, G. Krishnamurthy, B. Stauffer, R. Bhat, S. Fukayama, A. L. Upthagrove, P. V. N. Bodine 391. Identification of diarylsulfone sulfonamides as secreted frizzled related protein-1 (SFRP-1) antagonist. A. Gopalsamy, M. Shi, B. Stauffer, R. Bhat, J. Billiard, H. Ponce-de-Leon, L. Seestaller-Wehr, S. Fukayama, A. Mangine, R. Moran, G. Krishnamurthy, P. V. Bodine

TECH-91

MEDI

392. Iminooxothiazolidines as secreted frizzled related protein-1 (SFRP-1) antagonists. A. Gopalsamy, M. Shi, B. Stauffer, R. Bhat, J. Billiard, H. Ponce-de-Leon, L. Seestaller-Wehr, S. Fukayama, A. Mangine, R. Moran, G. Krishnamurthy, P. V. Bodine 393. Design, synthesis and SAR of potent substituted benzothiazole-cyclobutane histamine H3 receptor antagonists. C. Zhao, M. Sun, T. R. Miller, T. A. Esbenshade, J. M. Wetter, K. C. Marsh, J. D. Brioni, M. D. Cowart 394. Design and synthesis of novel, potent and selective H3 antagonists based on the natural product conessine. J. A. Covel, R. Hayashi, B. Hofilena, J. Ibarra, M. Pulley, M. Weinhouse, D. Sengupta, J. Duffield, V. J. Santora, G. Semple, R. R. Webb, M. Suarez, J. Frazer, W. Thompson, J. Edwards, E. Hauser, K. Whelan, A. Grottick 395. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel and potent H3 antagonists with improved pharmacokinetic profiles. R. Hayashi, J. A. Covel, B. Hofilena, J. Ibarra, M. Pulley, M. Weinhouse, D. Sengupta, J. Duffield, V. J. Santora, G. Semple, R. R. Webb, A. Ren, G. Pereire, M. Suarez, J. Frazer, W. Thompson, J. Edwards, E. Hauser, K. Whelan, A. Grottick 396. Withdrawn. 397. Development of potent histamine H3/H4 receptor ligands by the stereochemical diversity-oriented chiral cyclopropanebased conformational restriction strategy. M. Watanabe, Y. Kazuta, M. Arisawa, A. Matsuda, S. Shuto 398. Histamine H 3 antagonists with serotonin reuptake transporter inhibitor activity. K. S. Ly, M. A. Letavic, L. A. Gomez, J. A. Jablonowski, J. M. Keith, J. M. Miller, E. M. Stocking, R. L. Wolin, A. J. Barbier, J. D. Boggs, P. Bonaventure, B. Lord, K. L. Miller, S. J. Wilson, T. W. Lovenberg, N. I. Carruthers 399. Synthesis of DAG-lactones containing heterocyclic moieties: Small focused libraries in search of C1-specific domain interactions. S. El Kazzouli, N. E. Lewin, P. M. Blumberg, V. E. Marquez 400. Discovery of new generation of photodynamic therapeutics by an efficient combinatorial synthesis using porphyrin platform. M. Vinodu, D. Samaroo, X. Chen, C. M. Drain 401. Analysis of sample purity and integrity data using structural fragments: Patterns in the stability of compounds stored as solutions. L. P. Greenblatt, D. Mobilio, R. Nilakantan 402. New alkyl and aryl analogs of amodiaquine: Design, synthesis and antimalarial activity. E. Paunescu, S. Susplugas, E. Boll, R. A. Varga, E. Mouray, I. Grosu, P. Grellier, P. Melnyk 403. Prion diseases and malaria: Similar SAR of an active Quinoline family. R. Klingenstein, P. Melnyk, S. R. Leliveld, A. Ryckebusch, C. Korth 404. Non-phosphate inhibitors of IspE, a kinase in the non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and a potential target for antimalarial therapy. A. K. H. Hirsch, S. Lauw, P. Gersbach, W. B. Schweizer, F. Rohdich, W. Eisenreich, A. Bâcher, F. Diederich 405. Synthesis and biological activity of novel and potent C7 sancycline derivatives against Plasmodium falciparum. B. Bhatia, H. Assefa, L. Honeyman, A. Verma, M. Draper, P. Rosenthal, J. Gut, L. Garrity-Ryan, M. L. Nelson 406. Releasable dual-drug conjugates of folic acid (EC0225): An assembly concept for the consecutive introduction of unsymmetrical disulfide bonds. I. R. Vlahov, H. K. R. Santhapuram, Y. Wang, P. J. Kleindl, F. You, S. J. Howard, E. Westrick, J. A. Reddy, C. P. Leamon 407. Chalcogen-containing cationic dyes for photosensitized cleavage of DNA with therapeutic applications. M. K. Gannon II, J. J. Holt, M. Ye, D. J. Donnelly, T. Y. Ohulchanshyy, B. R. Wetzel, M. R. Detty 408. Gas-phase ion chemistry and tandem mass spectrometry for determination of alphal anti-trypsin inhibitor oxidation sites. H. P. Gunawardena

92-TECH

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 409. Discovery and optimization of a small molecule series that induces a novel isotropic growth phenotype in C. Albicans. S. Collibee, T. Lila, B. Morgan, P. Chua, M. Hamilton, T. Nakai, D. Pierce, D. J. Morgans Jr., C. Vacin, D. Clarke 410. Examination of the blood compatibility of heparinized carbon nanotubes. T-J. Park, S. Murugesan, S. Mousa, J. Fareed, R. J. Linhardt 411. Effect of three volatile oils on percutaneous absorption of aconitine. L Yanjie, M. Yunshu, B. Yicen 412. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles bearing tumor antigens as novel anticancer therapeutics. A. Sundgren 413. Targeted drug-delivery of an antibiotic bound to nanosized hydroxyapatite bone particles for treatment of bone injury. R. R. Runner, B. A. Shapiro, J. C. McPherson III, T. B. Buxton 414. Design and synthesis of heterocyclic cycloalkanol ethylamines as norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. J. P. Sabatucci, P. E. Mahaney, E. J. Trybulski, J. Leiter, G. Johnston, Y. Zhang, D. C. Deecher, O. McConnell 415. SAR of the cycloalkanol ethylamine scaffold: 4-aminopiperidine reuptake inhibitors. P. E. Mahaney, L. K. Gavrin, F. Ye, E. J. Trybulski, J. A. Bray, G. H. Johnston, J. Leiter, E. Koury, D. C. Deecher 416. SAR of the cycloalkanol ethylamine scaffold: N-Substituted piperazine reuptake inhibitors. P. E. Mahaney, E. J. Trybulski, G. Stack, G. E. M. Husbands, J. A. Bray, G. H. Johnston, J. Leiter, E. Koury, D. C. Deecher 417. SAR of the cycloalkanol ethylamine scaffold: Alkyl analogs. L. K. Gavrin, P. E. Mahaney, F. Ye, J. P. Sabatucci, M. B. Webb, E. J. Trybulski, J. A. Bray, G. H. Johnston, J. Leiter, E. Koury, D. C. Deecher 418. Substituted phenylpiperazinylethyl cycloalkanols as selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. A. T. Vu, S. T. Cohn, L. K. Gavrin, J. P. Sabatucci, P. E. Mahaney, A. N. Campbell, A. A. Santilli, E. J. Trybulski, R. E. Mewshaw, J. A. Bray, G. H. Johnston, J. Leiter, E. Koury, D. C. Deecher 419. SAR of the cycloalkanol ethylamine scaffold: Aminopyrrolidine and 3-aminopiperidine analogs. L. K. Gavrin, D. J. Jenkins, P. E. Mahaney, J. K. Belardi, E. J. Trybulski, J. A. Bray, G. H. Johnston, J. Leiter, E. Koury, D. C. Deecher 420. Withdrawn. 421. Practical asymmetric synthesis of potent NK-i antagonists. H-C. Tsui, S. Paliwal, G. A. Reichard, D. Xiao, C. Wang, M. L. Wrobleski, S. Shah, R. A. Duffy, J. Lachowicz, C. Morgan, A. Nomeir, G. Varty, N-Y. Shih 422. Novel {gammaj-lactams as potent, selective and orally active NK! antagonists. S. Paliwal, G. A. Reichard, S. Shah, M. L. Wrobleski, C. Wang, C. Stengone, H-C. Tsui, D. Xiao, R. A. Duffy, J. E. Lachowicz, F. Liu, A. A. Nomeir, G. B. Varty, N-Y. Shih 423. Synthesis of a new anti-leishmanial lead structure by a novel Heck-type reaction. C. Reichwald, O. Shimony, N. Sacerdoti-Sierra, C. L. Jaffe, C. Kunick 424. Discovery of 2-quinolyl-oxazoles as potent inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 4. R. Kuang, H-J. Shue, D. J. Blythin, N-Y. Shih, L Xiao, D. Gu, X. Chen, J. Schwerdt, L. Lin, P. C. Ting, X. Zhu, R. Aslanian, D. Prelusky, P. Wu, J. Zhang, X. Zhang, C. Celly, M. Minnicozzi, M. Billah, P. Wang 425. Discrimination of (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of pyrroloquinolone derivatives by PDE5: A molecular docking/dynamics study. M. R. Patel, T. T. Talele 426. Identification of N-acyl 4-(3-pyridonyl) phenylalanine derivatives and their orally active prodrug esters as dual acting alpha4-beta1 and alpha4-beta7 receptor antagonists. J. W. Tilley, A. Sidduri, J. P. Lou, P. Rossman, N. Tare, G. Cavallo, A. Railkar, L. Gerber, K. Frank, L. Renzetti

427. Discovery and preliminary evaluation of 5-(4-phenylbenzyl)oxazole-4-carboxamides as prostacyclin receptor antagonists. M-R. Brescia, L. L Rokosz, A. G. Cole, T. M. Stauffer, J. M. Lehrach, D. S. Auld, I. Henderson, M. L. Webb 428. Development of prostaglandin D2 receptor antagonist based on a tetrahydropyridoindole scaffold. C. Beaulieu, D. Guay, Z. Wang, Y. Leblanc, P. Roy, C. Dufresne, R. Zamboni, C. Berthelette, S. Day, N. N. Tsou, D. Denis, G. Greig, M-C. Mathieu, E. Vigneault, G. O'Neill 429. Structure-activity relationship of 1,2,3,5tetrasubstituted indoles as potent microsomal prostaglandin E 2 synthase-1 inhibitors. S. Laliberté, H. Juteau, Y. Gareau, R. Aspiotis, E. L Grimm, M. Blouin, D. B. Mackay, R. W. Friesen, D. Ethier, J. Guay, C-C. Chan, D. Riendeau 430. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of biarylimidazole derivatives as inhibitors of the microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1. H. Juteau, T. Y-H. Wu, Y. Ducharme, R. W. Friesen, S. Guiral, L. Dufresne, M. Salem, H. Poirier, D. Xu, L. Audoly 431. QSAR study of tacrine derivatives using variable selections. Y. Lee, Y. Jung, M. Jung 432. Structure guided virtual screening against dihydropteroate synthase. K. E. Hevener, I. Kerr, M. K. Yun, J. Qi, S. W. White, R. E. Lee 433. Structure-based virtual screening: The discovery of novel inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS5B RNA dependent RNA polymerase. S. Y. Kim, J. H. Shin, Κ. Τ. No 434. Computational investigation of direct antitumor cell activity of novel bisphosphonates. M. P. Hudock, Y. Zhang, K. Krysiak, F. Yin, R. Cao, Y. Song, E. van Beek, S. Papapoulos, E. Oldfield 435. Synthesis and profiling of a new multiple kinase inhibitor chemotype. A-M. Egert, S. Kohfeld, F. Totzke, C. Schâchtele, M. H. G. Kubbutat, D. W. Zaharevitz, C. Kunick 436. Synthesis and properties of novel stigmasterol-based cationic liposomes. Z. Le, J. Qian, F. Yu, S. Deng, R. Ruan, P. Chen 437. Synthesis, structure and solution chemistry of 3-thia-uracil. J . Gao, L. Shi, R. Ermis, L Seal, D. Aust, B. Shroot 438. Design and synthesis of unnatural DNA containing ring expanded purine analogs. O. R. Wauchope, D. Z. Zhang, D. K. Seley-Radtke 439. Synthesis of conformationally locked versions of puromycin as tools to understand the role of furanose conformation in the peptidyl transfer reaction. H. Saneyoshi, Y. Choi, P. Strazewski, V. E. Marquez 440. Efficient one-pot synthesis of chiral polysubstituted morpholines. R. A. Bilbeisi, N. Moitessier 441. Paullones are rearranged to 11 H-indolo[3,2-c]quinoline-6-carboxylic acids by a novel ring contraction reaction. A. Becker, S. Kohfeld, L. Preu, T. Pies, D. W. Zaharevitz, C. Kunick 442. Syntheses of UDP-GlcNYn, UDP-GalNYn and several analogs with utility to analyze sugar-transferase protein substrates. G. Rai, C. J Thomas 443. Synthesis of novel PNA building blocks for strain-promoted "click" chemistry. J. S. Taylor, P. Sengupta 444. Toward the synthesis of Clathculins A and B. S. G. Brown 445. Utilizing a diazirine and alkyne containing probe in a proof of principle study to investigate small molecule interactions across the proteome. C. A. LeClair, W. A. Prinz, S. Raychaudhuri, C. J. Thomas 446. Cholesterol lowering drugs inhibit Staphylococcus aureus virulence. E. Oldfield

THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 21OA Antiarrhythmic Agents Cosponsored by Wyeth Research J. A. Butera,

Organizer

9:00 447. Current therapy and innovative targets for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. J. K. Hennan 9:30 448. Class III antiarrhythmic agents: Delayed cardiac repolarization by selective blockade of IKr, IKs or IKur. H. Selnick 10:00 449. Design and synthesis of orally bioavailable Kv1.5 antagonists for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. B. W. Trotter 10:30 450. Discovery of potent gap-junction modifiers as novel antiarrhythmic agents: From stable hexa-peptides to orally available small molecules. J. A. Butera, Β. D. Larsen, Ε. Kerns, L. Di, J. Κ. Hennan, R. Swillo, G. Morgan, C. Huselton, R. J. Unwalla, J. Petersen 11:00 451. A1 Adenosine receptor agonists as ventricular rate control agents during atrial fibrillation. J. Zablocki, E. Elzein, R. Kalla, X. Li, T. Perry, T. Marquait, H. Genin, M. Micklatcher, J. Shryock, L Wu, Y. Li, Y. Wu, D. Zeng, A. Dhalla, I. Lepist, B. Stafford, K. Leung 11:30 452. Discovery of nicotinamides and related derivatives as potent and selective NCX reverse mode inhibitors. A. Kakefuda, T. Kuramochi, H. Yamada, I. Sato, I. Tsukamoto, T. Taguchi, S. Sakamoto Section Β BCEC 210B General Oral Session J. R. McCarthy,

Organizer

9:00 453. Design and synthesis of potent and efficacious 5-membered ring deriva­ tives of gabapentin for the treatment of neuropathic pain. D. C. Blakemore, S. A. Osborne, J. S. Bryans 9:20 454. Discovery and SAR of orally active tri- and tetracyclic mGluRI antagonists. D. A. Burnett, D. Tulshian, S. Cooke, J. Matasi, P. Korakas, L. S. Silverman, T. K. Sasikumar, W-L. Wu, C. Bennett, C. Knutson, W. J. Greenlee, A. Reggiani, A. Veltri, R. Bertorelli, S. Fredduzzi, G. Lozza, G. Tarozzo, C. Foglia, M. Grilli 9:40 455. Synthesis and topoisomerase poisoning activity of Α-ring and E-ring substituted luotonin A derivatives. K. Nacro, C. Zha, P. R. Guzzo, R. J. Herr, D. Peace, T. D. Friedrich 10:00 456. Synthesis and evaluation of pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine CDK inhibitors as antitumor agents. R. Lin, Y. Lu, G. Chiu, S. Li, Y. Yu, S. Huang, P. Connolly, X. Li, S. Emanuel, S. Middleton, M. Adams, A. Fuentes-Pesquera, R. Gruninger, L. Greenberger 10:20 457. Design and synthesis of novel second generation HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). T. J. Tucker, S. Saggar, J. T. Sisko, R. M. Tynebor, P. J. Felock, J. A. Flynn, M-T. Lai, Y. Liang, M. Liu, M. Miller, G. Moyer, V. Munshi, R. Perlow-Poehnelt, S. Prasad, R. Sanchez, M. Torrent, J. P. Vacca, T. M. Williams, B-L. Wan

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

MEDI/NUCL 10:40 458. Discovery and optimization of diphenyl ether nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase. J. P. Dunn, P. Dunten, T. R. Elworthy, X. Han, S. Harris, G. Heilek, D. R. Hirschfeld, J. H. Hogg, A. Kaiser, D. J. Kertesz, W. Kim, K. Klumpp, Y. Li, T. Mirzadegan, M. G. Roepel, Y. D. Saito, T. M. P. C. Silva, S. Swallow, Z. K. Sweeney, J. L. Tracy, A. Villasenor, H. Vora, M. Smith, D. Stefanidis, G. Su, A. Trejo-Martin, A. Zhou 11:00 459. Synthesis and anticancer activity of new migrastatin analogs. G. Anquetin, S. L. Rawe, P. V. Murphy 11:20 460. Design and SAR of P1-P3 ketoamide derived macrocyclic inhibitors of HCV protease. S. Venkatraman, F. Velazquez, W. Wu, M. Blackman, A. Arasappan, F. Bennett, S. L. Bogen, K. Chen, Y. Huang, E. Jao, L Nair, W. Pan, P. Pinto, M. Sannigrahi, B. Vibulbhan, W. Yang, A. Saksena, V. Girijavallabhan, X. Tong, K-C. Cheng, N-Y. Shih, F. G. Njoroge 11:40 461. Discovery of HCV protease inhibitors: Acyclic tripeptides containing novel P-2 substituted proline. J. Naud, P. Forgione, N. Goudreau, C. Lemke, M. Uinàs-Brunet 12:00 462. Novel potent second generation HCV NS3 protease inhibitors. K. X. Chen, B. Vibulbhan, W. Yang, A. Arasappan, F. Bennett, M. Blackman, S. L. Bogen, Y. Huang, L. Nair, F. G. Njoroge, A. Padilla, W. Pan, P. Pinto, M. Sannigrahi, F. Velazquez, S. Venkatraman, X. Tong, K-C. Cheng, N-Y. Shih Antibiotics Discovery, Biosynthesis, and Resistance Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI and BIOHW

3:50 470. Discovery of a novel, potent PPARa selective activator BMS-687453. J. Li, L. J. Kennedy, Y. Shi, S. Tao, X-Y. Ye, S. Y. Chen, R. Raju, Y. Wang, A. Hernandez, H. Zhang, W. Wang, P. V. Devasthale, S. Chen, Z. Lai, S. Wu, R. A. Smirk, S. A. Bolton, D. E. Ryono, H. Zhang, N-K. Lim, B-C. Chen, K. T. Locke, K. M. O'Malley, L. Zhang, R. A. Srivastava, B. Miao, D. S. Meyers, H. Monshizadegan, D. Search, D. Grimm, R. Zhang, T. Harrity, L K. Kunselman, M. Cap, V. Hosagrahara, L. Zhang, P. Kadiyala, C. Xu, Y-X. Li, J. K. Muckelbauer, C. Chang, S. Krystek Jr., M. A. Blanar, R. Zahler, R. Mukherjee, P. T. Cheng, J. A. Tino 4:10 471. Development of inhibitors of menaquinone biosynthesis: A new drug target in gram-positive bacteria. M. Kurosu, D. C. Crick 4:30 472. Discovery of novel active sitedirected pharmacological chaperones to increase the cellular activity of Gaucher disease associated glucocerebrosidase variants guided by virtual screening. T. Mu, Y. Hu, A. J. Olson, J. W. Kelly

NUCL Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology H. Nitsche, Program Chair

C. M. Folden III and C. L. Crawford, Organizers N. A. Wall, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 8. Future trends in nuclear and radiochemistry. G. Choppin 9:15 9. Current trends in nuclear science and engineering applications as a result of 911. S.S.Prasad 9:55 Discussion. 10:05 Intermission. 10:25 10. f Element studies using cyclic voltammetry in room temperature ionic liquids. W. J. Pemberton, K. Czerwinski, D. W. Hatchett 10:50 1 1 . Evaluation of a low temperature fluoride route to synthesize actinide mononitrides. G. W. C. Silva, C. B. Yeamans, G. Cerefice, F. Poineau, K. Czerwinski 11:15 12. Nitrate effects on uranium and plutonium extractions. A. D. Wright, K. Czerwinski 11:40 13. Separation of curium from euro­ pium by cloud point extraction using 8-hydroxyquinoline. T. A. Robinson, K. Czerwinski, M. Draye

Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Actinide Chemistry Overview Cosponsored by COMP and INOR

BUSINESS M E E T I N G : Business Meeting: Mon SUNDAY MORNING

General Oral Session J. R. McCarthy, Organizer,

Meeting the Diverse Needs of the 21st Century Nuclear Science Workforce: A Symposium by Graduate Student Scientists in Nuclear and Radiochemistry Separation Chemistry Cosponsored by YCC

Boston Park Plaza Franklin Rm

Section A BCEC 210A

Boston Park Plaza Lexington Rm

Section C S O C I A L EVENT: Social Hour: Mon

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section Β

Presiding

1:30 463. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of ansamycin prodrugs as water-soluble Hsp90 inhibitors. S. J . Moss, B. Wilkinson, A. Guiblin, A. McElhinney, C. Beckmann, L S. Sheehan, J-P. Crochard, A. J. Kaja, R. M. Sheridan, M. Nur-E-Alam, N. Coates, M. A. Gregory, T. Greiner, N. Bausch, C. J. Martin, M. Q. Zhang 1:50 464. Cu(l)Br-mediated preparation of 14C-labeled 3-pyridineacetate derivatives and synthesis of a novel 14C-labeled PDE-IV inhibitor. J . Z. Ho 2:10 465. Evaluating small molecule-protein interactions in transcriptional activation. S. J. Buhrlage, A. K. Mapp 2:30 466. Identification and development of azolidinone vinyl-fused heteroaromatic derivatives: Second generation of potent PI3Kg inhibitors, with improved oral activity in models of Rheumatoid Arthritis. T. Ruckle 2:50 467. Selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor WAY-260022 (NRI-022): Proposed therapy as a selective NRI for the treatment of neurological disorders and dysfunction. E. J. Trybulski, P. E. Mahaney, L. K. Gavrin, A. T. Vu, G. Stack, S. Cohn, D. J. Jenkins, J. P. Sabatucci, F. Ye, M. B. Webb, K. Sipe, J. Leiter, G. H. Johnston, K. Burroughs, S. Cosmi, L. Leventhal, Y. Zhang, C. Mugford, B. Piatt, D. C. Deecher 3:10 468. Discovery of LXR Modulator WAY252623. J . Wrobel, R. J. Steffan, E. Matelan, S. M. Bowen, B. Hu, M. Collini, C. P. Miller, R. J. Unwalla, P. Nambi, E. Quinet, L. Chen, A. Halpern, Q-Y. Liu, D. Savio, E. Zamaratsky, L. Kruger, A. Wilhelmsson, A. G. Nilsson, C. Ursu, E. Arnelof, J. Sandberg, C. Enroth, T. Bonn, M. Farnegardh 3:30 469. Synthesis, characterization, and nuclear receptor interaction profiles of enantiomeric bile acids. B. W. Katona, C. L Cummins, A. D. Ferguson, D. J. Mangelsdorf, D. F. Covey

P. Schwerdtfeger and N. Kaltsoyannis, Organizers

Section A Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm

J. Li, Organizer,

Molecular Imaging H. F. VanBrocklin,

Organizer

A. B. Packard, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 1. Role of PET in therapeutic drug development. T. J. McCarthy 9:25 2. F-18(+)FP-DTBZ: a PET ligand for imaging VMAT2 binding sites in the brain and pancreas. H. Kung, M. Kung, B. Lieberman, C. Hou, D. Ponde, R. Goswami, D. Skovraonsky, S. Deng, J. Markamnn, M. Kilborn 9:45 3. Automated synthesis of [C 11 ]DTBZ for PET molecular imaging study. K. Lim, R. R. Price, R. M. Baldwin 10:05 Intermission. 10:30 4. Ethanol isotopomers as candidate PET tracers. S. J. Gatley, L. Faleiro, A. N. Gifford 10:50 5. Radiofluorinated benzamide as a potential sigma-2 receptor ligand. S. V. Selivanova, J. E. van Lier, F. Bénard 11:10 6. Technetium/rhenium tricarbonyl labeled and fluorinated estradiols for estrogen receptor imaging: New variations. R. N. Hanson, R. Kirss, R. B. Hochberg 11:30 7. Cu-64 and ln-111 Labeled TPP cations as selective radiotracers for tumor imaging. J. Wang, C-T. Yang, Y-S. Kim, S. Sreerama, Q. Cao, Z-B. Li, X. Chen, S.Liu

Presiding

8:10 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 14. Perspectives on a quarter century of theoretical actinide chemistry. B. E. Bursten 9:00 15. Pu@Pb 12 : The first predicted 32-electron system. P. Pyykko 9:40 16. Density functional models of uranyl sorption at aluminum oxide and kaolinite. N. Roesch, A. Kremleva, L. V. Moskaleva, S. Krueger 10:20 Intermission. 10:40 17. Computational chemistry studies of actinide complexes. D. A. Dixon, K. E. Gutowski, S. Li, R. Craciun, V. Jackson, K. Tippey 11:20 18. Theoretical studies of the elec­ tronic properties and reactions of organoactinide complexes using density func­ tional theory. P. J . Hay, P. Yang, E. R. Batista, R. L. Martin SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm

2:40 22. Collagen targeted MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of myocardial infarction. P. Caravan, F. H. Epstein, P. A. Helm, Z. Zhang, B. Das, L Shen, V. Jacques, S. Dumas 3:00 Intermission. 3:25 23. Convenient approach for the prepa­ ration of radiotracers in high effective specific activity. J. Valliant, A. Donovan, J. Mclntee 3:45 24. No-carrier-added radiohalogenations using organotrifluoroborat.es. G. W. Kabalka, M-L. Yao, J. F. Green 4:05 25. Glucosamine conjugates for use in Tc(99m) imaging. M. L Bowen, Z-F. Chen, N. C. Lim, C. B. Ewart, C. L. Ferreira, M. J. Adam, C. Orvig Section Β Boston Park Plaza Lexington Rm Meeting the Diverse Needs of the 21st Century Nuclear Science Workforce: A Symposium by Graduate Student Scientists in Nuclear and Radiochemistry Nuclear Chemistry/Radiopharmacology Cosponsored by YCC N. A. Wall and C. L. Crawford, C. M. Folden III, Organizer,

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 26. Commissioning report on the NSCL RF fragment separator. J. Stoker, V. Andreev, B. Arend, D. Bazin, A. Becerril, M. Doleans, R. Fontus, P. Glennon, P. F. Mantica, J. Ottarson, D. Sanderson, H. Schatz, J. Vincent, J. Wagner, X. Wu, A. Zeller 1:45 27. Using light cluster production to explore the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. S. N. Soisson, L Chen, E. Bell, B. Li, D. Shetty, G. A. Souliotis, A. Keksis, B. Stein, S. Yennello 2:10 28. Strong dependence of reaction cross sections on projectile neutron num­ ber: 208Pb(48Ti,xn)256-xRf vs. 208Pb(50Ti,xn)258-xRf. I. Dragojevic, K. E. Gregorich, C. E. Dullmann, C. M. Folden III, M. A. Garcia, J. M. Gates, S. L. Nelson, R. Sudowe, H. Nitsche 2:35 29. Double magic nucleus 270108HS162· J. Dvorak, W. Bruechle, M. Chelnokov, R. Dressier, C. E. Duellmann, K. Eberhardt, R. Eichler, V. Gorshkov, E. Jaeger, R. Kruecken, A. Kusnetzov, Y. Nagame, F. Nebel, Z. Novakova, Z. Qin, M. Schaedel, R. Schuber, B. Schausten, E. Schimpf, A. Semchenkov, P. Thoerle, A. Tuerler, M. Wegrzecki, B. Wierczinski, A. Yakushev, A. Yeremin 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 30. A gas ionization detector with silicon nitride window for AMS applications. L. T. Demoranvilie, D. L. Knies, C. Cetina, A. C. Mignerey 3:40 3 1 . Sulfur-35 and promethium-147 source production for radioisotope micropower sources. D. E. Meier, A. Garnov, J. D. Brockman, J. D. Robertson 4:05 32. Radiochemical labeling of P 2 S 2 as a potential bifunctional chelating agent. B. D. Ballard, H. Engelbrecht, C. S. Cutler, S. S. Jurisson 4:30 33. Synthesis and chemical stability of actinium-fullerenes. J . Mwakisege, S. Mirzadeh, R. A. Boll, G. Schweitzer

Molecular Imaging A. B. Packard,

Organizer

H. F. VanBrocklin, Organizer,

Presiding

2:00 19. MicroPET imaging of alpha ν beta 3 expression on osteoclasts related to osteo­ lytic bone metastases. C. J. Anderson, T. J. Wadas, J. E. Sprague, H. Deng, Κ. Ν. Weilbaecher 20. Withdrawn. 2:20 2 1 . Effect of structural changes on the myocardial uptake of lipophilic cationic ^ C u complexes. V. Gottumukkala, T. Treves, F. Fahey, P. Dunning, E. Snay, A. B. Packard

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-93

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

NUCL Section C

Section Β

Boston Park Plaza Franklin Rm

Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm

Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Structure and Bonding Cosponsored by COMP and INOR

Meeting the Diverse Needs of the 21st Century Nuclear Science Workforce: A Symposium by Graduate Student Scientists in Nuclear and Radiochemistry Environmental Radiochemistry Cosponsored by YCC

J. Li, P. Schwerdtfeger, and N. Kaltsoyannis, Organizers E. R. Vorpagel,

Presiding

1:20 34. Multiconfigurational quantum chemistry for actinide containing systems: From isolated molecules to condensed phase. L. Gagliardi 2:00 35. Why are there (almost) no molecular actinide complexes containing unsupported metal-metal bonds? N. Kaltsoyannis, G. E. Cavigliasso 2:40 36. Quantum chemical calculations of structural properties and spectroscopy of solvated actinide ions: Theory and applications. V. Vallet 3:20 Intermission. 3:40 37. Combined infrared and computational studies of discrete uranyl trianion complexes. G. S. Groenewold, M. Van Stipdonk, G. L Gresham, J. Oomens, B. de Jong, A. K. Gianotto, M. E. Mcllwain 4:20 38. Combining computational modeling and gas-phase experiments to gain insight in actinide chemistry. W. A. de Jong, G. S. Groenewold, M. J. Van Stipdonk MONDAY MORNING

N. A. Wall and C. M. Folden III, Organizers C. L. Crawford, Organizer,

Presiding Section Β

9:00 46. Isotopic composition of uranium in soils. A. D. Choiniere, S. Clark, S. C. Smith, C. M. Knaack 9:30 47. Development of a colorimetric test for quantification of uranium in drinking water. A. E. Ratliff, T. DeVol, D. P. DiPrete 10:00 48. Bridging the gap between field studies of radionuclide mobility and lab sorption data. S. W. Thompson, R. A. Fjeld, D. I. Kaplan 10:30 Intermission. 10:50 49. Uptake of lanthanides onto hydroxyapatite. C. R. Armstrong, S. B. Clark 11:20 50. Multiisotope approach to process monitoring in reprocessing plants. C. R. Orton, R. N. Christensen, M. Douglas, L. E. Smith, J. J. Ressler, C. Durst, J. M. Schwantes 11:50 Concluding Remarks. Section C Boston Park Plaza Franklin Rm

Section A Boston Park Plaza Lexington Rm Nuclear Structure and Reactions in the Era of Radioactive Beams Nuclear Structure L. W . Phair and R. T. de Souza, Organizers l-Y. Lee,

Presiding

8:10 39. Radioactive rarities near the proton drip-line. R. K. Grzywacz 8:40 40. Investigations of pairing in nuclei. R. M. Clark 9:10 4 1 . Precision measurements with fast beams of rare isotopes. T. Glasmacher 9:40 Intermission. 10:00 42. Neutron-rich A-15 nuclei produced in fusion-evaporation reactions. M. Wiedeking, P. Fallon, A. O. Macchiavelli, L. W. Phair, R. M. Clark, M. Cromaz, M-A. Deleplanque, J. D. Gibelin, l-Y. Lee, M. A. McMahan, L. G. Moretto, E. Rodriguez-Vieitez, L. A. Bernstein, D. L Bleuel, J. T. Burke, B. F. Lyles, A. Volya 10:30 43. Nuclear structure research at TRIUMF-ISAC. P. E. Garrett 11:00 44. Properties of 7He from single nucléon transfer reactions. A. H. Wuosmaa, K. E. Rehm, N. Goodman, R. V. F. Janssens, L. Jisonna, J. C. Lighthall, S. T. Marley, R. C. Pardo, S. C. Pieper, J. P. Schiffer, R. E. Segel, R. H. Siemssen, R. B. Wiringa 11:30 45. Internal conversion coefficients in

TSD bands of 167Lu. C. W. Beausang

Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Solvation and Spectroscopy Cosponsored by COMP and INOR J. Li and P. Schwerdtfeger,

Organizers

N. Kaltsoyannis, Organizer,

Presiding

8:20 5 1 . Four-component relativistic theory for NMR parameters. W. Liu 9:00 52. Computational NMR studies of heavy element compounds: What can be learned from transition metals? J. Autschbach 9:40 53. Infrared spectroscopic and theoreti­ cal investigations of thorium and uranium atom reaction products with methane, ammonia, and halomethanes. W. L S. Andrews, J. T. Lyon, X. Wang 10:20 Intermission. 10:40 54. Probing actinide electronic struc­ ture using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy. M. C. Heaven 11:20 55. Near-infrared fluorescence emis­ sion from Pu(VI)02CI4. M. P. Wilkerson, J. M. Berg, K. S. Boland, L E. Wolfsberg MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza Lexington Rm Nuclear Structure and Reactions in the Era of Radioactive Beams Nuclear Reactions R. T. de Souza and L. W. Phair, Organizers A. C. Mignerey,

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

94-TECH

3:00 59. Current results and plans for iso­ topic observables of the asymmetry term of the nuclear EOS. M. A. Famiano 3:30 60. Density dependence of the symme­ try energy and the nuclear equation of state. S. J. Yennello, D. V. Shetty, G. A. Souliotis 4:00 6 1 . Heavy residue studies below the Fermi energy and the role of the nuclear symmetry energy. G. A. Souliotis, D. V. Shetty, S. J. Yennello 4:30 62. The in-medium correlations as seen from a causal perspective and the nuclear Caloric Curve T(E*). L G. Sobotka, R. J. Charity, W. H. Dickhoff

Presiding

1:10 56. Exploring the symmetry energy of asymmetric matter with heavy ion reac­ tions. W. G. Lynch, P. Danielewicz, M. Tsang, Y. X. Zhang, A. Steiner 1:40 57. Tidal effects and the Proximity decay of nuclei. S. Hudan, R. T. de Souza, A. B. Mcintosh 2:10 58. Nuclear level densities off of the stability line. S. M. Grimes, T. N. Massey, M. Oginni, S. Shukla, A. Voinov 2:40 Intermission.

Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Developments in Radiochemistry and Nuclear Counting Techniques Cosponsored by ANYL C. Coleman, D. Hobbs, D. Hobart, D. Peterson, S. Lamont, and D. Diprete, Organizers L Tandon, Organizer,

M O N D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

H. Nitsche,

Presiding

8:00-10:00 75. Investigation of lanthanide and actinide complexes with diamides of dipicolinic acid. M. Alyapyshev, A. Paulenova, V. A. Babain 76. Isotopic and elemental analysis of nuclear materials by mass spectrometry. S. Burger, L. R. Riciputi, D. A. Bostick, W. S. Kinman 77. Optimizing separation of iodine from halogen interferences in preparation for TIMS analysis. L A. Metz, R. F. Payne, M. D. Engelmann 78. The Imaging Probe Development Center: An NIH roadmap initiative to promote molecular imaging applications in interdis­ ciplinary research. H. Li, G. Kaur, Z. Shi, A. Sulima, B. Teng, O. Vasalatiy, H. Wu, B. Xu, S. Cofiell, N. Neale, B. Ruddy, C. Wilson, G. L Griffiths

Presiding TUESDAY MORNING

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:40 63. Plenary Lecture. Separation meth­ ods for the nuclear fuel cycle and waste management. G. R. Choppin 2:15 64. Evaluation of group actinide separa­ tion using a modified UNEX solvent. A. Paulenova, M. Alyapyshev, V. A. Babain, J. D. Law 2:35 65. Radiochronometry standards. B. Srinivasan, P. Croatto, J. Neuhoff, S. Goldberg, U. Narayanan, P. Mason 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 66. Measuring Po-210/Pb-210 ratios in air samples collected with an electrostatic sampler. P. R. Nuessle, J. R. Cadieux 3:30 67. Aerosol filter analysis using scan­ ning micro X-ray fluorescence. G. J. Havrilla, V. M. Montoya, L Tandon, S. P. LaMont 3:50 68. Sensors for radiochemical applica­ tions. E. M. Minogue 4:10 69. Polymeric thin films for extraction and analysis of radioactive analytes. D. Peterson, E. R. Gonzales, D. R. Porterfield Section C Boston Park Plaza Franklin Rm Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Relativistic Quantum Chemistry Cosponsored by COMP and INOR J. Li and N. Kaltsoyannis, P. Schwerdtfeger, Organizer,

Organizers Presiding

1:20 70. Screened hybrid density functional studies of actinides in solid state. G. E. Scuseria 2:00 7 1 . Computational chemistry for small and for large actinide complexes. L. Visscher 2:40 72. Relativististic energy-consistent pseudopotentials: New developments for f-elements and applications. M. Dolg 3:20 Intermission. 3:40 73. High-order electron-correlation methods with scalar relativistic and spinorbit corrections. S. Hirata, T. Yanai, R. J. Harrison, M. Kamiya, P-D. Fan 4:20 74. Relativistic molecular theory toward large molecular calculations. T. Nakajima

Section A Boston Park Plaza Lexington Rm Nuclear Structure and Reactions in the Era of Radioactive Beams Astrophysics and RHIC L. W . Phair,

Organizer

R. T. de Souza, Organizer,

Presiding

8:00 79. Benchmarking (d.p-γ) as a surrogate reaction for neutron capture. R. Hatarik, L. A. Bernstein, J. T. Burke, J. A. Cizewski, J. D. Gibelin, P. D. O'Malley, L. W. Phair, T. Swan 8:30 80. Experimental uncertainties of helium burning reactions and astrophysical impli­ cations. C. Tur, A. Heger, S. M. Austin, A. Wuosmaa 9:00 81. Helium burning in steady state and explosive nucleosynthesis. J. T. Burke, S. A. Sheets, L. W. Phair, N. D. Scielzo, J. D. Gibelin, R. M. Clark, M. Wiedeking, L. A. Bernstein, E. B. Norman, R. Hoffman, C. W. Beausang, S. Lesher, B. F. Lyles 9:30 82. Determining nuclear symmetry energy and its impacts in astrophysics. B-A. Li 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 83. Experimental constraints for the transport coefficients of the quark gluon plasma. R. Lacey 10:45 84. Kaon/pion fluctuations at RHIC. G. Westfall 11:15 85. Phase transitions from hadronic to partonic worlds. L. G. Moretto 11:45 86. Global measurements in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and beyond. A. C. Mignerey Section Β Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Developments in Radiochemistry and Nuclear Counting Techniques Cosponsored by ANYL C. Coleman, D. Hobbs, D. Hobart, S. Lamont, L. Tandon, and D. Diprete, Organizers D. Peterson, Organizer,

Presiding

8:20 Introductory Remarks. 8:25 87. Rapid measurements of Neptunium oxidation states using chromatographic resins. D. P. DiPrete, C. C. DiPrete, D. I. Kaplan, E. A. Kyser, M. A. Malek

NUCL 8:45 88. Diamides of dipicolinic acid in polar diluents: Promising solvent for extraction of actinides. V. A. Babain, M. Y. Alyapyshev 9:05 89. Novel uranyl complexants with enhanced selectivity: Activation of P = 0 in uranyl binding by auxiliary groups. X. Zhu, S. D. Alexandratos 9:25 90. Separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides by using tertiary-pyridine resin embedded in silica beads. T. Suzuki, Y. Fujii, S-l. Koyama, M. Ozawa, T. Mitsugashira 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 9 1 . Evaluation of a new scintillator for neutron detection in hand-held RIID instruments. R. A. Sigg, D. M. C. Odell 10:20 92. Automated flow scintillation analysis of polonium. A. A. Plionis, D. Peterson, E. R. Gonzales 10:40 93. Beyond traditional radioanalytical chemistry: Automated separation/preconcentration and ion-counting instruments. D. Larivière, S. Kiser, C. Li, S. Johnson, R. J. Cornett 11:00 94. Detection and measurement of plutonium isotopes in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)'s Peruvian Soil Standard Reference Material (SRM 4355) by alpha spectrometry and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). J. R. Cadieux, G. Hall, S. P. Lamont 11:20 95. Certified reference materials for nuclear forensic measurements. S. P. LaMont, L. Tandon, F. R. Roensch, R. Ε. Steiner, C. Bums, A. Wong Section C Boston Park Plaza Franklin Rm Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Transactinide Chemistry Cosponsored by COMP and INOR J. Li, P. Schwerdtfeger, and N. Kaltsoyannis, Organizers L. Visscher,

Presiding

8:20 96. Relativistic effects in Superheavy Elements. P. Schwerdtfeger 9:00 97. Toward the spectroscopy of nobelium and lawrencium, the heaviest actinides. U. Kaldor 9:40 98. Is eka-mercury (element 112) a group I IB metal? N. Gaston 10:20 Intermission. 10:40 99. Aqueous chemistry of the transac­ tinide elements, rutherfordium (Rf). Y. Nagame 11:20 100. New generation relativistic quan­ tum chemical methods. W. Liu, D. Peng, W. Kutzelnigg TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

3:50 105. Systematic heavy element forma­ tion studies with 208Pb and 209Bi targets. I. Dragojevic, Κ. Ε. Gregorich, C. E. Dullmann, C. M. Folden III, M. A. Garcia, J. M. Gates, S. L Nelson, R. Sudowe, H. Nitsche 4:20 106. Superheavy shell gaps from nobelium 2-quasiparticle energies. T. L. Khoo

Section A Boston Park Plaza Lexington Rm

Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Developments in Radiochemistry and Nuclear Counting Techniques Cosponsored by ANYL S. Lamont, C. Coleman, D. Hobbs, D. Hobart, L. Tandon, and D. Peterson, Organizers D. Diprete, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 107. Speciatidn of plutonium in the extraction organic phase of urex. P. Tkac, A. Paulenova 1:55 108. Nuclear forensics: Investigation of nuclear materials. E. Hastings, L. Tandon, Κ. J. Kuhn, S. LaMont, D. Beddingfield, A. S. Wong, D. R. Porterfield, S. C. Myers 2:15 109. Ultra purification of Mo 100 for use in double beta decay experiments. J. D. Baker, C. L. Riddle, C. A. McGrath, C. S. Sutton 2:35 110. Holdup measurements for visual examination and transuranic waste reme­ diation glovebox facilities at the Savannah River Site. R. A. Dewberry, V. R. Casella, R. A. Sigg, S. R. Salaymeh, F. S. Moore, D.Pak 2:55 111. 6 7 Cu separation from zinc by sublimation and ion exchange. D. L. Bowers, D. A. Ehst, V. S. Sullivan, G. F. Vandegrift 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 112. Redox separation of iodide from halides in preparation for TIMS analyses of radioiodine. R. F. Payne, L. A. Metz, M. D. Engelmann 3:50 113. Tritium in urine radiobioassay intercomparison results from the Intercomparison Studies Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. N. Bores, M. K. Schultz, J. M. Rankin, A. J. Denton, G. F. Payne 4:10 114. Analytical improvements in radio­ chemical processing of in vitro bioassay samples. F. R. Roensch, S. P. LaMont, R. E. Steiner 4:30 115. Study of the risk of leukemia disease due to environmental pollution by Cs137 radionuclides. N. I. Shaniyazov, M. R. Turakulova

Nuclear Structure and Reactions in the Era of Radioactive Beams Heavy Elements R. T. de Souza and L. W . Phair, Organizers

J. Li, P. Schwerdtfeger, and N. Kaltsoyannis, Organizers

D. J . Morrissey,

Presiding

S. L. Nelson, I. Dragojevic, M. A. Garcia, J. M. Gates, Y. Chung, R. Eichler, G. K. Pang, A. Turler, A. Yakushev, J. Dvorak, D. C. Hoffman, H. Nitsche 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 104. Synthesis of transactinide nuclei using radioactive beams. W. Loveland

L. Gagliardi,

Presiding

1:20 116. Computational actinide chemistry: Are we there yet? J . Li 2:00 117. Structures of actinide complexes: Combining DFT calculations, EXAFS spectroscopy, and thermodynamic speciation. S. Tsushima, C. Hennig, A. Ikeda, A. Rossberg, A. C. Scheinost 2:40 118. Role of surface charge density in

primary and secondary hydration spheres of Ln(lll) and An(lll)-(VI). A. Clark 3:20 Intermission. 3:40 119. Ab initio study of the photoinduced proton transfert on the uranyl in aqueous solution. F. Real, V. Vallet, U. Wahlgren, I. Grenthe

10:20 Intermission. 10:35 130. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy as a probe of chemical speciation and intrinsic nanoscience of actinide-containing materials. S. D. Conradson 11:00 131. Synchrotron studies of actinide speciation in solution. L. Soderholm, S. Skanthakumar, M. R. Antonio 11:25 132. Soft X-ray scanning transmission spectromicroscopy of actinide materials. D. K. Shuh, T. Tyliszczak, P. S. Nico, R. Daehn

Nuclear Structure and Reactions in the Era of Radioactive Beams Fission and Trapping

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

R. T. de Souza and L W . Phair, Organizers

Boston Park Plaza Lexington Rm

L. A. Bernstein,

Nuclear Structure and Reactions in the Era of Radioactive Beams Applications and the Future

Presiding

8:30 121. Thermalized exotic nuclei from fragmentation, creation and study. D. J. Morrissey, C. Bachelet, M. Block, G. Bollen, M. E. Facina, C. M. Folden III, C. Guenaut, A. Kwiatkowski, G. K. Pang, A. Prinke, R. Ringle, J. Savory, P. Schury, S. Schwarz, C. S. Sumithrarachchi 9:00 122. Precision experiments with ther­ malized beams of rare isotopes from projectile fragmentation. G. Bollen, C. Bachelet, M. Block, M. E. Facina, C. M. Folden III, C. Guenaut, A. Kwiatkowski, D. J. Morrissey, G. K. Pang, A. Prinke, R. Ringle, J. Savory, P. Schury, S. Schwarz, C. S. Sumithrarachchi 9:30 123. Fission of spherical radioactive beams: A new tool to study the dissipative properties of nuclear matter. A. Heinz, A. Kelic, K-H. Schmidt, C. Schmitt, B. Jurado, P. N. N. Nadtochy, J. Benlliure, M. V. Ricciardi, A. Junghans, A. Wagner, V. Henzl, D. Henzlova 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 124. Fission barrier landscape. L. W. Phair 10:50 125. In-flight fission of 2 3 8 U at 80 MeV/u. C. M. Folden III 11:20 126. Effects of angular momentum population distributions on the Surrogate Method. B. F. Lyles, J. T. Burke, L. A. Bernstein, D. L Bleuel, J. Escher, I. Thompson, F. Dietrich, L W. Phair, J. D. Gibelin, M. Wiedeking, M. McMahan, E. Rodriguez-Vieitez, R. M. Clark, A. O. Macchiavelli, S. Lesher, C. W. Beausang

Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Applications of X-Ray Techniques Cosponsored by ANYL C. Coleman, D. Hobbs, D. Hobart, D. Peterson, and L. Tandon, Organizers C. G. Worley, Organizer,

Section A

R. T. de Souza,

Organizer

L. W . Phair, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 133. An intense, tunable, mono-ener­ getic neutron source at LLNL. L E. Ahle, B. Rusnak, E. Hartouni, A. Tremaine 2:00 134. Gamma-ray energy tracking detec­ tor. I-Y. Lee 2:30 135. Nuclear Physics using the National Ignition Facility. L. A. Bernstein, M. A. Stoyer, R. Hoffman, U. Greife, S. M. Grimes 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 136. Neutrons, nuclear structure, and the death of the Mammoth. R. B. Firestone, Z. Revay, T. Belgya, A. West 3:50 137. Projectile fragmentation crosssection measurements for stable and unstable beams. M. Tsang, M. Mocko, F. Delaunay, M-J. V. Goethem, H. Hui, G. Verde, M. Wallace, L. Andronenko, M. Andronenko, A. Ono, M. Famiano, W. G. Lynch, P. Danielewicz, S. Lukyanov, S. Lobastov, D. Lacroix, R. J. Charity 4:20 138. Gamma ray multiplicity of Cf-252 spontaneous fission using LiBerACE. D. L Bleuel, L A. Bernstein, J. D. Gibelin, M. D. Heffner, J. Mintz, Ε. Β. Norman, L W. Phair, N. D. Scielzo, S. A. Sheets, N. J. Snyderman, M. Wiedeking Section Β Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm

Section B

Section C

Computational Actinide and Transactinide Chemistry: Progress and Perspectives Gas- and Condensed-Phase Actinide Chemistry Cosponsored by COMP and INOR

1:30 101. Superheavy elements and radioac­ tive ion beams. M. A. Stoyer 2:00 102. Study of superheavy elements at the GSI SHIP. S. Hofmann 2:30 103. Systematic study of heavy element compound nucleus reactions with 2 3 8 U targets. K. E. Gregorich, C. E. Dullmann, C. M. Folden III, R. Sudowe, L. Stavsetra,

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section Β

Boston Park Plaza Franklin Rm

Boston Park Plaza Lexington Rm

4:20 120. Quantification of covalency in An-CI bonds. P. Yang, E. R. Batista, P. J. Hay, R. L Martin, C. N. Carlson, D. L. Clark, S. D. Conradson, S. A. Kozimor, D. E. Schwarz, M. P. Wilkerson

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 127. X-ray based methods for nuclear materials characterization. G. J. Havrilla 9:30 128. Recent developments in a dried residue specimen preparation method for quantifying analytes in plutonium metal by X-ray fluorescence. C. G. Worley 9:55 129. Examples of the usefulness of X-ray powder diffraction to characterize uranium compounds. H. M. Volz, J. T. Dunwoody, L. Tandon, R. J. McCabe, J. R. FitzPatrick, R. E. Hackenberg

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Novel Sensors for Use in Radiological and Harsh Environments Cosponsored by ANYL C. Coleman, D. Hobbs, D. Hobart, Z. W a n g , and S. McWhorter, Organizers S. Bryan, Organizer,

Presiding

1:15 Introductory Remarks. 1:20 139. Combined spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis of UraniumOrganic interactions. P. Jha, G. P. Halada, J. D. Kubicki, A. Ceballos 1:40 140. On-line and off-line quantification with extractive scintillating resin. T. A. DeVol, J. E. Roane, L. D. Hughes 2:00 141. NMR and luminescence studies of actinides speciation in the environment. G. R. Choppin 2:20 142. Application of quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace gas sensing in a hydrogen process. S. McWhorter, A. A. Kosterev, B. M. Ashcraft, F. K. Tittel 2:40 143. Gas phase photoacoustic spec­ troscopy in the long-wave IR using quartz tuning forks and amplitude modulated quantum cascade lasers. M. D. Wojcik, M. C. Phillips, E. C. Golovich, B. D. Cannon, R. M. Ozanich, J. W. Grate 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 144. Fluorescence-based sensor for pertechnetate. C. J. Seliskar, W. R. Heineman, S. Bryan, A. S. Del Negro

TECH-95

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

NUCL/ORGN

3:35 145. Radiochemical sensor system for monitoring Tc-99 in Hanford Site ground­ water. M. J . O'Hara, 0 . B. Egorov, J. W. Grate 3:55 146. Use of Raman spectroscopy to monitor waste processing. R. Lascola, M. E. Stone, M. R. Poirier, D. T. Herman 4:15 147. Cryogenic laser-induced timeresolved fluorescence spectroscopy stud­ ies of uranium adsorbed at minerals and soil sediments. Z. Wang, J. M. Zachara, H-S. Chang, G. Korshin, J. M. Senko, W. D. Burgos, J. Wang 4:35 148. Receptor-free nanomechanical sensing. A. Passian, T. Thundat, G. M. Brown THURSDAY MORNING Section Β Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Characterization Methods and Corrosion Control Strategies for High-level Radioactive Waste Cosponsored by ANYL C. Coleman, D. Hobbs, D. Hobart, and R. Ray, Organizers A. A. Ekechukwu, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 149. A thermodynamic model for the solubility of Tc02-xH 2 0(am) in the aque­ ous Tc(IV)-oxalate- Na + -Cr-H + -OH--H 2 0 system. N. J . Hess, 0 . S. Qafoku, Y. Xia, A. R. Felmy 9:25 150. Electrochemical studies of Hanford double shell tank waste. J . B. Duncan, G. A. Cooke 9:45 151. Summary of nuclear operations at the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF). M. A. Lehto, F. T. Wilkins, N. R. Duckwitz 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 152. Review of corrosion inhibition in Department of Energy high-level waste tanks. K. H. Subramanian, B. J. Wiersma 10:40 153. Free hydroxide characterization of high level nuclear waste at the Savan­ nah River Site. R. Ray, A. A. Ekechukwu, W. Langford 11:00 154. Determination of carbonate in high level radioactive waste: Method evaluation and comparison. A. A. Ekechukwu, R. Ray, J. E. Young, W. Langford THURSDAY AFTERNOON

3:00 160. Understanding the effects of sur­ factant addition using microscopy. T. L. White, M. E. Stone, R. L. Brigmon, T. B. Calloway 3:20 161. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure applied to radioactive saltstone containing tetraphenylborate: Development of a modified zero-headspace extractor. K. P. Crapse, A. D. Cozzi, C. L. Crawford, A. R. Jurgensen, J. R. Zamecnik, C. A. Langton, D. M. Missimer

ORGN Division of Organic Chemistry W. Greenlee and S. M. Sieburth, Program Chairs

O T H E R S Y M P O S I A O F INTEREST: Heroes of Chemistry (see MEDI, Mon) Special Symposium in Honor of Sir Fraser Stoddart (see POLY, Sun) Mechanism of Action of Natural Prod­ ucts (see BIOL, Tue) S O C I A L EVENTS: Social Hour: Sun, Wed SUNDAY MORNING

BCEC Ballroom

Boston Park Plaza Stuart Rm Analytical Chemistry in Nuclear Technology Innovative Techniques and Analytical Applications in Material Science, Separation Science, and Nuclear Material Processing Cosponsored by ANYL C. Coleman, D. Hobbs, and D. Hobart, Organizers Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 155. Behavior of technetium, rhenium, and ruthenium in glass wasteforms. W. W. Lukens Jr., D. A. McKeown, A. C. Buechele, I. S. Mueller, D. K. Shuh, I. L. Pegg

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

96-TECH

2:40 159. Analytical method development for processing the next macro-batch feed of radioactive high-level waste sludge to the Defense Waste Processing Facility. D. Click, C. Coleman, C. Herman, K. Zeigler

Section A

Section Β

J. Terry, Organizer,

1:25 156. Speciation of Technetium-99 incorporated into metal oxide matrices. L. C. Francesconi, l-M. Mbomekalle, R.C.Howell, W . W . Lukens Jr., J. M. Poblet 1:45 157. Sorption on uranyl silicates. N. A. Wall, S. B. Clark, L C. Hull 2:05 Intermission. 2:20 158. Development and testing of improved analytical methods for process control of the Defense Waste Processing Facility. C. J . Coleman, T. B. Edwards, A. D. Marzolf, K. R. Hera, R. N. Mahannah, M. T. Feller, R. B. Spencer

BCEC 253 A/B/C Combinatorial, Parallel, and Process Chemistry X. Qian,

Presiding

8:00 9. Triazolone formation in the synthesis of a PPAR alpha agonist: Development of a robust impurity control strategy. J. W. Fennell, S. E. Dunlap, R. Metzler, J. T. Vicenzi, J. A. Werner 8:20 10. Application of rhodium(l)-catalyzed ene-allene carbocyclization strategy to prepare a library of alkyl- and alkylideneoxepanecarboxamides. S. Mao, K. M. Brummond 11. Withdrawn. 8:40 12. Combinatorial high throughput synthesis within continuous flow reactors. P. Watts, C. Wiles 9:00 13. Development of a practical and large scale synthesis of a Statin Intermedi­ ate via Horner-Wittig olefination. B. Zheng, M. Marchetti, J. Zhu, X. Qian, D. Kacsur, 0 . Akiti, J. Kant, D. Kronenthal 9:20 14. Development of a practical synthe­ sis of a potent, orally bioavailable calcito­ nin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist for the treatment of migraine. D. Steinhuebel, A. Alorati, M. Ashwood, J. Baxter, K. Belyk, B. Bishop, K. Emerson, 1. W. Davies, A. W. Gibson, M. Palucki, S. Krska, Y. Sun 9:40 15. Efficient synthesis of 7-amino-3hydroxyindan-1-one. H-O. Kim, R. S. Rajur, V. N. Rao, P. Nagafuji, X. Hearult, N. P. Peet 10:00 16. Parallel synthesis of 2-heteroarylsubstituted indole carboxylic acids. E. Jolicoeur, P. L. Beaulieu, D. Bykowski, J. R. Gillard 10:20 17. Practical route to a melanin-con­ centrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHrl) antagonist. D. L Andersen, P. Liu, T. Storz, X. Wang, A. Allgeier, J. Baum, Y. Chen, R. Crockett, L. Huang, R. D. Larsen, M. Martinelli 10:40 18. Process development of a C-4 methylcarbonate analog of paclitaxcel. R. Deshpande, F. Gibson, E. Gublo, J. Hamm, J . Li, J. Liang, K. Tenhuisen 11:00 19. Process research and develop­ ment toward a scaleable synthesis of a pyrazole-based CCK1 receptor antagonist: β-Enaminoketone as an armed intermedi­ ate for a regioselective pyrazole formation. A. Choudhury, T. Xiao, J. Grimm, S. Stefanick, K. L. S. Sorgi, N. S. Mani, J. Liang 11:20 20. Phase transfer dynamic combina­ torial chemistry. R. Pérez-Fernéndez, J. Κ. Μ. Sanders Section C

Young Academic Investigators L. McElwee-White,

Section Β

Organizer

BCEC 254 A/B Metal-Mediated Reactions and Syntheses

H. M. L. Davies, Organizer,

Presiding R. A. Singer,

8:00 1. Metathesis in cascade reactions with PDMS thimbles and the synthesis of comb block copolymers for new photonic band gap materials. M. B. Runge, M. T. Mwangi, A. L Miller II, N. B. Bowden 8:30 2. Self-assembly of high quality nanowires from rigid, planar aromatic molecules and applications in optoelectronic sensing. L Zang, J. S. Moore, Y. Che, K. Balakrishnan, T. Naddo, A. Datar 9:00 3. Learning from nature: A conforma­ tional approach to responsive supramolecular hosts, catalysts, and sensors. Y. Zhao 9:30 4. Functional materials from unconven­ tional donor-acceptor molecules. R. K. Castellano 10:00 5. Chemical approaches to under­ standing peroxide biology in the brain. C. J . Chang 10:30 6. Analyzing the dynamic glycome via chemical biology. L. K. Mahal 11:00 7. Chemical approaches to monitor protein phosphorylation. M. K. H. Pflum 11:30 8. Guiding bacteria with small mol­ ecules and RNA. J . P. Gallivan

10:00 27. Nickel-catalyzed synthesis of acrylamides from alpha olefins and isocyanates. K. D. Schleicher, T. F. Jamison 10:20 28. Novel Gold(l)-catalyzed intermolecular addition of carbonyl compounds to enynes. M. Schelwies, G. Helmchen 10:40 29. Rhenium catalyzed vinylations of carboxylic acids. C. Jaekel, P. Croizat, W. Staffel 11:00 30. Samarium(ll) iodide-promoted Reformatsky-type intermolecular coupling of α-haloketones and aldehydes. B. A. Sparling, R. T. Moslin, T. F. Jamison 11:20 3 1 . Secondary interaction in hydroxycontaining phosphinooxazolines. C. Moberg, A. Frolander 11:40 32. Modular approaches toward smallmolecule DNA hybrids (SMDHs). B. R. Stepp, J. M. Gibbs-Davis, D. L. F. Koh, S. T. Nguyen Section D BCEC 258A Molecular Recognition and Self-Assembly J. Michl,

Presiding

8:00 33. Coordination-driven face-directed self-assembled trigonal prisms: Facebased conformational chirality, internal mobility, and possibly an internal bubble? D. C. Caskey, T. Yamamoto, C. Addicott, R. K. Shoemaker, A. M. Hawkridge, D. C. Muddiman, G. S. Kottas, D. Horinek, J. Vacek, J . Michl, P. J. Stang 8:20 34. Engineering large molecular assem­ blies from calix[4]resorcinarenes. 0 . Ugono, K. T. Holman 8:40 35. From kinetic to thermodynamic control in the synthesis of donor-acceptor [2]catenanes. O. S. Miljanic, W. R. Dichtel, S. I. Khan, J. F. Stoddart 9:00 36. Hierarchical self-assembly of por­ phyrin trimers at the solid-liquid interface. R. van Hameren, P. Schôn, A. M. van Buul, J. Hoogboom, A. E. Rowan, J. A. Elemans, R. J. M. Nolte 9:20 37. Hydrogen bonding in small molecules investigated through hydrogendeuterium exchange. B. R. Linton, L. R. Steffel, T. J. Cashman, M. H. Reutershan 9:40 38. Hypercyclic replication networks exhibit dynamic selection and amplification. D. Philp 10:00 39. MIX and play squaraine-rotaxanes. J. J . Gassensmith 10:20 40. Molecular carousel. 1. Aprahamian, J-C. Olsen, J. F. Stoddart 10:40 4 1 . Quinoline oligoamide macrocycle: Selective G quadruplex binding ligand. P. S. Shirude, E. Gillies, S. Ladame, F. Godde, I. Hue, B. Okumus, C. Joo, S. Balasubramanian 11:00 42. Surface functionalization of Borromean rings. C. R. Yates, D. Benitez, J. F. Stoddart 11:20 44. Synthesis and characterization of linear acene rotaxanes. M. T. Stone, H. L. Anderson 11:40 43. Withdrawn.

Presiding

8:00 2 1 . Boron-masking strategy for the selective synthesis of oligoarenes via Suzuki-Miyaura coupling. M. Suginome, H. Noguchi, K. Hojo, T. Shioda 8:20 22. Direct synthesis of B-allyl and B-allenyldiisopinocampheylborane reagents via allyl and propargyl halides and indium metal. L. C. Hirayama, B. Singaram 8:40 23. Structural studies of boron enolates by X-ray crystallography and DOSY NMR spectroscopy. L. Ma, R. Hopson, P. G. Williard 9:00 24. Immobilized catalysts on siliceous mesocellular foam (MCF) via "click" chem­ istry. J. Lim, S. S. Lee, S. N. Riduan, J. Y. Ying 9:20 25. New strategies for chemical synthe­ sis: Development of a metal catalyzed pyrrole C-H bond functionalization for complex molecule synthesis. M. J. Gaunt, Ε. Μ. Beck 9:40 26. Nickel-catalyzed allene-aldehyde and alkene-aldehyde coupling reactions. S. Ng, T. F. Jamison

Section Ε BCEC 258B New Reactions and Methodology R. N. Salvatore,

Presiding

8:00 45. Expanding the scope of microwavepromoted synthesis. Ν. Ε. Leadbeater 8:20 46. Trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate as a metal-free, homogeneous, strong Lewis acid catalyst for efficient one pot synthesis of α-aminonitriles and their fluorinated analogs. G. K. S. Prakash, C. Panja, C. Do, T. Mathew, G. A. Olah 8:40 47. [2,3]-Sigmatropic rearrangement of benzofused oxonium and ammonium ylids. F. Tran, J. B. Sweeney 9:00 48. Asymmetric [1,2]-sigmatropic rear­ rangement of benzylic ammonium ylids. M. Ponce, J. Sweeney 9:20 49. Benzylidene-directed endo cyclization of epoxy alcohols. A. R. Van Dyke, T. F. Jamison

ORGN 9:40 50. N-lsopropylidene-N'-2-nitrobenzenesulfonyl hydrazine, a reagent for reduction of alcohols via the corresponding monoalkyl diazenes. M. Movassaghi, Ο. Κ. Ahmad 10:00 5 1 . Organocatalysis of aldol and related processes with a simple axially chiral benzylamine derivative. P. R. Blakemore, M. A. Sephton 10:20 52. Recent advances in decarboxyl­ a s e coupling. J. A. Tunge 10:40 53. Development of asymmetric syn­ theses of novel atropisomeric compounds. J. Clayden, W. J. Moran 11:00 54. Nucleophilic acylations using thiazolium carbinols: Fluoride-promoted Umpolung strategy for base-sensitive acceptors. A. K. Mathies, A. E. Mattson, K. A. Scheldt 11:20 55. Stereoselective synthesis of nucleosides and 4'-thionucleoside analogs from acyclic substrates. B. Cardinal-David, M. Prévost, D. Chapdelaine, M. Gagnon, I. Tamburlin, Y. Guindon 11:40 56. Synthesis of secondary amines via a phosphorimide-imide rearrangement. C. P. R. Hackenberger, G. del Signore, I. Wilkening, W. Ahlbrecht Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC Ballroom Young Academic Investigators H. M. L. Davies,

Organizer

L. McElwee-White, Organizer,

Presiding

1:00 57. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of carbohydrates with natural and non-natural modifications. X. Chen, H. Yu, H. A. Chokhawala, S. Huang, H. Cao, S. Muthana 1:30 58. Carbocation cascades in the biosynthesis of polycyclic terpenoid natural products. D. J . Tantillo 2:00 59. Efforts toward the total syntheses of natural products via oxocarbenium cations. M. P. Jennings 2:30 60. Directed carbometalation reactions for convergent C-C bond construction. G. C. Micalizio 3:00 6 1 . Design, development and applications of a new class of enantioselective acyl transfer catalysts. V. B. Birman 3:30 62. CCC-NHC Ligands: Carbene ligand scaffolds for catalyst design with broader applications. T. K. Hollis 4:00 63. Development of Nazarov cyclization chemistry for natural product synthesis. A. J. Frontier, W. He, J. Huang, J. A. Malona, I. Meracz 4:30 64. Recent developments in copperfacilitated nitrogen heterocycle synthesis. S. R. Chemler

4:25 70. Orthotopic tumor xenografts and human livers: Applications of tissue engineering in drug discovery. G. D. Prestwich 5:00 Concluding Remarks. Section C BCEC 254 A/B Metal-Mediated Reactions and Syntheses A. F. Abdel-Magid,

Presiding

1:00 7 1 . Synthesis of conjugated dienoic esters and vinyl cyclopropanes through ruthenium-catalyzed tandem metathesis/ diazo-transfer reactions. R. P. Murelli, M. L Snapper 1:20 72. Tandem reactions involving Grubbs type catalysts. D. F. Finnegan, B. Seigal, A. Sutton, M. L Snapper 1:40 73. Ruthenium-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis to form tetrasubstituted olefins. J. M. Berlin, I. C. Stewart, T. A. Ung, A. A. Pletnev, T. W. Funk, Y. Schrodi, R. H. Grubbs 2:00 74. Reversible inhibition/activation of Grubbs-type olefin metathesis catalysts. H-J. Schanz 2:20 75. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of Hoveyda-Grubbs type catalyst by activating groups. H. Clavier, D. Rix, F. Boeda, F. Ca'ijo, I. Laurent, M. Mauduit, S. P. Nolan 2:40 76. Anionic cyclization cascades: Competition between 5-exo-trig ring closure and [1,4]-proton transfer. J. D. Fair, R. P. Lorenzoni III, W. F. Bailey 3:00 77. Chemoselective and mild hydrogénation methods catalyzed by heterogeneous Pd/C-ethylendiamine, Pd-fibroin or Pd-polyethyleneimine complexes. H. Sajiki, S. Mori, Y. Kitamura, T. Ikawa, K. Hattori, Y. Monguchi, T. Maegawa 3:20 78. Chiral oxazoline-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes of Ir and Rh. P. K. Patra, Y. Zhang, J. Seayad, J. Y. Ying 3:40 79. Highly active iridium(l) complexes for catalytic hydrogen isotope exchange. W. J. Kerr, S. Irvine, J. A. Brown, S. Andersson, G. N. Nilsson 4:00 80. Improving the Meyer-Schuster olefination: Development of a stable alkoxyacetylene. S. S. Lopez, D. A. Engel, G. B. Dudley 4:20 8 1 . Iridium-catalyzed H/D exchange at vinyl groups without olefin isomerization. J. S. Zhou, J. F. Hartwig 4:40 82. Dibenzocycloheptenes via intramolecular Nicholas reactions: Application to the synthesis of Allocolchicines. J. R. Green, S. Djurdjevic Section D BCEC 258A Molecular Recognition and Self-Assembly B. R. Linton,

Presiding

Section Β BCEC 253 A/B/C New Molecular Strategies for Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery I. Ojima,

Organizer

1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 65. Folate receptor-targeted drugs for imaging and treatment of cancer. P. S. Low, E. Vlashi, E. Sega, W. He 2:05 66. Designing functionalized carbon nanotubes for drug delivery. A. Bianco 2:40 67. Design, application, and chemical biology of tumor-targeting drug conjugates. I. Ojima 3:15 68. Antibody-drug conjugates: Confer­ ring tumor specificity to highly cytotoxic drugs. R. V. Chari 3:50 69. Nanoparticle albumin bound {nab) technology: A nanotechnology platform for biologically interactivé drug delivery and targeting. N. Desai

1:00 83. Artificial peptide linkages that lead to beta-sheet peptidomimetics. B. R. Linton, T. J. Cashman, L. R. Steffel, H. E. English, L. F. Tethal, A. J. Koppel, C. M. Bragdon, R. A. Brawn, D. J. Yankura 1:20 85. Determinants of protein stability by dynamic combinatorial chemistry. M. A. Case 1:40 86. Physico-chemical property impact of pharmaceutical co-crystals. M. B. Hickey, M. L. Peterson, J. F. Remenar, Ô. Almarsson

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

2:00 87. Porous crystals from self-assembling macrocyclic ureas. L S. Shimizu 2:20 88. Preparation and reactivity of nanosized cocrystals formed by sonocrystallization. D-K. Bucar, L. R. MacGillivray 2:40 89. Sequence specific syntheses of Ν and O-alkylated aromatic oligoamide foldamers. F. Campbell, J. Plante, Β. Malkova, A. J . Wilson 3:00 90. Synthesis of novel cyclodextrin derivatives by the insertion of stimuliresponsive units into the skeleton and the control of their inclusion ability. M. Akashi, A. Kikuzawa, T. Kida 3:20 9 1 . Synthetic lectins: Biomimetic recep­ tors for carbohydrates in aqueous solution. A. P. Davis, E. Klein, Y. Ferrand, N. P. Barwell 3:40 92. Template-directed solid-state syn­ thesis: Toward alternative hydrogen-bond acceptors to pyridines. P. Kaushik, T. Friscic, L R. MacGillivray 4:00 93. The effect of boronic acid pKa on fluorescence quenching and glucose sensing performance of viologen-based boronic acids with pyranine. Z. Sharrett, S. Gamsey, J. Fat, B. Singaram Section Ε BCEC 258B New Reactions and Methodology D. A. Burnett,

Presiding

1:00 94. Synthetic and photophysical studies of photocycloadditions of S-hydroxyflavones and relative derivatives. B. Xia, B. Gerard, D. M. Solano, J. Wan, G.Jones II, J. A. PorcoJr. 1:20 95. The "cesium effect" in organic synthesis. R. N. Salvatore 1:40 96. A comparison between flow and batch reactor organic synthesis through the utilization of a novel microfluidic-based high pressure flow reactor. K. Niesz, C. Csajagi, R. Jones, F. Darvas 2:00 97. A facile and efficient antiselective four-component direct aldol addition via chemoselective thioester enolate forma­ tion: Rapid and versatile access to polyketide motifs. G. Zhou, J. M. Yost, S. Sauer, D. M. Coltart 2:20 98. Development of new enzyme-based screening methods for combinatorial catalysis. D. B. Berkowitz, S. Dey, Κ. R. Karukurichi, W. Shen, J. A. Friest, M. Bose 2:40 99. Diels-Alder approach to polysubstituted biaryls. B. O. Ashburn, R. G. Carter 3:00 100. Face selectivity in the dihydropyrone Diels-Alder reaction. A. J. Augatis, L. B. Avery, N. I. Totah 3:20 101. Intramolecular Gassman [2+2] cycloaddition reaction. C. Ko, S. Κ. Ghosh, R. P. Hsung 3:40 102. Synthesis of spiro-carbocyclic nucleoside analogs using catalytic asym­ metric nitroso Diels-Alder reactions. W. Lin, K. Virga, D. Mendal, M. J. Miller 4:00 103. Tandem driven dynamic libraries: Amplification through internal selection pressure. M. Angelin, P. Vongvilai, A. Fischer, O. Ramstrom 4:20 104. The use of immobilized thermo­ philic enzymes for organic synthesis in flow reactors. P. Watts, T. McCreedy, L Marie, J. Littlechild, A. M. Hickey, G. M. Greenway 4:40 105. The use of microreaction technol­ ogy for the multicomponent synthesis of α-aminonitriles. C Wiles, P. Watts Wolfrom/lsbell/New Investigator Award Symposium Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, MEDI, ORGN, BIOHW, and HIST

S U N D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Total Synthesis, Materials, Devices and Switches, Molecular Recognition and Self-Assembly, Biologically-Related Molecules and Processes S. M. Sieburth,

Organizer

8:00-10:00 106. Synthesis of demethylastorriquinone Β 1 analogs as potential antidiabetic drugs. T. Massoud 107. Indium-mediated synthesis of 2,6-disubstituted tetrahydropyrans in aqueous media. T. G. Minehan, M. Pham, A. Allatabakhsh 108. Photochemical composition of the nectar of Voacanga africana Stapf. (Apocynaceae) and the three honey samples of Ngaoundere (Cameroon). E. Talla, F. Tchuenguem, A. Taimanga 109. Stereoselectivity in the epoxidation of carbohydrate based oxepines. S. D. Markhad, M. W. Peczuh 110. Withdrawn. 111. Taming QscR: Synthetic ligands that modulate the quorum sensing control repressor protein in Pseudomonas aerugi­ nosa. M. E. Mattmann, G. D. Geske, G. A. Worzalla, Η. Ε. Blackwell 112. Tropical plants in the production of agricultural pesticides. J. O. Echeme Sr. 113. Practical, enantiomeric synthesis of a 7-[3-(4-fluoro-piperidin-1-yl)-propoxy]-2methyl-4-(4-methylsulfanyl-phenyl)-1,2,3,4tetrahydro-isoquinoline as a dual serotonin transporter/histamine H 3 ligand. X. Deng, J. T. Liang, J. Liu, H. McAllister, C. Schubert, N. S. Mani 114. Electrically produced polycarbynes: Polymeric precursors to diamond and diamond-like carbon. M. W. Pitcher, Y. Nur, S. Seyyidoglu, A. Taskin, H. Cengiz, L. Toppare 115. Secondary structure in ring-constrained gamma-peptides. Μ. Κ. Qureshi, A. Kothari, M. D. Smith 116. Advances in the asymmetric synthesis of silanediol protease inhibitors. Y. Qi, W. D. Arasho, S. M. Sieburth 117. Amphiphilic conjugated molecules for functional nano-architectures. P. van Rijn, M. C. A. Stuart, J. H. van Esch 118. Hydrocarbon-fluorocarbon donor-accep­ tor dyads assembled by "click" chemistry: Model systems for self-assembling doublecable polymers. T. Benanti, A. Bheemaraju, A. Kalaydjian, D. Venkataraman 119. Templated synthesis of desymmetrized [2]catenanes with excellent translational selectivity. Y. Liu 120. Total synthesis of belactosin C and derivatives via double diastereoselective tandem Mukaiyama aldol-lactonizations. S. W. Cho, D. Romo 121. Toward the total synthesis of azadirachtin. A. Boyer, E. Beckmann, G. E. Veitch, Β. J. Burke, S. V. Ley 122. Utilizing engineered E. coli as aN asym­ metric reducing biocatalyst toward phar­ maceutical precursors. B. D. Feske 123. Sequencing olefination reactions: appli­ cation toward the total synthesis of (+)crocacin C. G. Sirasani, T. Paul, R. B. Andrade 124. Advances toward the development of small molecule transcriptional activators. J-P. Desaulniers, A. Wands, A. K. Mapp 125. An expedient, scalable synthesis of the natural product L-anserine. C Wiles, P. Watts 126. β-Hairpin peptides via fluoroaromaticside chain interactions. A. Jain, N. Malambo 127. Beta-hairpin to beta-helix transition: Synthetic, structural, and mechanistic studies of a new abiotic peptide scaffold. J. L Kulp III, T. D. Clark 128. Beta-sheet propensity of highly fluorinated amino acids. H-P. Chiu, R. P. Cheng 129. Bivalent inhibitors of Type-I geranylgeranyltransferase for simultaneous recogni­ tion of interior and exterior protein sur­ faces. J. Ohkanda, S. Machida, N. Kato, M. A. Blaskovich, S. M. Sebti, K. Harada

TECH-97

ORGN

130. Development and application of the branched Sox-based peptides as fluores­ cent kinase activity reporters. E. Lukovic, B. Imperial! 131. Mapping the synapse: Synthesis and validation of chemical probes for PDZ domain-mediated synaptic trafficking. W. S. Iskenderian, B. Imperial! 132. Dimeric peptidic probes as tools for the study of tandem PDZ domain-containing proteins. M. Sainlos, C. Poujol, D. Choquet, B. Imperial! 133. Semisynthesis of caged phosphoproteins: Myosin regulatory light chain as a chemical tool in studies of cell migration. B. N. Goguen, B. Imperial! 134. Exploiting metal binding by UK-1: Syn­ thesis of potential HIV-1 integrase inhibi­ tors. D. N. Ward, M. Bekkerman, J. R. Blasic Jr., P. Lubet, S. Menji, P. Schaughency, M. Tavag, P. J. Smith 135. Fluorescent scaffold for parallel peptide strands. L. M. Jordan, E. R. Witt, W. E. Allen 136. Functionalized bis-amino acids: One step closer to the synthesis of designed func­ tional macromolecules. S. Gupta, C. E. Schafmeister 137. Mannose 6-phosphate mimics as poten­ tial ligands for the M6P-IGF2R. X. Fei, K. Panigrahi, C. M. Connelly, R. G. MacDonald, D. B. Berkowitz 138. Probing subunit interactions in ribo­ nucleotide reductase (RNR). A. Q. Hassan, Y. Wang, L. Plate, J. Stubbe 139. Rapid identification of novel and potent inhibitors of HIV protease using "click" chemistry techniques. J. C. Tripp, M. P. Whiting, K. B. Sharpless, V. V. Fokin 140. Selective oxidation of linear and cyclic peptides by dioxiranes. M. R. Relia, P. G. Williard 141. Synthesis of FR235222 derivatives: Novel templates as potent anticancer agents. S. Lapera, C-M. Pan, E. Singh, S. Ravula, P-S. Pan, S. R. McAlpine 142. Synthesis of orthogonally protected peptide nucleic acid (PNA) building block for attachment of groups to C5 of U. A. Kshetry, J. S. Taylor 143. Synthesis of thio and amino analogs for MEP pathway. S. Krasutsky, C. D. Poulter 144. Viable construction of N-methyl cysteine and its use in peptide synthesis. E. L. Ruggles, R. J. Hondal 145. 6-Azidopurine nucleoside derivatives: Synthesis and NMR studies. M. K. Singh, M. K. Lakshman 146. 0^-(Benzotriazol-1-yl)inosine derivatives: a new class of electrophilic nucleosides. M. K. Lakshman, S. Bae 147. A one-pot method for the synthesis of nucleoside triphosphates from nucleoside H-phosphonate monoesters. Q. Sun, J. Edathil, R. Wu, B. R. Peterson 148. Carbocyclic analogs of 1,3-diazepin-2one nucleosides as transition-state inhibi­ tors of cytidine deaminase. V. E. Marquez, Ο. R. Ludek 149. Carbon-hydrogen bond activation in benzosemiquinones via radical-radical coupling with nitric oxide. S. J. Peters, T. M. Blood, A. M. Sudhoff 150. Chemical and pharmacological charac­ terization of new ligands for the benzodiazepine-binding site in the GABA^ recep­ tor complex. J. Nilsson, 0 . Sterner 151. Circular dichroism, thermal denaturation, and nuclease stability studies of modified oligodeoxynucleotides containing mixed sequences of four nucleosides attached through diphosphodiester bridges. Y. Ahmadibeni, K. Parang 152. Convenient entry to C2 and C3-substituted gulono-7-lactone derivatives from L-ascorbic acid. B. J. Heyen, K. Wimalasena 153. DNA-catalyzed organic transfer reaction for sequence-specific DNA-detection. T. N. Grossmann, 0 . Seitz 154. Fluorination at the C-8 of purine nucleo­ sides. B. Zajc, P. Lagisetty, A. K. Ghosh 155. Glycosylceramides: Synthesis and bio­ physical properties. N. Fujimoto, J. Howe, K. Brandenburg 156. Influence of amide bonds on the hydraphile ion channel activities. W. Wang, G. W. Gokel

98-TECH

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 157. Kinetics of chloramine-B oxidation of methionine in acid medium. S. Kesani, K. Cholkar, K. S. Rangappa, Ν. Μ. Made Gowda 158. N-Ethoxybenzylimidazoles: pH Sensitive linkers for controlled release of cancer therapeutics. A. Luong, S. D. Kong, G. Manorek, S. B. Howell, J. Yang 159. New approaches toward the photochemi­ cal regulation of gene function. W. F. Edwards, A. Deiters 160. Novel analogs of tamiflu. A. Jain, C. N. Lewis, J. C. Holder, Y. Liu, K. J. Hetrick 161. Studies on the condensation of H-phos­ phonate monoesters with S-nucleophiles. R. Hiresova, J. Stawinski 162. Synthesis and biological evaluation of inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin metalloprotease. J. R. Widom 163. Synthesis and biological evaluation of the new sterol 3B-hydroxy-23,24-bisnor-5cholen-22-(1-N-3-methyl-imidazoit-2thione) against Tripanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi. G. G. Visbal, C. Chacon Sr., I. Odreman 164. Synthesis and properties of amide modi­ fied RNA. E. Rozners, S. L Mathieu, J. R. Abbott 165. Synthesis of BODIPY-linked conjugates of cholesterol and FTY720. Z. Li, R. Bittman 166. Synthesis of C-20 substituted mutilin. M. Takadoi, T. Sato, Y. Fukuda 167. Synthesis of derivatives of sphingosine and development of an agonist for sphin­ gosine 1-phosphate receptors. D. S. Park, B. K. Lee, D. S. Kim, W. K. Lee, H-J. Ha 168. Synthesis of novel nitrone spin-traps. C. Quin, R. C. Hartley, A. Hay 169. Synthetic approach to natural tRNA modifications. E-M. Jahn, T. Carell 170. Synthetic ribonucleoside analogs as mutagenic antiviral agents. J. P. Edathil, J. D. Graci, C. E. Cameron, B. R. Peterson 171. Templated synthesis of nylon nucleic acid and characterization by nuclease digestion using LCMS. Y. Liu, R. Wang, L Ding, R. Sha, N. C. Seeman, J. W. Canary 172. Synthesis of porphyrins bearing uracyl groups and the analysis of their selfassembling behaviors. S. Arai, S. Takeoka 173. Urea based amphiphiles as hydro/organogelators: Versatile hosts for in situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles. P. K. Vemula, G. John 174. Utilization of spirolactam ring opening or spirolactone ring opening processes for the detection of metal ions via fluorescent changes. S. K. Kwon, J. H. Soh, K. Swamy, J. Yoon 175. A colorimetric sensor for aromatic alco­ hols based on intermolecular charge transfer. R. Rasberry, K. D. Shimizu 176. Aggregation structure of L-{2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1 -[(pyren-1 -ylmethyl)-carbamoxyl]ethyl}-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester: From a chiral small molecule to helical aggre­ gates architecture. H. Liu, J. Xiao, Y. Li 177. Withdrawn. 178. Biomimetic models of pyrroloquinoline quinone in a host-guest environment. A. A. Kennedy, G. Cooke, S. A. Macgregor 179. Highly efficient syntheses of mechani­ cally interlocked molecules. W. R. Dichtel, 0 . S. Miljanic, I. Aprahamian, W. Zhang, A. B. Braunschweig, J. M. Spruell, M. A. Olsen, J. R. Heath, J. F. Stoddart 180. Enzyme-responsive biocompatible nanovalves. K. Patel, S. Angelos, W. R. Dichtel, A. Coskun, Y-W. Yang, J. I. Zink, J. F. Stoddart 181. Convergent synthesis of mechanically interlocked compounds using "click" chem­ istry. J. M. Spruell, W. R. Dichtel, 0 . S. Miljanic, J. R. Heath, J. F. Stoddart 182. From cross-linked dynamer to [2]rotaxane. P. C. Haussmann, J. F. Stoddart 183. Electrically controllable microfluidic devices based on bistable rotaxanes. L. Fang, Y-W. Yang, J. F. Stoddart 184. Hexafunctionalized borromeates. C. R. Yates, D. Benitez, J. F. Stoddart 185. Creating interlocked molecules through dynamic covalent chemistry. K. Griffiths, C. R. Yates, B. H. Northrop, S. J. Cantrill, J. F. Stoddart

186. High order bistable [njrotaxane architec­ tures. I. Aprahamian, W. R. Dichtel, T. B. Gasa, J-C. Olsen, J. F. Stoddart 187. Electrochemical switching of bistable liquid crystalline [2]rotaxanes. K. K. Coti, I. Aprahamian, T. Ikeda, W. R. Dichtel, S. Saha, J. F. Stoddart 188. Cyclic aromatic donor-acceptor foldmers with a hairpin turn. C. R. Martinez, B. L. Iverson 189. Design and preparation of peptide ion channels from β-helical scaffolds for detection. V. Rodriguez-Garcia, T. D. Clark 190. Explorations of the inner space of a cylindrical capsule. D. Ajami, T. Iwasawa, J. Rebek Jr. 191. Formation of heterodimers using linear arrays comprising three hydrogen-bonding sites. A. M. McGhee, A. J . Wilson 192. Functionalized axles derived from 1,2bis(benzimidazolium)ethane for the self assembly of [2]pseudorotaxanes with 24-crown-8 wheels. J. Tiburcio, S. I. Moreno 193. Highly fluorinated hosts for anions. J. V. Gavette, A. L. Sargent, W. E. Allen 194. Irreversible thermal hydrogelation and conformational switching behavior of an amphiphilic foldamer. V. J. Bradford, B. L. Iverson 195. New rhodamine Β boronic acid deriva­ tives and fluorescein boronic acid deriva­ tive for chemosensors for catecholamines and C u 2 + ion. S. K. Kim, Η. Ν. Lee, K. Swamy, J. Yoon 196. Non-covalent superomolecular nanosheet from self-assembled G-quadruplexes. X. Shi, C. Zhong, N. N. Wu, G.Wu 197. Open chain sugar gelators by biocatalytic synthesis pathway: A possible drug delivery vehicle. S. R. Jadhav, G. John, P. K. Vemula 198. Pyrophosphate selective chemosensors. H. N. Lee, H. N. Lee, J. Yoon 199. Stereoselective binding of peptides by artificial receptors in water: New insights into the molecular recognition of biologi­ cally relevant substrates. P. Wich, C. Schmuck 200. Synthesis and characterization of DNA base receptors. Y. L. Jiang, L. M. Daniels, B. Lamale 201.1,6-Methano[10]annulene as a compo­ nent of organic semiconductors. P. A. Peart, J. D. Tovar 202. Conformationally controlled regioselective bromination of conjugated thiophenes. D. A. Guthrie, J. D. Tovar 203. Activatable MRI contrast agent triggered by light or redox. C. Tu, R. Nagao, F. Osterloh, A. Y. Louie 204. Design and studies of electrochemically driven molecular motors. 0 . Ivasenko, D. F. Perepichka 205. Designing nanosensors based on charged derivatives of Gramicidin A. S. Blake, R. Capone, M. Rincon-Restrepo, T. Mayer, M. Mayer, J. Yang 206. Synthesis and application of carbon nanotube and fullerene derivatives func­ tionalized via a zwitterion approach. J. Sprafke, W. Zhang, T. M. Swager 207. Iptycene-derived pyridazines and phthalazines. J. Bouffard, T. M. Swager 208. Synthesis of functionalized hexa-mphenylenes. J. M. W. Chan, T. M. Swager 209. Magnetostructural correlations of amidesubstituted nitronyl nitroxide radicals. S. Aboaku, P. M. Lahti 210. Withdrawn. 211. Novel chemical cyclization routes to ladder-type conjugated polymers. T-H. Kim, I. Kim, M. Yoo 212. Novel crown ether and salen metal chelation driven molecular pincers. A. M. M. Abe, J. Helaja, A. M. P. Koskinen 213. Organic photovoltaics through combina­ tion of self-assembly and electropolymerization: A novel approach to improve light-to-power conversion efficiency. E. Hwang, K. M. N. de Silva, E. E. Nesterov 214. Potassium-2,6-diamino-(N,N,N',N'-tetraacetate)-4-methylanisole and its deriva­ tives as zinc(ll) ion selective fluorescence sensors. J. N. Ngwendson, D. K. Srivastava, A. Banerjee

215. Spectroscopic characterization of bis(di(alkoxyphenyl)amine)s with thiophenebased bridges and their radical cations. S. A. Odom, K. Lancaster, L. Beverina, V. Coropceanu, S. Zheng, L. Padilha, J. Fu, D. Hagan, E. Van Stryland, J-L. Bredas, S. R. Marder, S. Barlow 216. Stimuli-responsive molecular switching of N-methyl aromatic amides bearing 2,6disubstituted pyridines. I. Okamoto, M. Nabeta, K. Ono, N. Morita, 0 . Tamura 217. Synthesis and properties of organic charge transfer salts based on nanostructure. Y. Li, H. Liu 218. Synthesis of an aminooxy-functionalized alkanethiol for oriented protein conjugation on self-assembled monolayers. R. C. Li, D. P. Parra, H. D. Maynard 219. Synthesis of building blocks for 2-D conjugated polymers. T. A. Taerum, R. Wylie, D. F. Perepichka 220. Synthesis of chemically robust and functionalized polymer-quantum dot micro­ spheres. J. M. Behrendt, M. Afzaal, L. M. Alexander, A. Bella, M. Bradley, J. Brickman, A. V. Hine, M. Li, D. Nagel, P. O'Brien, A. J. Sutherland 221. Synthesis of highly water-soluble fullerenol and its application. K. Kokubo, S. Shirakawa, K. Matsubayashi, T. Oshima 222. Synthesis, characterization, and proper­ ties of conjugated monolayer films pre­ pared via self-assembled monolayers. M. J. Schultz, X. Zhang, S. Unarunotai, A. Finke, J. A. Rogers, J. S. Moore 223. Triggering the fluorescence of anthra­ cene derivatives by click reaction. F. Xie, Q. Zeng, B. Hodges, Q. Wang 224. Modulating flavin push-pull systems via molecular recognition. B. J. Jordan, M. A. Pollier, Y. Ofir, S. Joubanian, G. Cooke, V. M. Rotello 225. Convergent synthesis of redox-active dendrons possessing a flavin core. A. A. Kennedy, G. Cooke, S. A. Macgregor, V. M. Rotello 226. Facile control over monolayer stabilities of functionalized gold nanoparticles. S. S. Agasti, C-C. You, V. Rotello 227. Ultraversatile protein sensor based on an array of conjugated polymers. 0 . R. Miranda, C-C. You, R. Phillips, l-B. Kim, P. S. Ghosh, U. H. F. Bunz, V. M. Rotello 228. Quantum dot-based fluorescence switch by redox modulation of tetrathiafulvalene ligands. P. Arumugam, T. Lu, Y. Ofir, M. A. Pollier, Β. J. Jordan, V. M. Rotello 229. Drug discovery: Escorting drugs within the monolayer of nanoparticles. R. R. Arvizo, V. Rotello 230. Water-soluble temperature-responsive fluorescent polythiophenes with tunable emission color. J. Choi, Ε. Ε. Nesterov 231. Progress toward the total synthesis of bielschowskysin. S. D. Townsend, G. A. Sulikowski 232. Total synthesis of (+)-aigialospirol via a unique cyclic ketal-tethered RCM. R. Figueroa, C. C. Guevarra, R. P. Hsung 233. Attempted synthesis of paclitaxel mimetics-future anticancer drugs? S. M. Manner, V. Thornqvist, T. Frejd 234. Cascade strategies for chemical synthe­ sis: Toward the synthesis of Nakadomarin A. C. Gauntlett 235. Development of new synthetic method­ ologies and strategies toward the total synthesis of Daphnicyclidin alkaloids. D. R. Williams, P. P. Nag 236. Efforts toward the total synthesis of kendomycin. M. M. Jacobson, S. D. Burke 237. Efforts toward the total synthesis of quinine. A. C. Smith, R. M. Williams 238. Efforts toward the total synthesis of the marine natural product violatinctamine. W. Sun, M. D. Vera, J. C. Pelletier

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

ORGN

239. Enantioselective total synthesis of (-)salinosporamide A (NPI-0052) and ana­ logs. T. Ling, V. R. Macherla, R. R. Manam, K. A. McArthur, B. C. M. Potts 240. Model studies toward the synthesis of the C22-34 fragment of antascomicin-B. W. Qi Sr., M. C. Mcintosh 241. Patellamide A: Toward a biomimetic synthesis. P. Garcia-Reynaga, M. S. VanNieuwenhze 242. Progress toward the total syntheses of clusianone and nemorosone. B. Mitasev, J. A. Porco Jr. 243. Progress toward the total synthesis of enantiomeric deoxycholic acid. B. W. Katona, N. P. Rath, D. F. Covey 244. Withdrawn. 245. Progress toward the synthesis of armatol A through a polyether cyclization cascade. B. S. Underwood, T. F. Jamison 246. Progress toward the synthesis of cucurbitacins. B. J . Gilbes, F. T. Halaweish 247. Progress toward the total synthesis of (+)-phomactin A. K. D. Schwartz, J. D. White 248. Progress toward the total synthesis of cycloaraneosene. S. M. Ng, M. L. Snapper 249. In pursuit of tedanolide. J. R. Dunetz, W. R. Roush 250. Studies on the synthesis of tetrafibricin. R. Lira, A. Sorg, W. R. Roush 251. Studies toward the total synthesis of amphidinolide C. R. H. Bates, J. B. Shotwell, W. R. Roush 252. Studies toward the total synthesis of scytophycin C. W. R. Roush, C. P. Nguyen, B. Knapp-Reed 253. Studies toward the total synthesis of tagetitoxin. A. K. Sandhu, M. J. Porter 254. Studies toward the synthesis of neolaulimalide and laulimalide. I. Paterson, J. K. Hutchinson, A. Longstaff 255. Studies toward the synthesis of right hand fragment of oxazolomycin A. M. Yaqoob, M. G. Moloney 256. Studies toward the total synthesis of amaminol A. E. T. T. Kumpulainen, A. M. P. Koskinen 257. Studies toward the total synthesis of brevenal and psymberin. K. Iyer, J. Zhou, J. D. Rainier 258. Studies toward the total synthesis of communesin Β. Υ. He, S. L. Crawley, R. L Funk 259. Studies toward the total syntheses of erythrinan and homoerythrinan alkaloids. J. Belmar, Y. He, R. L Funk 260. Studies toward the total synthesis of reidispongiolide A. I. Paterson, G. Cecere, G. J. Florence, G. Chouraqui, J. Stafford, K. Ashton, R. Britton 261. Studies toward the total synthesis of the brasilinolides. I. Paterson, P. M. Burton, F. Muhlthau 262. Synthesis of ring-fused and conformationally restrained epothilone A/D analogs. W. Zhan, D. C. Liotta, J. P. Snyder 263. Total synthesis of micrococcin P 1 . D. Lefranc, M. A. Ciufolini, Y. C. Shen 264. Synthetic studies toward the total synthe­ sis of tetrodotoxin. B. A. Mendelsohn, M. A. Ciufolini 265. Synthesis of sordarin analogs. H. Liang, A. Schulé, J-P. Vors, M. A. Ciufolini 266. Total synthesis of streptonigrone. B. K. Chan, M. A. Ciufolini 267. Synthetic approaches to chaetominine. X . W u , B . B . Snider 268. Approaches to the synthesis of the berkelic acid. J . Zhou, Β. Β. Snider 269. Synthetic approaches to cinachyramine. O. V. Barykina, Β. Β. Snider 270. Synthetic studies on marine norditerpenoids xestenone and secoxestenone. H. Miyaoka, K. Ota, T. Kurokawa, T. Honda, E. Kawashima

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

271. Synthetic studies on saxitoxins. 0 . Iwamoto, H. Koshino, K. Nagasawa 272. Synthetic study of azaspiracid-1. M. Oikawa, M. Kitago, T. Uehara, M. Sasaki 273. Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids. M. Movassaghi, A. E. Ondrus 274. Total synthesis of galanthamine by a tandem aryne [2+2] cycloaddition-rearrangement strategy. K. R. Buszek, D. L. Bixby 275. Total synthesis of myxovirescin A ^ M. Bonnekessel, J. T. Blank, F. Lacombe, K. Radkowski, A. Furstner 276. Total synthesis of trans-dihydronarciclasine through a highly endo-selective DielsAlder cycloaddition of 3,5-dibromo-2pyrone. C-G. Cho, l-J. Shin, E-S. Choi 277. Toward the total synthesis of hodgsonox. N. C. Lévaray, H. Lebel MONDAY MORNING Section A BCEC Ballroom Young Industrial Investigators D. Huryn, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 278. Synthesis and evaluation of small molecule C5a receptor antagonists. J. K. Barbay, M. Buntinx, Y. Gong, J. Li, C. Claes, P. J. Hornby, G. van Lommen, J. van Wauwe, W. He 9:40 279. Enantioselective arylation of N-Boc pyrrolidine. K. R. Campos 10:15 280. From cytotoxic agents to targeted therapies: A new era in oncology research. R. M. Borzilleri 10:50 281. Development of nonproprietary catalysts for the palladium-catalyzed amination reaction. R. A. Singer 11:25 282. Synthesis and chemical biology of ILS-920: A novel non-immunosuppressive rapamycin analog with efficacy in multiple animal models of ischemic stroke. E. I. Graziani, B. Ruan, S. Liang, D. Liu, F. Jow, M. Bowlby, Y. Chen, M. L. Mercado, X. Feng, L. McDonald, M. M. Zaleska, A. Wood, P. Reinhart, M. N. Pangalos, R. L. Magolda, J. Skotnicki, F. E. Koehn, G. T. Carter, M. Abou-Gharbia, K. Pong 12:00 Concluding Remarks.

Section C BCEC 254 A/B Metal-Mediated Reactions and Syntheses N. G. Bhat,

Presiding

8:00 293. Investigations in organobarium chemistry: Novel mechanistic concepts and synthetic applications. R. N. Salvatore 8:20 294. Synthesis of anilines and di- and triarylamines by palladium-catalyzed cou­ pling of aryl halides and ammonia. D. S. Surry, S. L. Buchwald 8:40 295. Cu-Catalyzed amidation of vinyl halides: A highly efficient synthesis of a wide variety of heterocycles. R. Martin, S. L. Buchwald 9:00 296. Copper-catalyzed coupling of amides with potassium alkenyltrifluoroborate salts. Y. Bolshan, R. A. Batey 9:20 297. Palladium(ll)-catalyzed aerobic oxidative carbocyclization of allene-substituted olefins and conjugated dienes. J. Piera Balaguer, J. E. Bâckvall 9:40 298. Palladium-catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition of carbon dioxide and trimethylenemethane under mild conditions. G. E. Greco, B. L. Gleason, T. A. Lowery, M. J. Kier, L B. Hollander, A. D. Worthy, S. A. Gibbs 10:00 299. Preparation of saturated CCC-Nheterocyclic carbene (NHC) pincer complexes of Zr: Metallation, transmetallation and catalytic applications. J. Cho 10:20 300. Synthesis and catalytic applications of supported palladium nanoparticles in coupling and hydrogénation reactions. N. Erathodiyil, S. Ooi, H. Yu, A. M. Seayad, S. S. Lee, J. Y. Ying 10:40 301. Synthesis of benzannulated /V-heterocycles by a domino palladiumcatalyzed C-C/C-N coupling. P. Thansandote, A. Rudolph, M. Raemy, M. Lautens 11:00 302. Synthesis of oxa- and azaheterocycles by an intramolecular oxy- and aminopalladation via 1,3-chirality transfer. J-l. Uenishi, N. Kawai, J-M. Lagrange, S. H. Mahadeo, V. Y. Shankar 1.1:20 303. Synthesis of phenanthrene derivatives via palladium-mediated aryne annulation. S. A. Worlikar, R. C. Larock 11:40 304. Palladium-catalyzed synthesis of phthalimide derivatives via intermolecular aminocarbonylation of ortfto-halobenzoates. S. A. Worlikar, R. C. Larock Section D

Section Β BCEC 253 A/B/C Chemistry of the Mechanical Bond and Beyond S. Rowan, D. A. Leigh, and J . A. Preece, Organizers 8:00 283. Records broken by reticular chem­ istry. Ο. Μ. Yaghi 8:30 284. Replication and amplification in nanoscale construction. D. Philp 8:50 285. Photochromic switches, lumines­ cent probes and electroactive films based on functional heterocycles. F. M. Raymo 9:10 286. Design and modeling of molecular scale electronic systems: Predictions of structures and properties. W. A. Goddard III 9:40 287. Properties of deep-cavity cavitands. B. C. Gibb 10:00 288. Gated molecular baskets. J. D. Badjic 10:20 289. Covalent and supramolecular patterning of surfaces. D. N. Reinhoudt 10:50 290. Automated micromachines for sequential and parallel reactions. H-R. Tseng 11:10 291. Exercising demons: Synthetic molecular motors and machines. D. A. Leigh 11:30 292. Thermodyamically and kinetically controlled template-directed synthesis. J. F. Stoddart

BCEC 258A Molecular Recognition and Self-Assembly B. D. Smith,

Presiding

8:00 305. Amygdalin hydrogelators from renewable resources: Enzyme triggered controlled drug delivery. P. K. Vemula, G.John 8:20 306. Drug smuggling: GSH-mediated release of hydrophobic drugs from within the monolayer of gold nanoparticles. R. R. Arvizo, V. Rotello 8:40 307. Enhancing the dimensions of a self-assembled cylindrical capsule and devising a spring loaded system. D. Ajami, J. Rebek 9:00 308. Reversible disproportionation creates hybrid capsules. D. Ajami, M. P. Schramm, A. Volonterio, J. Rebek Jr. 9:20 309. Withdrawn. 9:40 310. Polymeric receptors: Supramolecular recognition with monodisperse polymers. A. F. Tominey, A. Kraft 10:00 311. Self-assembled organic nanowires and platelets via charge transfer and hydrogen bonding. B. J. Jordan, Y. Ofir, P. Arumugam, M. A. Pollier, G. Cooke, V. M. Rotello 10:20 312. Squaraine-rotaxanes as novel fluorescent bioimaging probes. B. D. Smith 10:40 313. Supramolecular recognition of explosives and their potential applications. S. R. Waldvogel

11:00 314. Supramolecular synthesis of discrete stacked G-quartets. D. Gonzalez-Rodriguez, A. P. H. J. Schenning, E. W. Meijer 11:20 315. Surface nanopatteming with hydrogen-bonded and covalent conjugated polymers. D. F. Perepichka 11:40 316. Synthesis and properties of supramolecular AB and ABA copolymers using specific complementary interactions. M. J. Kade, K. E. Schaefer, E. W. Meijer, E. J. Kramer, C. J. Hawker Section Ε BCEC 258B New Reactions and Methodology P. L. Feldman,

Presiding

8:00 317. Nucleophile promoted bis-cyclization toward tetrahydrofuran-fused-3-lactones and application to haterumalide A/NA. K. A. Morris, D. Romo 8:20 318. Construction of heterocycles via enecarbamate cyclizations. M. G. Nilson, K. N. Cossey, R. L. Funk 8:40 319. Gallium triflate catalyzed synthesis of quinoxalines. G. K. S. Prakash, T. Mathew, H. Vaghoo, C. Panja, A. Venkat, S. Chacko, G. A. Olah 9:00 320. Nafion-H catalyzed synthesis of fluorinated benzoimidazoles, benzothiazolines, benzoxazolines and dihydrobenzoxazinones. G. K. S. Prakash, H. Vaghoo, C. Panja, T. Mathew, G. A. Olah 9:20 321. New methodologies for the synthe­ sis of azaheterocycles. M. Movassaghi, M. D. Hill, Ο. Κ. Ahmad 9:40 322. New methodology for the synthe­ sis of indoles via electrocyclic ring closures of enecarbamates. R. J. Huntley, R. L Funk 10:00 323. Novel method for the synthesis of 2-substituted-3-formylfurans and pyrroles via addition/oxidative rearrangement. M. H. Kerrigan, A. R. Kelly, P. J. Walsh 10:20 324. One-pot synthesis of furocoumarins through cascade addition-cyclizationoxidation. Y. Hu, G. Cheng, L. Zhao 10:40 325. Palladium-catalyzed C-H activation/C-S bond formation in the synthesis of azole heterocycles. L. L. Joyce, R. A. Batey 11:00 326. Rearrangement of spiro-benzimidazolines: Preparation of N-alkenyl-2benzimidazolones. J. T. Kuethe 11:20 327. Synthesis of ΛΖ-alkyl pyridones via an intramolecular rearrangement of benzyloxypyridines. C. E. Anderson 11:40 328. Synthesis of fused heterocycles via a one-pot orthoalkylation/direct heteroarylation sequence. A. Martins, M. Lautens Anion Coordination Chemistry Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by ORGN Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Structure and Function Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC Ballroom Tetrahedron Prize for Creativity in Organic Chemistry Asymmetric Catalysis S. S. Hall and J . Milne,

Organizers

C-H. W o n g and S. F. Martin,

Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. S.F. Martin. 1:05 329. Asymmetric catalysis with chiral Lewis bases: A new frontier in main group chemistry. S. E. Denmark 2:00 330. Recent progress in asymmetric two-center catalysis. M. Shibasaki 2:55 Intermission. 3:00 331. Chiral cations as catalysts for enantioselective synthesis: Pathways and applications. E. J . Corey

TECH-99

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ORGN

3:55 Award Presentations. C-H. Wong, J. Milne. 4:05 332. Award Address (Tetrahedron Prize for Creativity in Organic Chemistry, sponsored by Elsevier). Molecular design of the catalyst for organic synthesis. H. Yamamoto 5:05 Concluding Remarks. Section Β BCEC 253 A/B/C Peptide Natural Products M. Kozlowski and D. Huryn, M. Abou-Gharbia,

Organizers

Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 333. Ramoplanin: Synthetic and mechanistic studies. D. L. Boger 1:50 334. The catalytic cycle of discovery in total synthesis. P. S. Baran 2:30 335. Mimicry of antimicrobial peptides with synthetic oligomers and polymers. S. H. Gellman 3:10 336. Biosynthesis of moenomycin and other phosphoglycolipid antibiotics. S. Walker 3:50 337. Synthesis and biological analysis of natural and unnatural peptides. P. Wipf 4:30 338. Total syntheses of (+)-Lyconadin A and (-)-Lyconadin Β. Α. Β. Smith, D. C. Beshore Section C BCEC 254 A/B

351. Withdrawn. 1:20 352. Synthesis and photophysical properties of donor-acceptor purines. R. S. Butler, K. A. Abboud, R. K. Castellano 1:40 353. Synthesis and properties of new stable thienoacenes for organic electronics. J. L. Brusso, O. D. Hirst, G. Srinivasan, D. F. Perepichka 2:00 354. Synthesis of differentially functionalized OPEs via regioselective deprotection for use in molecular electronics. K. L. Chandra, C. B. Gorman 2:20 355. Unusual aromatic circuits for organic electronics. J. D. Tovar 2:40 356. Synthesis of novel reversible photoswitchable chiral dopants with unusually high helical twisting power. Q. Li, L. Green, L. Li, J. Kim 3:00 357. Synthesis of polythiophenes containing pendant calixarenes and their application in polythiophene/carbon nanotube hybrid sensors. Y. Yang, F. Wang, T. M. Swager 3:20 358. Synthesis, characterization, and application of highly stable carbon-centered radicals. E. L Dane, T. M. Swager, R. G. Griffin 3:40 359. The chemical reactivity of sorbitol with pedot. A. Onorato, D. Navarathne, M. B. Smith, G. A. Sotzing 4:00 360. Toposelective synthesis of a triply-bridged molecular gyroscope: Encasing of a phenylene rotator in the solid state. J. E. Nunez, A. Natarajan, M. A. Garcia-Garibay

4:20 372. Metal-catalyzed silylene insertion into allylic ethers: Allylic silane formation and reactivity. L. E. Bourque, K. A. Woerpel 4:40 373. N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalyzed acylation of nitroso compounds: Synthesis of hydroxamic acids. F. T. Wong, J. Seayad, P. K. Patra, Y. Zhang, J. Y. Ying Anion Coordination Chemistry Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by ORGN Heroes of Chemistry Sponsored by MEDI, Cosponsored by ORGN Nucleic Acids as Drug Targets Novel Targets and Therapeutic Approaches Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BIOL, MEDI, and ORGN M O N D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Section C

S. M. Sieburth,

Presiding

8:00-10:00

4:20 361. Toward ratiometric fluorescent chemosensors based on attenuated energy transfer: Design and studies. J. R. Acharya, H. Zhang, X. Li, E. E. Nesterov

133,136,153,155,164,169,180,182,189, 193,199, 201, 239, 273. See previous listings. 491, 507, 521, 528, 550, 559, 566, 569, 571, 578, 584, 587, 599, 613, 637, 742, 750, 762, 772, 788, 797, 801, 808, 813, 815, 818, 824, 840, 854, 866, 870, 876, 893, 899, 905-906. See subsequent listings.

Section Ε

TUESDAY MORNING

BCEC 258B

Section A

Metal-Mediated Reactions and Syntheses M. Hoke,

Presiding

1:00 339. Natural product synthesis via [2+2+2] cyclotrimerizations. J. A. Teske, A. Deiters 1:20 340. Microwave-assisted [2+2+2] cyclotrimerization reactions. D. D. Young, A. Deiters 1:40 341. Highly enantioselective intramo­ lecular [2+2+2] cycloaddition of enediynes and dienynes. T. Shibata, Y-K. Tahara, K. Tamura 2:00 342. C-C bond formation via double C-H functionalization: Aerobic oxidative coupling as a method for synthesizing bisarenes. B. DeBoef, T. A. Dwight, N. R. Rue, D. Charyk, R. Josselyn 2:20 343. Cycloaddition reactions of ethyl cyclopropylideneacetate in the presence of Ni(0) catalysts: A new building block for the synthesis of medium-sized rings. S. Saito, S. Komagawa, I. Sotome, T. Yoshizawa, N. Terashima, Y. Fukusaki, K. Maeda 2:40 344. Enantioselective cyanosilylation of carbonyl compounds. S. S. Kim 3:00 345. Gold(l)-catalyzed polycyclizations of functionalized 1,6-enynes. A. M. Echavarren, E. Jiménez-Nunez 3:20 346. Investigations of cross coupling reactions using new bulky neopentylphosphine ligands. L. L. Hill, K. H. Shaughnessy 3:40 347. Monosubstituted olefins as allylmetal and alkenylmetal equivalents in carbon-carbon bond coupling reactions. C-Y. Ho, T. F. Jamison 4:00 348. Sequential reactions via metal bifunctional catalysis. N. A. Owston, J. M. J. Williams, A. J. Parker 4:20 349. Zr (IV)-Catalyzed ester-amide exchange and related applications. C. Han, J. A. Porco Jr.

New Reactions and Methodology

BCEC Ballroom

A. B. Cooper,

Arthur C. Cope and Arthur C. Cope Scholars Awards

Presiding

1:00 362. Bi(OTf)3 as a dual role catalyst: Synthesis of substituted morpholines via catalytic ring-closing O-alkylation. G. R. Cook, R. Hayashi 1:20 363. Synthesis and transformations of polycyclic β-lactones. V. C. Purohit, A. Matla, D. Romo 1:40 364. Carbasugar synthesis via a palla­ dium catalyzed glycosylate. M. Shan, G. A. O'Doherty 2:00 365. Methods for carbon-carbon bond formation and fragmentation. M. Brewer, C. Draghici, M. I. Javed 2:20 366. Palladium-catalyzed intramolecular Heck coupling of unactivated alkyl electrophiles with terminal olefins mediated by N-heterocyclic carbenes. L. Firmansjah, G. C. Fu 2:40 367. Polyfunctional polymeric catalysts. C. W-Y. Chung, C. K-W. Kwong, P. H. Toy 3:00 368. Ruthenium-catalyzed tandem enyne metathesis-hydrovinylation. J. Gavenonis, M. L. Snapper 3:20 369. Selective catalytic oxidation of amines using molecular oxygen over gold-titania catalysts: New routes to caprolactam and cyclohexanone oxime. K. Egeblad, A. Popov, S. K. Klitgaard, E. Taaming, U. V. Mentzel, T. Jensen, C. H. Christensen 3:40 370. Synthesis and reactivity of an osmium (VIII) alkylidene. S. Blakey 4:00 371. Intramolecular pericyclic reactions of bicyclo[1.1.0]butanes. M. A. A. Walczak, P. Wipf

Section D BCEC 258A Materials, Devices, and Switches M. B. Smith,

Presiding

1:00 350. Synthesis and application of carbon nanotube and fullerene derivatives functionalized via a zwitterion approach. W. Zhang, J. Sprafke, T. M. Swager

100-TECH

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

W . Greenlee,

Organizer

R. A. Volkmann,

Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 374. Synthesis of Callypeltoside A aglycone. J. A. Marshall 8:45 375. From σ- to ττ-electrophilic Lewis acids: Application to selective organic transformations. Y. Yamamoto 9:25 376. New organic chemistry for protein design and analysis. D. Tirrell 10:05 377. Through-space interactions in optoelectronically active organic materials. G. C. Bazan 10:45 378. Nanotechnology: The passive, hybrid and active sides. J. M. Tour 11:25 379. The versatility of nickel cycloaddi­ tion catalysts. J. Louie Section Β BCEC 253C Asymmetric Reactions and Syntheses P. Wuts,

9:40 385. Chiral anthracene derivatives as facially restrictive chiral auxiliaries. X. Liu, J. K. Snyder 10:00 386. Chiral Lewis base-dependent asymmetric bifunctional catalysis: Can the R/S absolute configuration be predicted? Y-M. Lin, Z. Li 10:20 387. Withdrawn. 10:40 388. Enantioselective synthesis of disubstituted cyclopentenes by N-heterocy­ clic carbene-catalyzed desymmetrization of 1,3-diketones. M. Wadamoto, K. A. Scheldt 11:00 389. First asymmetric oxidation of phenols to ortho-quinols using a new class of enantioselective oxidants. J. K. Boppisetti, V. B. Birman 11:20 390. Highly enantioselective indiummediated crotylation of aliphatic hydrazones. G. R. Cook, R. Kargbo, Y. Takahashi 11:40 391. Organocatalytic amine synthesis via allylic sulfimide rearrangement. A. Armstrong, L. Challinor

Presiding

8:00 380. Asymmetric arylation of a-bromoketones with arylzinc reagents. P. M. Lundin, J. Esquivias, G. C. Fu 8:20 381. Nickel-catalyzed asymmetric cross-couplings of secondary allylic chlo­ rides and alkylzinc reagents. S. Son, G. C. Fu 8:40 382. Enantioselective synthesis of protected amines via the catalytic asym­ metric addition of hydrazoic acid to ketenes. X. Dai, T. Nakai, J. A. C. Romero, G. C. Fu 9:00 383. Asymmetric cyclization of nitrogencontaining heterocycles via catalytic C-H bond activation. R. M. Wilson, R. G. Bergman, J. A. Ellman 9:20 384. Catalytic enantioselective reduction of β,β-disubstituted vinyl sulfones using bisphosphine monoxide ligands. J-N. Desrosiers, A. B. Charette

BCEC 254 A/B Physical Organic Chemistry: Calculations, Mechanisms, Photochemistry, and High Energy Species J. P. Richard,

Presiding

8:00 392. Aromaticity: Molecular orbital picture of an intuitive concept. S. C. A. H. Pierrefixe, F. M. Bickelhaupt 8:20 393. Ball-in-a-box model of hypervalence: Carbon vs. silicon. S. C. A. H. Pierrefixe, C. Fonseca Guerra, F. M. Bickelhaupt 8:40 394. Withdrawn. 9:00 395. Attractive or repulsive character of the halogen-halogen interaction in halo­ gen-substituted biphenyls? J. Poater, J. J. Dannenberg, F. M. Bickelhaupt, M. Sola 9:20 396. Chemical and theoretical tools for understanding iminium ion catalysis. T. J. K. Gibbs, J. A. Platts, N. C. O. Tomkinson 9:40 397. Conformational analysis of Ν,Ν,Ν',Ν'-tetramethylethylenediamineΝ,Ν'-dioxide using NMR spectroscopy. E. J. Lee, P. V. Jog, J. D. Roberts 10:00 398. Dynamic effects in electrophilic aromatic substitution. J. O. Besinaiz-Thomas, D. A. Singleton 10:20 399. Experimental and theoretical conformational analysis of 2-substituted 1-nitroethenes and 1-bromo-1-nitroethenes. Y. A. Vereshchagina, A. A. Gazizova, D. V. Chachkov, E. A. Ishmaeva, V. M. Berestovitskaya 10:40 400. Foiled β-silicon stabilization in cyclopropyl carbocations. E. D. Willis, X. Creary 11:00 401. Nucleophilic substitution at phos­ phorus (SN2@P): Disappearance and reappearance of reaction barriers. M. A. van Bochove, M. Swart, F. M. Bickelhaupt 11:20 402. Oxygenation rate control by temperature with a thermoresponsive polymeric photosensitizer. H. Koizumi, Y. Shiraishi, T. Hirai Section D BCEC 258A Materials, Devices, and Switches R. K. Castellano,

Presiding

8:00 403. lndolo[3,2-b]carbazole derivatives as semiconducting materials in organic field-effect transistors. S. Wakim, P-L. Boudreault, N. Blouin, Y. Tao, M. Leclerc

ORGN 8:20 404. Actuation based on pi-stacking intermolecular interactions. M. Kertesz, Y. Tian 8:40 405. Withdrawn. 9:00 406. Incorporating perfluoroanthracene units into organic semiconductors. J. F. Tannaci, M. Noji, J. McBee, T. D. Tilley 9:20 407. Conformational switching of a Cj-symmetric fluorophore: Design prin­ ciples for reactivity-based turn-on sensing. X. Jiang, J. C. Bollinger, D. Lee 9:40 408. Cooperative mechanical coupling schemes for allosteric switching. J. Riddle, X. Jiang, J. Huffman, D. Lee 10:00 409. Designing host-guest co-crystals for the preparation of poly(diiododiacetylene) by using N-l halogen bonds. L. Luo, C. Wilhelm, A. Sun, J. W. Lauher, N. S. Goroff 10:20 410. End-capping of conjugated thiophene-benzene aromatic systems. B. Wex, B. R. Kaafarani, D. C. Neckers 10:40 411. Exercising demons: A molecular information ratchet. D. A. Leigh, E. R. Kay, C-F. Lee, V. Serreli 11:00 412. Explosives detection with organic hydride donors. T. L Andrew, T. M. Swager 11:20 413. Fluorotweezers with quinoxaline pincers: Syntheses, structures and hostguest complexation. M. Etzkorn, M. D. Brooker, D. T. Nguyen 11:40 414. From molecular wires to nanorings. M. Hoffmann, H. L. Anderson Section Ε

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section C

Section A

BCEC 254 A/B

BCEC Ballroom Arthur C. Cope and Arthur C. Cope Scholars Awards

R. J . McMahon, W . Greenlee, Β. Β. Snider,

Presiding

1:15 Introductory Remarks. 1:20 427. The advent and develoment of organocatalysis. D. W. C. MacMillan 2:00 428. Molecular synthesis via principles of solid state and supramolecular chemis­ try. L. R. MacGillivray 2:40 429. Polyethylene the hard way, one carbon at a time: The living polymerization of ylides and diazoalkanes. K. J. Shea 3:20 430. Synthesis and applications of diorganozinc reagents and hemi-labile bidentate ligands in asymmetric catalysis. A. B. Charette 4:00 Introduction of Awardee. 4:10 431. Award Address (Arthur C. Cope Award, sponsored by Arthur C. Cope Fund). Macromolecules at the interface of organic and materials chemistry. J. M. J. Frechet Section Β

Asymmetric Reactions and Syntheses

New Reactions and Methodology

P. Wuts,

Β. Κ. Banik,

1:00 432. Catalytic kinetic resolution of hydroxycyclopentenones through asym­ metric silylation reaction. Z. You, A. H. Hoveyda, M. L. Snapper 1:20 433. Efficient kinetic resolution of diols through catalytic asymmetric silylation. Y. Zhao, A. W. Mitra, A. H. Hoveyda, M. L Snapper 1:40 434. A practical enantioselective syn­ thesis of a potent dual PPAR α/γ agonist peliglitazar. R. P. Deshpande, A. Staab, D. Petsch, J. Pesti, H-Y. Li, L. Kolla, L. Spangler, J. Li, A. Littke, M. Marchetti, C. Escobar, J. Muslehiddinoôlu, Ο. Akiti 2:00 435. Adventures in process research and development: Innovative chemistry for scale-up. S. G. Koenig, H. Zhao, C. P. Vandenbossche, S. P. Singh, R. P. Bakale 2:20 436. Catalytic enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of allylic epoxides from propargylsilanes. Y. Aye, D. A. Evans 2:40 437. Catalytic, asymmetric synthesis of beta-lactams with Cinchona alkaloid cata­ lysts. X. Xu, K. Wang, S. G. Nelson 3:00 438. Co(salen)-catalyzed asymmetric intramolecular openings of oxetanes. E. N. Jacobsen, R. N. Loy 3:20 439. Diastereoselective electrophilic fluorination of chiral allylsilanes. S. Purser, P. R. Moore, V. Gouverneur 3:40 440. Iron-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation of aromatic alkenes using hydrogen peroxide. F. G. Gelalcha, A. Gopinatan, B. Bitterlich, M. K. Tse, M. Beller 4:00 441. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids: Catalytic, enantioselective addition of glycolate derived silyl ketene acetals to aldehydes. S. E. Denmark, W-J. Chung 4:20 442. Stereochemical and skeletal diver­ sity employing chiral azide functionalized organosilanes. Y. Chen, J. A. Porco Jr., J. S. Panek 4:40 443. Synthesis of alkoxy nicotine derivatives from (S)-nicotine. P. W. Ondachi, D. L Comins

Presiding

8:00 415. Tandem ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis/oxidations. A. A. Scholte, M. L Snapper 8:20 416. Au(l)-catalyzed cycloisomerization of ynylidene-cyclopropanes. Ο. Υ. Hung, F. D. Toste 8:40 417. First catalytic method for the alkynylation of benzyl chlorides. C. H. Larsen, K. W. Anderson, R. E. Tundel, S. L. Buchwald 9:00 418. A two-carbon homologation of aldehydes and ketones using ynamides. L You, R. P. Hsung, Z. F. Al-Rashid 9:20 419. Au-catalyzed reactions of functionalized aliènes. L. Zhang 9:40 420. Withdrawn. 10:00 421. New variations of the Trost-Lu alkyne to 1,3-diene isomerization reaction. D. D. Yang, M. Y. Fu, C. K-W. Kwong, P. H. Toy 10:20 422. Oxidative hydration of alkynes: A modular connection tool. J. Raushel, S. M. Pitram, M. P. Cassidy, V. V. Fokin 10:40 423. Palladium-catalyzed 1,1- and 1,2-difunctionalization of alkenes. D. Kalyani, M. S. Sanford 11:00 424. Palladium-catalyzed intramolecular diamination and chloroamination of unactivated alkenes. P. A. Sibbald, Β. Μ. Cochran, F. E. Michael 11:20 425. Preparative scale synthesis of derivatized trans-cyclooctenes. M. Royzen, J. M. Fox 11:40 426. Simple, metal-free, intermolecular hydroamination of alkenes and alkynes. A. M. Beauchemin Anion Coordination Chemistry Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by ORGN RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC

Presiding

Organizer

BCEC 253C

BCEC 258B

Physical Organic Chemistry: Calculations, Mechanisms, Photochemistry, and High Energy Species

Presiding

1:00 444. Hypercloso C(BCH 3 ) 11 as a reagent: A new mechanism of aromatic substitution. K. Vyakaranam, Z. Havlas, J. Michl 1:20 445. Kinetic studies on the rate of transmetallation. K. H. Shukla, P. DeShong 1:40 446. Mechanistic investigations of the photochemistry of 1,4-disubstituted tetrazolethiones. S. Rayât, R. Chhabra 2:00 447. Photo-induced electron transfer in room temperature ionic liquids: Charge stabilization and solvent mediation. D. E. Falvey, R. C. Vieira 2:20 448. Phototriggers: Leaving group ability vs. photorelease efficacy. E. D. Cope, R. S. Givens 2:40 449. Selective organic transformations on photocatalysts. Y. Shiraishi, T. Hirai 3:00 450. Solvent and substituent effects in nucleophilic attack on small-ring nitrogen compounds. H. D. Banks 3:20 451. Spectroscopy of "invisible" alkylchlorocarbenes: Dynamics and solvent interactions. R. A. Moss, J. Tian, K. Krogh-Jespersen, R. R. Sauers 3:40 452. Structure-reactivity effects on primary deuterium isotope effects. J. P. Richard, W-Y. Tsang 4:00 453. Ultrafast studies of rearrangement in the excited states. J. Wang, J. Kubicki, G. Burdzinski, T. L. Gustafson, M. S. Platz 4:20 454. Visible-light-absorbing sensitizers and gold nanoparticles as mediators in the release of carboxylate anions through photoinduced electron transfer. J. B. Borak, D. E. Falvey Section D BCEC 258A Materials, Devices, and Switches H-R. Tseng,

Presiding

1:00 455. Parallel screening of an in situ "click" chemistry library in integrated microfluidics. Y. Wang, W-Y. Lin, M. E. Phelps, H.C.Kolb, H-R. Tseng 1:20 456. Integrated microfluidic devices for sequential synthesis of molecular imaging probes. W-Y. Lin, Y. Wang, Y-C. Chen, S. Hou, N. Satyamurthy, M. E. Phelps, H-R. Tseng 1:40 457. Molecular switches and functional materials based on mechanically interlocked molecules. D. Tuncel 2:00 458. Nanocrystalline T i 0 2 solar cells based on variable band gap poly(arylene ethynylene) conjugated polyelectrolytes. H. Jiang, X. Zhao, K. S. Schanze 2:20 459. Novel fluoran dyes for direct thermal printing. J. L. Marshall, M. P. Filosa, S. J. Telfer, R. M. Allen, X. M. Hérault, K-S. Cheon 2:40 460. Novel phosphorescent polymers as sensors. K. Venkatesan, T. M. Swager 3:00 461. Photochromic manipulation of energy and electron transfer. S. D. Straight, J. Andréasson, G. Kodis, Y. Terazono, A. L Moore, T. A. Moore, D. Gust

3:20 462. Polyethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) nanobiointerfaces: Construction of thin, uniform, functionalized, and biocompatible PEDOT films. H-H. Yu, S-C. Luo, H. Xie, N. Chen, E. A. B. Kantchev, S. Gao, J. Y. Ying 3:40 463. Preparation and application of borylated hexabenzocoronenes in organic devices. K. N. Plunkett, K. Godula, S. Xiao, C. P. Nuckolls 4:00 464. Read-write molecular receptors based on restricted rotation. K. D. Shimizu 4:20 465. Recent advances in the chemistry of molecular knots. E. E. Fenlon, M. S. C. Dietz, D. M. Patterson 4:40 466. Toward the control of the arrangement of semiconductor molecules within cocrystals. A. Sokolov, L. R. MacGillivray Section Ε BCEC 258B New Reactions and Methodology A. O. King,

Presiding

1:00 467. Allenyl azide cycloaddition chemis­ try: Photochemical initiation in the pres­ ence of Cu(l) leads to improved regioselectivity. D. K. Hester II, K. S. Feldman 1:20 468. Asymmetric conjugate addition of allylboronates to activated enones using Ni-catalysis. J. D. Sieber, S. Liu, J. P. Morken 1:40 469. Asymmetric synthesis of (Z)disubstituted allylic alcohols. L. Salvi, S-J. Jeon, E. L Fisher, P. J. Carroll, P. J. Walsh 2:00 470. Azides in organic synthesis: Ste­ reoselective synthesis of biologically active molecules. S. Baskaran, M. G. Sankar, A. Aravind 2:20 471. Cationic Nazarov-type electrocyclization of arylallyl alcohols in the forma­ tion of indenes: Investigation of substituent effects on regioselectivity. C. D. Smith, G. Rosocha, L. Mui, R. A. Batey 2:40 472. Cis-fused bicyclic ether arrays as a general framework for natural product synthesis. S. P. Fearnley, P. Lory 3:00 473. Diastereoselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions of α-chiral benzylic cations. P. Rubenbauer, D. Stadler, F. Muhlthau, T. Bach 3:20 474. Direct reduction of diazene link­ ages to hydrazo groups with hydrazine. J. S. Moran, W. Koppes, J. C. Oxley 3:40 475. Efficient N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed O- to C-acyl transfer. A. D. Smith, J. E. Thomson, C. D. Campbell, C. Concellon, K. A. Gallagher, P. Lenden 4:00 476. Intramolecular Diels-Alder reac­ tions of oxazolone: Approaches toward total synthesis of pumiliotoxin C and related alkaloids. C. Thongsomkleeb, S. P. Fearnley 4:20 477. Syntheses and antagonist hor­ monal properties of novel 113-aryl-17,17spiro[(4'H,5'-methylene)oxazol]-substituted steroids. C. Jin, J. P. Burgess, J. A. Kepler, C. E. Cook 4:40 478. Toward directing-group-free epox­ ide opening cascades: Control of regiose­ lectivity in intramolecular epoxide opening reactions. I. Vilotijevic, C. J. Morten, T. F. Jamison Anion Coordination Chemistry Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by ORGN Mechanism of Action of Natural Products Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-101

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ORGN

T U E S D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Physical Organic Chemistry, Metal-Mediated Reactions, Asymmetric Reactions and Syntheses S. M. Sieburth,

Organizer

8:00-10:00 479. Anion sensors utilizing m-terphenylscaffoided bis(imidazolium) receptors. R. C. Smith, G. Galdamez 480. Formation of rhodamine Β spirolactams for the development of selective sensing materials. C. J . Stephenson, Κ. Μ. Yehl, K. D. Shimizu 481. Polymer-caged liposomes: A pH-responsive drug-delivery system with high stabil­ ity. S-M. Lee, T. V. O'Halloran, S. T. Nguyen 482. Disproportionation of p-nitrotoluene and />nitroethylbenzene catalyzed by hydrox­ ide ion in water by the action of β-cyclodextrin. Y. Lu, Ζ. Khedra, Β. Liu 483. Ortho arylation of acetanilides via Pd(ll) catalyzed C-H functionalization. Z. Shi 484. Oxazolidinones: Properties, reactivity and role in catalysis. D. Seebach, A. K. Beck, D. M. Badine, Β. Jaun 485. Scalable, catalytic asymmetric synthesis of anti-,anti-stereotriad building blocks for polypropionate natural products. Q. Xie, K. A. Parker 486. Intramolecular nitrene addition to alkenes and aliènes. S. A. Fleming, R. Liu 487. Diethylenetriamine substituted naphthalimide fluoroionophores as ligands for trace metal analysis: Synthesis and fluorescence study. A. V. Skobeleva, J. E. Elbert 488. Photochemistry of η-acetyl-, n-trifluoroacetyl-, n-tosyl- and n-mesyl dibenzothiophene sulfilimine. V. Desikan, Y. Liu, J. P. Toscano, W. S. Jenks 489. Spectroscopic characterization of triplet 3-thienylcarbene, its substituted analogs, and their rearrangement products. C. R. Pharr, R. J. McMahon 490. Practice makes perfect in organic chem­ istry: The WEJ.EARN System for Organic Chemistry. J. H. Penn 491. Enantioselective intramolecular [2+2]photocycloaddition reactions of tetramic acid esters and their structural homologs mediated by a chiral lactam host. D. Albrecht, B. Basler, T. Bach 492. Synthesis and characterization of new photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy. D. S. Crumrine, P. B. Sanjeevaiah, B. M. Zaitoun 493. Amplified unmasking of fluorophores in a spatially addressable fashion. T. P. Gustafson, A. G. Kutateladze 494. Ene and yne dienophiles and substituents: Theoretical insights into surprising substituent effects. G. O. Jones, M. Dai, S-J. Min, P. L Theofanis, K. N. Houk, S. J. Danishefsky 495. Influence of triplet sensitizer's energies on the di-ir-methane reactivity of acyclic 1,4-dienes and 3,7-unsaturated ketones. D. Armesto, M. J. Ortiz, A. R. Agarrabeitia, N. El-Boulifi 496. Application of excited state meta-effect in photolabile protecting group design. P. Wang, H. Hu, Y. Wang 497. Graphite-sensitized microwave flash pyrolysis: Making reactive intermediates in the microwave. R. P. Johnson, H. Y. Cho, P. A. Waske 498. Benzo-fused nitrogen heterocycles by tandem processes involving nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) reactions. R. A. Bunce, T. Nago 499. Conformational analysis in reversible intramolecular [2+2] photocycloaddition of cyclobutane-fused quinone. H. Asahara, E. Mochizuki, K. Kokubo, T. Oshima 500. Direct observation of zwitterion interme­ diates in the photolysis of arylhalodiazirines. J. Wang, G. Burdzinski, J. Kubicki, M. S. Plato 501. Photochemistry of ergosterol and synthe­ sis of lumisterol 2 . B-W. Zhang, X-S. Wang, X-X. Cheng, Y-Y. Liu

102-TECH

502. Temperature-controlled changeable photooxygenation selectivity with a poly­ meric photosensitizer as a microreactor. H. Koizumi, Y. Kimata, Y. Shiraishi, T. Hirai 503. Photosensitization properties of thermoresponsive polymer containing a benzophenone fragment. H. Koizumi, Y. Shiraishi, T. Hirai 504. Irradiation of all-trans lycopene solution for high percentage of cis-lycopene iso­ mers. Y-Y. Liu, X-S. Wang, X-X. Cheng, B-W. Zhang 505. Single molecule spectroscopy from an organic chemist's perspective: Controlling the photophysics of thioketones by molecular encapsulation. N. Jayaraj, V. Ramamurthy 506. Density functional theory study of reac­ tions of aromatic thiols and Angeli's salt. L. L. Serbulea, K. Goto, J. M. Fukuto, Κ. Ν. Houk 507. Vapor phase photochemistry of dimethylpyrazines and dimethylpyrimidines. J. W. Pavlik, T. Vongnakorn 508. Solid state photodecarbonylation and properties of quaternary ammonium salts of crystalline keto-diacids. F. Family, M. A. Garcia-Garibay 509. Unusual structure and dynamic of 3,7dichloro-2,4,6,8-tetracarbomethoxy-barbaralane I—A neutral bishomoaromatic molecule? J. Wang, l-H. Tsai, L. J. Todaro, K. G. Grohmann 510. Linear free energy relationship of the cis to trans epimerization of substituted 1-phenyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3-carbolines. M. L Van Linn, F. H. Fôrsterling, M. P. Ver Haag, J. R. Deschamps, J. M. Cook 511. Trapping of photochemically generated reactive species in singlet oxidation of organic sulfides. C. Smith, D. L. Dillon 512. Synthesis and photolysis of dendron based phototrigger: Phenylacetylenyl phenacyl (PAP) dendron. J . I. Lee, A. Riamoni, S. Roy 513. Type I (electron transfer) photooxygenations of sulfides. E. L. Clennan, C. Liao 514. Disparate effects of metal complexation and metal catalysis in an aqueous auxiliary-mediated Diels-Alder reaction. V. M. Krishnan, S. K. Kundu, E. Mejia, M. P. Mahindaratne, G. R. Negrete 515. Electronic vs. steric effects in SN2@P reactions. M. A. van Bochove, M. Swart, F. M. Bickelhaupt 516. Hydroboration of alkenes with BH3: A "hot" reaction at room temperature in solution. Y. Oyola, D. A. Singleton 517. Measurement and calculation of optical transitions in substituted tetraarylcyclopentadienones. T. S. Hughes, R. G. Potter 518. RCM approach toward 1,6-methano[12]and [14]annulenes and their bisdehydroderivatives. Y-Y. Chen, S-Y. Hsu, R. Benshafrut, L. J. Todaro, K. G. Grohmann 519. Reaction mechanism studies of solvolytic displacement of chloride from phosphorus and sulfur. D. N. Kevill, H. J. Koh, S. J. Kang, M. J. D'Souza, S. Mlynarski, L. Yaakoubd 520. Structure of 1,4-heterophosphinanes: Experimental and theoretical studies. Y. A. Vereshchagina, A. A. Gazizova, D. V. Chachkov, E. A. Ishmaeva, M. G. Voronkov 521. Surface participation during imine formation. D. R. Dalton, P. E. Sonnet, L. M. Mascavage 522. A practical and efficient Pd/C-catalyzed copper-, ligand- and amine-free Sonogashira coupling reaction. S. Aoyagi, S. Mori, T. Yanase, Y. Monguchi, T. Maeagwa, H. Sajiki

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

523. Chiral benzimidazoline-2-ylidene Pd(ll) complex for intermolecular asymmetric oxidative Heck-type reaction of arylboronic acids with alkenes. S. Sakaguchi, K. S. Yoo, C. P. Park, J. O'Neill, K. W. Jung 524. Copper mediated coupling of vinyl boronates with aliphatic alcohols: Toward a general synthesis of allyl vinyl ethers. R. Shade, C. A. Merlic 525. Intramolecular one-pot transition metalcatalyzed methylenation-Heck crosscoupling processes. L. Brethous, H. Lebel 526. Copper(l)-catalyzed olefination reactions of carbonyl coupounds. M. Davi, H. Lebel 527. /V-Substituted tosyloxyamine derivatives as a new source of metal nitrenes. K. Huard, H. Lebel 528. N-Tosyloxycarbamates as precursor for enantioselective and catalytic aziridination reactions. M. Parmentier, H. Lebel 529. Cu(l)-catalyzed synthesis of enol lactones from alkynoic acids in water. T. L Mindt, R. Schibli 530. Development of an efficient method for N-terminal alpha-amino group ligation of peptides in aqueous medium. M-K. Wong, W-K. Chan, C-M. Ho, C-M. Che 531. Development of palladium(ll) catalyzed macrocyclization reactions. C. A. Merlic, J. M. Fernandez, D. G. Chan 532. Development of sustainable synthetic methods: Construction of 4-dihydropyridinones and β-amino esters by domino reactions in aqueous ethanol. P. J . Alaimo, R. V. O'Brien III, A. Johnson, S. Slauson, J. O'Brien, E. Tyson, J. Chacon, L. Wallace, S. Connell 533. Dynamic diastereoselectivity during iron tricarbonyl mediated spirocyclization reac­ tions. A. J. Pearson, H. Sun 534. Dynamic kinetic resolution of primary amines by a combined lipase-metal cataly­ sis. L M. Kanupp, C. E. Hoben, J. Paetzold, J-E. Bàckvall 535. Exploring the stereochemical outcome (E/Z) of tandem metal-mediated reactions leading to 3-arylidene isobenzofuran-1ones. K. B. Voellinger, B. F. Ohman, E. T. Pelkey 536. Investigation of domino Mannich-type reactions. E. Tyson, J. Chacon, P. J. Alaimo 537. Ionic liquid-anchored ruthenium-based complexes: Activity and recyclability in cross metathesis reactions. H. Clavier, M. Mauduit, S. P. Nolan 538. Ligand-free and heterogeneous Pd/C catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction toward the synthesis of heterobiaryl derivatives. S. Sako, Y. Kitamura, T. Udzu, T. Maegawa, Y. Monguchi, H. Sajiki 539. Mechanism of the permanganate-promoted oxidative cyclization of 1,5-dienes: A DFT study. T. Strassner, A. Poethig 540. Metal-catalyzed conversion of alcohols to amides via oximes. N. A. Owston, J. M. J. Williams, A. J. Parker 541. N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC)- and phosphine-containing ruthenium indenylidene complexes: A comparative study in olefin metathesis. H. Clavier, F. Boeda, S. P. Nolan 542. N-Vinylpyridinium and-ammonium tetrafluoroborate salts: New electrophilic coupling partners for Pd(0)-catalyzed crosscoupling reactions. N. Brown, M. Minatoya, G. Gao, K. R. Buszek 543. Ni/NHC-catalyzed preparation of unsymmetrical oligophenyls. C-B. Kim, C. K. Kim, K. Park 544. Dihydroboration of 1-phenylselenyl-1alkynes with dichloroborane-dioxane complex. N. G. Bhat, V. Garate 545. Novel route to (Z)-1-alkenylboronate esters. N. G. Bhat, F. Gutierrez 546. Hydroalumination of (Z)-1-trimethylstannyl-1-alkenes followed by selective iodinolysis. N. G. Bhat, M. Salinas 547. Novel synthesis of (Z)-allylsilanes containing trimethylsilylmethyl moiety via organoboranes. N. G. Bhat, E. A. Cavazos 548. One-pot Lewis acid catalyzed reductive N-heterocyclization of 2-nitrobenzoates: A novel approach to prepare antitumor quinazoline derivatives. S. K. Kundu, M. P. D. Mahindaratne, G. R. Negrete 549. Palladium-catalyzed conversion of alkenes to organoboron compounds. N. A. Petasis, K. C. Nagulapalli

550. Palladium-catalyzed methylation and arylation of unactivated C-H bonds in simple carboxylic acids. J-Q. Yu, R. Giri, N. Maugel 551. Palladium-catalyzed oxidation of Bocprotected N-methylamines with lOAc as the oxidant: A Boc-directed sp3 C-H bond activation. D. Wang, X. Hao, J-Q. Yu 552. Pd-catalyzed aryl amination of purine nucleosides. P. F. Thomson, P. Lagisetty, M. K. Lakshman 553. Pd-catalyzed C-C bond forming reactions of a thymidine arylsulfonate. S. B. Kang, E. De Clercq, M. K. Lakshman 554. Polyisobutylene supported ligands for homogeneous Cr(lll) and Ru(ll) catalysts. C. Hongfa, H. S. Bazzi, D. E. Bergbreiter 555. Propargylic oxidation catalyzed by dirhodium caprolactamate: Rapid access to α,β-acetylenic ketones. E. C. McLaughlin, M. P. Doyle 556. Radical additions to styrene-transition metal complexes. J. H. Byers, N. J. Janson, M. K. Griswold, D. M. O'Mara 557. Reduction of chalcones with nickel boride in methanol. S. Majumdar, K. Dawra, J. M. Khurana 558. Relative stabilities of aluminum chelates of aldols involved in aldol-transfer reac­ tions. V. Nevalainen 559. Rh-catalyzed [2+2+2+1] and [2+2+2] cycloadditions: Construction of 5-7-5 and 5-6-5 fused-rings system from triynes, enediynes, and related substrates. Y-H. G. Teng, J. Kaloko Jr., I. Ojima 560. Development of chiral biphenol-based phosphorus ligands and their applications to asymmetric allylic amination reactions. C. Shi, S. Chaterpaul, I. Ojima 561. Rhenium(VII) catalyzed isomerization of allylic alcohols. G. L. Beutner, C. Morrill, R. H. Grubbs 562. Selectivity between nonequivalent ortho sites of organoiridium-catalyzed deuterium exchange in meta-substituted substrates. C. S. Elmore, J. R. Heys 563. Spontaneous formation of water-soluble rhodium quinone catalysts. M. D. Faust Jr., S. B. Kim, J. L Barkin, W. C. Trenkle, D. A. Sweigart 564. Studies toward the total synthesis of a novel -y-lactone. W. T. Spencer III, J. Smith, M. Agusto, C. G. Collison 565. Synthesis and characterization of hydrazono-disulfonic acid 1, a novel and highly sensitive color reagent for determination of vanadium. Q-L. Feng, D-Q. Liu 566. Synthesis of 4-arylpiperidines from 1-benzyl-4-piperidone: Application of the Shapiro reaction and alkenylsilane crosscoupling. C. Morrill, N. S. Mani 567. Synthesis of phenanthrene derivatives via microwave-promoted Suzuki-Miyaura coupling/aldol condensation cascade reaction. J-N. Heo, Y. H. Kim, Β. Τ. Kim 568. Synthesis of polythiophenes using oxida­ tive homocoupling. S. Datta, B. DeBoef 569. Direct oxidative coupling of electron-rich arènes via double C-H functionalization. T. A. Dwight, B. DeBoef 570. Rhodium-catalyzed allylic C-H activation and intramolecular hydroalkylation as a facile method of synthesis of pyrrolizidinone alkaloids. A. S. Dumas, B. DeBoef 571. Tandem cyclization of alkynes via rhodium alkynyl and alkenylidene catalysis. J . M. Joo, Y. Yuan, C. Lee 572. Transition metal-catalyzed reaction of ΛΖ-propargyl anilines: Synthesis of heteroaromatic compounds. Y. Hanzawa, A. Kanno, A. Saito 573. Triazolyl phosphine ligands for the cop­ pers-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. L. B. Krasnova, V. V. Fokin 574. Chemocatalytic and biocatalytic approaches to the highly stereoselective reduction of ketones. D. Tellers, B. Kosjek, M. Biba, J. C. Moore 575. Kinetic resolution of secondary alcohols through enantioselective silylation. S. G. Patel, S. L. Wiskur 576. Progress toward the synthesis of thapsigargin and its analogs. L. Sun, M. A. Avery 577. A biomimetic total synthesis of (+)intricarene. B. Tang, G. Pattenden 578. A highly enantioselective synthesis of amide-substituted chiral biaryls through rhodium(l)-catalyzed asymmetric [2 + 2 + 2] cycloadditions of ynamides. J. Oppenheimer, W. Johnson, R. P. Hsung

ORGN 579. Withdrawn. 580. Asymmeteric conjugate addition of thiols to unsaturated carbonyls by organic cata­ lysts based on cinchona alkaloids. Y. Liu, B. Wang, B. Sun, L Deng 581. Asymmetric nucleophilic additions to carbonyls by organic catalysts. X. Lu, H. Li, L. Deng 582. Withdrawn. 583. Asymmetric Baylis-Hillman reactions promoted by chiral imidazolines. J . Xu, C-H. Tan 584. Asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction cata­ lyzed by novel hydrazine organocatalysts. G. R. Cook, Y. Takahashi, S. Bhor 585. Asymmetric synthesis of β-silyl β-amino acids and peptides using reverse azaBrook rearrangement. B. Niu, G. Liu, S. M. Sieburth 586. Stability studies of α-silyl amino acids and their derivatives. Y. Qi, G. Liu, S. M. Sieburth 587. Asymmetric synthesis of anti- and syn-2, 3-diamino esters using sulfinimines: Water and concentration effects. F. A. Davis, Y. Zhang, H. Qiu 588. Asymmetric synthesis of cis and trans2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidines. F. A. Davis, J. Zhang, H. Qiu, H. Xu, Y. Wu 589. Diastereoselective synthesis of trans 2,3-disubstituted pyrrolidines. M. E. Scott, M. Lautens 590. Asymmetric transfer hydrogénation of ketones using in situ tethered Iridium catalysts. J. E. D. Martins, M. Wills, D. J. Morris 591. Asymmetric transfer hydrogénation with "tethered" catalysts. C. Lin, M. Wills, F. K. Cheung 592. Bio-inspired polyene cyclization constructs tetracyclic terpenoid promoted by steroid acetal-SnCI4. Y. J. Zhao, T. P. Loh 593. Biocatalyzed addition of cyanide to sterically hindered 2-chlorobenzaldehyde. A. Soli's, H. I. Pérez, N. Manjarrez, H. Luna, J. Cassani 594. Camphorpyrazolidinone derived auxiliaries in asymmetric synthesis. K. Chen 595. Cassette-ISES (in situ enzymatic screening) identifies complementary salen scaffolds for hydrolytic kinetic resolution across a range of epoxides. S. Dey, D. B. Berkowitz 596. Catalytic asymmetric acylcyanation of imines. S. C. Pan, J. Zhou, B. List 597. Cleft molecules as organocatalysts in an asymmetric hetero-Diels-Alder reaction. C. Olsson, A. Friberg, F. Ek, U. Berg, T. Frejd 598. Comparative study on the oxynitrilase activity in several prunus seeds. A. Soli's, H. I. Pérez, Ν. Manjarrez, Η. Luna, J. Cassani 599. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric cycloaddi­ tions to form dihydrofurans. S. Son, G. C. Fu 600. Nickel/diamine catalyzed asymmetric cross-coupling of α-bromoesters with arylsilanes. X. Dai, N. A. Strotman, G. C. Fu 601. Diastereoselective synthesis of functionalized (Z)-fluoroalkene dipeptide isosteres: Lys-Lys and Glu-Glu type FADIs. T. Narumi, Y. Kodera, K. Tomita, E. Inokuchi, S. Oishi, H. Ohno, N. Fujii 602. Diastereoselective allylic alkylations to yield quaternary carbon stereocenters. S. E. Schaus, E. Birkett 603. Asymmetric catalytic synthesis of chiral dihydropyrimidones. J. M. Goss, S. E. Schaus 604. Catalytic asymmetric alkynylboration of imines. J. A. Bishop, S. E. Schaus

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

605. Enantioselective Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction of cyclopentenone catalyzed by chiral Bransted acids. A. M. Wensley, S. E. Schaus 606. Synthetic and photophysical studies of ESIPT-mediated [3+2] dipolar cycloaddi­ tions of 3-hydroxyquinolinones. B. Xia, B. Gerard, J. A. Porco Jr., G. Jones II 607. Enantioenriched 3,4-chromanediones via asymmetric rearrangements of 3-allyloxyflavones. J-C. Marié, G. K. Min, A. R. Yeager, S. E. Schaus, J. A. Porco Jr. 608. Enantiomerically pure planar chiral ferrocene based bidentate Lewis acids. R. Boshra, A. Doshi, K. Venkatasubbaiah, F. Jaekle 609. Enantioselective Michael addition of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds to α,β-unsaturated ketoesters using cinchona alkaloidderived catalysts. M. A. Calter, J. Wang, R. Philips 610. Enantioselective synthesis and biological evaluation of stereoisomers of 1-octen-3-ol and its analogs. A. 0 . Adesunloro, C. 0 . Ikediobi, L. M. Latinwo, L. Ayuk-Takem, J. Cilek 611. Facile access to a propellane derivative of salinosporamide A by a stereoselective Ugi reaction. M. Vamos, Y. Kobayashi 612. Highly enantioselective aza-Henry reac­ tion catalyzed by a novel Bls-thiourea derivative of binaphthyl diamine. K. Rampalakos, W. D. Wulff 613. Highly enantioselective synthesis of atropisomeric lactams through catalytic asymmetric Buchwald-Hartwig amination. 0 . Kitagawa, H. Tanabe, T. Taguchi 614. Kinetic resolution of alcohols using chiral, resin-bound catalysts. B. A. Brando, A. Jain 615. Kinetic study of the reaction using the enzyme oxynitrilase from capulin. A. Soli's, H. I. Pérez, Ν. Manjarrez, Η. Luna 616. Mesoporous silica functionalized L-proline amide derivative as a heterogeneous chiral organocatalyst in asymmetric aldol reaction. L-C. Lee, V. S. Lin, K. Chen 617. New chiral piperidine derivatives for catalytic enantioselective synthesis. V. Nevalainen, Ο. Β. Olubanwo 618. Catalytic enantioselective Diels-Alder reaction in ionic liquid via a recyclable chiral In(lll) complex. F. Fu, Y. C. Teo, T. P. Loh 619. Organocatalytic approach to tetrahydrofurans: Application to the total synthesis of (-)-Goniothalesdiol. F. A. Suva, K. J. Franklin, V. Gouverneur 620. Enantioselective organocatalytic hydrophosphination of α,β-unsaturated alde­ hydes. I. Ibrahem, R. Rios, J. Vesely, A. Cordova 621. The direct enatioselective synthesis of bicyclic Diels-Alder products. H. Sundén, R. Rios, Y. Xu, A. Cordova 622. Organocatalytic asymmetric 5-hydroxyisoxazolidine synthesis: A highly enantioselective route to β-amino acids. 1. Ibrahem, R. Rios, J. Vesely, G-L. Zhao, A. Cordova 623. Three component organocatalytic 1,3dipolar cycloaddition. R. Rios, I. Ibrahem, J. Vesely, G-L. Zhao, A. Cordova 624. Organocatalytic enantioselective aziridination of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. J. Vesely, I. Ibrahem, G-L. Zhao, R. Rios, A. Cordova 625. Highly enantioselective organocatalytic synthesis of cyclopentanones. R. Rios, J. Vesely, H. Sunden, G-L. Zhao, A. Cordova 626. Organocatalytic enantioselective cyclopropanation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. R. Rios, H. Sundén, J. Vesely, G-L. Zhao, P. Diedzic, A. Cordova 627. Organocatalytic enantioselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of alpha.beta-unsaturated aldehydes. B-C. Hong, H-C. Tseng, M-F. Wu, J-H. Liao 628. Organocatalyzed benzion condensation by in situ formed planar chiral carbene. Y. Ma, Q. Chai, T. Zhou, X. Fang, C. Ma, C. Song 629. Study for synthesis chiral /V,/V'-bis(13Rparyl-4Sp-[2,2] paracyclophanyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazolium tertafluoroborate. Y. Ma, W. Duan, X. Fang, H. Xia, B. Qu, K. Chen, C. Song 630. Screening of a modular sugar-based phosphite-oxazoline ligand library in asymmetric Pd-catalyzed Heck reactions. 0 . Pamies, Y. Mata, M. Diéguez

631. Structure activity relationships of secondary amines in iminium ion catalysis. T. J. K. Gibbs, R. L. Elliott, G. Evans, I. L Jones, J. A. Platts, N. C. 0 . Tomkinson 632. Synthesis of chiral trifluoromethyl amino acid esters by Friedel-Crafts aminoalkylation using alpha-methyl benzylamines as chiral auxiliaries. M. Abid, L. Teixeira, B. Torok 633. Asymmetric synthesis of a-trifluoromethylamines from trifluoromethylketones: A green approach. S. Dasgupta, E. Morzhina, S. Mhadgut, B. Tôrôk 634. Synthetic studies toward biologically active pyran-containing natural products using a catalytic enantioselective heteroDiels-Alder/allylboration multicomponent reaction. 0 . Marion, H. Lachance, X. Gao, D. G. Hall 635. The catalytic, asymmetric synthesis of β-lactams with cinchona alkaloid catalysts. X. Xu, C. Zhu, S. G. Nelson 636. Toward the total synthesis of (-)-cylindrocyclophane F using a catalytic asymmetric cyclopropanation/cyclopropane ring open­ ing strategy. S. R. Goudreau, A. B. Charette 637. Transition-metal catalyzed synthesis and functionalization of 1,2- and 1,4-bis(boronate)esters. H. E. Burks, J. P. Morken 638. Use of chiral anthracene templates for the synthesis of cyclohexene monoepoxide natural products. A. Jaunet, S. Jones, C. Poinsard WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC Ballroom Sixty Years of Physical Organic Chemistry S. A. Fleming, L Tolbert, and D. Crumrine, Organizers 8:10 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 639. Forty-seven years in organic photochemistry. D. I. Schuster 8:55 640. Effect of methoxy substituents on the photoreactivity of arylmethyl sub­ strates. J. A. Pincock, C. M. Gonzalez, J. C. Roberts, M. Chuang, A. L. Pincock 9:30 641. Photoremovable protecting groups: Variations on the photo-Favorskii rear­ rangement—a mechanistic study. R. S. Givens, K. F. Stensrud, E. D. Cope, C. Perera, S. Senadheera, C. Ma, S. Yang 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 642. Photoinduced DNA electron transfer revisited. F. D. Lewis, P. Daublain, B. Cohen, M. R. Wasielewski, T. Fiebig 10:50 643. From photochemistry to alkaloids. A. Padwa 11:25 644. Photoresponsive diarylethene single crystals. M. Irie Section Β

10:20 652. Synthesis and application of bifunctional organic catalysts for direct amide condensation between carboxylic acids and amines. K. Arnold, B. Davies, A. Whiting 10:40 653. Synthesis of bicyclo[2.2.2]octenone-containing natural products using asymmetric oxidative dearomatization. S. Dong, J. A. Porco Jr. 11:00 654. Synthesis of chiral 3-substituted indanones via enantioselective Heckreaction. A. Minatti, X. Zheng, S. L. Buchwald 11:20 655. Synthesis of highly enantioen­ riched cyanohydrins by dual Lewis a c i d Lewis base activation. E. Wingstrand, S. Lundgren, A. Hamberg, K. Huit, C. Moberg 11:40 656. Transannular asymmetric cataly­ sis: Development of an enantioselective transannular Diels-Alder reaction and applications in total synthesis. E. P. Balskus, E. N. Jacobsen Section C BCEC 254 A/B Technical Achievements in Organic Chemistry Award Symposium P. L. Feldman,

Organizer

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:10 657. Synthesis of MK-2048: A tricyclic hydroxypyrrole HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitor with unique resistance properties. M. W. Embrey, T. E. Fisher, T. A. Lyle, J. P. Vacca, D. J. Hazuda, M. D. Miller, P. J. Felock, M. V. Witmer, L. J. Gabryelski, J. S. Wai 9:40 658. Design and synthesis of novel anthranilic acid analogs as HCV polymer­ ase inhibitors. K. J. Curran, T. Nittoli, S. Insaf, A. S. Prashad, M. B. Floyd, M. Orlowski, A. Howe, R. Chopra, A. Agarwal, J. Bloom 10:10 659. Optimized catalytic enantioselec­ tive aryl transfer process provides access to mGlu2 receptor potentiators. M. A. Staszak 10:40 Intermission. 10:50 660. Discovery of a novel benzophenone as a next generation HIV-1 NNRTI agent. A. Freeman 11:20 661. Selective progesterone receptor antagonists for the treatment of endome­ triosis. K. N. Dack, P. S. Johnson, P. A. Bradley, S. Skerratt, I. R. Marsh, T. Underwood 11:50 Concluding Remarks. Section D BCEC 258A Total Synthesis of Complex Molecules

BCEC 253 A/B/C

M. P. Jennings,

Asymmetric Reactions and Syntheses

8:00 662. Simple, short and flexible synthe­ sis of viridiofungin derivatives. S. M. Goldup, C. J. Pilkington, A. J. P. White, A. Burton, A. Barrett 8:20 663. Active-template syntheses of interlocked architectures. D. A. Leigh, V. Aucagne, J. Berna, J. D. Crowley, S. M. Goldup, N. Gowans, K. D. Hânni, A-L. Lee, P. J. Lusby, V. E. Ronaldson, A. M. Z. Slawin, A. Viterisi, D. B. Walker 8:40 664. Studies toward the asymmetric synthesis of silvestrol. B. Gerard, J. A. Porco Jr. 9:00 665. Studies toward the asymmetric synthesis of the ambewelamides. A. S. Kleinke, J. A. Porco Jr. 9:20 666. Studies toward the synthesis of azaphilone natural products. A. R. Germain, J. A. Porco Jr. 9:40 667. Studies toward the asymmetric synthesis of the diazobenzofluorene FL-120B'. S. S. Scully, J. A. Porco Jr. 10:00 668. A general route to cyclopeptide alkaloids. M. Toumi 10:20 669. De novo asymmetric synthesis of anthrax tetrasaccharides via palladium catalyzed glycosylate. H. Guo, G. A. O'Doherty

C. Dai,

Presiding

8:00 645. Enantioselective synthesis of flavanones. J. R. Giguere, S. E. Schaus 8:20 646. Synthesis of enantioenriched dihydropyrimidones and derived libraries. P. Dai, S. Lou, S. E. Schaus 8:40 647. Application of Prins-type chemistry toward the total synthesis of (+)-SCH 351448. L L. Cheung, C. D. Anderson, S. Marumoto, S. D. Rychnovsky 9:00 648. De novo asymmetric approach to the two trisaccharide portions of PI-080. X. Yu, K. K. Wang, G. A. O'Doherty 9:20 649. Organocatalytic multicomponent reaction: Total control up to 5 stereocenters. R. Rios, J. Vesely, I. Ibrahem, G-L. Zhao, A. Cordova 9:40 650. Ring expanded tetramisole ana­ logs as enantioselective acyl transfer catalysts. X. Li, V. B. Birman 10:00 651. Stereoelectronic tuning of chiral sulfinimines in asymmetric radical reac­ tions. T. Akindele, Y. Yamamoto, M. Maekawa, H. Umeki, M. Nakano, K-l. Yamada, K. Tomioka

Presiding

TECH-103

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ORGN 10:40 670. Functionalized bicyclo[5.3.0] decane ring systems via fragmentation of highly strained cyclopropanes: Applications in total synthesis. A. J. Leyhane, M. J. Williams, M. L Snapper 11:00 671. Synthesis and stereochemical evaluation of bioactive ceramides from the dental pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. A. Onorato, F. Nichols, M. B. Smith 11:20 672. Synthesis of 1,10-disubstituted bicyclo[8.8.8]hexacosane monomers for novel polymer archeticture. I. W. Jones, E. Mash 11:40 673. Triple diene-transmissive DielsAlder cycloaddition approach to quassinoids. A. Dion, C. Spino Section Ε BCEC 258B

Section Β

Biologically-Related Molecules and Processes R. A. Volkmann,

1:50 687. Synthetic and supramolecular approaches to carbene-based magnets. H. Iwamura 2:25 688. Photochemistry at the nanoscale: Recent advances in photochemistry at nanostructured surfaces. M. A. Fox 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 689. Covalently linked dinners of 1,3diphenylisobenzofuran: Evidence for singlet fission. J. C. Johnson, X. Chen, A. E. Schwerin, Z. Havlas, J. Chalupsky, D. B. Popovic, D. E. David, G. Rana, I. Paci, M. A. Ratner, J . Michl, A. J. Nozik 3:50 690. Charge distribution in the ground and excited states of resonance stabilized anions. L. M. Tolbert 4:25 691. From then to now: The beginnings and the present. H. E. Zimmerman

Presiding

8:00 674. Transposing green fluorescence into the near-IR: Luminogenic redox reporters. M. Halim, M. S. Tremblay, S. Jockusch, Ν. J. Turro, D. Sames 8:20 675. Harnessing enzyme promiscuity: A fluorescent reporter substrate for SCHAD/ ABAD, a key metabolic enzyme implicated in neurodegeneration. Μ. Κ. Froemming, D. Sames 8:40 676. An expedient route for the enantioselective synthesis of immunosuppres­ sive agent CP-690,550. J. K. Jiang, Z. Chen, J. J. O'Shea, Ε. Η. Liu, D. M. Harlan, C. J. Thomas, M. Perreira 9:00 677. Efficient synthetic approach to new tricyclic spiroketone scaffolds. G-H. Chu, M. Gu, Β. Le Bourdonnec, R. Ε. Dolle 9:20 678. Evolution of new scaffolds for microtubule inhibition. K-H. Altmann, F. Cachoux, F. Feyen, J. Gertsch, M. Wartmann 9:40 679. Improved synthesis of a thienopyridine AMPK activator. J . Lee, V. N. R. Neelagiri, H-O. Kim, R. S. Rajur 10:00 680. Influence of lipid composition on membrane activity of synthetic antimicro­ bial oligomers. A. Som, L. Yang, G. C. L. Wong, G. N. Tew 10:20 681. New approaches to the synthesis of Cycloproparadicicol and its analogs as preclinical anticancer agents based on Hsp90 inhibition. X. Lei, S. J. Danishefsky 10:40 682. Preparation and functionalization of 6-hydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 H-benzo[djazepines and their use in the synthesis of 5-HT2c agonists. J. A. Werner, S. E. Dunlap, M. J. Rupp, W. Dullenkopf 11:00 683. Strong inhibition of cholera toxin by multivalent GM1 derivatives. R. J. Pieters, A. V. Pukin, H. M. Branderhorst, C. A. G. M. Weijers, M. Gilbert, R. M. J. Liskamp, G. M. Visser, H. Zuilhof 11:20 684. Synthesis and biological action of novel 4-position-modified derivatives of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. S. J. Conway, D. Bello, T. Aslam, G. Bultynck, A. M. Z. Slawin, H. L. Roderick, M. D. Bootman 11:40 685. Synthesis of beta-cryptoxanthin via unusual regioselective catalytic hydro­ génation. Y. Liu, H. Showalter, F. Khachik Eli Lilly Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, CARB, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW

BCEC 253 A/B/C Modern Organometallic Catalysis F. D. Toste,

Organizer

1:00 692. Palladium- and nickel-catalyzed coupling reactions. G. C. Fu 1:40 693. Alkyne functionalization via metal vinylidene-mediated catalysis. C. Lee 2:20 694. New ligands, catalysts and strate­ gies for enantioselective synthesis. A. H. Hoveyda 3:00 695. Hydrogen-mediated C-C bond formation: Green chemistry for catalytic fragment coupling. M. J . Krische 3:40 696. New strategies for biaryl synthesis. K. Fagnou 4:20 697. Discovery and understanding of transition metal-catalyzed substitution reactions. J. F. Hartwig Section C BCEC 254 A/B

P. L. Feldman, R. D. Larsen,

Organizer Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 698. Copper-promoted C-heteroatom bond cross-coupling via organometalloids with NH/OH-substrates. P. Y. S. Lam, C. G. Clark 2:35 699. Discovery of Brecanavir: A next generation HIV protease inhibitor. J. F. Miller 3:05 700. Process development of LY444711 : An imidazole-based growth hormone secretagogue. C. A. Alt, R. L. Robey 3:35 Intermission. 3:45 701. Synthesis and Src kinase inhibitory activity of a series of 4-phenylamino 7-pyridinyl-3-quinolinecarbonitriles. B. Wu 4:15 702. Synthesis, crystal structure, and activity of 4-pyridylpyrazole inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase. M. J. Graneto, R. Kurumbail, M. Vazquez, H. S. Shieh, J. Williams, R. Mourey, R. Compton, S. Mnich, G. Anderson, J. Monahan, R. Devraj 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

Section A BCEC Ballroom

S. A. Fleming, L Tolbert, and D. Crumrine, Organizers 1:15 686. Detection and photoamplification of molecular recognition events. A. G. Kutateladze, R. N. Ezhov, T. P. Gustafson, R. A. Valiulin

104-TECH

BCEC 258A Total Synthesis of Complex Molecules M. S. Chorghade,

Presiding

1:00 703. A diosphenol based strategy for the total synthesis of (-)-Terpestacin. G. Dong, B. M. Trost, J. A. Vance 1:20 704. Total synthesis of Leustroducsin B. C. Brindle, T. Hunter, B. Trost 1:40 705. A short and efficient synthetic strategy for the total synthesis of (S)-(+)and (R)-(-)-Plakolide A. M. S. Chorghade, M. K. Gurjar, D. K. Mohapatra, C. Pramanik 2:00 706. An efficient and practical total synthesis of Aigialomycin D and analogs. A. Chen, N. Q. Vu, C. L L Chai, K. P. Lim, S. C. Chia 2:20 707. Concise total synthesis of (-)Calycanthine, (+)-Chimonanthine, and (+)-Folicanthine. M. Movassaghi, M. A. Schmidt 2:40 708. Enantioselective total synthesis of (-)-Acylfulvene and (-)-lrofulven. M. Movassaghi, D. S. Siegel, G. Piizzi 3:00 709. Endeavors into the total synthesis of Zoanthenol. J. Stockdill, D. C. Behenna, B. M. Stoltz 3:20 710. Methodology for the synthesis of the Calothrixins and related derivatives. P. Bernardo, W. Fitriyanto, C. L. L. Chai 3:40 711. Prins-pinacol approach to Sieboldine A. D. J. France, C. C. Kofink, B. Leon, L. E. Overman 4:00 712. Progress toward the total synthe­ ses of Spiroxin A and B. P. Wipf, E. E. Englund, S. Lynch 4:20 713. Progress toward the total synthe­ sis of Bryostatin 1: Emphasis on C17-C27 fragment. V. L. Wilde, S. D. Burke 4:40 714. Progress toward the total synthe­ sis of Palau'amine and its congeners. S. Rasapalli, C. Lovely Section Ε

Technical Achievements in Organic Chemistry Award Symposium

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Sixty Years of Physical Organic Chemistry

4:40 726. Phosphatidylcholine analogs derived from glyceric acid: A new class of biologically active phospholipid com­ pounds. J. Hajdu, R. Rosseto

Section D

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

BCEC 258B Biologically-Related Molecules and Processes L. Du,

Presiding

1:00 715. Multiplex fluorescent polymethine dye generation through DNA programmed chemistry. Y. Huang, L. Haff, B. Seigal, N. Walsh, D. J. Livingston, J. M. Coull 1:20 716. Tautomeric modification of GlcNAc-thiazoline. M. Abdo, K. Ajayi, S. Knapp 1:40 717. Bacteriorhodopsin analogs based on indolyl chromophores. A. K. Singh, P. K. Hota 2:00 718. Strategies for enhancement of hydrophilicity and radioprotectivity of com­ pounds in Vitamin A and Ε series. A. K. Singh, K. Gopu, S. Libsu 2:20 719. Synthesis of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. B. Lindsay, D. R. Adams 2:40 720. Chemoselective probes for metabolite enrichment and profiling. E. E. Carlson, B. F. Cravatt 3:00 721. Allosteric regulation of physiologic ligand binding to integrin CD11b/CD18 by the novel beta-tail domain. V. Gupta, A. Gylling, J. L. Alonso, T. Sugimori, P. lanakiev, J-P. Xiong, M. A. Arnaout 3:20 722. Biosynthetic mechanism for tetramic acid-containing macrolactam antibiot­ ics. L. Du, L. Lou, K. Zaleta-Rivera, W. Liu 3:40 723. Chemical control of bacterial biofilms. C. Melander 4:00 724. Comparative mechanistic studies on the catalytically promiscuous serine/ threonine protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and the dinuclear cobalt(lll) complex [Co2(tacn)2(OH)3](CI04)3. E. A. Tanifum, A. C. Hengge, E. A. Lund, Ν. Η. Williams, G. Feng, C. McWhirter 4:20 725. Investigation of the degradation mechanism of betamethasone 17, 21-dipropionate and related compounds under acidic and alkaline conditions. B. Chen, M. Li, A. M. Rustum

Symposium in Honor of Perry Frey Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW W E D N E S D A Y EVENING Section A BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Combinatorial, Parallel and Process Chemistry, Heterocycles, Aromatics, New Reactions and Methodology S. M. Sieburth,

Organizer

8:00-10:00 727. Withdrawn. 728. Synthesis of templates containing guanine-N2 monoadducts of mitomycin C and guanine-N7 monoadducts of 2,7-diaminomitosene as substrates to monitor translesion synsthesis by different DNA polymerases. C. C. Clement, S. Ladwa 729. A one-pot synthesis of the 2,3-dihydropyrrolo [3,2-c]quinolines. M. Tomaszewski, A. Whalley, L-D. Cantin, Y-J. Hu 730. Synthetic studies toward a pyrazolotriazine drug candidate. T. Brandt, J. Ragan, B. Vanderplas, L. Wei, A. Ghosh 731. An in situ enol silane formation-Mukaiyama aldol reaction mediated by TMSOTf. W. Downey, M. W. Johnson 732. Copper(l)-mediated amination of organostannanes with hydroxylamine derivatives. Z. Zhang, Y. Yu, L. S. Liebeskind 733. Cyclocondensation between 2-propenyl2-oxazolines and 1,3-dielectrophiles. Y. Song, H. Guo, G. Ye, S. Chatterjee, C. U. Pittman Jr. 734. New substrates for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions. P-L. Boudreault, N. Voyer 735. Novel organosilicon methods for heterocycle synthesis. A. P. Dobbs, J. Dunn, I. Miller 736. Synthesis of fluorine containing hetero­ cycles via Prins methodology. M. J. Penny, A. P. Dobbs, L Pivnevi, P. Stephenson, P. Jones 737. Synthesis of highly-functionalized pyri­ dines: Studies toward the total synthesis of streptonigrin. T. E. Hurst, C. J. Moody, T. J. Miles 738. Synthesis of novel fluorous reagents for synthesis: Fluorous-TEMPO and FluorousDMPU. M. J. Penny, A. P. Dobbs, P.Jones 739. Synthesis and development of VR1 antagonists. A. O. King, R. D. Larsen, O. Thiel, J. Tedrow, A. Guram, C. Bernard, Y. Liu, T. J. Xiang, T. Bostick, M. Dilmeghani-Seran, T. Storz, R. Crockett, L. Huang, X. Wang, E. Bunel, M. Faul, M. Martinelli, P. Reider 740. A cascade reaction sequence en route to 7-substituted 2-aminopyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrimidine-4,6-diones and the corresponding acrylic acid derivatives. J . Gao, A. J. Souers 741. A facile, scalable preparation of 4-chloro2-iodothieno[2,3-b]pyridine-5-carbonitrile. L. N. Tumey, B. Wu, D. H. Boschelli 742. A new and efficient synthesis of tert-butyl 2-((4R,6S)-6-((E)-2-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)-6isopropyl-2-(methylsulfonyl)pyrimidin-5yl)vinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxan-4-yl)acetate, a versatile intermediate for the synthesis of HMG-CoA reductase inhibi­ tors. R. Zhao, B-C. Chen, B. Wang, H. Zhang, B. Balasubramanian 743. Advances toward the chemical synthesis of uniform [5,5] single walled carbon nanotubes. E. A. Jackson, L. T. Scott 744. Bismuth nitrate-catalyzed three compo­ nent Mannich reaction toward beta amino ketones. Β. Κ. Banik, A. Reddy, P. Ruiz 745. Bismuth nitrate-catalyzed synthesis of pyrrole-substituted beta-lactams. I. Garcia, Β. Κ. Banik 746. Bismuth nitrate-induced simple synthesis of dihydropyrimidones via Biginelli conden­ sation. Β. Κ. Banik, A. Reddy, A. Datta, C. Mukopadhyay

ORGN 747. Catalytic synthesis of 5-amino-oxazoles and chiral heterocycles from isonitriles and imines. A. Ting, S. E. Schaus 748. Chemical synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes: Progress toward a C 6 0 H 1 2 l C3V symmetric end-cap template utilizing a 1,3-shift of hydrogen in aryl radicals. T. J. Hill, R. K. Hughes Jr., L T. Scott 749. Chemistry of ortho-Fluoranil. S. Ramanathan, Κ. Μ. Conner, D. M. Lemal 750. Conformational analysis and ring current effects of porphyrins studied by molecular modeling. P. Wacker, J. Richter, M. 0 . Senge, E. Kleinpeter 751. Construction of a C 3 V symmetric [6,6] nanotube end-cap: Building a solid founda­ tion for rational nanotube synthesis. A. P. Bélanger, M. F. Ambury, L. T. Scott 752. Construction of the quinoline ring system by application of minisci radical cyclization. R. N. Burgin, S. Jones, A. Smith, B. Tarait 753. Convenient synthesis of polysubstituted benzofurans. V. Vuligonda, L. Li, T. Vu, R. L. Beard, M. E. Garst 754. Cross-bridged tetraazamacrocycles bearing phosphonate and phosphonic acid pendant arms and their Cu(ll) complexes. D. J. Stigers, G. R. Weisman, E. H. Wong, C. J. Anderson 755. Cycloaddition reaction between [8]annulyne and isocyanate systems. S. J. Peters, J. Klen 756. Withdrawn. 757. Expanding the family of indenocorannulenes. B. D. Steinberg, L. T. Scott 758. Facile activation of small molecules at a single carbon center. G. D. Frey, B. Donnadieu, W. W. Schoeller, G. Bertrand 759. Facile preparation of new polyfunction^ pyrrolidinones from 3-hydroxyitaconate alkyl diesters. J-F. Morizur, L. J. Mathias 760. Facile synthesis of 5,5-disubstituted hydantoins. R. G. Murray, D. Whitehead, F. Le-Strat, S. J. Conway 761. Facile synthesis of alpha-ionone and its analogs. D. W. Rangnekar, V. S. Kulkarni, P. V. Ranade, R. W. Sabnis 762. Fine tuning of the orifice size of an open-cage fullerene by placing selenium in the rim: Insertion/release of molecular hydrogen. S-C. Chuang, Y. Murata, M. Murata, K. Komatsu 763. Five-fold annulation of corannulene as a route toward nanocones and nanotubes. J. M. Quimby, D. Ho, L. T. Scott 764. Improved synthesis of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic ligands. A. Y. Odendaal, G. R. Weisman, E. H. Wong, C. J. Anderson 765. Lone-pair/lone-pair proximity effects in a series of cyclic diethers derived from 7,7'-dihydroxy-8,8'-biquinolyl. P. R. Blakemore, S. D. Milicevic, H. Perera, A. Shvarev, L. N. Zakharov 766. Mechanism research on thermal cyclodehydrogenations to form 5- or 6-membered rings. X. Xue, L. T. Scott 767. Methodology development in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon synthesis. A. W. Amick, L. T. Scott 768. Mild and practical method for the a-arylation of nitriles with heteroaryl halides. J. H. Waldman, A. Klàpars, K. R. Campos, M. S. Jensen, M. McLaughlin, J. Y. L. Chung, R. J. Cvetovich, C-Y. Chen 769. New route to ABCD-porphyrins. D. K. Dogutan, J. S. Lindsey 770. New routes to cyclopenta[c]thiophenes. V. V. Karambelkar, C. A. Snyder 771. Novel copper-mediated cycloaromatization of electron-poor diarylethynylbenzenes to form benzo[a]fluoren-11-ones. T. S. Hughes, A. E. S. Thamban 772. Oxidative rearrangement of 2-alkoxydihydropyrans: Stereocontrolled synthesis of 2,3-cis tetrahydrofurans (THFs) and 4,5-cis tetrahydrofuranones. C. Ashraff, A. Armstrong, L. Murtagh 773. Withdrawn. 774. Practical synthesis of a (N)-(S)-2-hydroxy-3-methyl butyryl-1- (S)-alaninyl(S)-1-amino-3-methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro2H-3-benzazepin-2-one. S. Boini, R. Vaid, K. Moder, J. Pu, D. Mitchell 775. Preparation of cross-linked single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Y. Larose

776. Progress toward the synthesis of the tetracyclic core of Viridin. K. Patil, T. E. Benedum, P. Wipf 777. Progress toward novel polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by corannulene oligomerization. J. A. Rose, M. T. Silk, L. T. Scott 778. Progress toward the synthesis of (Z)axinohydantoin and (Z)- debromoaxinohydantoin. G. M. E. Papeo, F. Tutino, H. Posteri, F. Quartieri, N. Mongelli 779. Rapid assembly of 2,4,5-trisubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles by sequential 1,4-conjugate additiorVPalladium(O) catalyzed crosscoupling. J. Hein, S. W. Kwok, V. V. Fokin, K. B. Sharpless 780. Revisiting the stereochemistry of hydrindanes via catalytic hydrogénation of hydrindenes and synthesis of cis/trans-7oxa-estra-4,9-diene-3,17-diones. F-A. Kang, N. Jain, Z. Sui 781. Stereochemical properties of pyrogallolarenes in the solid state. M. Zeller, A. D. Hunter, R. D. Pike, C. Zambrano, T. Ray, E. Dueno 782. Stereoselective synthesis of novel pyrroloisoxazoles by intramolecular nitrone cycloaddition. L Meng, J. C. Fettinger, M. J. Kurth 783. Syntheses and characterization of 2,4disubsituted 5-methyl furans. D. A. Scherzer, M. A. Cichy-Knight, M. L. Moore, J. A. Leiby, A. K. Dunn, D. P. Suarez 784. Synthesis and acidity constant of 13 C0 2 H-labelled [6]-semirubin. S. Datta, D. A. Lightner 785. Synthesis and biological activity of some C- and N- alkylated derivatives of 3-methyl quinoxaline-2-one. A. R. Mali, M. Deshmukh 786. Synthesis and photophysics of a terphenylene-ethynylene macrocycle. T. S. Hughes, A. L. Korich, I. A. McBee 787. Synthesis and reactions of 3,4-diaryl-3pyrrolin-2-ones. S. J. P. Yoon-Miller, K. M. Dorward, E. T. Pelkey 788. Synthesis of 5-(2-methoxy-1-naphthyl)and 5-[2-(methoxymethyl)-1-naphthyl]-11Hbenzo[b]fluorene as 2,2'-disubstituted 1,1'-binaphthyls. Y-H. Wang, J. F. Bailey, J. L. Petersen, Κ. Κ. Wang 789. Synthesis of a novel water soluble biliru­ bin. S. K. Dey, D. A. Lightner 790. Synthesis of acridine derivative. Y. Chen, X. Wang, T. Xiang, Y. Lu, A. King, R. D. Larsen 791. Synthesis of an equatorial functionalized carcerand. C. Zambrano, M. Zeller, A. D. Hunter, E. Dueno 792. Synthesis of functionalized 2,4-imidazolidinone and 2-thioxoimidazolidin-4-one from an enantiomerically pure aziridine-2carbaldehyde. B. K. Lee, S. Y. Yun, D. S. Kim, W. K. Lee, H-J. Ha 793. Synthesis of functionalized Krôhnke-type terpyridines using an evironmentallyfriendly one-pot procedure. A. Winter, U. S. Schubert 794. Synthesis of novel indolylarylmaleimides, bisindolylmaleimides and oxazolyl-indoles. S. Roy, G. W. Gribble 795. Synthesis of substituted azaindoles and their lead-like libraries. G. R. Smith, M. W. Wagaman, A. E. Blize 796. Synthesis of the 2H-quinolizin-2-one scaffold via a stepwise acylation-intramolecular annulation strategy. R. Tynebor, S. Natarajan, S. Heller, M-H. Chen, E. Crawford, J. B. Doherty 797. Synthetic advances towards the first Ce v symmetric carbon nanotube endcap. V. M. Tsefrikas, J. A. Rose, M. T. Silk, L. T. Scott 798. Synthetic and mechanistic studies related to dearylative annellations. D. A. Klumpp, A. Li 799. Tandem Friedel-Crafts approach to novel perylene analogs. M. A. Penick, M. P. D. Mahindaratne, G. R. Negrete 800. Tandem Pd-catalyzed benzothiazole ring closure and functionalization. M. D. Vera, W. Sun, J. C. Pelletier 801. Template for the elongation of carbon nanotubes by cycloaddition. E. H. Fort, L. T. Scott

802. The outside knows the difference inside: Trapping helium by immediate reduction of orifice size of an open-cage fullerene and NMR investigations of the effect of encapsulated helium and hydrogen to the proton directly attached to the open-cage fullerene sphere. S-C. Chuang, Y. Murata, M. Murata, K. Komatsu 803. Two-fold symmetric precursors for the chemical synthesis of [5,5]nanotubes. N. J. Smith, L T. Scott 804. "Quinoxaline and allied compounds": Novel reactions and synthetic perspectives. R. N. Salvatore, J. Hovland 805. Compound libraries based on the Stemona alkaloid skeleton. K. J. Frankowski, J. Aube 806. Design and synthesis of medium-ring lactam libraries inspired by octalactin A. N. Brown, B. Xie, T. L Coleman, J. K. Mansfield, N. Markina, M. Minatoya, G. Gao, A. Kearney, Y. Jeong, N. Sato, K. R. Buszek 807. Design, synthesis and purification of diverse lead-like libraries. M. W. Wagaman, G. R. Smith, A. E. Blize 808. Development of a commercial process for the preparation of ixabepilone: A semisynthetic analog of epothilone B. Z. Guo, T. Comezoglu, J. E. Thornton, S. Swaminathan, C. McConlogue, W-S. Li 809. Diastereoselective synthesis of chromans via silane reduction. K. Li, J. A. Tunge 810. Diversity-oriented synthesis of a library of multicyclic compounds via phosphine catalysis. H. D. G. Fiji, S. Castellano, S. S. Kinderman, O. Kwon 811. Withdrawn. 812. Withdrawn. 813. Practical synthesis of ER-40133, a novel dual inhibitor of NEP and ACE. A. Kayano, M. Kotake, K. Akasaka, H. Akamatsu, Y. Komatsu, N. Shimomura, T. Shimizu, K. Tagami, H. Naka, K. Hayashi, Y. Kimoto, T. Matsushima, N. Yoneda, S. Suda, Y. Daiku, M. Saito, T. Matsuoka, S. Negi 814. Process for the preparation of a ketolide antibiotic. T. B. Towne, D. S. Reno, D. A. Davis, S. J. Wittenberger, J. Mei, S. Parekh, M. Naris, E. Kristensen 815. Development of a selective chiral auxiliary removal process for N-phenylethanolisoxazolidine. W. Li, T. B. Towne, T. S. McDermott, G. S. Wayne, S. J. Wittenberger 816. Screening solid bonded metal scavengers for metal-catalyzed coupling reactions. S. Ghassemi 817. Solid-phase synthesis of iridium complexes with quinazoiinone ligands. W-R. Li, N-M. Hsu, C-M. Yang, P. M. Dewang, Y-C. Huang, T-S. Lin, B-H. Hu 818. Synthesis of complex polycyclic ketals using tandem cycloisomerization/annulation. J. A. Porco Jr., A. B. Beeler, P. Yuan 819. Synthesis of cyclic peptidomimetics inspired by 7-turns and applications to library design. E. Fenster, J. Aube 820. Synthesis of Isochroman-based small molecule libraries. B. Leng, A. B. Beeler, J. A. Porco Jr. 821. Synthesis of substituted benzoimidazole derivatives as potent and selective histamine-3 receptor antagonists. T. Grieme, Y-Y. Ku, Y-M. Pu, M. Cowart,

T. A. Esbenshade 822. TLC for solid phase reactions. S. T. Phillips, K. A. Zharkova, G. M. Whitesides 823. A solvent-free tetrahydropyran (THP) protection of alcohols and phenols and their deprotection catalyzed by triphenylphosphine dibromide (TPPDB). H. Chen, K. L. Sorgi 824. Novel anodic concepts for the orthoselective phenol coupling reaction. S. R. Waldvogel 825. Overcome the limitation of acyl chloride in amide bond formation and peptide coupling. L. Zhang, X-J. Wang, D. Krishnamurthy, C. Senanayake 826. Ring expansion reaction of formyl[2.2.1]bicyclic carbinols with primary amines. T-F. Yang, L-H. Chen, L-D. Kao 827. Stereoselective addition to furanones. A. M. Ochocinska, J. Sweeney

828. A reductive rearrangement of hydroxyand aminocyclopropyl imides. T. A. Dunstan, J. L. Methot 829. A very efficient, selective and scalable 2-amination of pyridines and quinolines. B. Xiang, J. Yin, M. A. Huffman, C. E. Raab, I. W. Davies 830. BF 3 -H 2 0 catalyzed Fries rearrangement of phenolic esters. G. K. S. Prakash, C. Panja, T. Mathew, G. A. Olah 831. Catalytic Wittig-type olefination of carbonyl compounds. P. Cao, C-Y. Li, Y-B. Kang, X - L Sun, Y. Tang 832. Ylide cyclization-beyond three member rings. Y. Tang, X-L. Sun, L-X. Dai 833. Concise synthesis of biologically interesting natural products with benzopyran moiety: Alloxanthoxyletin, citrunobin, boesenbergin A and B, nigrolineabenzopyran A, blandachromene II, and daurichromene D. L. Xia, X. Wang, Y. R. Lee 834. Construction of 2-(aminomethyl)indole motif by Cu-catalyzed multi-component reaction. Y. Ohta, O. Shinya, N. Fujii, H. Ohno 835. Conveient synthesis of pyranochromenes by ethylenediamine diacetatecatalyzed double condensation of substituted trihydroxybenzenes with enals: Concise synthesis of octandrenolone, O-methyloctandrenolone, flemiculosin, laxichalcone, and racemic deoxy-Ms-ll. X. Li, Y. R. Lee 836. Decarbonylation of phenyl-pyrrolidinones in the solid-state, advances toward total synthesis of natural products. M. J. E. Resendiz, M. Garcia-Garibay 837. Design of chiral auxiliaries for the aliène ether Nazarov cyclization. A. R. Banaag 838. Efficient method for the preparation of nitriles from aldoximes with a TiCI4/Et3N system. M. Kim, K-J. Han 839. Efficient N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed Ο to C-acyl transfer. A. D. Smith, J. E. Thomson 840. Efficient synthetic route toward the cyclic, cysteine-containing natural products FK228 and the spiruchostatins. K. A. Kocak, K. A. Perri, Y. L. Cheng, J. S. Miller 841. Environmentally benign synthesis of aryl diethyl phosphates via reaction of phenols with diethyl phosphoryl chloride generated in situ from diethyl phosphite and N-chlorosuccinimide. M. J. Lusch, N. A. Kwolek, K. M. Schleis, A. K. Wagner, C. A. Walden, A. L Danberry 842. Exocyclic enol ethers as carbonyl cou­ pling partners. T. Lam, D. T. Sharum, N. I. Totah 843. Exploring the dichotomy in the rear­ rangement of cyclopropylcarbinols: Devel­ opment of new methods for the synthesis of substituted arènes and carbocyclic nucleosides. S-Y. Liu, A. G. Glass 844. Exploring the scope of pseudoprolineassisted cyclization. N. Sayyadi, K. A. Jolliffe 845. Facile synthesis of α-fluoro acrylates. S. Kake, B. Zajc 846. Facile synthesis of vinyl fluorides from alkyl halides and alcohols using 1- fluorobis(phenylsulfonyl)methane. G. K. S. Prakash, S. Chacko, G. A. Olah 847. Fast ultrasonic processing of the PMB group. F. A. Luzzio, J. Chen 848. Flow-through technology as an approach to scale-up of microwave-promoted reac­ tions. M. D. Bowman, E. C. Wood, Ν. Ε. Leadbeater 849. Fructopyranose-based salens as novel chiral scaffolds for asymmetric transition metal-based epoxide opening. S. K. Roy, K. R. Karukurichi, W. Shen, S. Dey, D. B. Berkowitz

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-105

ORGN

850. Homocoupling of arylmethylphosphonium salts in polar aprotic solvents in the presence of a base. J. N. Ngwendson, W. N. Atemnkeng, C. M. Schultze, A. Banerjee 851. Internal-standard system of multinuclear diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and its applications in identification of organometallic complexes. D. Li, W. Li, P. G. Williard 852. Intramolecular aryne [4+2] cycloadditions with acyclic dienes: Conformational, electronic, and steric effects. S. Ellappan, N. Brown, K. R. Buszek 853. ISES (In Situ Enzymatic Screening) uncovers an interesting halocarbocyclization entry into sesquiterpenoid lactones. J. A. Friest, W. J. Chung, D. B. Berkowitz 854. Lewis acid catalyzed ring fragmentation of 3,7-dihydroxy-a-diazoesters. C. Draghici, M. Brewer 855. Lithium hexamethyldisilazide (LiHMDS): An extremely efficient promoter for the cyanosilylation of aldehydes and ketones with trimethylsilyl cyanide. K-H. Park, Q.Yao 856. Methods for the conversion of hydrazones to alkyl chlorides, diazo compounds or diazenium salts. M. I. Javed, M. Brewer 857. Microwave assisted preparation of trifluoroacetaldehyde (fluoral): Isolation and its application. S. M. Landge, D. Borkin, B. Torok 858. Environmentally benign synthesis of tetrahydronaphthalenes and dihydroindenes: A model study. A. M. Kulkarni, S. Dasgupta, B. Tôrôk 859. Multicomponent reactions on bifunctional catalysts: Synthesis of substituted pyridines by one-pot tandem cyclizationoxidative aromatization on Pd/C/K-10 catalyst. 0 . De Paolis, J. Baffoe, S. M. Landge, B, Torok 860. Microwave-assisted solvent-free synthesis of phenacylphthalides. M. Berryman, S. M. Landge, B. Torok 861. Mitsunobu coupling of nucleobases and alcohols: An efficient, practical synthesis for novel non-sugar carbon-nucleosides. X. Shi, S. Sengupta, W. Lu, J. L. Petersen 862. Monodirected diastereoselective zincocyclopropanation of allylic alcohols using gfem-dizinc carbenoids. L. E. Zimmer, A. B. Charette 863. Withdrawn. 864. New catalytic and green phosphorusoxygen bond-formation using hypophosphorous acid. L. M. Coudray, I. Abrunhosa-Thomas, J-L. Montchamp 865. New general synthetic methods via trichloromethyl carbinols. T. S. Snowden, L. R. Cafiero, J. L. Shamshina 866. New indole alkaloid analogs by novel domino electrophile addition-cyclizations on tryptophan derived α-amino nitriles. J. A. Gonzâlez-Vera, P. Ventosa-Andrés, M. T. Garcia-Lopez, R. Herranz 867. New perspective over solvent involvement in metal-mediated cyclopropanation reactions. I. M. Ungureanu, T. Granier 868. New reaction of α,β-unsaturated esters mediated by cesium carbonate. N. A. Petasis, K. J. Gaffney, K. C. Nagulapalli 869. New studies into the stereoselectivity of the zinc-mediated chain extension-aldol reaction. T. J. Henderson, K. S. Aiken, A. J. Csakai, C. K. Zercher 870. New synthetic protocols for the prepara­ tion of unsymmetrical bisindoles. H. M. Kaiser, W-F. Lo, I. Zenz, A. Spannenberg, M. Bélier, M. K. Tse 871. New [1,2]-Wittig rearrangement: Methodology and application. W. Li, D. Li, P. G. Williard 872. Ni-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate allylation of activated enones. J. D. Sieber, S. Liu, J. P. Morken

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

106-TECH

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 873. Nickel-catalyzed room temperature Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of secondary alkyl halides with alkylborane reagents. B. Saito, G. C. Fu 874. Nontraditional solvents and Grignard reagents. M. L. Bender, T. Ramnial, S. Taylor, C. Walsby, J. A. C. Clyburne 875. Novel synthesis of 4,5 substituted triazol compounds through Lewis base mediated Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction. S. Sengupta, W. Lu, J. L Petersen, X. Shi 876. Novel synthetic methodologies toward the synthesis of substituted tetrahydrofurans. I. S. Taschner, C. K. Zercher 877. On the development of direct methods for carbon-carbon bond formation via soft enolization: A facile and efficient synthesis of 1,3-diketones. D. Lim, F. Fang, G. Zhou, D. M. Coltart 878. One-pot synthesis of pyranoquinolinones with various substituents on the pyranyl ring by ethylenediamine diacetate-catalyzed reactions of 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline: Total synthesis of zanthosimuline, cis3',4'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dihydroflindersine, and orixalone D. X. Wang, Y. R. Lee 879. One-pot synthesis of secondary amine derivatives via nucleophilic 1, 2-addition of organometallic reagents to N-phosphinylimines and subsequent alkylation. K. T. Nguyen, T. Dinh, S. Hyunshun 880. One-step synthesis of novel isoindoline derivatives from amines, carbonyls and organoboron compounds. N. A. Petasis, A. N. Butkevich 881. Oxidative cyclization of 2-arylsubstituted cinnamic acid esters using M0CI5. S. R. Waldvogel, K. M. Wehming 882. Oxidative reactions of tetrahydrobenzimidazole derivatives with the Davis' reagent. P. B. Koswatta, S. Rasapalli, C. J. Lovely 883. Palladium-catalyzed C-H activation/ functionalization of aromatic C-H bonds. D. Kalyani, A. R. Dick, N. R. Deprez, W. Q. Anani, M. S. Sanford 884. Palladium-catalyzed carbonylations with near stoichiometric carbon monoxide loading. C. M. Kormos, N. E. Leadbeater 885. Phosphonium salt catalysis of the intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction. W. R. Roush, T. D. Hopkins 886. Polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS)/TFA: A novel system for reductive amination reactions. J. Patel, A-H. Li, H. Dong, M. J. Mulvihill, V. L. Korlipara 887. Rare earth metal/anhydride activation of N-phosphinylimines. W. W. Ong, A. B. Beeler, S. Kesavan, J. A. Porco Jr. 888. Reduction of primary amides with borane tetrahydrofuran complex. Β. Μ. Coleridge 889. Regioselective synthesis and structural studies of α-substituted γ-hydroxybutenolides. S. N. Patil, F. Liu 890. Rh(l)-Catalyzed alkylation and arylation of quinolines and pyridines via C-H bond activation. J . C. Lewis, R. G. Bergman, J. A. Ellman 891. Role of pyridine bases in oxoammonium oxidations. A. L. Bartelson, J. M. Bobbitt, W. F. Bailey 892. Scaling-up microwave-promoted organic transformations. V. A. Williams, M. D. Bowman, Ν. Ε. Leadbeater 893. Schmidt-type rearrangement reactions of alkylarylhydroximoyl azides. A. S. McKim, D. D. Dolliver 894. Short and mild route to TMM diyls: Application in intermolecular/intramolecular trapping reactions toward natural products. R. D. Little, J. Myung 895. Stereochemical control in electroreductive cyclization and electrohydrodimerization reactions using chiral auxiliaries and Lewis acid complexes. R. D. Little, J. A. Mallory 896. Solid supported tricarbonylcyclobutadiene iron complexes for diversity oriented synthesis. J. J. Marineau, M. L. Snapper 897. Stereoselective reductive amination of 4-substituted cyclohexanone. Y. Chen, F. Liu, K. Sorgi 898. Stereoselective synthesis of glycosylamides via allylic imidate rearrangement. H. Nguyen, J. Yang

899. Synthesis of (Z)-3-boryl-substituted allylboranes: Access to 1,2-syn-diols, (Z)-1,5-antl· and (£)-1,5-syn-diols. W. R. Roush, A. C. DeBaillie 900. Synthesis of functionalized organophosphorus compounds via organoboranes. M. I. Antczak, J-L. Montchamp 901. Synthesis of homoallylic sulfones via catalytic decarboxylative coupling. J. D. Weaver, J . A. Tunge 902. Synthesis of new derivatives of 3-(hydroxymethyl)-3-buten-2-one. R. Iseri, S. H. Kusefoglu 903. Synthesis of pyrophosphopeptides and methylphosphopeptides. Y. Ahmadibeni, R. Bhandari, S. H. Snyder, K. Parang 904. Toward the Fmoc solid-phase synthesis of native chemical ligation precursors using thioester equivalent ester linkers. N. D. Valente, K. A. Kocak, Y. L. Cheng, J. S. Miller 905. Transition metal-catalyzed decarboxyl­ ative ring contractions and olefin insertion reactions. C. Wang, J. Tunge 906. Type 2 intramolecular Diels-Alder reac­ tion with /V-acylazo dienophiles: Scope and applications. C. L. Molina, K. J. Shea 907. Unprecedented alterations to the selec­ tivity of amine addition to 2,4-dichloropyrimidines: Lewis acid assisted synthesis of 2-amino-4-chloro-5-trifluoromethylpyrimidine intermediates. D. T. Richter, J. C. Kath, M. J. luzzio, M. Wessel, N. Keene, M. A. Berliner 908. A new practical synthesis of substituted pyrazoles in aqueous media. X. Wang THURSDAY MORNING Section A

BCEC 253A Asymmetric Reactions and Syntheses M. S. Chorghade,

Presiding

8:00 921. Protecting group directed ringclosing metathesis (RCM): First total synthesis of antimalarial nonenolide. M. S. Chorghade, D. K. Mohapatra, R. H. Grubbs, Μ. Κ. Gurjar, M. A. Giardello, D. K. Ramesh 8:20 922. Asymmetric boronate reactions catalyzed by chiral diols-1. S. E. Schaus 8:40 923. Asymmetric boronate reactions catalyzed by chiral diols-2. S. Lou, P. N. Moquist, S. E. Schaus 9:00 924. Asymmetric catalytic allylboration of ketones and acyl imines. P. N. Moquist, S. Lou, S. E. Schaus 9:20 925. Catalytic asymmetric hydroboration: The highly enantioselective amidedirected reaction. S. M. Smith, N. Thacker, J. M. Takacs 9:40 926. Transition-metal catalyzed diboration: Synthesis and functionalization of bis(boronate)esters. Η. Ε. Burks, J. P. Morken 10:00 927. Sparteine-mediated lithiation of pyrrolidine: Asymmetric synthesis of boron-proline analogs. C. Grosjean, K. Arnold, A. Whiting 10:20 928. Organocatalytic enantioselective direct vinylation and alkynylation of enolates. T. B. Poulsen, L. Bernardi, M. Bell, J. Alemân, K. A. Jorgensen 10:40 929. Palladium-catalyzed diastereoselective and enantioselective WagnerMeerwein shift: Ring expansion of allenylcyclobutanols. J . Xie, Β. Μ. Trost

BCEC 258B Proteins, Peptides, Amino Acids, and Enzyme Inhibitors R. Cheng,

Section Β

Presiding

8:00 909. Effect of highly fluorinated amino acids on protein secondary structure stability. R. P. Cheng, H-P. Chiu 8:20 910. Activity-driven targeting of lipases and proteases using functionalized phosphonate inhibitors. H. P. Dijkstra, G. van Koten, R. J. M. Klein Gebbink, M. R. Egmond 8:40 911. Beta-helical scaffolds from alter­ nating D,L peptides: New variations on old structures. T. D. Clark, V. Rodriguez-Garcia, J. L Kulp III 9:00 912. Conformational and stability stud­ ies of novel {beta}-peptides from L-aspartic acid and {beta}-amino-L-alanine. K. Kaur, S. Ahmed, R. Beleid, T. Sprules 9:20 913. Cyclic D,L-a-peptide nanotubes as potential therapeutic agents. S. Rahimipour, L Motiei, M. R. Ghadiri 9:40 914. Examining the alpha-[(2Z)-fluoro]vinyl trigger in the lysine decarboxylase active site: The absolute stereochemistry dictates the reaction course. D. B. Berkowitz, K. R. Karukurichi, R. de la Salud-Bea 10:00 915. Hydrocarbon stapled interfacial peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase. S. J . Hershberger, J. Chmielewski 10:20 916. Inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor. B. D. Gaddis, J. A. Chmielewski 10:40 917. N-terminal protein modification through a biomimetic transamination reaction. R. A. Scheck 11:00 918. Withdrawn. 11:20 919. Selective hydroxylation of di- and tri-peptides bearing alkyl side chains by methyl(trifluoromethyl)dioxirane. M. R. Relia, P. G. Williard 11:40 920. Synthesis of okadaic acid-based protein phosphatase inhibitors. S. A. Habay, A. R. Chamberlin

11:00 930. Phosphite ligands for the highly active and enantioselective Pd-catalyzed substitution reactions. M. Diéguez, Ο. Pamies, E. Raluy 11:20 931. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis of 1,2-antihomoallylic alcohols and amines. F. Menard, M. Lautens 11:40 932. Synthesis of novel ligand scaf­ folds via "click" chemistry and their use in optimizing asymmetric catalysis. Q. Zhang, J. M. Takacs Section C BCEC 254 A/B Heterocycles and Aromatics S. M. Sieburth,

Presiding

8:00 933. A new and efficient preparation of 2-aminothiazole-5-carbamides, applica­ tions to the synthesis of Dasatinib, a new potent pan-src kinase inhibitor. B-C. Chen, R. Zhao, B. Wang, R. Droghini, J. Lajeunesse, P. Sirard, M. Endo, B. Balasubramanian, J. C. Banish 8:20 934. Kilogram synthesis of a LFA-1/ ICAM inhibitor. A. J. DelMonte 8:40 935. A regiospecific synthesis of N-aryl and N-alkyl benzimidazoles. N. Zheng, K. W. Anderson, X. Huang, Η. Ν. Nguyen, S. L. Buchwald 9:00 936. Origins of selectivity in Pd-cata­ lyzed C-N bond-forming reactions using biarylphosphine ligands. M. R. Biscoe, T. E. Barder, S. L. Buchwald 9:20 937. Combined directed metalation and cross coupling tactics: A new carbanionic indole N-carbamoyl translocation reaction. V. Snieckus, K. A. Groom, Z. Zhao 9:40 938. Highly regioselective syntheses of Ν1-substituted and N2-substituted 1,2,3triazoles. S. W. Kwok, J. Hein, V. V. Fokin, Κ. Β. Sharpless 10:00 939. Isomeric diazadienes via the Lewis acid-mediated isomerization of methylenecyclopropyl hydrazones. M. E. Scott, Y. Bethuel, M. Lautens 10:20 940. Tandem benzannulation cycliza­ tion strategy for the synthesis of highlysubstituted indoles. T. Y. Lam, R. L. Danheiser

ORGN 10:40 941. Tandem benzannulation ringclosing metathesis strategy for the synthe­ sis of benzo-fused nitrogen heterocycles. X. Y. Mak, A. L. Crombie, R. L. Danheiser 11:00 942. What are the requirements for monohomoaromatic carbocations with > 1 0 IT electrons? A DFT study. P. M. Warner 11:20 943. What is the IT electron size limit for neutral bishomoaromaticity?: a DFT study. P. M. Warner 11:40 944. N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalyzed synthesis of isoxazolidin-5-ones and a one-pot synthesis of β-amino acid esters. J. Seayad, P. K. Patra, Y. Zhang, J. Y. Ying Section D BCEC 258A Total Synthesis of Complex Molecules B. Balasubramanian,

Presiding

8:00 945. Synthesis and characterization of the structure and reactivity of a model system for Maoecrystal V. P. Carberry, J. D. Chisholm 8:20 946. Toward the total synthesis of Amphidinolide H4 via diastereoselective Ni-catalyzed coupling of an enyne and aldehyde fragment. C. O. Ndubaku, A. M. Lauer, T. F. Jamison 8:40 947. Toward the synthesis of naturally occurring N-hydroxy pyridones. F. Moore, M. Bonnet, I. L Jones, C. L L Chai 9:00 948. Progress toward the total synthe­ sis of (+)-Peloruside A. D. R. Williams, N. Zorn, C. D. Claeboe 9:20 949. Progress toward the total synthe­ sis of (+)-Pillaromycinone. W. H. C. Martin, J. D. White 9:40 950. Progress toward the total synthe­ sis of Solandelactones Ε and F. W. H. C. Martin, J. D. White 10:00 951. Progress toward the total synthe­ sis of the diamine alkaloid Haliclonacyclamine C. B. J. Smith, G. A. Sulikowski 10:20 952. Studies directed toward the total synthesis of Sieboldine A. V. S. Gehling, T. F. Jamison 10:40 953. Studies on the syntheses of the Pladienolides and FD-895. A. L. Mandel, B. D. Jones, J. J. La Clair, M. D. Burkart 11:00 954. Total synthesis of (-)-galanthamine hydrobromide. R. Bandichhor, J. M. Reddy, K. V. Kumar, V. Raju, B. V. Bhaskar, V. Himabindu, A. Bhattacharya, G. M. Reddy 11:20 955. Total synthesis of Asmarine B. S. A. Rodgen, S. E. Schaus 11:40 956. Total synthesis of Galbulimima alkaloids. M. Movassaghi, M. Tjandra, D. K. Hunt Section Ε BCEC 253B Biologically-Related Molecules and Processes M-E. Duban,

Presiding

8:00 957. Modifications of the N-terminus of polyamides resulted in compounds with enhanced DNA binding sequence specific­ ity. T. Brown, H. Mackay, M. Turlington, A. Sutterfield, T. Smith, L. Westrate, A. Sielaff, C. D. Bruce, J. Kluza, C. O'Hare, B. Nguyen, J. Hartley, D. Wilson, M. Lee 8:20 958. Toward the development of lightregulated antisense methodologies. H. Lusic, A. Deiters 8:40 959. Development of photochemical tools for gene regulation. D. D. Young, A. Deiters 9:00 960. Amphiphilic polymers endowed with desirable antimicrobial properties. G. J. Gabriel, J. M. Dabkowski, G. N. Tew

9:20 961. Discovery aimed at Gram-positive antibacterials, 1. Mannich base mecha­ nism-based inactivation of sortase via an apparent E1cb elimination. M-E. Duban, A. W. Maresso, R. Wu, J. W. Kern, R. Zhang, D. Janik, D. M. Missiakas, A. Joachimiak, O. Schneewind

4:40 980. Synthesis of immunostimulating peptidoglycan fragments recognized by intracellular receptor. Y. Fujimoto, A. Kawasaki, A. Shimoyama, N. Inohara, K. Fukase 5:00 975. Withdrawn.

9:40 962. Anomeric Pudovik rearrangement. K. Ajayi, S. Knapp 10:00 963. Design and synthesis of nucleo­ side analogs to probe RNA-editing mecha­ nism. O. Maydanovych, P. A. Beal 10:20 964. Enzymatically cleavable fluores­ cent nucleotides for DNA sequencing by synthesis: Design, synthesis and proof of concept. M. Lopalco, J. K. Cho, M. Bradley 10:40 965. Lethal mutagenesis of RNA viruses: Design of artificial nucleosides as antiviral agents. J. P. Edathil, C. E. Cameron, B. R. Peterson 11:00 966. Mimicry of exposed phosphocholine on damaged cells: Synthetic cell surface receptors that bind C-reactive protein promote apoptosis of lymphocytes. Q. Sun, S. Athavankar, B. R. Peterson

Section Β

11:20 967. Photolabile reporters of molecular recognition: Caging, tagging and photoam­ plification. A. G. Kutateladze, T. P. Gustafson, R. A. Valiulin 11:40 968. Novel blockers of the M2 channel of influenza virus, 1 Inhibitor design, and first active agents. M-E. Duban, S. P. Lee, D. Janik, C. Ma, V. Balannik, D. J. Kempf, L. H. Pinto THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 258A Proteins, Peptides, Amino Acids, and Enzyme Inhibitors T. P. Curran,

Presiding

1:00 969. Synthesis and conformation of metallacyclicpeptides. T. P. Curran, A. B. Lesser, R. S. H. Yoon 1:20 970. Targeted, multivalent antimicrobial peptides. R. J . Pieters, C. J. Arnusch, R. M. J. Liskamp, E. Breukink 1:40 971. Virus capsid-based materials for medical imaging. D. W. Romanini, J. M. Hooker, J. P. O'Neil, M. B. Francis 2:00 972. A practical route to fluorescent Glu7-phalloidin analogs. L. A. Schuresko, R. S. Lokey 2:20 973. Acidic deprotection of boraneprotected phosphinothioesters: Chemoselective synthesis of cyclic peptides via the Staudinger ligation. C. P. R. Hackenberger, R. Kleineweischede 2:40 974. Application of ring-closing metathe­ sis for the synthesis of macrocyclic peptidomimetics as inhibitors of HCV NS3 protease. F. Velazquez, S. Venkatraman, W. Wu, M. Blackman, V. Girijavallabhan, N-Y. Shih, F. G. Njoroge 3:00 84. Cyclic modular β-sheets that inhibit β-sheet aggregation. R. J. Woods, B. Vadla, M. Necula, C. G. Glabe, W. J. Goux, J. S. Nowick 3:20 976. Design and synthesis of RNA binding macrocyclic helix-threading pep­ tides. M. Krishnamurthy, P. A. Beal 3:40 977. EDCI-mediated guanylation meth­ odology between N-Pmc-N'-Alkyl thioureas and amines: Applications toward in situ SPPS arginine headgroup diversification in poly-L-proline type II peptide mimic librar­ ies. S. Flemer Jr., J. S. Madalengoitia 4:00 978. Expansion and further character­ ization of a three-component, Mannich type, coupling reaction on proteins. J. M. McFarland, N. S. Joshi, M. B. Francis 4:20 979. Short and efficient diastereoselec­ tive synthesis of pyrrolidinone-containing small peptide analogs. M. Hosseini, J. S. Grau, K. K. Sorensen, I. Sotofte, D. Tanner, A. Murray, J. E. lander

BCEC 253A Asymmetric Reactions and Syntheses V. K. Singh,

Presiding

1:00 981. The indium mediated synthesis of chiral homoallylic alcohols from ketones using an enantiopure amino alcohol as the chiral director. T. D. Haddad, P. Taynton, B. Singaram 1:20 982. The synthesis of novel chiral 1,2-amino alcohols and their use in direct­ ing the addition of diethylzinc to aromatic aldehydes. C. M. Binder, B. Singaram 1:40 983. Studies toward the development of a catalytic asymmetric reducing system using tartaric acid-derived boronic esters and trisubstituted alkoxy- and acyloxyborohydrides. J . Kim, G. Dao, K. E. Park, B. Singaram 2:00 984. Asymmetric hydrogénation using Ru(ll) complexes. M. Wills, D. J. Morris, F. K. Cheung, F. Minissi, C. Lin, A. Lorente Criville 2:20 985. Asymmetric Morita-Baylis-Hillman reactions: mechanism and catalyst design. S. E. Schaus 2:40 986. On the mechanism of the MoritaBaylis-Hillman reaction catalyzed by chiral Bransted acids. Ν. Τ. McDougal, S. E. Schaus 3:00 987. Asymmetric organocatalytic aldol reaction in the presence of water. V. K. Singh, V. Maya, M. Raj 3:20 988. Diastereoselective addition of nucleophiles to aldehydes having polar aand β-substituents. T. Borg, P. Restorp, P. Somfai 3:40 989. Improved immobilization of aza(bisoxazoline) on silica: Application to circulating flow-type packed bed reactor. S. S. Lee, J. Lim, S. N. Riduan, J. Y. Ying 4:00 990. Mesoporous polymer colloids and their applications in heterogeneous cataly­ sis. Y. Zhang, P. K. Patra, L. Zhao, J. Y. Ying 4:20 991. New developement in the prolinemediated aldol reaction. Y. Hayashi, S. Aratake, T. Itoh, T. Okano, T. Sumiya, M. Shoji 4:40 992. New highly selective and easily displaced chiral auxiliary for boron medi­ ated aldol reactions. A. N. Hulme, S. Fanjul, J. W. White Section C BCEC 254 A/B

2:00 996. Analysis of the local aromaticity in natural nucleobases and their size-ex­ panded benzo-fused derivatives. J. Poater, O. Huertas, M. Fuentes-Cabrera, M. Orozco, M. Sola, F. J. Luque 2:20 997. Withdrawn. 2:40 998. Direct synthesis of magnesium porphine via 1-formyldipyrromethane. D. K. Dogutan, M. Ptaszek, J. S. Lindsey 3:00 999. Evaluation of 6,6'-bis(methylaminosulfonyl)-7,7'-dihydroxy-8,8'-biquinolyl in reaction catalysis with and without metal additives. P. R. Blakemore, S. D. Milicevic 3:20 1000. Formation of gamma-lactones via CAN-mediated oxidations. C. K. Zercher, A. M. Jacobine 3:40 1001. From Mannich-bases to transition metal complexes and supramolecular assemblies. A. Winter, J. Hummel, N. Risch, U. S. Schubert 4:00 1002. New uses for the century-old Zincke ring opening of pyridines. C. D. Vanderwal, S. Steinhardt, J. Silverston 4:20 1003. Preparation of tetramic acid analogs. D. C. Dittmer, D. V. Avilov, M. T. Purzycki 4:40 1004. Regio- and diastereoselective decarboxylative coupling of heteroaromatic alkanes. S. R. Waetzig, J. A. Tunge Section D BCEC 258A Total Synthesis of Complex Molecules B. Balasubramanian,

Presiding

1:00 1005. Oxidative entry to the core struc­ ture of Pederin family of natural products: a-oxy N-acyl aminals and hemiaminals. N. Shao, X. Huang, A. Palani, R. Aslanian, A. Buevich 1:20 1006. Studies toward the total synthesis of superstolide A. M. Tortosa, W. R. Roush 1:40 1007. Withdrawn. 2:00 1008. Synthesis and biological evalua­ tion of Reblastatin and Geldanamycin analogs. J. S. Panek, I. E. Wrona 2:20 1009. Synthesis of ABCD rings of azaspiracid. X. Li, D. R. Mootoo 2:40 1010. Synthesis of C1-C23 fragment of spirastrellolide A. J. H. Yang 3:00 1011. Synthesis of strychnos alkaloids via the intramolecular [4 + 2]-cycloaddition/ rearrangement cascade of substituted amidofurans. J. Boonsombat, H. Zhang, M. Chunghthai, A. Padwa 3:20 1012. Synthetic approach toward basiliolide B. M. V. Kozytska, G. B. Dudley 3:40 1013. Total synthesis of communesin A is described. Y. Qin 4:00 1014. Total synthesis of GEX1 A. Y. Zhang, J. S. Panek 4:20 1015. Total synthesis of Laurenditerpenol. G-Y. J . Im, M. E. Jung

Heterocycles and Aromatics G. Shipps,

Presiding

1:00 993. Synthesis and characterization of 2,7-di-tert-butyl-9-(2,2,2-triphenylethylidene)-fluorene and (E and Z) 4-methyl2,7-di-tert-butyl-9-(2,2,2-triphenylethylidene)-fluorene. D. J. Phillips, M. D. Ward, D. R. Phillippi 1:20 994. Tandem reduction/cyclization of o-nitrophenyl propargyl alcohols: Facile synthesis of 2,4-disubstituted quinolines. M. J. Sandelier, P. DeShong 1:40 995. Trisannulated benzene derivatives by acid catalyzed aldol cyclotrimerizations of cyclic ketones: Methodology develop­ ment and mechanistic insight. A. W. Amick, L. T. Scott

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-107

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

PETR

Section Β

PETR Division of Petroleum Chemistry Y. Wang and J. D. Allison, Program

Boston Park Plaza Whittier Rm Mechanism in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Epoxidation Epoxidation by Biomimetic Catalysts and Homogeneous Complexes

Chairs T. D. P. Stack,

Presiding

S. T. Oyama, Organizer,

Presiding

OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: BioFuels: Renewable Liquid Fuels & Chemicals from Biomass (see FUEL, Mon) Coal Conversion to Clean Liquid and Gaseous Fuels (see FUEL, Mon) Feedstocks for the Future II: Renewables for the Production of Chemicals and Materials (see l&EC, Mon, Tue) Fuel Processing for Hydrogen Pro­ duction: Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels (see FUEL, Sun, Mon, Tue) Workshop on Oil Shale Samples (see FUEL, Wed) Nanotechnology in Catalysis V (see CATL, Sun) SOCIAL EVENT: Dinner: Tue

8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:25 8. Selective biomimetic epoxidations. R. Breslow 9:05 9. Bioinspired iron-catalyzed olefin oxidations: Epoxidation vs. cis-dihydroxylation. L. Que Jr., P. D. Oldenburg, R. Mas-Balleste 9:45 10. Iron(lll) porphyrin-catalyzed epoxi­ dation of olefins by hydrogen peroxide: Factors affecting catalyst activity and selectivity. A. T. Bell 10:25 Intermission. 10:40 11. Unprecedent selectivity in the H202 epoxidation of simple alkenes imparted by soft Pt(ll) Lewis acid catalysts. G. Strukul, A. Scarso 11:20 12. Selective epoxidation with hydro­ gen peroxide catalyzed by polyoxometalate. N. Mizuno Nanotechnology in Catalysis V Sponsored by CATL, Cosponsored by COLL, l&EC, and PETR

2:25 22. Hydroperoxide intermediates in propylene epoxidation on gold/titanosilicate catalysts. S. T. Oyama, J. J. Bravo-Suârez, J. Lu, Κ. Κ. Bando, T. Fujitani 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 23. Direct PO-synthesis from propylene and oxygen in the presence of hydrogen. W. F. Holderich, M. Drope 3:50 24. Kinetics of the propene epoxidation and water formation over gold-titania catalysts. T. A. Nijhuis, Β. Μ. Weckhuysen 4:20 25. Direct synthesis of hydrogen perox­ ide from H2 and 0 2 using Ti-HMS sup­ ported gold catalysts . H. Song, G. Li, X. Wang Inorganic Materials: Applications to Environmental and Energy Research Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by PETR S U N D A Y EVENING Applications of Materials Energy Research Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by PETR Nanoscience: Applications Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR MONDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm Catalysis and Chemistry for the Synthesis of Fuels, Chemicals and Petrochemicals

SUNDAY AFTERNOON Y. W a n g and A. M. Gaffney,

BUSINESS M E E T I N G S : Division Business Meeting: Tue >Executive Committee Meeting: Sat Membership/Preprint Committee Meeting: Sat Program Committee Meeting: Sat

SUNDAY MORNING

Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm Catalysis and Chemistry for the Synthesis of Fuels, Chemicals and Petrochemicals Y. W a n g and A. M. Gaffney,

Section A Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm Catalysis and Chemistry for the Synthesis of Fuels, Chemicals and Petrochemicals Y. W a n g and A. M. Gaffney,

Section A

Organizers

8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 1 . Shape-selective catalysis for synthe­ sis of value-added chemicals from naph­ thalene and biphenyl. C. Song 8:50 2. New process for laurolactam. W. F. Hoelderich 9:20 3. Oxidative dehydrogenation of pro­ pane over nanostructured membrane catalyst. C. L. Marshall 9:50 4. Engineered nanostructures for cataly­ sis. H. H. Kung, M. C. Kung 10:20 Intermission. 10:30 5. Probing reaction pathways on model catalyst surfaces: Vinyl acetate synthesis and olefin metathesis. W. T. Tysoe, F. Gao, Y. Wang, F. C. Calaza, D. Stacchiola 11:00 6. Ensemble effects of Pd-Au and Pd-Sn bimetals for vinyl acetate and benzene synthesis. M. Chen, Κ. Κ. Gath, T. Wei, D. Kumar, D. W. Goodman 11:30 7. Manganese octahedral molecular sieves catalyzed preparation of amino alcohols from epoxides. S. Sithambaram, Y. Ding, X. Shen, L. Xu, S. L Suib

1:15 13. Operando Raman Methodology for the determination of structure-activity relationships in supported oxide catalysts. M. A. Banares 1:45 14. Selective (amm)oxidation of pro­ pane over Mo-V based mixed oxide cata­ lysts. V. V. Guliants, N. R. Shiju, D. R. Mullins, S. H. Overbury 2:15 15. Analyzing the outermost atomic layer of supported catalysts by highsensitivity low energy ion scattering. H. Brongersma, R. ter Veen, A. Knoester, A. Trunschke, R. Schlôgl 2:45 16. Identifying structure-property relationships for selective oxidation catalysts. A. T.Bell 3:15 Intermission. 3:25 17. Kinetics of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on supported cobalt. C. H. Bartholomew, G. W. Huber 3:55 18. Potassium promoted iron FischerTropsch synthesis catalyst activation study with Mossbauer spectroscopy. M. Luo, H. Hamdeh, Β. Η. Davis 4:25 19. Effect of additives on carbon-sup­ ported iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons and alcohols. W-P. Ma, D. B. Dadyburjor, E. L. Kugler Section Β Boston Park Plaza Whittier Rm Mechanism in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Epoxidation Propylene Oxide Production with H2 + 0 2 W. N. Delgass,

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

108-TECH

Organizers

Presiding

S. T. Oyama, Organizer,

Presiding

1:15 20. Gas phase propylene epoxidation over gold nanoparticles deposited on mesoporous titanium silicates. M. Haruta 1:55 2 1 . Synthesis and characterization of Au/Ti-SBA-15 catalysts for the vapor phase epoxidation of propylene. E. Sacaliuc, A. M. Beale, B. M. Weckhuysen, T. A. Nijhuis

Organizers

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 26. Eastman Chemical Company's chemicals from coal program: The 1 st quarter century. J. R. Zoeller 9:05 27. Novel oxidation reaction processes using novel oxygen carrying materials. D. S. Jack, J. H. White, E. J. Schutte, J. W. Taylor, S. L. Rolfe 9:35 28. Syngas from biomass in millisecond reactors. L. D. Schmidt 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 29. Precious metal catalysts supported on ceramic and metal monolithic structures for the hydrogen economy. R. J. Farrauto 10:45 30. Hydrotreating performance of NiW/Ti02-AI 2 0 3 catalyst for ultralow sulfur diesel. A. Duan, R. Li, J. Gao, Z. Zhao, X. Zhang, Κ. Η. Chung 11:15 3 1 . Environmentally friendly coopera­ tive acid-base mixed-oxide catalytic sys­ tems for the synthesis of biodiesel. J. A. Nieweg, C. Kern, V. S-Y. Lin Section Β

Section C Boston Park Plaza Plaza Ballroom Symposium Honoring Martin Gorbaty J. F. Schabron and B. R. Cook, Organizers 8:20 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 39. Coal structure and reactivity: A physical organic chemistry approach. R. E. Winans 9:10 40. Response of Argonne Premium bituminous coals to C 0 2 , CH4 and N2 adsorption. S. R. Kelemen, L. M. Kwiatek 9:40 4 1 . Sooting tendency of oxygenates. R. Malhotra, A. L. Boehman, S. R. Kirby, H. G. Pitsch, P. Pepiot-Desjardins 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 42. Influence of asphaltene molecular structure on the morphology of coke produced in delayed coking. M. Siskin, S. R. Kelemen, M. L. Gorbaty, M. Afeworki, L. Brown, D. Ferrughelli, R. Kennedy 10:55 43. Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD)/chemical ionization mass spectrom­ etry in petroleum analysis. H. I. Kenttamaa 11:25 44. Measurement of distributed total acid numbers by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. K. Qian, K. E. Edwards, G. J. Dechert, S. B. Jaffe, L. A. Green, W. Olmstead BioFuels: Renewable Liquid Fuels & Chemicals from Biomass Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by AGRO and PETR Coal Conversion to Clean Liquid and Gaseous Fuels Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by PETR MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm Symposium Honoring Martin Gorbaty J. F. Schabron and B. R. Cook, Organizers

Boston Park Plaza Whittier Rm Mechanism in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Epoxidation Epoxidation Chemistry on Silver M. A. Barteau,

11:00 37. Structure sensitivity in the partial oxidation of styrene on silver single crys­ tals. L. Zhou, X. Liu, C. M. Friend, R. J. Madix 11:30 38. An Operando Raman spectro­ scopic investigation of C 2 H 4 epoxidation over supported Ag/Al 2 0 3 catalysts. I. E. Wachs, M. A. Barteau, W. Lin, J. Dellamorte

Presiding

S. T. Oyama, Organizer,

Presiding

8:00 32. Olefin epoxidation on silver: Mecha­ nistic insights from computation and experiment. M. A. Barteau, A. B. Mhadeshwar, J. Dellamorte, J. Lauterbach 8:40 33. An investigation into the origins of selectivity in ethylene epoxidation on promoted and unpromoted Ag/AI203 catalysts: A detailed kinetic, mechanistic and adsorptive study. K. C. Waugh, M. Hague 9:10 34. Competing epoxidation and allylic hydrogen abstraction in heterogeneous oxidation of olefins: Trans-p-methylstyrene oxidation on Au(111). X. Liu, C. M. Friend 9:40 35. The role of alkali promoters in the Ag-catalyzed epoxidation of olefins. J. R. Monnier 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 36. Effect of support on ethylene epoxidation over Au, Ag and Au-Ag cata­ lysts. S. Chavadej, S. Rojluechai, J. W. Schawank, V. Meeyoo

1:00 45. Effect of pore confinement on free-radical reactions. P. F. Britt, A. C. Buchanan III, M. K. Kidder, E. J. Kintzel Jr., K. W. Herwig, A. L. Chaffee 1:30 46. Mixed isotope labeling as proof of shape selectivity in zeolite catalysis. B. R. Cook 2:00 47. Highly active dispersed MoS2 catalyst prepared by hydrothermal synthe­ sis for hydrodesulfurization of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene. C. Song, B. Yoosuk, J. H. Kim, P. Prasassarakich 2:30 Intermission. 2:45 48. Sulfur k-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of fuels: A retrospective. G. N. George 3:15 49.13C NMR chemical shift tensors: The role they play in studying the aromaticity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. R. Pugmire, D. M. Grant, M. D. Hailing 3:45 50. An NMR study of the behavior of polyphosphoric acid in asphalt. F. P. Miknis 4:15 5 1 . Fuels science: A glance back and a look forward. M. L. Gorbaty

PETR

Section B Boston Park Plaza Whittier Rm BioFuels: Renewable Liquid Fuels & Chemicals from Biomass Cosponsored by FUEL P. O'Connor, J. E. Holladay, C. Leclerc, and D. C. Dayton, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:40 52. Catalytic conversion of biomassderived feedstocks utilizing aqueous-phase reforming. R. D. Cortright 2:05 53. New mesoporous silica-supported acid catalysts for the production of biodiesel from high free fatty acid-containing feedstocks. N. A. Zafiropoulos, H. L. Ngo, E. T. Samulski, T. A. Foglia, W. Lin 2:30 54. Processing of biomass-derived feedstocks in a petroleum refinery: Cata­ lytic cracking of biomass-derived feed­ stocks. G. W. Huber, L. Sauvanaud, P. O'Connor, A. Corma 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 55. Bioethanol dehydration to bioethylene with modified Zn/Mn/ZSM-5 catalyst. F. Pan, Y. Wu, J. Zhang, J. Tong 3:35 56. Production of biodiesel and glycerol from biomass by supercritical fluid technol­ ogy. S. Tang, Y. Zhou, J. Zhang, C. Li Section C Boston Park Plaza Plaza Ballroom Catalysis and Chemistry for the Synthesis of Fuels, Chemicals and Petrochemicals Y. Wang and A. M. Gaffney, Organizers 1:15 57. Synthesis of soluble chemicals from cellulose by supported metal catalysis. A. Fukuoka 1:45 58. Production of furan derivatives by dehydration of biomass-derived carbohy­ drates. Y. Roman-Leshkov, J. A. Dumesic 2:15 59. Novel catalysts for carbohydrate conversion to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. Z. C. Zhang, H. Zhao, J. E. Holladay 2:45 Intermission. 2:55 60. Deactivation of ZSM-5 additives in laboratory for realistic testing. E. P. Rautiainen, M. Ludvig, C. Pouwels, R. D. Pimenta 3:25 61. Catalysis and kinetic analysis of liquid phase methane oxidation. W. Chen, T. A. Brandvold, M. L. Bricker, J. A. Kocal, K. Popp, N. Greenlay, S. R. Bare, J. T. Walenga, S. Yang 3:55 62. Dehydration of bioethanol into ethylene over modified nanoscale HZSM-5. X. Guo, X. Zhu, J. Bi, L. Sun, M. Liu, X. Wang Coal Conversion to Clean Liquid and Gaseous Fuels Sponsored by FUEL, Cosponsored by PETR TUESDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm Catalysis and Chemistry for the Synthesis of Fuels, Chemicals and Petrochemicals Y. Wang and A. M. Gaffney, Organizers 8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 63. Selective aqueous-phase oxidation of glycerol over carbon-supported Au, Pd, and AuPd catalysts. R. J. Davis, W. C. Ketchie 8:50 64. Novel nickel-copper supported catalysts for hydrogen production from methanol decomposition. W. Chu, X. Zhang, X. Wang, Z. Ci, T. Zhang 9:20 65. Synthesis of N-vinyl caprolactam. F. Shubo, L. Shuyuan, H. Cunfeng, Z. Erli 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 66. Catalytic cracking of mixed C4 hydrocarbons over Cr and Fe modified HZSM-5 catalysts. X. Wang, Z. Zhao, C. Xu, A. Duan

10:30 67. The effect of N-containing com­ pounds on oxidative desulphurization of liquid fuel. Y. Jia, G. Li 11:00 68. Reaction rules of slurry catalytic cracking. X. Lan, G. Wang, C. Xu, J. Gao 11:30 69. Thermal cracking studies by design of a pilot plant. E. Bakhshi, F. Abniki

Section Β Boston Park Plaza Whittier Rm Mechanism in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Epoxidation Homogeneous Complexes and Immobilized Systems

10:45 93. The synthesis of up-scalable molybdenum based ultra dispersed catalysts: Effect of temperature on particle size. J. Thompson, J. M. Hill, P. R. Pereira-Almao 11:10 94. Trimetallic FeMoW and CuMoW unsupported catalysts for HDS. A. Olivas, D. H. Galvan, S. Fuentes Section Β

Section Β S. T. Oyama, Organizer Boston Park Plaza Whittier Rm Mechanism in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Epoxidation Gold Clusters and TS-1 M. Haruta, Presiding S. T. Oyama, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 70. Propylene epoxidation by 02 + H2 over Au nanoparticles on Ti-nanoporous supports. A. M. Joshi, B. Taylor, L Cumaranatunge, K. T. Thomson, W. N. Delgass 9:10 71. Epoxidation of propylene with dilute hydrogen peroxide over TS-1 modified by TPAOH. X. Guo, Y. Dong, J. Mao, M. Liu, X. Wang, G. Li 9:40 72. Reactivity of TS-1 toward H202/ H20 solutions. S. Bordiga, A. Damin, F. Bonino, A. Zecchina, C. Lamberti 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 73. Current processes and possibilities for the epoxidation of propene. T. A. Nijhuis 11:10 74. Properties of gold mass-selected clusters supported on titania. L. Benz, X. Tong, P. R. Kemper, M. T. Bowers, S. Chretien, S. K. Buratto, H. Metiu Nanoscience: Applications Energy and Environment Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm 3rd International Symposium on Hydrotreating/Hydrocracking Technologies O. R. Koseoglu, S. Nagamatsu, and S. Kasztelan, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 75. PCA Reduction in naphtenic base oils by hydrotreatment. E. Gomez U, L. Santos, O. D. Ordonez 2:00 76. Understanding the role of glycoltype additives in the improvement of hdt catalyst performances. V. Costa, C. Geantet, M. Digne, K. E. Marchand 2:25 77. Hydrogen saving in LCO upgrading. R. Giardino, V. Calemma, A. Carati, M. Ferrari 2:50 Intermission. 3:05 78. A simplified oxidative desulfurization of diesel followed by methanol extraction. F. M. Al-Shahrani, T. Xiao, H. Shi, M. L H. Green 3:30 79. Ν Removal from GO cut: Sorbent efficiency and infleuence on Hds reaction. C. Flego, F. Baldiraghi, L. M. F. Sabatino 3:55 80. Non-catalytic partial oxidation of heavy residues using by-product oxygen: A novel integrated approach. H. K. Abdel-Aal, M. A. Shalabi

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

A. Katz and T. D. P. Stack, Presiding 1:00 81. New organocatalytic systems for asymmetric epoxidation. P. C. Bulman Page, B. R. Buckley 1:40 82. Fine-tuning and recycling of homo­ geneous tungstate and polytungstate epoxidation catalysts. P. L. Alsters, P. T. Witte, R. Neumann, D. Sloboda-Rozner, W. Adam, R. Zhang, J. Reedijk, P. Gamez, J. ten Elshof, S. Roy Chowdhury 2:10 83. Aerobic epoxidation of alkenes catalyzed by cobalt(ll) calix[4]pyrrole. W. Chavasiri, S. Thipthinnakorn, P. Buranaprasertsuk 2:40 Intermission. 3:00 84. Covalent attachment of [Mnll(phenanthroline)2] in porous silica: Development of a selective and efficient epoxidation catalysts for electron-deficient olefins. T. J. Terry, P. Hung, A. J. Murphy, T. D. P. Stack 3:30 85. Epoxidation of styrene with porphy­ rin catalysts encapsulated in molecular square cavities. R. Q. Snurr, Μ. Ο Curet-Arana, L. J. Broadbelt 4:00 86. Investigating effect of environment on heterogeneous Ti-catalyzed olefin epoxidation: inner- and outer-sphere ligand effects. J. M. Notestein, L. R. Andrini, A. Solovyov, N. de Silva, F. G. Requejo, E. Iglesia, A. Katz 4:30 87. Metal-doped epoxy resins: Easily accessible epoxidation catalysts with high long-term activities. U. Arnold, H. Bautz, F. Fan, M. Dôring

Boston Park Plaza Whittier Rm Mechanism in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Epoxidation New Directions in Propylene Epoxidation: Phase Transfer/02/Propane/Membranes D. H. Busch, Presiding S. T. Oyama, Organizer, Presiding 8:15 95. Homogeneous catalysis for selec­ tive and light olefin epoxidations. G. Yin, H-J. Lee, T. P. Shi, B. Subramaniam, D. H. Busch 8:55 96. A green route to propylene oxide by reaction controlled phase transfer cataly­ sis. S. Gao, Z. Xi 9:25 97. Direct epoxidation of propylene by molecular oxygen over Y 2 0 3 and K20promoted Ag/a-AI203 catalyst. W. Yao, Y. Guo, G. Lu 9:55 Intermission. 10:15 98. Direct conversion of propane and oxygen to propylene oxide. M. F. Asaro, G. Mul, A. S. Hirschon 10:45 99. Advances in catalysts and reactors for generating H 2 0 2 in H2-02 mixtures and synthesizing propylene oxide in H2-02-C3H6 mixtures. F. Shubo, L Shuyuan, Z. Erli, Y. Guangxin 11:15 100. Novel directions in propylene epoxidation research: New catalysts and feedstocks, and the application of mem­ branes. S. T. Oyama, J. J. Bravo-Suârez, L. Jiqing, X. Zhang, K. K. Bando, T. Fujitani Section C

Nanoscience: Applications Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR TUESDAY EVENING Applications of Materials Environmental Research Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by PETR Nanoscience: Synthesis and Characterization Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm 3rd International Symposium on Hydrotreating/Hydrocracking Technologies O. R. Koseoglu, S. Nagamatsu, and S. Kasztelan, Organizers 8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:25 88. Hydrodesulfurization of thiophene over MoS2 catalysts at realistic conditions. A density functional study. P. G. Moses, B. Hinnemann, H. Topsoe, J. K. Norskov 8:50 89. Hydrotreatment catalysts engineered at the molecular level through support functionalization. B. F remon, A. Chambard, E. Payen, A. Chaumonnot, Κ. Ε. Marchand 9:15 90. New insight to desulfurization pro­ cess: Geometric modeling of the sulfa­ tion of ZnO by H2S. C. Babé, C. Geantet, M. Vrinat, T. Huard, A. Nicolaos 9:40 91. Preparation of beta zeolite and MCM-41-based hydrocracking catalysts. S. Ahmed, K. Alam 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 92. Ring opening of methylcyclohexane over platinum and iridium loaded silica-alumina catalysts. V. Calemma, A. Carati, F. Gagliardi, M. Ferrari, R. Giardino

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Poster Session Y. Wang, Organizer 9:00-11:00 101. Study on the interaction of heavy crude oil components and emulsifiers in heavy crude oil-in-water emulsion. W. Fan, J. Bai, T. Zhang, G. Nan, S. Li 102. Coke combustion kinetics of coked FCC naphtha aromatizing catalyst. J. Chang, X. Lan, C. Xu, J. Gao 103. Cr(lll)-mediated ring opening of epoxide to halohydrins. S. Pattarativanont, W. Chavasiri 104. Effect of physical mixing of solid components on the epoxidation of propylene over gold catalysts. J. Kawahara, N. Hamakawa, J. Huang, S. Tsubota, M. Haruta 105. Low temperature catalytic performance of nanostructured Zr-Ni-O. Y. Wu, B. Wu, D. Lin, T. Wu, H. Wan 106. Metal-doped cryptomelane manganese oxides in catalysis: Structure-activity correlation. S. Sithambaram, L. Xu, Y. Ding, C-H. Chen, S. L Suib 107. Microwave enhanced cracking of n-hexane and conversion of activated carbon into silica coated carbon nanotubes. S. Nosheen, P. T. Fanson, S. L Suib 108. New compositional correlation for calculating the viscosity of crude oils. L. X. Zhao, Y. Wu, X. Q. Guo, L. Y. Yang 109. Study of catalytic cracking behavior of coker gas oil. G. Wang, X-Q. Wang, C. Xu, J. Gao 110. Study on n-butoxy ethanol as an oxygenated fuel for diesel engine. H. Guo, L. Li, S. Liu, G. Li, L Zhou 111. Study on synthesis and applied performance of NPS petroleum sulfonate for enhanced oil recovery:"!. Synthesis and interfacial tension of NPS. W. Fan, F. Yu, X. Chen, S. Li, G. Nan

TECH-109

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

PETR/PHYS 112. Study on synthesis and applied perfor­ mance of NPS petroleum sulfonate for enhanced oil recovery:2. Adsorption prop­ erties and oil-displacement performance of NPS. W. Fan, F. Yu, Y. Duan, G. Nan, S.Li

THURSDAY MORNING

Nanoscience: Applications Biological Systems Sponsored by INOR, Cosponsored by BIOHW and PETR

Chemistry of Petroleum and Emerging Technologies Hydrotreating of Synthetic Crudes from Oil Sands and Heavy Oil

G. A. Voth, Program Chair SUNDAY MORNING

J. Gao and S. Hammes-Schiffer, Organizers

A. K. Dalai, Organizer

Section A

S. S. Iyengar, Presiding

9:00 124. Hydrotreating synthetic crude with in situ hydrogen and nanodispersed mo catalyst. F. Ng 9:30 125. 7-AI 2 0 3 supported NiMo nitride: Effect of phosphorus concentration on the HDN and HDS of heavy gas oil. S. Vedachalam, A. K. Dalai, J. Adjaye 10:00 126. Hds of dibenthothiophene over MCM-41 supported mop and wp. A. Wang 10:30 127. Thermodynamic and experimen­ tal studies of ring opening of decalin. J. Govindhakannan 11:00 128. Upgradation of gas oil by ultra­ sound treatment. R. Gopinath, A. K. Dalai, J. Adjaye 11:30 129. Evidence of hydrogen spillover contribution to hydrogénation reactions. H. Yang

BCEC 157A

8:20 13. Detailed balance and equilibrium in mixed quantum-classical dynamics. J. R. Schmidt, P. Parandekar, J. Tully 9:00 14. Electron transfer, Condon approxi­ mations and the nature of accepted fluc­ tuations in simple nonadiabatic processes. M. A. Ratner 9:40 15. Extended spin-boson model for nonadiabatic hydrogen tunneling in the condensed phase. A. V. Soudackov, Y. Ohta, S. Hammes-Schiffer 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 16. Vibronic dynamics via the semiclassical (SC) initial value representation (IVR). W. H. Miller 11:00 17. Modeling electronic and vibrational pure dephasing and dissipation dynamics in condensed phase systems. D. F. Coker 11:40 18. Electronic dynamics in molecular excited states. P. J. Rossky

Section A Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm

PHYS Division of Physical Chemistry

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm Mechanism in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Epoxidation Liquid Phase Processes S. T. Oyama, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 113. Shell's styrene monomer and propylene oxide (SMPO) process: Lessons learnt from 28 years of highly selective catalytic propylene epoxidation. J. K. F. Buijink, J-P. Lange, R. A. N. R. Bos, A. D. Horton, F. G. M. Niele 2:10 114. Propylene epoxidation with ethylbenzene hydroperoxide over Ti-containing catalysts prepared by chemical vapor deposition. K-T. Li, C-C. Un, P-H. Lin 2:40 115. Catalytic epoxidation of olefins with silylated Ti-TUD-1 catalysts. M. R. Prasad, G. Mul, M. S. Hamdy, E. Bouwman, E. Drent 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 116. Selective aerobic radical epoxida­ tion of α-olefins catalyzed by A/-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI). C. Punta, D. Moscatelli, O. Porta, F. Minisci, F. Récupéra, C. Gambarotti, M. Lucarini 4:00 117. Novel Ag-MnOx catalysts for selective epoxidation of olefins. S. Sithambaram, C. A. Calvert, N. Opembe, S. L Suib Section Β Boston Park Plaza Whittier Rm 3rd International Symposium on Hydrotreating/Hydrocracking Technologies O. R. Koseoglu, S. Nagamatsu, and S. Kasztelan, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:40 118. Arorincle catalysts for hydrocracking of aromatics. V. Ali, C. Galarraga, J. M. Hill, M. C. Oballa, Y. Traa, J. Weitkamp, P. R. Pereira-Almao 2:05 119. Distribution of basic and non-basic nitrogen compounds in diesel feeds. C. Dartiguelongue, F. Bertoncini, F. Adam, T. Chapus 2:30 120. Physico-chemical characterization and HDS catalysis on Zr-SBA-15 sup­ ported Mo, CoMo and NiMo catalysts. M. G. Dhar, K. Soni, G. M. Kumaran, S. Garg, M. Kumar, J. Gupta, L. D. Sharma 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 121. Ultradeepadsorption-desulfurization of gasoline with Ni/AI-Si02 material in presence of ethanol. M. V. Landau, M. Cohen, M. Herskowitz, R. Agnihotri, J. E. Kegerreis 3:35 122. Ultramicroporous carbon with developed mesoporosity based on halogenated polymers. Y. G. Kryazhev, V. A. Drozdov, V. A. Likholobov 4:00 123. Ultrasound assisted synthesis, in aqueous media, of nanometric MoS2, and its promotion with Co. I. Uzcanga, M. Vrinat, I. Bezverkhyy, P. Afanasiev, C. E. Scott

110-TECH

Section Β Boston Park Plaza Whittier Rm Mechanism in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Epoxidation Novel Oxidants for PO Production S. T. Oyama, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 130. Reaction network and product distribution in the vapor phase epoxidation of propene. T. Thômmes, A. Reitzmann, B. Kraushaar-Czarnetzki 8:55 131. A general route for gas-phase epoxidation. T. Berndt 9:20 132. Use of reticular oxygen of metal oxides for the selective epoxidation of propene. A. Dibenedetto, M. Aresta, C. Pastore, F. Nocito 9:45 133. Gas-phase epoxidation of propene with in situ H202 produced by H2/02 plasma. Z. Juncheng, S. Ji, W. Xiangsheng, G. Hongchen, Z. Jianli, G. Weimin 10:10 134. Ethylene epoxidation over silver catalysts in low-temperature corona discharge. A. Tansuwan, S. Chavadej, T. Sreethawong

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Methods for Single-Molecule Detection Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW X. Zhuang, H. Yang, and P. Selvin, Organizers W. E. Moerner, Presiding 8:20 1. Recent progress in single-biomolecule fluorescence imaging. W. E. Moerner 9:00 2. Analysis of biomolecular heterogeneity using fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy. R. N. Zare, S. Kim, Y. Luo 9:40 3. Accurate single molecule FRET efficiency determination for surface immobilized DNA using maximum likelihood calculated lifetimes. A. Meller, E. Atas, J. Sutin, J. Edel 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 4. Nanoelectronic devices for visualizing and interacting with biological systems. C. M. Lieber 11:00 5. Imaging information in DNA. S. R. Quake 11:40 6. Bidirectional stepping of cytoplasmic dynein: Effects of mechanical load and ATP hydrolysis. A. Gennerich, A. Carter, S. Reek-Peterson, R. D. Vale Section Β BCEC 157C Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Computational Methods Cosponsored by BIOL J. Ma, M. R. Diehl, and S. Huo, Organizers M. Feig, Presiding

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Boston Park Plaza White Hill Rm Chemistry of Petroleum and Emerging Technologies A. K. Dalai, Organizer 1:30 135. Effect of different additives on coke reduction during thermal cracking of vacuum residues. K. U. Ogbuneke, C. E. Snape, J. M. Andresen, R. Sharpe, S. Crazier, C. A. Russell 2:00 136. Additive evaluation in the lube oil process: Liquid-liquid extraction. E. F. Pantoja Sr., J. A. Carrillo, C. Ballesteros, S. Monsalve 2:30 137. Interaction of petroleum deposits to atmosphere in formation of tornadoes. S. Mori 3:00 138. Study on methyl 1-methoxy-2propyl carbonate as a clean oxygenated fuel for diesel engine. H. Guo, J. Zhang, G. Li, S. Liu, L Zhou 3:30 139. Visbreaking of Jazmin crude oil: Transport alternative. J. A. Carrillo, G. Garzon, L. M. Corredor, H. J. Picon 4:00 140. Association behavior of asphaltene in toluene by synchronous fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopy. D. Yu, S. Zhang, G. Que

8:00 7. Sampling and scoring in protein structure refinement. M. Feig 8:40 8. Functional mechanics of the ribosome. R. Jernigan, O. Kurkcuoglu, Y. Wang, P. Doruker 9:20 9. Narrowing the gap in understanding protein structure and function through computer simulations. H. Guo 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 10. Molecular modeling of bacterial sensing machineries. C. Soto, M. Dal Peraro, P. Carloni, W. F. DeGrado, M. L Klein 11:00 11. Combating drug resistance: Les­ sons from substrate recognition in HIV-1 protease. C. A. Schiffer 11:40 12. Studying the switching of proteins involved in signal transduction with pathbased molecular dynamics simulations. A. C. Pan, B. Roux

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Section C BCEC 158 Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Nonadiabatic Dynamics Cosponsored by COMP

Section D BCEC 157B Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Structure-Function Correlation Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL M. Kumikova, Organizer R. D. Coalson, Organizer, Presiding 8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 19. Molecular driving forces determining potassium channel slow inactivation. E. Perozo 9:00 20. Structural analysis of glutamate receptor function. M. Mayer 9:40 Intermission. 10:00 21. Self assembly of the HIV-1 VPU protein into a pentameric ion channel using a coarse grain model. P. B. Moore, R. DeVane 10:20 22. Dual-color fluorescence-burst analysis to probe protein transport through membrane pores. G. V. D. Bogaart, J. Mika, V. Krasnikov, B. Poolman 11:00 23. Permeability of the nuclear pore complexes as probed by scanning electro­ chemical microscopy. S. Amemiya 11:40 24. Low resolution structure prediction of transmembrane helical bundles. K. Speranskiy, M. Kurnikova Section Ε BCEC 159 Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solution Electrons in Water D. M. Neumark, Organizer K. D. Jordan, Organizer, Presiding 8:20 25. Effect of hydration on reactions of Η and OH radicals. D. M. Bartels 9:00 26. Ultrafast relaxation dynamics of the "ammoniated" electron from liquid metalammonia solution. J. Lindner, A. N. Unterreiner, P. Vôhringer 9:40 27. Hydration dynamics of solvated electrons in THF-water mixtures. A. E. Bragg, B. J. Schwartz 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 28. Excess electron hydration in inhomogeneous and non-equilibrium environments. P. J. Rossky 11:00 29. Dynamics of the excess electron in anionic water and methanol clusters via femtosecond photoelectron imaging. A. Kammrath, G. B. Griffin, J. R. R. Verlet, A. E. Bragg, R. M. Young, D. M. Neumark

PHYS

11:40 30. Ultrafast internal conversion pro­ cesses for excited solvated electrons for clusters and the bulk. S. F. Fischer, P. Scherer, W. Dietz

Section Β

Section F

Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Computational Methods Cosponsored by BIOL

BCEC 160A

BCEC 157C

Section Ε

Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Redox Potentials Cosponsored by COMP

J. Ma, M. R. Diehl, and S. Huo, Organizers

M. Dupuis,

S-J. Chen,

Organizer

D. G. Truhlar, Organizer,

Presiding

8:20 Introductory Remarks. 8:25 3 1 . Redox free energies and oneelectron energy levels from density func­ tional theory based molecular dynamics. M. Sprik, R. Ayala, J. VandeVondele 9:05 32. Predicting accurate oxidation and reduction potentials in condensed phases. C. J. Cramer, P. Jaque, C. P. Kelly, A. V. Marenich, D. G. Truhlar 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 33. Solvent fields in electron transfer reactions. D. S. Dudis, A. T. Yeates 10:20 34. Uranium redox chemistry and its importance in nuclear waste disposal. S. Tsushima, C. Hennig, A. Ikeda, A. C. Scheinost 11:00 35. Interpretation (correlation) of elec­ trochemical oxidation and reduction poten­ tials with DFT HOMO and LUMO orbital energies for large supramolecular com­ plexes involving porphyrins and fullerenes. M. E. Zandler, F. D'Sousa 11:40 36. Potential energy surfaces from spectral representations. S. M. Vaione, S. R. Atlas Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Computational Challenges in Modeling Catalysis Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Ultrafast Phenomena and Reactions at Interfaces Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 157A Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Probe Development Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW X. Zhuang, H. Yang, and P. Selvin, Organizers A. P. Alivisatos,

Presiding

1:20 37. Molecular motor protein mediated crowding of single quantum dots inside living cells. A. Agrawal, G. Ruan, S. Nie 2:00 38. Plasmon rulers for measuring dynamical distance changes in biological macromolecular assemblies. A. P. Alivisatos 2:40 39. Tunable optical properties of indi­ vidual single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in biocompatible environments. D. Tsyboulski, L. Witus, L. Cognet, J-D. Rocha, J. D. Hartgerink, R. B. Weisman 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 40. Single molecule imaging of receptor trafficking with small, monovalent quantum dots. A. Y. Ting 4:00 4 1 . Strongly emissive ss-DNA-encapsulated Ag nanoclusters as new single molecule fluorophores. R. M. Dickson 4:40 42. Polymer dot nanoparticles for intra­ cellular imaging. C. Wu, C. J. Szymanski, Y. Zheng, J. D. McNeill

3:00 Intermission. 3:20 59. Metal-rich gold-thiolate clusters: Co-emergence of the metallic state and monolayer ordering. R. L Whetten 4:00 60. Building up collective properties in simple liquid crystals. C. Zannoni 4:40 6 1 . Effects of "overpacking" on the phase behavior of microgel assemblies. A. N. St. John, V. Breedveld, L A. Lyon

Presiding

Section C BCEC 158 Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Statistical Theories Cosponsored by COMP

Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solution Electrons in Water K. D. Jordan,

D. M. Neumark, Organizer,

Section F

M. A. Gomez,

BCEC 160A

Presiding

1:20 49. From quantum chemistry to model potentials: Coarse graining in polymer chemistry. M. S. Gordon, L. Slipchenko, M. H. Lamm, G. Pranami 2:00 50. Entropy-driven population distribu­ tions in a prototypical flexible molecule with two flexible side chains: 0-(2-acetamidoethyl)-N-acetyltyramine. V. A. Shubert, E. Baquero, D. P. Schofield, K. D. Jordan, M. A. Lipton, T. S. Zwier 2:20 5 1 . Multiscale theory of electronic structure in solution: Quantum mechanics coupled with 3-D molecular theory of solvation. A. Kovalenko 2:40 52. Constrained search density func­ tional theory and the entropy of charge transfer. S. R. Atlas, S. M. Vaione 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 53. Why not just evaluate the partition function? L. R. Pratt 4:00 54. Model for simulating nuclear and electronic state dynamics in liquids. D. Chandler, D. E. Manolopoulos, T. Miller 4:40 55. A statistical view of effective interac­ tions in condensed matter. G. A. Voth Section D BCEC 157B Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Cosponsored by COLL D. Evans and N. C. Seeman, R. Hernandez, Organizer,

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 56. Modeling the fluid-driven behavior of micro- and nano-particles near heterog­ eneous surfaces. A. C. Balazs 2:00 57. Building function from the top-down and the bottom up. R. G. Nuzzo 2:40 58. What emerges in the diffusional behavior in nonequilibrium colloidal sus­ pensions? A. Popov, R. Hernandez

Organizer Presiding

1:20 62. Isomer-selective vibrational spec­ troscopies of anions and cations in water clusters. M. Johnson 2:00 63. Electron binding motifs of water cluster anions, and how to model this class of systems. T. Sommerfeld, A. A. DeFusco III, K. D. Jordan 2:40 64. Monte Carlo simulations of neutral, protonated and deprotonated clusters of Lewis Water. S. Kale, S. Dai, L. Vugmeyster, M. Blank, J. Herzfeld 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 65. First-principles simulations of the structure and spectroscopy of the hydrated electron. J. M. Herbert 4:00 66. New results on the photoionization and solvation dynamics in aqueous solu­ tions using femtosecond pump-repumpprobe spectroscopy. A. Laubereau, H. Iglev 4:40 67. Water aggregates in the Earth's atmosphere. V. Vaida

J. Gao and S. Hammes-Schiffer, Organizers

M. Dupuis and D. G. Truhlar,

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 76. DFT studies of oxidation of C1 compounds on platinum surfaces. E. Spohr 2:00 77. Electrocatalysis from first principles. M. Neurock, M. Janik 2:40 78. Computational studies in electroca­ talysis: Homogeneous catalysis of water oxidation using a Ru-based multielectron catalyst. J . T. Muckerman, E. Fujita, D. Polyansky, K. Tanaka 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 79. Predicting mechanisms in electroca­ talysis from adsorption bond strengths, and activation energies from electron affinities or ionization potentials of the reaction centers. A. B. Anderson 4:15 80. First-principles-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of water-gas shift reac­ tion on copper and platinum surfaces. D.Mei 4:55 8 1 . Modeling sulfur electrochemical reactions for advanced batteries. A. Jara, J. Fritchman, D. S. Dudis, A. T. Yeates Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Modeling Reactivity Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Ions at Interface Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS MONDAY MORNING Section A

Excited Electronic States in Chemistry and Biology: Theory and Experiment Methods and Techniques T. J . Martinez and S. Matsika, A. I. Krylov,

Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Electrocatalysis Cosponsored by COMP

W. F. Schneider,

BCEC 159

1:20 43. The electrostatic free energy land­ scape for nucleic acid helix assembly. S-J. Chen 2:00 44. A multistep approach to proteinprotein docking. D. Kozakov, Y. Shen, R. Brenke, D. Beglov, P. Vakili, I. C. Paschalidis, S. Vajda 2:40 45. Drug discovery based on large scale molecular dynamics Simulation for membrane proteins. Y. Xu, W. Zhu, D. Liu, H. Liu, X. Shen, J. Ma, H. Jiang 3:20 Intermission. 3:40 46. Withdrawn. 4:20 47. Toward building structural models for multicomponent protein-DNA com­ plexes. H-X. Zhou 5:00 48. Rebuilding atomistic detail from coarse-grained models in resolution exchange. P. Liu, Q. Shi, G. A. Voth

Section G BCEC 160C

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 68. Excitations from time-dependent density functional theory: Good, bad, and ugly. K. Burke 2:00 69. Going beyond Bom-Oppenheimer in TDDFT. A. Abedi, N. T. Maitra, E. Gross 2:20 70. MP/SOFT simulations of nonadiabatic dynamics at conical intersections. X. Chen, V. S. Batista 2:40 Intermission. 2:50 7 1 . Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: An approach for on-the-fly dynamics in complex systems. S. S. Iyengar 3:30 72. Spectral-product methods for theo­ retical studies of electronically excited states: Exact atomic-pair representations of molecular Hamiltonian matrices. P. W. Langhoff, R. J. Hinde, J. D. Mills, J. A. Boatz 3:50 73. Vibrationally-resolved excited-state dynamics of nonlinear optical chromophores: Development and application of a simultaneous frequency-resolved and subpicosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering probe. B. D. Prince, M. N. Slipchenko, A. Chakraborty, B. M. Prince, A. J. Blom, H. U. Stauffer 4:10 74. Targeting individual excited states in DMRG. J. J. Dorando, J. Hachmann, G. K-L. Chan 4:30 75. Path-integral simulations beyond the adiabatic approximation. J. R. Schmidt, J. Tully

BCEC 157A Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW X. Zhuang, H. Yang, and P. Selvin, Organizers I. Tinoco,

Presiding

8:20 82. Single molecule study reveals active DNA uwinding mechanism of ringshaped helicase. D. S. Johnson, L Bai, Β. Υ. Smith, S. S. Patel, M. D. Wang 9:00 83. Translocation of messenger RNA through a ribosome one codon at a time. I. Tinoco, J-D. Wen, L. Lancaster, C. Hodges, H. F. Noller, C. Bustamante 9:40 84. Mechanochemistry of Rad51dsDNA filament disassembly. J. van Mameren, M. Modesti, R. Kanaar, C. Wyman, E. J. G. Peterman, G. J. L Wuite 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 85. Insights on the role of nucleic acid/protein interactions in the chaperoned nucleic acid rearrangements of HIV-1 reverse transcription. H. W. Liu, Y. Zeng, C. F. Landes, Y. J. Kim, Y. Zhu, X. Ma, M-N. Vo, K. Musier-Forsyth, P. F. Barbara 11:00 86. Viral DNA packaging one step at a time. Y. R. Chemla, J. R. Moffitt, K. Aathavan, S. Grimes, P. J. Jardine, D. L. Anderson, C. Bustamante

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-111

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 11:40 87. DOE vision and funding opportuni­ ties. A. Katz Section Β BCEC 157C Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Cosponsored by BIOL J. Ma, M. R. Diehl, and S. Huo, Organizers T. M. Squires,

Presiding

8:20 88. In vivo looping properties of DNA: Effects of the bacterial nucleoid protein HU on DNA flexibility and topology. L. Czapla, D. Swigon, W. K. Olson 9:00 89. Zipped, bridged, and looped: Prob­ ing the protein-DNA interactions that structure the nucleoid. P. Wiggins, R. T. Dame, M. C. Noom, G. J. L Wuite 9:40 90. What is the pressure in a virus, and why? W. M. Gelbart 10:20 Intermission. 10:40 9 1 . Non-Boltzmann polymer concen­ tration profiles: Cross-stream migration via differential relaxation. T. M. Squires 11:20 92. Intermuscular interactions of prestin. R. M. Raphael Section C BCEC 158 Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Water and Solvent Effects Cosponsored by COMP J. Gao and S. Hammes-Schiffer, Organizers M. E. Tuckerman,

Presiding

8:20 93. Hydrogen bonded fluids: Insight from ab initio simulations and electronic structure calculations. G. Galli 9:00 94. Statistical mechanical and electronic structure definitions of hydrogen bonding in liquid water. J. L Skinner 9:40 95. How quantized hydroxyl vibrations report on classical aqueous environments. P. L. Geissler 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 96. Conical intersection structure and dynamics: Effects of an environment. J. T. Hynes, I. Burghardt 11:00 97. Density functional based molecular dynamics simulation of the aqueous hydroxyl and thiyl radical. M. Sprik, C. Adriaanse, M. Sulpizi, J. VandeVondele 11:20 98. Dissociation of heavy water. M. A. Gomez, L. Fernandez, L. Ndebele 11:40 99. Water addition along with reduc­ tion of aqueous ruthenium complexes by ab initio free energy calculation method for bond breaking/formation coupled to elec­ tron transfer. Y. Tateyama, J. Blumberger, T. Ohno, M. Sprik Section D BCEC 157B Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Understanding Potassium Channels Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL R. D. Coalson and M. Kumikova, Organizers M. Cascio,

Presiding

8:20 100. Computational studies of the K+ channel. B. Roux, V. Jogini 9:00 101. Revealing structural aspects of the voltage sensor with yeast and computers. M. Grabe 9:40 102. Quantum-chemical investigations of ion selectivity mechanisms by K-channels and Valinomycin. S. Varma, S. B. Rempe

10:00 Intermission. 10:15 103. Role of fluctuations in a snug-fit mechanism of KcsA channel selectivity. D. Asthagiri, L. R. Pratt, M. Paulaitis 10:55 104. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of voltage sensor domains. D. J. Tobias 11:35 105. Determination of ion selectivity from the coordination properties of ions. H. Saint-Martin, I. Ortega-Blake, J. Hemandez-Cobos, M. L. SanRomân, M. C. Vargas

Section G

Section Β

BCEC 160C

BCEC 157C

Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Charge Transfer Cosponsored by COMP

Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Computational Methods Cosponsored by BIOL

Section Ε

8:20 119. Getting insight into the electro­ chemical environment from computational models. F. Illas 9:00 120. Molecular-level modeling of proton transport in polymer electrolyte mem­ branes: Transfer, hydration, and diffusion. S. J. Paddison 9:40 121. Using constrained DFT to study electron transfer. Q. Wu, T. Van Voorhis 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 122. Mechanistic analysis of electron transfer at film-modified metal electrodes and computation of associated electronic structure and energtics. M. D. Newton 10:55 123. Charge transfer across metal oxide interfaces. S. Kerisit, K. M. Rosso, M. Dupuis, N. A. Deskins 11:35 124. QM/MM calculation of electron transfer process: Fractional number of electrons approach. X. Zeng, H. Hu, W. Yang

BCEC 159 Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Cosponsored by COLL R. Hernandez, D. Evans, and N. C. Seeman, Organizers A. B. Walker,

Presiding

8:20 106. Models of functional nanostructures. G. C. Schatz 9:00 107. Out-of-equilibrium self-assembly of nanoparticles and nanorods. E. Rabani 9:40 108. Entrapment of metals and C2 inside fullerenes on the shrinking hot giant road: Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations. S. Irle, Z. Wang, B. Y. Finck, G. Zheng, K. Morokuma 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 109. Spectroscopy of low-dimensional materials with tunable behavior. A. P. Shreve, W. E. Buschmann, M. G. Brown, A. M. Dattelbaum, R. C. Rocha, G. A. Montafio, H-L. Wang 11:00 110. Multiphoton nanofabrication, from the bottom up to the top down. J. Fourkas 11:40 111. Aligned single-walled carbon nanotube assemblies for dry adhesives. L Qu, L Dai

Κ. Μ. Rosso,

Organizers

J. Ma, M. R. Diehl, and S. Huo, Organizers

Presiding

Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Oxide-Supported Catalysts Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS

BCEC 160A Excited Electronic States in Chemistry and Biology: Theory and Experiment Protein Environments and Extended Systems T. J . Martinez and S. Matsika,

Organizers

Presiding

8:20 112. Computer simulations of photobiological reactions: Advances and problems. A. Warshel 9:00 113. Radiationless decay and protein structural transitions in Zn(ll)-substituted cytochrome c. W. F. Beck, S. Lampa-Pastirk, K. J. Barns 9:20 114. Direct QM/MM simulations of the excited state dynamics of retinal protonated Schiff base in isolation and complex environments. C. Punwong, J. M. Owens, T. J. Martinez 9:40 Intermission. 9:50 115. Excited state, proton transfer and solvation dynamics in green fluorescent protein (GFP). S. G. Boxer 10:30 116. Computational modeling and design of fluorescent dyes for bioimaging. D. J. Yaron, V. Ediz, J. L. Lee, G. L. Suva, B. A. Armitage 10:50 117. Exciton-bath modeling and com­ putation of the energy transfer dynamics in bacterial light harvesting complex 2. S. Jang 11:10 118. Computational design and char­ acterization of a biomimetic photochemical switch. M. Olivucci

J. W a n g ,

Presiding

1:20 131. Spring and things: Exploring Nature's approach to building robust motors and machines. C. L. Brooks III 2:00 132. Macromolecular associations. Β. Μ. Pettitt 2:40 133. Modeling the allostery transition of protein molecules: A double-well network model (DWNM). J-W. Chu, G. A. Voth 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 134. Dynamics of large conformational changes in biomolecular recognition. J. Wang, Q. Lu, H. P. Lu 4:00 135. Mapping multidimensional free energy surfaces in biomolecular simula­ tions. W.Yang Section C BCEC 158 Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Nuclear Quantum Dynamics Cosponsored by COMP

Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Liquid Surfaces Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS

J. Gao and S. Hammes-Schiffer, Organizers

MONDAY AFTERNOON

V. Batista,

Section A BCEC 157A

Section F

M. Elstner,

M. Dupuis and D. G. Truhlar,

Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Motor Proteins Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW X. Zhuang and H. Y a n g , P. Selvin, Organizer,

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 125. Organelle transport: Moving on moving tracks. V. I. Gelfand, H. Kim, A. E. X. Brown, C. Kural, P. R. Selvin, P. C. Nelson, I. M. Kulic 2:00 126. Regulation of the cell's dynamic city plan and the myosin family of molecu­ lar motors. J. A. Spudich 2:40 127. The length of the neck-linker determines the step size of kinesin. A. Yildiz, M. Tomishige, R. D. Vale 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 128. Kinesin waiting for ATP. E. Toprak, S. S. Rosenfeld, P. Selvin 4:00 129. Generating function methods in single molecule spectroscopy. F. L. H. Brown 4:40 130. Two distinct modes of processive kinesin movement in mixtures of ATP and AMP-PNP. R. Subramanian, J. Gelles

Presiding

1:20 136. Quantum molecular dynamics and quantum statistics: Imaginary and real time treatments. P-N. Roy, N. Blinov, B. Issack 2:00 137. Adapting statistical mechanical methods for enhanced sampling to the dynamical path-integral problem. M. E. Tuckerman 2:40 138. Application of path integral meth­ ods to kinetic isotope effects employing Feynman-Kleinert variational perturbation theory and free energy simulations. K-Y. Wong, D. T. Major, J. Gao 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 139. Quantized Hamilton dynamics. O. V. Prezhdo 4:00 140. Electron-proton correlation effects in the nuclear-electronic orbital approach. A. Chakraborty, S. Hammes-Schiffer 4:20 141. Vibrational action spectroscopy of clusters through dynamics averaging: An ab initio dynamical perspective. S. S. Iyengar 4:40 142. Vibrational relaxation of a solvated hydrogen-bonded complex via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville method. G. Hanna, E. Geva Section D BCEC 157B Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Ion Channel Membrane Interaction Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL R. D. Coalson and M. Kumikova, Organizers S. Sukharev,

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Presiding

1:20 143. Partitioning of charged amino acids in a lipid bilayer. D. P. Tieleman, W. D. Bennett, J. L. MacCallum 2:00 144. Lipid bilayers as allosteric regula­ tors of membrane protein function. 0 . S. Andersen 2:40 145. Charged protein side chain move­ ment in membranes with implications for voltage gated ion channels. L. Li, 1. Vorobyov, S. Dorairaj, T. W. Allen

PHYS 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 146. Structure of a protein ion channel in tethered bilayer membranes and electronic measurements of single molecules with solitary nanopores. J. J. Kasianowicz, J. Robertson, V. M. Stanford, D. J. McGillivray, G. Valincius, F. Heinrich, D. J. Vanderah, W. Febo-Ayala, I. Ignatiev, M. Lôsche 4:00 147. Interactions of ion channels with lipids: MD simulation studies. M. S. P. Sansom 4:40 148. Membrane permeabilization by cationic amphipathic peptides. I. V. Polozov Section Ε BCEC 159 Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Cosponsored by COLL R. Hernandez, D. Evans, and N. C. Seeman, Organizers A. P. Shreve,

Presiding

1:20 149. Soft colloidal assemblies: Overpacked crystals and glasses. L. A. Lyon, A. N. St. John, Z. Meng, V. Breedveld, J. K. Cho 2:00 150. Structure-property relationships in organic electrets. G. M. Whitesides 2:40 151. From nonmesomorphic nature to liquid crystallinity via halogen bonding. G. Resnati, P. Metrangolo, D. W. Bruce, G. Terraneo 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 152. Emergence of order in nanopar­ ticle assemblies by exploiting building block anisotropy. S. C. Glotzer 4:00 153. Cooperative effects in molecular conduction. A. Nitzan, A. Landau 4:40 154. Coarse grained modeling of HIV-1 capsid proteins and their self assembly. V. Krishna, Z. Zhang, G. A. Voth

2:00 162. Computational nanomaterials design: Recent progress in fuel cell research. H. Kasai, T. Roman, W. A. Dino, E. S. Dy, M. Tsuda 2:40 163. Proton transfer in Nation: Firstprinciples molecular dynamics study. Y-K. Choe, E. Tsuchida, T. Ikeshoji, S. Yamakawa, S-A. Hyodo 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 164. Molecular dynamics simulation of excess proton solvation and transport in polymer electrolyte membranes. G. A. Voth 3:55 165. Nanostructure of Nation mem­ brane and dynamics of small molecules at low hydration. R. Devanathan, A. Venkatnathan, V-A. Glezakou, M. Dupuis 4:35 166. Connect microscopic mechanisms to macroscopic charge-defect transport kinetics via population correlation func­ tions. M. E. Tuckerman Computational Science & Engineering Advances Supported by NSF Resource Engineering Sciences Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Industrial Applications Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS

D. G. Truhlar,

Organizer

M. Dupuis, Organizer,

Presiding

1:20 161. Atomistic simulation of molecular transport, adsorption and growth at min­ eral surfaces. S. C. Parker, J. P. Allen, C. Arrouvel, S. Kerisit, D. Spagnoli, W. Gren

BCEC 158

W . C. Swope,

11:00 187. Mechanosensitive ion channels: Where the stress meets the strain. F. Sachs 11:40 188. Dynamic modeling of ion channel gating. R. J. Mashl, E. Jakobsson Section Ε BCEC 159 Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Bioassemblies, Biomaterials and Microfluidics Cosponsored by COLL D. Evans and N. C. Seeman, R. Hernandez, Organizer,

Organizers

Presiding

8:20 189. Emergence of an active choles­ terol state in binary and ternary lipid mix­ tures. M. Ratajczak, C. Ko, J. Majewski, K. Kjaer, Y. Lange, T. Steck, K. Y. C. Lee 9:00 190. Rupture, spreading, and healing of 2-D fluid lipid bilayers at structured sur­ faces. Β. Sanii, A. M. Smith, A. W. Szmodis, A. N. Parikh 9:40 191. UV-Photodetection based on highly organized 1-D nanostructures of arylene ethynylene marocycles and fullerene. K. Balakrishnan, A. Datar, J. S. Moore, L. Zang 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 192. Making viruses. W. M. Gelbart 11:00 193. Renormalization group approach to multiscale modeling in materials sci­ ence. N. Goldenfeld, B. P. Athreya, J. A. Dantzig 11:40 194. Kinetics and structural fluctua­ tions of the ribosome. U. Mohanty Section F

G. A. Voth,

Organizer

Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS

Section A

Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Transport Cosponsored by COM Ρ

8:20 172. Electron tomographic analysis of inner ear hair cells. M. Auer 9:00 173. The active process and spontane­ ous oscillations in hair cells of the inner ear. D. Bozovic 9:40 174. Unfolding thermodynamics of a three domain fragment of Von Willebrand Factor. M. Auton 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 175. Channel-facilitated molecular transport across membranes: Attraction, repulsion and asymmetry. A. B. Kolomeisky 10:55 176. Probing gene expression in single live cells, one molecule at a time. J. Xiao, J. Yu, X. S. Xie

Sci-Mix

TUESDAY MORNING

BCEC 160C

Presiding

J. Gao and S. Hammes-Schiffer, Organizers

Presiding

Section G

A. B. Kolomeisky,

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Advanced Materials for Conversions and Separations in Energy Applications

1:20 155. Spectroscopy and dynamics of tryptamine, serotonin, and crown ether complexes with water. J. R. Clarkson, V. A. Shubert, T. LeGreve, T. S. Zwier 2:00 156. Exploring energy landscapes with explicit and implicit water. D. J. Wales 2:40 157. Sequential bond energies of water to sodiated amino acids. P. B. Armentrout, S. J. Ye, R. M. Moision 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 158. Hydration of small biomolecules: Structure, structural change and selectivity J. P. Simons 4:00 159. Microsolvation of biomolecular building blocks. M. S. de Vries 4:40 160. Aqueous solutions of amino acids from structural motifs to large assemblies. G. Martyna

J. Ma, M. R. Diehl, and S. Huo, Organizers

Section A

Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solution Biomolecule—Water Clusters

D. W. Pratt,

Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Dynamics at Multiple Resolution Cosponsored by BIOL

Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Electronic Structure Theories Cosponsored by COMP

M O N D A Y EVENING

BCEC 160A

D. M. Neumark and K. D. Jordan, Organizers

BCEC 157C

Section C Undergraduate Research Poster Session Physical Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by PHYS and SOCED

8:00-10:00 345, 376, 385, 401, 413, 443, 446, 462, 471, 474, 481, 483, 485, 491, 503, 506, 508, 575, 633, 636, 640, 647, 653. See subse­ quent listings.

Section F

Section Β

BCEC 157A Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Novel Imaging Methods Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW X. Zhuang, H. Yang, and P. Selvin, Organizers S. W. Hell,

Presiding

8:20 177. Electronic structure theory of molecular complexes, clusters, liquids and solids. M. P. Head-Gordon 9:00 178. Accurate density functionals for molecules and solids: The role of nonlocal exact exchange. G. E. Scuseria 9:40 179. Merging high-level coupled cluster methods with classical molecular dynam­ ics simulations for accurate calculations of thermally averaged ground and excited state properties in large chemical systems. M. Valiev, K. Kowalski 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 180. Molecular dynamics simulations using periodic QM/MM with conducting boundary conditions to study chemically reacting systems with classical explicit treatment of solvent. J. E. Rice, W. C. Swope, H. W. Horn 11:00 181. The Mod-QM/MM methodology. J. A. Gascon, S. S. F. Leung, E. R. Batista, V. S. Batista 11:40 182. BLW-DFT: An efficient ab initio valence bond (VB) method at the density functional theory (DFT) level. Y. Mo

Section D

Presiding

8:20 167. Anomalous molecular mobility: "Lipid rafts" vs. "protein rafts". W. W. Webb 9:00 736. Lens-based Fluorescence Nanoscopy. S. W. Hell 9:40 168. Sub-diffraction-limit imaging by stochastic optical reconstruction micros­ copy. B. Huang, M. Bates, G. Dempsey, X. Zhuang 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 169. Single-molecule and singlenanoparticle spectroscopy. M. Orrit 11:00 170. Mapping molecular landscapes inside cells by cryoelectron tomography. W. Baumeister 11:40 171. High-resolution near-field optical imaging of a freestanding biological mem­ brane under physiological conditions. N. Neuberth, M. Hermann, J. Wissler, D. Gradl, A. Naber

BCEC 157B Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Gating Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL R. D. Coalson and M. Kumikova, Organizers E. Jakobsson,

Presiding

8:20 183. From sensing input signals to controlling output function: Voltage-gated membrane proteins. E. Isacoff 9:00 184. Gating mechanism of the bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscS. S. Sukharev, B. Akitake, A. Anishkin 9:40 185. Reversible gating of the ATPsensitive potassium channel. K-H. Choi, M. Tantama, S. Licht 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 186. Gating ion channels: Monte Carlo normal mode following. P. C. Jordan, G. V. Miloshevsky

BCEC 160A Excited Electronic States in Chemistry and Biology: Theory and Experiment Gas and Liquid Environments T. J. Martinez and S. Matsika, V. Batista,

Organizers

Presiding

8:20 195. Spectra of strongly coupled elec­ tronic states. M. S. Schuurman, D. R. Yarkony 9:00 196. Non-linear conjugate gradient method for excited states: An initial step toward an efficient linear scaling solver for the RPA equations. M. J. Lucero, A. M. N. Niklasson, M. Challacombe 9:20 197. Ab initio molecular dynamics of photoisomerization in cis-stilbene. B. G. Levine, T. J. Martinez 9:40 Intermission. 10:00 198. Electronic structure of ionized noncovalent dimers. A. I. Krylov 10:40 199. Nonadiabatic photodissociation dynamics of BrCH2CI and BrCH2C(0)CI including spin-orbit effects. R. Valero, D. G. Truhlar 11:00 200. New high-level coupled-cluster theories for modeling excited-state ener­ gies of biologically relevant systems. K. Kowalski, M. Valiev, J. R. Hammond 11:20 201. Excited state chemical bonding and spectroscopy of inert metals and noble gases. J. Determan, P. Sinha, M. A. Omary, A. K. Wilson 11:40 202. Identifying different types of the electronic degeneracies: The case of ethylene and its heteroatom derivatives. S. Zilberg, Y. Haas, B. Dick

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-113

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

PHYS

Section G

Section Β

BCEC 160C

BCEC 157C

Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Materials and Processes Cosponsored by COMP

Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Computational Methods Cosponsored by BIOL

M. Dupuis and D. G. Truhlar, J. T. Muckerman,

Organizers

Presiding

8:20 203. Bridging the gap between nanoparticles and extended surfaces in electro­ chemistry. T. Jacob, M. Scheffler, T. E. Madey 9:00 204. Parameter free simulation of oxygen vacancies diffusion in yttrium stabilized zirconia. A. Curioni, C. Pignedoli, W. Andreoni 9:40 205. Time-domain ab initio studies of photoinduced electron transfer in the dye-sensitized semiconductor solar cell. O. V. Prezhdo, W. R. Duncan 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 206. Oxygen activation at metal and metal oxide surfaces. W. F. Schneider, R. B. Getman, H. Wang 10:55 207. Non situ studies of the oxygen reduction reaction. J. W. Medlin, M. P. Hyman 11:35 208. Modeling electrochemistry with analytic density functional theory. B. I. Dunlap Frank H. Field and Joe L. Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry in Honor of Jean H. Futrell Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by PHYS Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Biological Interface Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 157A Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Biomacromolecule Dynamics Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW X. Zhuang, H. Yang, and P. Selvin, Organizers J. M. Fernandez,

Presiding

1:20 209. Folding and activity of junctioncontaining RNA species. D. M. Lilley 2:00 210. Probing chemical reactions with force, one bond at a time. J. M. Fernandez 2:40 211. Single molecule folding studies of the neurospora VS ribozyme identify the catalytically active global fold. N. G. Walter, M. J. B. Pereira, E. N. Nikolova 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 212. Traversing the RNA folding land­ scape. D. Herschlag 4:00 213. Computational microscopy merg­ ing crystallographic and electron micro­ scope images. K. Schulten, A. Arkhipov, P. Freddolino, L. Trabuco, E. Villa, J. M. Hogle, D. Belnap, K. Namba, J. Frank 4:40 214. Intrinsic motions along an enzy­ matic reaction trajectory. M. Wunderlich, V. Thai, K. Henzler-Wildman, M. Lei, G. A. Petsko, M. Karplus, D. Kern, C. G. Hiibner 5:00 215. Single-molecule conformational dynamics of E. coli adenylate kinase. J. A. Hanson, K. Duderstadt, L Watkins, S. Bhattacharyya, H. Yang

114-TECH

M. R. Diehl and S. Huo, J . Ma, Organizer,

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 216. Prediction of protein structure and function on a proteomic scale. J. Skolnick 2:00 217. Protein-protein docking algorithm development and testing. Z. Weng 2:40 218. Structural and dynamic aspects of biomolecular self-assembly and solvation. A. Luzar 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 219. Dramatic changes in protein struc­ ture during evolution. N. V. Grishin 3:55 220. Identifying biologically relevant interfaces in protein crystals. Q. Xu, A. Canutescu, M. Shapovalov, R. Dunbrack Jr. Section C BCEC 158 Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Materials and Surfaces Cosponsored by COMP J. Gao and S. Hammes-Schiffer, Organizers O. V. Prezhdo,

Presiding

1:20 221. Study of silica-water interactions on mineral surfaces. S. Nangia, B. J. Garrison 2:00 222. Proton transfer along ordered water chains inside carbon nanotubes. G. Hummer, S. A. Hassan, Y. S. Lee, C. Dellago 2:40 223. Monte Carlo simulation of cluster nucleation using quantum mechanical potentials. L D. Crosby, T. L. Windus, S. M. Kathman 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 224. Quantum-based simulations of the response of materials to extreme condi­ tions. E. A. Carter 4:00 225. QM/QM electronic embedding for electronic structure studies of surface chemistry. H. P. Hratchian, P. Parandekar, K. Raghavachari, T. Vreven, M. J. Frisch 4:20 226. Quantum drude oscillator models: Using Feynman path integrals to develop accurate force fields for biophysical simu­ lation. G. Martyna 4:40 227. Understanding framework for molecular simulations with classical and quantum nuclei: Anharmonicity, tempera­ ture, normal modes, and rotation. L-F. Yuan, R. Car Section D BCEC 157B Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Ligand Gated Ion Channels Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL R. D. Coalson and M. Kurnikova, Organizers M. Mayer,

3:40 Intermission. 4:00 231. Glutamate receptor structure and function. D. R. Madden, A. Birdsey, A. Gill, C. Midgett 4:40 232. The 5-HT 3 receptor: Relating structure to function in a typical Cys-loop receptor. S. C. R. Lummis 5:20 233. Blocking and resistance mecha­ nism in M2 channel from influenza A virus explored by molecular dynamics. E. Khurana, S. Vemparala, M. Dal Peraro, R. DeVane, W. F. DeGrado, M. L Klein

BCEC 160C Computational Electrochemistry for New Energy Biological Applications Cosponsored by COMP D. G. Truhlar,

Organizer

M. Dupuis, Organizer,

Presiding

Section Ε BCEC 159 Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Bioassemblies, Biomaterials and Microfluidics Cosponsored by COLL R. Hernandez and D. Evans, N. C. S e e m a n , Organizer,

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 234. Self-replication with colloids. P. M. Chaikin, D. G. Grier, D. J. Pine, R. Dreyfus, R. Sha, J. C. Crocker, N. C. Seeman 2:00 235. Colloidal crystallization, kinetics and interactions due to DNA hybridization. J. C. Crocker, A. J. Kim, P. Biancaniello, R. Scarlett, T. R. Sinno 2:40 236. Synthesis of crystals with a pro­ grammable kinetic barrier to nucleation. R. Schulman, E. Winfree 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 237. Directed assembly of functionalized patchy particles. D. J. Pine, D. R. Breed, V. N. Manoharan, M. T. Elsesser, A. D. Hollingsworth 4:00 238. Algorithmic self-assembly of DNA. E. Winfree 4:40 239. Toward large-scale integrated nucleic acid logic circuits. G. Seelig, D. Soloveichik, D. Y. Zhang, E. Winfree

BCEC 160A Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solution Ions in Water D. M. Neumark and K. D. Jordan, Organizers F. W a n g ,

1:20 246. Simulation of macromolecular proton transfer equilibria with Q-HOP molecular dynamics. V. Helms, W. Gu, T. Frigato, E. Herzog, C. R. D. Lancaster 2:00 247. Computational bioelectrochemistry for cytochrome-electrode interfaces. K. M. Rosso, S. Kerisit, M. Valiev, D. M. A. Smith, N. A. Deskins, S. V. Yanina, N. S. Wigginton, T. P. Straatsma, M. Dupuis 2:40 248. Computation of Franck-Condon factors for intra-protein electron transfer reactions: Benchmark calculations on Ru(His33)(bpy)2im modified cytochrome c. J. Blumberger 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 249. Theoretical investigation of the reduction of flavins and the effect of sub­ stitutions on the isoalloxazine ring. S. Bhattacharyay, S. Hati, M. T. Stankovich, J. Gao, D. G. Truhlar 3:55 250. QM/MM analysis of reduction in flavoenzymes. J . Yu, Q. Cui 4:15 251. Computational studies of oxygen reduction by cofacial porphyrins. R. P. Muller, D. Ingersoll 4:35 Concluding Remarks. Computational Science & Engineering Advances Supported by NSF Resource Molecular Sciences Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Nanoparticle Catalysts Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS

Section F

Presiding

1:20 240. Solutes in aqueous nanodrops and at the aqueous surface. M. J. Shultz, M. Kuo, N. Kamelamela 2:00 241. Development of a transferable interaction potential for water from first principles: Extension of the TTM potential (version 3.0) to describe the vibrational spectra of water clusters and the liquid. S. S. Xantheas, G. S. Fanourgakis 2:40 242. Interaction of water with extended anionic charge distributions. J. M. Weber, H. Schneider, K. M. Vogelhuber 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 243. Time-resolved study of solvent induced recombination in photodissociated dihalides. W. C. Lineberger, R. Parson 4:00 244. Proton puzzles: Unraveling spec­ tral signatures of ion/water interactions. A. B. McCoy 4:40 245. Entropie and kinetic effects in M + (H 2 0) n Ar cluster formation: An experi­ mental and theoretical investigation. D. J. Miller, A. L. Nicely, J. M. Lisy

Presiding

2:00 228. Overexpression and functional characterization of a mutated form of the extracellular domain of human glycine a1 subunit. M. Cascio 2:40 229. Glycine receptor transmembrane domain: Structures, channel potentiation mechanism and ion permeation kinetics. M. H. Cheng, M. Cascio, R. D. Coalson 3:20 230. Finding prokaryotic ion channels. G. Rendon, J. Tilson, M-F. Ger, E.Jakobsson

Section G

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Frank H. Field and Joe L. Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry in Honor of Jean H. Futrell Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by PHYS Molecular Imaging Visualization of Biological Processes at the Molecular Level Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, PHYS, and BIOHW WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 157A Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Imaging of Live Tissue, Cells, and Organelles Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW X. Zhuang, H. Y a n g , and P. Selvin, Organizers X. S. Xie,

Presiding

8:20 252. Imaging adaptive immune responses in mammals. U. von Andrian 9:00 253. Localization in vivo enhancement (LIVE): A single molecule approach for probing biochemistry in living cells. X. S. Xie 9:40 254. Microtubule motor proteins studied in vivo and in vitro with high time resolu­ tion and spatial precision. P. A. Sims, X. Nan, X. S. Xie 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 255. Modeling gene expression using single transcript analysis. R. H. Singer, D. Zenklusen, D. Larson, X. Darzacq, Y. Shav-Tal, S. Burke, S. Shenoy 11:00 256. Femtoliter-volume aqueous droplets as single-molecule reaction con­ tainers. D. T. Chiu

PHYS

Section Β BCEC 157C Structurai Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Computational Methods Cosponsored by BIOL J. Ma, M. R. Diehl, and S. Huo, Organizers

10:20 271. AMPA receptors: From chemical interactions to function. V. Jayaraman, K. Mankiewicz, J. Gonzalez, A. Rambhadran 11:00 272. Ligand binding and conforma­ tional reorganization in the ligand binding domain of the glutamate receptor. T. Mamonova, K. Speranskiy, M. Kurnikova 11:40 273. Optical-patch clamping: A new approach for imaging single ion channel activity. A. Demuro

Presiding

8:20 257. Biomolecular systems dynamics and allostery: Insights from network mod­ els. C. Chennubhotla, E. Eyal, I. Bahar 9:00 258. Study of mechanosensation of membrane proteins using simplified mod­ els. J. Yoo, Y. Tang, X. Chen, Q. Cui 9:40 259. Protein dynamics in crystallographic data and coarse-grained normal mode analysis. D. A. Kondrashov, A. W. Van Wynsberghe, E. J. Levin, R. M. Bannen, E. Bitto, R. Aranda, J. G. McCoy, Q. Cui, G. N. Phillips Jr. 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 260. Validation of MD simulations using NMR data as benchmarks. S. Showalter, R. Bruschweiler 11:00 261. Use of an ensemble of structures in X-ray crystallographic analysis. G. N. Phillips Jr., E. J. Levin, D. A. Kondrashov, G. E. Wesenberg Section C BCEC 158 Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? QM/MM Methods and Applications Cosponsored by COMP J. G a o and S. Hammes-Schiffer, Organizers W. Yang,

Presiding

8:20 262. Mixed QM/MM methods based on high resolution protein structure prediction and ab initio quantum chemistry: Method­ ology and applications. R. Friesner 9:00 263. QM/MM simulations of organic and enzymatic reactions. W. L. Jorgensen 9:40 264. Ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation of enzyme catalysis in histone lysine methylation. Y. Zhang, S. Wang, P. Hu 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 265. Hydrolysis of formamide and the proficiency of amidohydrolases: The bur­ den borne by kW. K. M. Merz Jr. 11:00 266. A quantum picture of hemoglobin affinity. V. Guallar, R. Alcantara 11:40 267. How important is sampling in spectroscopic characterizations of metalloenzymes using QM/MM simulations? S. Yang, D. Riccardi, N. Ghosh, Q. Cui Section D BCEC 157B Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Ligand Gated Ion Channels Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL R. D. Coalson,

Organizer

M. Kurnikova, Organizer,

Presiding

8:20 268. Use of ESR spectroscopic rulers to understand ligand gated ion channel function. S. Saxena, K. Stone, Z. Yang, M. Cascio 9:00 269. Transition state analysis of acetyl­ choline receptor channel gating. A. L. Auerbach 9:40 270. Barriers to ion translocation in cationic and anionic receptors from the Cys-loop family. I. Ivanov, X. Cheng, S. M. Sine, J. A. McCammon 10:00 Intermission.

Current Techniques in Molecular Simulation of Biological Systems Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS and BIOHW Electronic Structure Modeling of Heterogeneous Catalysis Electrochemical Reactions Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS

Section Ε Q. Cui,

11:40 288. Rational design of conjugated organic chrbmophores for two-photon absorption and bioimaging: One-photon and two-photon spectroscopy. N. N. Siegel, A. J. Zucchero, J. N. Wilson, U. H. F. Bunz, S. Sarojini Amma, Y. Wu, C. J. Fahmi, M. Rumi, J. W. Perry

BCEC 159 Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solution Ions in Water

Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Ice Surface Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS

D. M. Neumark and K. D. Jordan, Organizers

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

J. M. Lisy,

Section A

Presiding

8:00 274. Dynamically averaged vibrational spectroscopy in protonated and hydroxide water clusters: Insights from ab initio molecular dynamics. S. S. Iyengar 8:20 275. Effects of hydration on the disso­ ciation and ionization chemistry of liquid H 2 0 . C. G. Elles, R. A. Crowell, C. A. Rivera, P. Jungwirth, S. E. Bradforth 9:00 276. New insights into the hydration of aqueous ions from X-ray absorption spec­ troscopy of liquid microjets. R. J. Saykally, C. D. Cappa, C. P. Schwartz, J. D. Smith, B. M. Messer 9:40 Intermission. 10:00 277. Accessing charge transfer states in van der Waals clusters. C. C. Jarrold, C. S. Parmenter, C. Kang 10:20 278. Ions at surfaces of hydrated proteins and other interfaces. P. Jungwirth 11:00 279. Probing stepwise ion solvation by gas phase vibrational spectroscopy. K. R. Asmis 11:40 280. Ultrafast vibrational dynamics of asymmetric proton interfaces in solution. P. B. Petersen, S. T. Roberts, M. W. Kanan, E. R. Young, R. A. Nicodemus, K. Ramasesha, D. G. Nocera, A. Tokmakoff Section F BCEC 160A Excited Electronic States in Chemistry and Biology: Theory and Experiment Protein Environments and Extended Systems S. Matsika,

Organizer

T. J. Martinez, Organizer,

Presiding

8:20 281. Studying the photochemistry of retinal proteins with QM/MM methods. M. Elstner 9:00 282. Excited state CASSCF/forcefield dynamics computations on systems of biological interest. G. Groenhof, L V. Schaefer, H. Grubmueller, M. Boggio-Pasqua, M. A. Robb 9:20 283. Calculation of excited states with ONIOM(QM:QM) methods. T. Vreven, M. J. Bearpark, M. J. Frisch 9:40 Intermission. 10:00 284. Ultrafast exciton dissociation in semiconducting polymers: Non-adiabatic quantum dynamics based upon a hierar­ chical electron-phonon model. I. Burghardt, E. R. Bittner, H. Tamura 10:40 285. Exciton diffusion in nanotubes. K. Schuiten, A. Rajan, M. S. Strano 11:00 286. Electron stimulated desorption and dissociation of thin water films adsorbed on T i 0 2 (110). N. G. Petrik, C. D. Lane, T. Orlando, G. A. Kimmel 11:20 287. Charge transfer and carrier mobility in OPV materials examined with ultrafast multidimensional infrared spec­ troscopy. J. B. Asbury, L. W. Barbour, M. Hegadorn, R. D. Pensack

BCEC 157A Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems Nucleic Acid-Protein Interaction Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW H. Y a n g and P. Selvin, X. Zhuang, Organizer,

Organizers Presiding

1:20 289. Under the hood of the replisome: A single-molecule view of DNA replication. A. M. van Oijen 2:00 290. Visualization and analysis of protein-DNA complexes at the singlemolecule level. S. C. Kowalczykowski 2:40 291. Real-time observation of RecA filament nucleation and dynamics. C. Joo, S. Mckinney, I. Cisse, B. Okumus, M. Nakamura, I. Rasnik, S. Myong, T. Ha 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 292. Discrimination between nucleic acid substrates by HIV reverse transcrip­ tase. E. A. Abbondanzieri, S. Liu, G. E. Bokinsky, J. Zhang, S. Le Grice, X. Zhuang 4:00 293. Single-molecule analysis of tran­ scription. R. H. Ebright, S. Weiss, A. Kapanidis, E. Margeat, S. On Ho, E. Kortkhonjia, Y. Wang, D. Wang 4:40 294. Engineered Holliday junctions as single-molecule reporters for protein-DNA interactions. P. Chen Section Β BCEC 157C Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecular Complexes Computational Methods Cosponsored by BIOL J . M a and M. R. Diehl, S. Huo, Organizer,

Section C BCEC 158 Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics: Can One Avoid the Other? Free Energies and Sampling Cosponsored by COMP J. G a o and S. Hammes-Schiffer, Organizers Y. Zhang,

Presiding

1:20 300. Techniques for free energies estimation using ab initio QM/MM meth­ ods. B. R. Brooks, H. L Woodcock III, W. Zheng 2:00 3 0 1 . Free energies of chemical reac­ tions in enzyme and in solution. H. Hu, W. Yang 2:40 302. Sampling enhanced quantum mechanical potential based free energy simulations. H. Li, W. Yang 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 303. Using statistical mechanics with quantum mechanics for enzymes and nanoparticles. D. G. Truhlar, D. Bhatt, A. Dybala-Defratyka, J. Gao, M. Garcia-Viloca, Z. H. Li, P. Paneth, J. Pu, J. I. Siepmann 4:00 304. Consistent and effective sampling in ab initio QM/MM simulations. A. Warshel 4:40 305. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of nucleophilic attack of hydroxide on C 0 2 and manganese porphyrin hydration. K. Leung, Ι. Μ. Β. Nielsen, I. Kurtz, C. J. Medforth Section D BCEC 157B Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Bioassemblies, Biomaterials and Microfluidics Cosponsored by COLL R. Hernandez, D. Evans, and N. C. S e e m a n , Organizers A. J . Liu,

Presiding

1:20 306. Understanding dynamics of com­ plex networks using microfluidics. R. F. Ismagilov, C. Kastrup, E. Lucchetta, M. Runyon, F. Shen 2:00 307. DNA origami: Folding DNA to create nanoscale shapes and patterns. P. W. K. Rothemund 2:40 308. Floppy modes and nonaffine deformations in biopolymer networks. E. Frey 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 309. Precision mixing and matching of fluids with microfluidics. D. A. Weitz 4:00 310. Emergence of motility in selfassembled actin networks. A. J . Liu, K-C. Lee 4:40 3 1 1 . Symmetry code for tRNA. D. Gurel, O. Gurel

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 295. Theoretical dtudies of pressure effects on folding/unfolding of proteins and nuclei acids. A. E. Garcia, R. Day, D. Paschek 2:00 296. Atomistic and reduced models of protein folding and aggregation. J. E. Straub 2:40 297. On the effect of force on biomo­ lecular conformational kinetics. I. Andricioaei 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 298. Modeling Alzheimer amyloid con­ formations and toxicity. R. Nussinov, H. Jang, J. Zheng, B. Ma 4:00 299. Destruction of long-range interac­ tions by a single mutation in protein lysozyme. R. Zhou

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-115

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

PHYS

Liquid Surfaces Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS

Section Ε BCEC 159

W E D N E S D A Y EVENING

Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solution Ions in Water D. M. Neumark and K. D. Jordan, Organizers C. C. Jarrold,

Section F BCEC 160A Excited Electronic States in Chemistry and Biology: Theory and Experiment DNA and RNA Bases T. J . Martinez and S. Matsika,

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 318. Electronic spectroscopy for confor­ mational identification of biologically related species. W. Kong, L. Pei, J. Zhang 2:00 319. Molecular basis of the photostability and photoinduced reactivity in biomolecules. M. Merchân 2:40 Intermission. 2:50 320. Observing ultrafast dynamics in gas-phase biomolecules: On the photostability of Adenine. S. Ullrich, N. Evans, B. Potter, H. Satzger, M. Z. Zgierski, A. Stolow 3:30 321. Ultrafast dynamics of flavins and flavoproteins. D. Zhong 4:10 322. Ultrafast photophysics of DNA bases in solution: Motion to the conical intersection captured by 30 fs dispersed pump-probe spectroscopy. A. Jailaubekov, C. Chester, S. E. Bradforth 4:30 323. Radiationless decay of pyrimidine bases in the gas phase and in water. H. Hudock, A. Virshup, T. J. Martinez Advanced Materials for Conversions and Separations in Energy Applications Separations and Catalysis Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS Computational Science & Engineering Advances Supported by NSF Resource General Sciences Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

116-TECH

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Physical Chemistry Poster Session Experiment: Spectroscopy and Imaging, Interfaces, Condensed Matter, Kinetics

Presiding

1:20 312. Hydration of anions, cations, and lipids at air-aqueous interfaces. H. C. Allen, G. Ma, M. Xu 2:00 313. Caught in action: Observation of hydrolysis reactions in hydrated multiply charged anions, [Α] χ -(Η 2 0) η ->[ΗΑ] ( χ - 1 '( H 2 0 ) n - i O H - L-S.Wang 2:40 314. Vibrational dynamics revealed through isotopic substitution of the H 5 0 2 + complex. L. R. McCunn, J. R. Roscioli, M. A. Johnson 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 315. Infrared spectroscopy of cationwater networks. M. A. Duncan 4:00 316. Adsorption, uptake and dissolution of HF in amorphous solid water: Ionic dissociation in cryogenic solutions of a weak acid. P. Ayotte 4:40 317. Hydration effects on water reorien­ tation and ionic charge transfer. J. T. Hynes, D. Laage, S. Re, S. G. Ramesh

R. J. Stanley,

Section A

G. A. Voth,

Organizer

7:00-9:00 324. Synthesis and ultrafast chelation dynamics of organomanganese and organochromium complexes. T. T. To, C. B. Duke III, T. J. Burkey, E. J. Heilweil 325. A new batch chemical oscillator: The bromate-bromide-sulfuric acid system. G. A. Frerichs, C. L. Park, D. J. Shaughnessy, R. C. Thompson 326. Absorption behavior of electrospun polyurethane fibers. E. Scholten, L Bromberg, G. C. Rutledge, T. A. Hatton 327. Analysis of critical index constant in percolation theory via flammability studies of partially fluorinated hydrocarbons. R. Rodgers, A. Miller, C. Blaszkowski, I.Kul 328. Aqueous macromolecular adsorption on ordered mesoporous silica. W. Xing, W. Si 329. Charge transfer through peptide nucleic acid films. A. Paul, D. Waldeck, R. M. Watson, P. Lund, C. Achim 330. Withdrawn. 331. CS radical detection during the HFCVD of diamond thin film deposition by CRDS. V. Makarov, M. Buzaianu, B. R. Weiner, G. Morell 332. Cu(ll)-Cu(ll) ESR spectroscopic ruler. Z. Yang, J. Becker, S. Saxena 333. Cyclotrimerization of acetylene to benzene on a Au-Pd surface. Κ. Κ. Gath, D. Kumar, C-W. Yi, M-S. Chen, D. Goodman 334. Dissociative photodetachment of methyl peroxide anion. K. E. Kautzman, P. E. Crider II, D. M. Neumark 335. Domain registration in planar polymer tether bilayers of asymmetric composition. S. Garg, J. Ruehe, K. Luedtke, R. Jordan, C. A. Naumann 336. Withdrawn. 337. Energy transfer pathways for N 0 2 + rare gas aggregates in helium nanodroplets. A. Zadorozhnyy, C. M. Nemirow, C. Wittig 338. Exfoliation of clays in polystyrene by supercritical carbon dioxide assisted pro­ cessing. R. T. Schneider, R. Ozisik, R. W. Siegel 339. Fluorescence enhancement of Europium complex by binding to silver nanoparticles. W. Yuehui, W. Ting, Z. Ji 340. FTIR microspectroscopy and theoretical calculation of RDX in soil and clay miner­ als. N. M. Hernandez, N. Mina, . Y. M. Colon 341. Heterogeneous asymmetric aziridination of styrene using Cu2+ exchanged zeolite Y. G. J. Hutchings, L Jeffs, D. Bethell, D. Arquier 342. Heterogeneous asymmetric hydrogénation of C=C bonds. D. J. Watson, R. B. R. John-Jesudason, A. I. Mcintosh, D. C. Madden, J. W. Burton, R. M. Lambert 343. Host-guest complexation of tethered dyes with cucurbit[7]uril in solution and on glass substrates. R. L. Halterman, J. L Moore, K. A. Woodson, L. M. Mannel, J. W. Colson, A. R. Miller, W. T. Yip 344. Hydrolysis of ruthenium (III) complexes. T. R. Brewer, P. K. Nangunuri 345. Hyperpolarized 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of molecularly organized nanostructural materials. L-Q. Wang, S. Pawsey, I. Moudrakovski, J. L. C. Rowsell, G. J. Exarhos, J. Ripmeester, O. M. Yaghi, Y. Shin 346. In situ IR studies of superoxide species on the BaF2/La203 catalyst. L. Wang, X. Yi, W. Weng, H. Wan 347. Influence of deuterium isotope effects on the photophysics of tetramethylrhodamine. X. Song, J. W. Foley 348. Investigating beta amyloid 1-16 at the air-water interface. A. E. Miller, P. B. Petersen, C. W. Hollars, R. J. Saykally

349. Investigation of SH radical during the diamond thin film deposition in the HFCVD by means of CRDS. M. Buzaianu, V. Makarov, B. R. Weiner, G. Morell 350. Investigation of single molecule charge transfer using a confocal scanning optical microscope (CSOM). J. M. Tyler, M. L Blumenfeld, O. L A. Monti 351. Kinetics of Ο + HCNO Reaction. W. Feng, J. F. Hershberger 352. Lactic acid oxidation by chloramine-T in sulfuric acid medium: A kinetic study. V. S. K. Kolachana, M. D. Mahadevaiah, K. S. Rangappa, N. M. Made Gowda 353. Mass spectra from the ionization of amides by metastable atoms. P. E. Siska, T. A. Madison 354. Matrix isolation infrared observation of the H 2 Si-N 2 complex using a 121 nm vacuum-ultraviolet photolysis source. J. C. Amicangelo, C. T. Dine, D. G. Irwin, C. J. Lee, N. L. Saxton 355. Mechanoluminescence induced by acoustic cavitation. N. C. Eddingsaas, K. S. Suslick 356. Withdrawn. 357. Neutron reflectivity at the liquid/liquid interface. J. R. P. Webster 358. Newly sequence-specific probe for DNA bioelectrochemical sensor. J . Li, Z. Ji, G. Yuan, S. Cai 359. No dual fluorescence in trans-4-dimethylamino-4'-cyanostilbene (DCS). J. Breffke, D. Vorobyev, N. P. Ernsting 360. Nonthermal plasma synthesis of ammo­ nia using renewable hydrogen. S. Deng, Z. Le, R. Ruan, F. Yu, M. Reese, G. Cuomo, P. Chen 361. Oxyhalogen-sulfur chemistry: Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of 1,3-dimethylthiourea by acidic bromate. O. Olagunju, K. Morakinyo 362. Photochemical protonation of peptides in the gas phase: Infrared spectroscopy in the OH and NH stretch regions. T. D. Vaden, T. S. J. A. de Boer, J. P. Simons, L C. Snoek 363. Photoelectrochemistry of dyecucurbit[7]uril (CB7) complexes. R. L Halterman, S. B. Ellis, D. T. Glatzhofer 364. Photoracemization of the novel chiral ligands VANOL and VAPOL. Ε-A. Gould, K. M. Solntsev, L. M. Tolbert 365. Pulsed electron-electron double reso­ nance: Beyond distance measurements. O. Schiemann, P. Cekan, D. Margraf, T. F. Prisner, S. T. Sigurdsson 366. Reaction volume and enthalpy changes for caged urea photodissociation deter­ mined by PBD. M. Rubio, K. Michael, J. Miksovska 367. Selection of cathode materials in the process of electroreduction nitrobenzene to p-aminophenol. J. Zhao Sr., L. Wang, C. Song, H. Xu 368. Single-Molecule chiroptical spectroscopy: Fluorescence excitation and circularlypolarized luminescence of single helicene molecules in polymer-supported films. R. Hassey, E. J. Swain, N. I. Hammer, D. Basak, G. M. Smith, E. L. Richards, D. Venkataraman, M. D. Barnes 369. Spectroscopy of B r o o k e d Merocyanine in channel-containing zeolites. J. S. Holt, C. Sheldon 370. Spheric micellization of end functionalized PB-b-PEO. N. Hoda, R. Ozisik, L. Interrante 371. Stability investigations of Dicarboxylic dianions. N. Mirsaleh Kohan, S. G. Ard, R. N. Compton 372. Study on electrochemical reduction behavior of o-nitrophenol in ionic liquid. X. Yang Sr., J. Wang Sr., G. Li Sr. 373. Study on preparation and electrocatalytic activities of the doped Pb02/Ti electrodes. L-C. Wang, C. Song, J. Zhao 374. Studying the conformational changes of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mutant by single-channel recording. M. Tantama, S. Licht 375. Submonolayer adsorption structure determination of Na on Cu (111) by low energy ion blocking. R. Zhang, B. Makarenko, J. W. Rabalais

376. Surface enhanced Raman and infrared spectroscopy (SERS and SEIRA) of ibuprofen intercalated hybrid bilayer nanoshells. J. Kundu, C. S. Levin, B. G. Janesko, G. E. Scuseria, R. Raphael, N. J. Halas 377. Surface modifications to silica for oligo­ nucleotide attachment. D. J. Ceckanowicz, P. M. St. John 378. Terahertz, biomolecules and morphol­ ogy. A. B. True 379. Thermodynamic studies of LNA in DNA hairpins. P. M. St. John 380. Tunable photoluminescence observed in semiconductor nanostructures. G. P. Glaspell II, J. E. Anderson, D. S. M. El-Shall 381. Ultrafast time resolved dynamics of a photochromic oxazine in solution. A. Altan, M. Tomasulo, F. M. Raymo, V. Kleiman 382. Ultrafast vibrational relaxation of liquid water following librational combination band excitation. L. Chieffo, J. Shattuck, J. J. Amsden, S. Erramilli, L D. Ziegler 383. Ultrafast, interfacial electron dynamics of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide/Ag(111) interface. M. L. Strader, A. Yang, J. Johns, E. Muller, C. B. Harris 384. UVWisible absorbance, steady-state fluorescence and 1H NMR spectroscopy of cationic dyes complexed with cucurbit[7]uril. R. L Halterman, J. L. Moore, K. A. Yakshe 385. Vapor characterization and explosive detection near 700 cm-1. S. W. Reeve, A. R. Ford 386. Vibrational spectroscopy study of myo­ globin compound II. W. Zeng, A. Barabanschikov, Y. Zhang, J. T. Sage, E. E. Alp, W. Sturhahn, J. Zhao 387. Wavelength-dependent blinking statistics of single CdSe nanoparticles studied by fluorescence microscopy. K. L. Knappenberger Jr., D. B. Wong, S. R. Leone Section Β BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Physical Chemistry Poster Session Theory: Electronic Structure, Kinetics, Thermodynamics, Statistical Mechanics G. A. Voth,

Organizer

7:00-9:00 388. Design and modeling of n-channel organic semiconductors based on thiazolothiazole and its interface with metals. A. T. Yeates, D. S. Dudis 389. QM/MM study of vibrational energy relaxation of N-methylacetamide. Y. Zhang, J. E. Straub 390. Relaxation in a PbSe and a CdSe quan­ tum dots. S. V. Kilina, O. V. Prezhdo 391. Reliable descriptions of phosphate hydrolysis reactions using QM/MM simula­ tions with proper sampling. Y. Yang, Q. Cui 392. Withdrawn. 393. Engineering entropy-driven reactions and networks catalyzed by DNA. D. Y. Zhang, A. J. Turberfield, B. Yurke, E. Winfree 394. Mixtures separation enabled by size matching between bis-onium cations and supramolecular bis-halides in self-as­ sembled crystals. P. Metrangolo, G. Resnati, Y. Carcenac, T. Pilati 395. Organophosphate functionalized Gd@C82 as MRI contrast agent. C-R. Wang 396. Self-assembly of xanthene dyes ternplated by poly-L-lysine. W. Xia, A. Ferreira, V. I. Vullev 397. The molecular mechanisms surrounding the allosteric activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase. A. Shih, M. A. Lemmon, R. Radhakrishnan 3 9 8 . 1 3 C NMR chemical shielding: Probing conformational behavior of 222 cryptand in condensed phases. J . W. Su, R. R. Burnette 399. A hydration model of multicomponent solutions of electrolytes. C. Panayiotou, I. Tsivintzelis, C. Tsioptsias, G. Dritsas

PHYS

400. A self-consistent Hubbard U approach to transition metal chemistry. H. J. Kulik, M. Cococcioni, N. Marzari 401. Accounting for temperature fluctuations when modeling chemical reactions with KMC. T. C. Castonguay, F. Wang 402. Adaptive force matching: A systematic way of generating high quality force fields from QM/MM calculations. 0 . Akin-Ojo, F. Wang 403. Adsorption configurations and dissocia­ tive reactions of HN3 molecule on Ti02 anatase (101) surface. J-G. Chang, C. Chen, S-P. Ju, C-S. Chang, M. C. Lin, J-M. Lu 404. An exploration of mechanisms for the transformation of 8-oxoguanine to guanidinohydantoin and spiroiminodihydantoin by density functional theory. B. H. Munk, C. J. Burrows, H. B. Schlegel 405. Application of correlation energy contri­ butions of bonding electron pairs in pro­ pane system. W. Si, S. Zhuo 406. Assessing the role of sequence in the aggregation of human islet amyloid poly­ peptide. E. K. Rivera, J. Straub 407. Asymptotic analysis and simulation of coagulation-fragmentation equations. F. Torrens, G. Castellano 408. Benchmark study of bond breaking in hydrocarbons by EOM-SF methods: Meth­ ane and ethane examples. A. Golubeva, A. I. Krylov 409. Benzene dimer interaction energies and solvent distributions for various solvents. S. Kang, N. Yoshida, S. Yan, F. Hirata, J. Y. Lee 410. Beta-hairpin folding with parallel-temper­ ing and metadynamics. G. Bussi, F. L. Gervasio, A. Laio, M. Parrinello 411. Calculation of quantum mechanical time correlation functions in liquids via the linearized semiclassical method. F. X. Vazquez, E. Geva 412. Carbon-13 NMR shifts of nonprotonated carbon atoms of aromatic amino acids in peptides and proteins. D. Mukkamala, Y. Zhang, H. Sun, F. Cheng, E. Oldfield 413. Changes in configurational entropy on protein-ligand binding based on multiple molecular dynamics simulations. J. Y. Kravitz, B. J. Killian, Y-P. Pang, M. K. Gilson 414. Computational modeling of cyanine dyes for bioimaging. J. L. Lee, V. Ediz, G. L. Silva, B. A. Armitage, D. J. Yaron 415. Computational scheme for numerically simulating for IR, VCD and 2-D IR photon echo spectra of Ubiquitin in water. J-H. Choi, H. Lee, K-K. Lee, S. Hahn, M.Cho 416. Computational study of the reactions OH + Ο {harr} H 0 2 {harr} Η + 0 2 and Η + OH {harr} H 2 0 . S. R. Sellevâg, Y. Georgievskii, J. A. Miller 417. Computer simulations of nucleophilic reactions solvated by ionic liquids. G. M. Arantes, M. C. C. Ribeiro 418. Delanauy tessellation of zeolite structures. D. A. Carr, I. Vaisman, E. Blaisten-Barojas 419. Density functional theory study of the Au (111) surface activation by benzene. C. Calderon, F. Wang, A. E. Baber, E. C. H. Sykes 420. DFT investigation of the electronic properties of nitrogen-doped ΤΊ02 nanowire. H. Wang, H. Wang, J. P. Lewis 421. Effect of dopant on perovskite proton conduction pathways. L. S. Foster, K. M. Fletcher, M. Gomez 422. Effect of the explicit account of atomic polarization on the dynamics of ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (GLYM) in aqueous solutions: Mechanism of the self-assembly in polyethylene-glycol-lipid mixtures. S. Yulia, S. Noskov 423. Electron pair localization function: Toward a theoretical electrophilicity scale. C. Amador-Bedolla, R. Salomon-Ferrer, A. Aspuru-Guzik 424. Electron propagator calculations on peptide nucleic acid monomers. R. R. Pandey, J. V. Ortiz, R. K. Lake 425. Electronic structure of reduced and oxidized pyrrole oligomers and polypyrrole chains studied with density functional theory. Y. Dai, E. Blaisten-Barojas 426. Elucidation of the loosening mechanisms of polycation-DNA complexes induced by polyanions and polyampholytes through Monte Carlo simulations. C-Y. Shew

427. Exploring quantum molecular dynamics approaches. Y. Huh, P-N. Roy 428. Folding of a computationally redesigned zinc-binding domain. S-G. Kang, J. Tang, F. Gai, J. G. Saven 429. Forcefields for Αβ simulations: TIP4P-Ew and Amber99SB. N. L Fawzi, T. Head-Gordon 430. Franck-Condon analysis of ionization thresholds of C3H. Y. Wang, B. J. Braams, J. M. Bowman 431. Hybrid methods for accurate electronic structure calculations. J. M. Mullin, M. S. Gordon, M. A. Collins 432. Hydrophobic potential of mean force as a solvation function for protein structure prediction. M. S. Lin, N. L Fawzi, T. Head-Gordon 433. Improvement of length scaling in the hyperdynamics method. S. Y. Kim, A. F. Voter 434. Intermolecular interactions of charged protein-ligand complexes in the gas phase: A molecular dynamics study. M. Seo, E. N. Kitova, J. S. Klassen, P-N. Roy 435. Investigation of slow preferential solva­ tion dynamics via potential energy land­ scape theory. C. N. Nguyen, R. M. Stratt 436. Isotope selectivity of adsorbents. L. Fernandez, L. Ndebele, M. Gomez 437. Kapitza resistance: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study. J. Lyver IV, E. Blaisten-Barojas 438. Modeling vibronic coherence in the condensed phase. D. Montemayor, D. F. Coker 439. Molecular connection to rubber elasticity. G. G. Hoffman 440. Molecular design of a crystal surface. M. L. Mihajlovic, P. M. Mitrasinovic 441. Molecular dynamics calculation of the static dielectric constant of ice Ih. G. E. Lindberg, F. Wang 442. Molecular dynamics simulation of argon and propanol scattering off molten NaOH/ KOH surfaces. L. Tribe, T. Lloyd, M. Fox, R. Martin 443. Molecular dynamics simulations of cellu­ lose degrading enzymes. Y. A. Small, J. W. Davenport 444. Withdrawn. 445. Molecular power spectra from ab initio semiclassical dynamics. M. Ceotto, S. Atahan, A. Aspuru-Guzik 446. Molecular solvation in ionic liquids: Restocking the conceptual toolbox. Μ. Ν. Kobrak 447. Moving Domain QM/MM method for accurate description of molecular electro­ static potentials in proteins. L. C. Menikarachchi, J. A. Gascon 448. NBO analysis of the conformational and energetic properties of the 1:1 benzo-12crown-4 UCIO4 complex in the gas and crystal phase. R. R. Burnette, L. Xiao 449. Predictions of hole mobilities in organic nanoscale data storage materials. M. L. Rossi, K. Sohlberg 450. Punching holes in density functional theory: Toward a novel nonlocal exchange-correlation functional. L. Vogt, A. Najmaie, C. Amador-Bedolla, A. Aspuru-Guzik 451. Quantum dynamics on the quantum computer. I. Kassal, A. Aspuru-Guzik 452. Raman spectroscopy of ionic liquids derived from 1 -buthyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride and ZnCI 2 or NbCIs· J. C. Rubim, M. B. Alves, V. C. D. Soares, V. O. Santos Jr., P. A. Z. Suarez 453. Reaction of ground state carbon atom with diacetylene (HCCCCH) at ultra-low temperatures. C. Y. Huang, B. J. Sun, H. H. Kuo, K. T. Chen, H. L Sun, C. H. Huang, M. F. Tsai, C. H. Kao, Y. S. Wang, L. G. Gao, R. I. Kaiser, Α. Η. Η. Chang

454. Rotation/inversion study of CH 3 XH 2 for group 5A elements [X = Ν, Ρ, As, Sb]. H-W. Kim, D. Zeroka 455. Separation of overall rotation and internal motion in various Eckart generalized coordinates. F. J . Lin 456. Silicon carbide nanostructures: A tightbinding approach. A. Patrick, X. Dong, E. Blaisten-Barojas, A. Hasmy, T. C. Allison 457. Simulated second-quantized time evolu­ tion for molecular electronic structure with quantum computers. J. D. Whitfield, M. Mohseni, A. Aspuru-Guzik 458. Spontaneous self-assembly mechanism of micelle formation. K. Nguyen, N. Z. Rao, P. B. Moore 459. Withdrawn. 460. Substituent effects in pi-pi stacking interactions: Performance of new DFT functionals and an experimental probe. S. E. Wheeler, A. J. McNeil, T. M. Swager, K. N. Houk 461. Symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction theoretical study on the (E)and (Z)-acetaldehyde N,N-dimethylhydrazone in methanol. S-l. Lu 462. Temperature-dependent probabilistic roadmap: Algorithm for calculating variationally optimized conformational transition pathways. H. Yang, H. Wu, D. Li, L. Han, S.Huo 463. The hidden radical nature of the acenes. J. Hachmann, J. J. Dorando, G. K-L. Chan 464. The relationship between the ionic struc­ ture and viscosity in the room-temperature ionic liquids. H. Li, M. Ibrahim, I. Aberemi, M. N. Kobrak 465. Theoretical characterization of diluted magnetic semiconductors: (Mn, Zn)0 and (Co, Zn)0 clusters. E. Badaeva, Y. Feng, D. R. Gamelin, X. Li 466. Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface of small biomolecules. D. P. Schofield, K. D. Jordan, V. A. Shubert, E. Baquero, T. S. Zwier 467. Theoretical study of binding site prefer­ ence in several [2]rotaxanes. M. Foster, K. Sohlberg 468. Theoretical study of the formation and destruction of H 2 D + via reactions HD + H 3 + H H 2 + H 2 D + . Z. Xie, J. M. Bowman 469. Thermodynamic characterization of RNA duplexes containing naturally occurring 1x2 nucleotide internal loops. J. Badhwar, S. R. Karri, C. K. Cass, E. L. Wunderlich, B. M. Znosko 470. To the phonon bottleneck effect in PbSe quantum dots. S. V. Kilina, D. S. Kilin, 0 . V. Prezhdo 471. Toward developing an ab initio theory for nuclei in thermodynamics. K-Y. Wong 472. Turn structures of a model peptide system: Insights from circular dichroism. K. L. Carlson, S. J. Bush, S. Vollmer, K. A. Thomasson 473. Ultracold ytterbium atom-ion collisions. P. Zhang, A. Dalgamo 474. Use of the solute partitioning model to predict or interpret Hofmeister effects on biopolymer processes. L. M. Pegram, M. T. Record Jr. 475. Vibrational energy flow within the dimeric hemoglobin Scapharca. J. K. Agbo, G. G. Maisuradze, K. Kachlishvili, B. W. Beck, D. M. Leitner Section C BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Physical Chemistry Poster Session Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies G. A. Voth,

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Organizer

7:00-9:00 476. Analysis of 1-diphenylamino-4-tricyanoethenylbenzene by X-ray diffraction. B. H. Bailey, M. M. Bader, D. S. Jones, H. P. Gunawardena 477. Electron transfer dynamics from Rhodamine Β to semiconductor nanocrystalline films. J. Huang, D. Stockwell, A. Boulesbaa, J. Guo, T. Lian

478. Force spectroscopy study of chitosan. M. Kocun, L Cuccia, M. Grandbois 479. Molecular order in electroactive polymers investigated by polarization resolved ultrafast infrared spectroscopy. A. Main, J. B. Asbury 480. Self-assembling behavior of lipid-like peptides by synchronous fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopy. D. Yu, S. Zhang 481. Biophysical studies of confinement utilizing reverse micelle technology. A. C Spencer, A. K. Simorellis, W. D. Van Horn, P. F. Flynn 482. Combining lithographic and photothermal femtosecond laser ejection techniques of gold nanoparticles to synthesize monodisperse colloids. C Tabor, W. Qian, M. El-Sayed 483. Computational redesign of human H ferritin: A biotemplate for noble metal nanoparticles. S-G. Kang, C. A. Butts, J. Swift, I. J. Dmochowski, J. G. Saven 484. Controlling self-assembled monolayers' pattern by dipolar interactions. W. Tong, M. B. Zimmt 485. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with surface active β- and 7-CDs: Redox and photophysical properties. R. Marthi, R. J. Forster, Τ. Ε. Keyes 486. Improvement of the dispersion of singlewalled carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices by supercritical carbon dioxide foaming process. L Chen, R. Ozisik, L. S. Schadler 487. Influence of surface modifier molecular weight on silica deaggregation in PMMA. B. K. Goren, R. Ozisik, L. S. Schadler 488. Inter-particle optical coupling in noble metal nanostructures. P. K. Jain, W. Huang, M. A. El-Sayed 489. Molecularly-tuned size selectivity of metal nanoparticles. M. Schadt, J. Luo, H-Y. Park, L Wang, C-J. Zhong 490. Polymer induced solvation of carbon nanotubes: A molecular dynamics study. W. Martin, W. Zhu, G. Krilov 491. Quantum chemical molecular dynamics Simulations of fullerene formation during benzene combustion. B. Saha, S. Irle, K. Morokuma 492. Relative stabilities of porphyrin-fullerene complexes in the gas phase. S. Jung, S. K. Shin 493. Self-assembled styrene based alternat­ ing copolymer nanotubes: Modeling and experiment. T. D. Lazzara, M. A. Whitehead, T. G. van de Ven 494. Cation transport by novel redox-active synthetic ion channels. M. Banks, S. A. Gebre, A. Saquibal, M. Wang, A. C Hall, C. D. Hall, C. Suârez Section D BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Physical Chemistry Poster Session Excited Electronic States in Chemistry and Biology: Theory and Experiment G. A. Voth,

Organizer

7:00-9:00 495. Spectral properties, gormation of the dye molecular aggregates and vapochromism of adsorbed dyes in thin silica gel matrix. V. M. Aristarkhov Sr. 496. A simplified MP/SOFT algorithm for simulations of nonadiabatic quantum dynamics. X. Chen, V. S. Batista 497. Excited state solvation of malononitriles. C. Swalina, S. Arzhantzev, H. Jin, M. Maroncelli 498. LANDmap with re-focusing: A new semi-classical method for extending a short time approximation to compute non-adiabatic dynamics at long times. L Chen, S. Bonella, D. F. Coker 499. Mixed quantum-classical dynamics and surface hopping methods. E. R. Dunkel, D. F. Coker 500. Modeling vibrational pure dephasing or decoherence in condensed phase. Z. Ma, D. F. Coker 501. QM/MM modeling of the photochemistry of photoreceptors of biological interest. P. B. Coto, S. Marti, M. Oliva, J. Andres, M. Olivucci, M. Merchân

TECH-117

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

PHYS

502. Simulated excited state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hydroxyflavone. Y. P. Tambouret, D. F. Coker 503. Studies on phototherapy: Psoralen. L. Serrano-Andrés, M. Merchân, J. J. Serrano-Pérez 504. Withdrawn. 505. Bioexcimers as precursors of charge transfer and reactivity in photobiology. M. Merchén, L Serrano-Andrés, M. Rubio, D. Roca-Sanjuén, G. Olaso-Gonzâlez, I. Gonzalez-Ramirez 506. Effect of secondary structure on the electronic excited state dynamics of d(GC)9. K. D. de La Harpe, C. E. Crespo-Hernéndez, B. Kohler 507. Ultrafast energy relaxation in DNA/RNA base monomers. L. Serrano-Andrés, M. Merchén, R. Gonzâlez-Luque, T. Climent, A. C. Borin 508. Ultrafast nonradiative deactivation dynamics of electronically excited nucleobases: Resolution of the gas vs. solution phase mystery. N. K. Schwalb, F. E. E. Temps 509. Carrier dynamics in single conjugated polymer nanoparticles. C. J . Szymanski, Z. Cain, C. Wu, J. D. McNeill 510. Chemical control of photoexcited states in titanate nanostructures. O. Diwald, A. Riss, T. Berger, H. Grothe, J. Bemardi, E. Knôzinger 511. Conformer-selected photodissociation: Ab initio multiple spawning dynamics of excited propanal cation. H. Tao, T. J. Martinez 512. Decomposition mechanism of firefly dioxetanone in the enzyme luciferase. H. Sakai, N. Wada, M. Kusunoki 513. Does Nature perform quantum algorithms? M. Mohseni, A. Najmaie, I. Kassal, A. Aspuru-Guzik 514. Effect of solvent on the spectral and excited state decay properties of alkylamino substituted 2,5-diarylidenecyclopentanone dyes. C. A. Zoto, M. G. Ucak-Astarlioglu, C. Changtong, R. E. Connors 515. Effects of substituents on synthetic analogs of chlorophylls. H. L. Kee, C. Kirmaier, Q. Tang, J. R. Diers, C. Muthiah, M. Taniguchi, J. K. Laha, M. Ptaszek, J. S. Lindsey, D. F. Bocian, D. Holten 516. Excited state dynamics of para-nitroanilines probed by fs/ps CARS. B. D. Prince, M. N. Slipchenko, B. M. Prince, A. J. Blom, H. U. Stauffer 517. Femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy of carotenoids. H. A. Frank, H. Cong, D. Niedzwiedzki, G. N. Gibson 518. Fluorescent proteins: Benchmarking computational methods against new experimental measurements. A. Brown, Q. Timerghazin, C. Liang, H. Carlson, R. [QJampbell 519. Hybrid density functional theory study of photoluminescence spectra of platinum II porphine and platinum II octaethylporphine. C. V. Diaconu, R. L Martin, D. L Smith, E. R. Batista, Β. Κ. Crone, S. A. Crooker, I. H. Campbell 520. Investigating substituent effects on lowbarrier hydrogen bonding. C. Chatterjee, S. A. Broadbent, P. H. Vaccaro, B. R. Johnson 521. Isomerization dynamics and large-ampli­ tude vibrational motion in electronically excited acetylene. A. H. Steeves, H. A. Bechtel, A. J. Merer, N. Yamakita, A. Beck, R. W. Field 522. Pathways and dynamics of excited-state energy flow in self-assembled wheel-andspoke light-harvesting architectures. H-E. Song, C. Kirmaier, J. K. Schwartz, E. Hindin, L. Yu, D. F. Bocian, J. S. Lindsey, D. Holten 523. Photodissociation dynamics of thiophenol: Observation of the intramolecular orbital alignment. J . S. Lim, I. S. Lim, Y. S. Lee, S. K. Kim 524. Photoexcitation of comers and edges of MgO nanocubes. O. Diwald, S. Stankic, M. Muller, M. Sterrer, J. Bemardi, E. Knôzinger, P. V. Sushko, P. Trevisanutto, A. L Shluger

118-TECH

525. Photoluminescence-variations of CdSe quantum dots and its relation to interactions of solvents and dissolved molecules on surface states. V. Biju, T. Itoh, M. Ishikawa 526. Photophysical properties of emissive cryptophane-based molecules and their heavy atom containing complexes. H. A. Fogarty, T. Brotin, J-P. Dutasta 527. Photophysics of fluorescent rhodamine dyes. X. Song, J. W. Foley 528. Radiationless electronic relaxation of prototypical aromatic molecules by femtosecond time-of-flight mass spectrometry and photoelectron imaging. H. Studzinski, S. Zhang, F. Renth, F. E. E. Temps 529. Reaction pathways and excited states in H 2 0 2 + OH - > H 0 2 +. H 2 0 : A new ab initio investigation. B. Ginovska, D. M. Camaioni, M. Dupuis 530. Solvent-dependent ultrafast excited state energy flow in a push-pull stilbene probed by fs/ps CARS. Β. Μ. Prince, M. N. Slipchenko, B. D. Prince, A. Chakraborty, A. J. Blom, H. U. Stauffer 531. Spectra and dynamics of molecules in long-lived, highly reactive triplet states. W. L Virgo, K. L. Bittinger, R. W. Field 532. Structure and dynamics at soft interfaces in OPV materials. L. W. Barbour, M. Hegadorn, R. D. Pensack, J. B. Asbury 533. Structure and electronic coupling ele­ ment of the TCNF/TCNE - · association in solution — A polarizable continuum model study. Q. Wang, M. D. Newton 534. Subpicosecond protein backbone changes during the proteorhodopsin pri­ mary photoreaction. J. J. Amsden, J. M. Krai], L. Chieffo, X. Wang, S. Erramilli, E. N. Spudich, J. L. Spudich, L. Ziegler, K. J. Rothschild 535. Surface effects on QD-based energy transfer. S. Dayal, C. Burda 536. Theoretical and experimental investiga­ tions about the mechanism of the o-nitrobenzyl photochemistry. K. Schaper, F. Bley, D. Maydt 537. Unraveling photoisomerization pathway of cis.trans- and cis.cis-distyrylbenzene. F-C. Hsu, S. H. Lin, J-K. Wang 538. UV-Vis Spectra and RSA properties of phthalocyanine compounds. J. Andzelm, A. M. Rawlett, J. A. Orlicki, J. F. Snyder, K. K. Baldridge 539. Vibronic excitation patterns influenced by energy transfer. M. Yang Section Ε BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Physical Chemistry Poster Session Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solution G. A. Voth,

Organizer

7:00-9:00 540. Changes in water structure in colloidal silica as a function of particle density. J. R. Bailey, M. M. McGuire 541. Computational models of ion hydration. T. W. Whitfield, G. Lamoureux, S. Varma, S. B. Rempe, B. Roux 542. Effect of inner-sphere reorganization on the shape of diabatic free energy curves: Insight from Bom-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation. J. Blumberger 543. Effects of local and long range structural properties on dynamics in water. M. E. Johnson, T. Head-Gordon 544. Efficient LEWIS potentials for water, its ions and other second row hydrides. J. Herzfeld, S. Dai, M. Blank 545. Electron attachment and detachment in the water hexamer anion. C. F. Williams, J. M. Herbert 546. Hydration effects on charge spatial extent in DNA and implications for trans­ fer: A theoretical SIC-QM/MM study. Y. A. Mantz, F. L Gervasio, T. Laino, M. Parrinello 547. Insights on aqueous solvation from alchemical free energy calculations. D. L Mobley, J. D. Chodera, K. A. Dill 548. Mapping hydration dynamics and coupled water-protein fluctuations around a protein surface. L. Zhang, L. Wang, Y-T. Kao, W. Qiu, Y. Yang, D. Zhong

549. Molecular dynamics simulations of meth­ ane hydrate decomposition using a polar­ izable force field. E. M. Myshakin, H. Jiang, K. D. Jordan 550. Molecular dynamics study of cooperative and localized translational dynamics of water around an amphiphilic peptide. C. Malardier-Jugroot, R. K. Murarka, T. Head-Gordon 551. Nitrile groups as vibrational probes of protein structure and dynamics: Calcula­ tions of the C=N vibrational line shape. B. A. Lindquist, S. A. Corcelli 552. Probing the structure and dynamics of aqueous OH- with ultrafast infrared spec­ troscopy. S. T. Roberts, P. B. Petersen, R. A. Nicodemus, K. Ramasesha, A. Tokmakoff 553. Quantification of interactions between nonpolar molecules in water by single molecule force spectroscopy. B. B. Akhremitchev 554. Reaction mechanisms and dissolution rates of quartz in acidic, basic, and neutral media. S. Nangia, B. J. Garrison 555. Reduced hydration at aerosol interfaces: Halide anion fractionation and enhanced oxidation. A. J . Colussi, S. Enami, C. D. Vecitis, J. Cheng, M. R. Hoffmann 556. Solvated electron and solvated atom. I. Shkrob, C. G. Elles, R. A. Crowell 557. Solvation free energies of monovalent ions in TIP4P-FQ water. G. L. Warren, S. Patel 558. Solvation of HCI by water in helium droplets. D. S. Skvortsov, M. Y. Choi, A. F. Vilesov 559. Spontaneous rearrangements of H+(H20)21 coated with trimethylamine: An ab initio study. D. J. Anick 560. Stability of hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water hydrated to ions studied by molecular orbital calculations. Y-H. Zhang, A. Ohtsubo, T. Oi 561. Study of the physical nature, lifetimes and reactivity of nonequilibrium prehydrated electrons in liquid water. C-R. Wang, Q-B. Lu 562. Surface hydration by aqueous nanodroplets in electric field. C. D. Daub, D. Bratko, K. Leung, A. Luzar 563. The elusive structure of H 3 O + (H 2 O) 2 0 . S. S. Xantheas 564. Toward an understanding of the hydra­ tion of the guanidinium ion. M. Mandziuk, J. Landers 565. Transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the aqueous Br atom and Br2" anion: Solvation and reactivity. C. G. Elles, R. A. Crowell, I. A. Shkrob, D. A. Arms, E. C. Landahl 566. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of nitrate-water systems: Hydration vs. ion pairing. M. Xu, M. Roshdy, H. C. Allen 567. Water clusters in the nonpolar cavities of the protein tetrabrachion. J . C. Rasaiah, H. Yin, G. Hummer 568. Water dynamics near peptide surfaces: Effect of cosmotrope co-solvents. C. Malardier-Jugroot, M. E. Johnson, T. Head-Gordon 569. Water mediated attraction and folding: The cluster approach. S. J. Keasler, B. Chen 570. Analysis of interaction energy of the water-graphite system. G. R. Jenness, K. D. Jordan 571. Effect of water molecules in electron tunneling through bis-amino acid donorbridge-acceptor oligomers. S. Chakrabarti 572. Electron attachment to large water clus­ ters. A. A. DeFusco III, T. Sommerfeld, K. D. Jordan 573. Infrared spectroscopy of the water dimer cation. G. H. Gardenier, M. A. Johnson 574. Microsolvated OH(H20)n cluster based approach of studying vapor/liquid interface. M-K. Tsai, K. Kowalski, M. Valiev, B. C. Garrett 575. Microsolvation of the dicyanamide anion: [N(CN)2-](H20)n (n = 0-12). X-B. Wang, B. Jagoda-Cwiklik, H-K. Woo, J. Yang, G-J. Wang, M. Zhou, P. Jungwirth, L-S. Wang 576. Molecular dynamics simulation of the mobility of the hydroxide ion. S. H. Lee, J . C. Rasaiah 577. Solubility of 2-methyl-1 ^-naphthoqui­ none in ethanol + water from (292.65 to 343.75) K. C. Song, J. Zhao, L. Wang, F. Wang

578. Understanding the hydrogen-bonded structures of interfacial waters through quantum chemical calculations and Raman spectroscopy. D. Y. Wu, S. Duan, X. Xu, Z-Q. Tian 579. Using Hofmeister to cross bacterial endsopore cell wall structures. C. R. French Section F BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Physical Chemistry Poster Session Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecular Systems G. A. Voth,

Organizer

7:00-9:00 580. Withdrawn. 581. Withdrawn. 582. Atom level computer simulation and force mapping of single protein conforma­ tional changes under external force. H. Lu 583. Capturing the multiple-time-scale dynamical state-network buried in the time series of single molecule experiments. C. B. Li, T. Komatsuzaki 584. Chasing poliovirus in live cells. B. Brandenburg, J. C. Vaughan, L. Y. Lee, M. Lakadamyali, M. J. Rust, J. M. Hogle, X. Zhuang 585. Cholesterol level regulates the mobility of folate receptor-containing endosomes via Rab proteins. H. Chen, J. Yang, P. S. Low, J-X. Cheng 586. Comparative studies of single-molecule rotational dynamics in polymer hosts. D. R. Sluss, P. M. Wallace, L. R. Dalton, P. J. Reid 587. Confined diffusion of the enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein in ordered nanoporous alumina membranes. J. Hohlbein, M. Steinhart, E. Hinze, C. Schiene-Fischer, C. G. Hubner, U. Gôsele 588. Cucurbit[7]uril enhances organic probe fluorescence for single-molecule imaging. T. A. Martyn, J. L. Moore, W. T. Yip, R. L. Halterman 589. Dissecting the reverse power stroke of myosin VI. J-C. Liao, Z. Bryant, S. L. Delp, J. A. Spudich 59& -Withdrawn. 591. luorescence probe of globular protein \jyriarnics. J. N. Pronchik, D. S. Talaga, T. C. Messina 592. Generalization of Fôrster theory for quantum mechanical modulation of the donor-acceptor coupling. S. Jang 593. High mobility group proteins: Exploring structure and function with optical tweezers. M. J. McCauley, P. R. Hardwidge, L J. Maher III, M. C. Williams 594. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase shuttles back and forth during strand displacement synthesis. S. Liu, E. A. Abbondanzieri, G. Bokinsky, S. Le Grice, X. Zhuang 595. Improved single fluorophore localization halves the number of photons required for high resolution. K. Mortensen, L S. Churchman, J. A. Spudich, H. Flyvbjerg 596. Internalization and trafficking of cell surface proteoglycans and proteoglycanbinding ligands. C. K. Payne, S. A. Jones, C. Chen, X. Zhuang 597. Liposome characterization using fluorescence cumulant analysis. J. E. Reiner, A. Jahn, W. N. Vreeland, L. E. Locascio, J. J. Kasianowicz, M. Gaitan 598. Live cell fluorescence visualization of clathrin coat assembly with 10nm axial resolution. S. Saffarian, T. Kirchhausen

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

PHYS

599. Metal ion-dependent folding study of the 8-17 DNAzyme through single molecule FRET. H-K. Kim, I. Rasnik, C. Joo, Y. Lu

621. Single-molecule studies of forked DNA binding with helicase loading protein (gp59). S. R. Arumugam, M. Praia,

600. Mie theory investigation of surfaceenhanced Raman optical activity in local fields of metallic nanoparticles.

S. J. Benkovic, A. A. Heikal 622. Single-molecule study of a functionally important conformational change in T7 DNA polymerase: A crucial step for repli­ cation fidelity. G. Luo, W. H. Konigsberg, M. Wang, X. S. Xie

B. R. Johnson, R. Acevedo, R. Lombardini 601. Modeling the forced extension of nicked DNA. A. Balaeff, S. Craig, D. N. Beratan 602. Physical models for flexible tethers in proteins. D. Van Valen, M. Haataja, R. Phillips 603. Pre-mRNA splicing in singulo. A. A. Hoskins, D. J. Crawford, L. J. Friedman, J. Gelles, M. J. Moore 604. Pre-mRNA splicing studied using FRET with novel PNA-based probes: Single molecule and bulk approaches. A. Jaquins-Gerstl, K. Robertson, L. Yu, S. Y. Kwan, B. A. Armitage, A. J. Lopez, L. A. Peteanu 605. Probing nucleation, reverse annealing, and chaperone function along the reaction path of HIV-1 single strand transfer. Y. Zeng, H. W. Liu, C. F. Landes, Y. J. Kim, X. Ma, Y. Zhu, K. Musier-Forsyth, P. F. Barbara 606. Re-directing lipoic acid ligase for specific and covalent labeling of proteins with biophysical probes in live cells. M. Fernândez-Suârez, H. Baruah, Α. Υ. Ting 607. Real time study of the replication machinery in living E. coli cells. G. Lia, X. S. Xie 608. Robust kinetic analysis via the "phase function method": Determining reaction steps and distribution of rate constants. Y. Zhou, X. Zhuang 609. Shallow free energy landscapes remod­ eled by ligand binding in glucose/galactose binding protein. T. C. Messina, D. S. Talaga, E. Gallichio, R. Levy 610. Silver nanostructures with bright fluores­ cence and giant Raman enhancement for biological imaging. J. Zheng, Y. Ding, B. Tian, Z. L Wang, C. M. Lieber, X. Zhuang 611. Single molecule force spectroscopy study of NBD2 in CFTR. S. Zou, S. Di Bernardo, G. L Lukacs, G. C. Walker 612. Single molecule FRET studies of elF4A helicase activity. E. Atas, L. Lindqvist, J. Pelletier, A. Meller 613. Single molecule manipulation and detec­ tion in monodisperse sub-femtoliter bioreactors. J. Tang, A. M. Jofre, R. Kishore, G. M. Lowman, M. E. Greene, J. E. Reiner, K. Helmerson, L S. Goldner 614. Single molecule observation of DNA polymerase/RNA polymerase interactions on DNA templates. C. M. Schroeder III, S. Kim, P. C. Blainey, X. S. Xie 615. Single molecule spectroscopy of spliceosomal RNAs. D. Rueda, Z. Guo, R. Zhao 616. Single molecule studies of protein con­ formational dynamics. D. S. Talaga 617. Single molecule studies of salt depen­ dent binding of bacteriophage T7 gene 2.5 protein to single and double-stranded DNA. L Shokri, B. Marintcheva, C. C. Richardson, I. Rouzina, M. C. Williams 618. Single molecule studies of the biological catch bond. O. V. Prezhdo, Y. V. Pereverzev, W. Thomas, E. Sokurenko 619. Single molecules of polymers: Imaging under liquid using AFM. Y. Roiter, S. Minko 620. Single-molecule detection of biomolecules involved in bacterial adhesion to cells and biomaterials. Y. Liu, J. A. Strauss, P. A. Pinzon-Arango, T. A. Camesano

623. Stochastic inhibitor release and binding from single enzyme molecules. H. H. Gorris, D. M. Rissin, D. R. Walt 624. Strategies to improve signal strength and photostability of fluorophors in single molecule spectroscopy. K. Schaper, B. Bier, P. Taureg, S. von Dahlen, D. Pfiffi, C. A. M. Seidel, A. Chmyrov, J. Widengren 625. Structural studies of telomerase ribonucleoprotein assembly and catalysis. M. D. Stone, M. Mihalusova, C. M. O'Connor, R. Prathapam, K. Collins, X. Zhuang 626. Withdrawn. 627. Threading through DNA bases: A view with optical tweezers. T. Paramanathan, F. Westeriund, M. J. Mc Cauley, P. Lincoln, I. Rouzina, M. C. Williams 628. Torsional buckling and supercoiling of fluctuating DNA. P. K. Purohit 629. Withdrawn. 630. Tracking single calmodulin molecules in live cells. C. K. Johnson, G. S. Harms 631. Tracking single myosin molecules with high temporal resolution and low applied load. A. R. Dunn, J. A. Spudich 632. Withdrawn. 633. Applications of gold nanoparticles in cancer cell diagnostics and therapy. X. Huang, I. H. El-Sayed, M. El-Sayed 634. Computational screening of new classes of dyes for biological imaging. V. Ediz, J. L. Lee, B. A. Armitage, D. J. Yaron 635. Development of novel optical tips for near-field imaging and manipulation of single molecules. C. A. Carlson, J. C. Woehl 636. Epsin is the adaptor for clathrin mediate endocytosis of influenza virus. C. Chen, X.Zhuang 637. Folding dynamics of lambda repressor by single molecule FRET. J. Jung, C-Y. Huang, D. S. Talaga 638. Heterogeneous dynamics in glasses with single molecule spectroscopy. A. Adhikari, N. A. Capurso, D. Bingemann 639. Withdrawn. 640. New perspectives on fluorescence probes for protein single molecule spec­ troscopy. F. Luschtinetz, C. Dosche, M. U. Kumke 641. Nonlinear spectroscopic probes of unimolecular dynamics: Vibrationally-mediated tunneling in the ground electronic state of tropolone. D. Murdock, L. A. Burns, P. H. Vaccaro 642. Oligonucleotide encapsulated Ag nanoclusters as potential single molecule. C. I. Richards, Y. Antoku, T. Vosch, J. Yu, J-C. Hsiang, R. M. Dickson 643. Probing transcription factor dynamics at the single molecule level in a living cell. G-W. Li, J. Elf, X. S. Xie 644. Ultrafast dynamics imaging of lipid ana­ log interactions in giant unilamellar vesicles. F. S. Ariola, D. J. Mudaliar, R. P. Walvick, A. A. Heikal Section G BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Physical Chemistry Poster Session Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomoiecuiar Complexes G. A. Voth,

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Organizer

7:00-9:00 645. Withdrawn. 646. Analysis of conformational transition pathways of the c-subunit of F1FO ATP synthase. M. Mottamal, G. Krilov 647. Computational and theoretical study of translocation in T7 RNA polymerase. H-J. Woo

648. DNA flexibility measured with small angle X-ray scattering using gold nanoparticle markers. A. J. Mastroianni, D. A. Sivak, P. L. Geissler, A. P. Alivisatos 649. Dynamics of relatively small molecules bound to very large ones: Structure and internal motions of ribosome-bound nascent polypeptides. S. Cavagnero 650. Impact of local structural rearrangements on the directionality of a light-activated proton pump. A. N. Bondar, J. C. Smith 651. In vitro structure of photoreversible pre-amyloid oligomers determined with small-angle neutron scattering. A. Hamill, S. Wang, C. T. Lee 652. Large-scale allosteric conformational transition of adenylate kinase upon binding inhibitor appears to involve population-shift mechanism. K. Arora, C. L. Brooks III 653. New coarse-grained model of ATPdriven molecular machines. K. Yoshimoto, C. L Brooks III 654. Normal mode-based calculations of the diffuse X-ray scattering of biomoiecuiar crystals. D. Riccardi, Q. Cui, G . N . Phillips Jr. 655. QM/MM investigation of structure and spectroscopic properties of Vanadiumcontaining enzyme peroxidases. Y. Zhang, J. A. Gascon 656. Withdrawn. 657. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) for real-time and real-space detection of structural change in proteins. J. S. Salafsky 658. Structure and dynamics of a mycobacte­ rial outer membrane porin (MspA) by computer simulation. M. Kang, P. E. Smith 659. Three-layer ONIOM studies of Rhodopsin in the dark state: Shedding light on the protonation state of Glu-181. K. F. Hall, T. Vreven, M. J. Frisch, M. J. Bearpark THURSDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 157A Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomoiecuiar Systems Biomacromolecule Dynamics Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW X. Zhuang, H. Yang, and P. Selvin, Organizers N. Scherer,

Presiding

8:20 660. Illuminating and manipulating single-molecule membrane proteins. H. P. Lu 9:00 661. Driven dynamics and entropy fluctuations in single RNA folding. N. Scherer 9:40 662. Single molecule conformational dynamics. J. Wang, Q. Lu 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 663. Single molecule protein folding and unfolding. S. Marqusee 11:00 664. Single molecule FRET efficiency distributions of diffusing molecules with conformational dynamics. A. Szabo, I. Gopich 11:40 665. Unfolding behavior of Rossmann fold integrin I domain measured directly using optical tweezer. J. Seog, J. W. Dill, S. B. Smith, X. Zhang, C. Cecconi, S. Marqusee, C. Bustamante, T. A. Springer Section Β BCEC 157C Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomoiecuiar Complexes Computational Methods Cosponsored by BIOL

9:00 667. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations and sampling of transition paths. Y-Q. Gao, L. Yang, X. Fu 9:40 668. The conformational change and translocation mechanism of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. W. Wang 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 669. Cryo-EM data fitting using geo­ metric simulation. M. F. Thorpe, C. Jolley, S. Wells 11:00 670. Multiresolution protein modeling by combining theory and experiment. C. Clementi Section C BCEC 158 Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Proton and Chloride Pathways Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL R. D. Coalson and M. Kurnikova, Organizers J. Cuppoletti,

Presiding

8:20 671. Probing CLC chloride channels with pore blockers and chemical modifiers. T-Y. Chen, X-D. Zhang 9:00 672. Voltage-gated proton channels: An update. T. E. DeCoursey 9:40 673. Insights and predictions on proton conducting ion channels from molecular simulation. J . M. Swanson, J. Xu, H. Chen, G. A. Voth 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 674. Acid-base chemistry and the structure and electrostatics of ion-channel pores. G. D. Cymes, C. Grosman 11:00 675. Large scale simulation of gating and transport in membrane channels and transporters. E. Tajkhorshid 11:40 676. Proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase: Insights from QM/MM simula­ tions. N. Ghosh, X. P. Résina, Q. Cui 12:00 Concluding Remarks. Section D BCEC 157B Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Molecular Electronics and Electronic and Magnetic Materials Cosponsored by COLL R. Hernandez, D. Evans, and N. C. Seeman, Organizers R. Agarwal,

Presiding

8:20 677. Charge and energy transfer in functional molecular materials. J - L Brédas 9:00 678. Electronic properties of DNA: Theoretical studies in solution and biological environments. D. L Cox, R. R. Singh, J-C. Lin, A. Huebsch, M. S. Swaroop, R. G. Endres 9:40 679. Designing electronic properties of peptide nanotubes. N. Ashkenasy 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 680. Exciton and charge migration in rigid rod conjugated polymers. A. B. Walker, D. Beljonne, S. Athanasopoulos, J. Nelson, J. Kirkpatrick, E. Hennebicq 11:00 681. Emergent characteristics of biological electron transfer reactions. D. N. Beratan 11:40 682. Hg-Pt tunneling junctions using Cyclodextrin complexes as electron mediators. C. T. Mallon, R. J. Forster, T. E. Keyes

J. Ma, M. R. Diehl, and S. Huo, Organizers I. Andricioaei,

Presiding

8:20 666. How much experimental data is needed to predict a protein's structure? A. E. Roitberg, C. R. Crecca

TECH-119

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

PHYS/POLY

Section Ε

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

BCEC 159

Section A

Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solution Pure Water D. M. Neumark and K. D. Jordan, Organizers

BCEC 157A Single Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging and Manipulation of Biomolecuiar Systems Methods of Single-Molecule Detection Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, and BIOHW

K. Szalewicz,

Presiding X. Zhuang and P. Selvin,

8:20 683. 2-D IR spectroscopy of hydrogen bond fluctuations and switching in water. J. J. Loparo, S. T. Roberts, R. A. Nicodemus, P. B. Petersen, A. Tokmakoff 9:00 684. What can be learned from vibra­ tional spectroscopy of aqueous solutions? P. L. Geissler 9:40 685. Structure, dynamics of hydration water: First evidence of a liquid-liquid transition. M-C. Bellissent-Funel 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 686. The relationship between bulk water and protein dynamical transitions. T. Head-Gordon, M. E. Johnson, C. Malardier-Jugroot, A. A. Louis, R. K. Murarka 11:00 687. Synchrotron radiation based core-level electron spectroscopy studies of water and aqueous solutions using a liquid microjet facility at MAX-lab. G. Ôhrwall 11:40 688. Nuclear quantum effects: A key factor for water structure and dynamics? F. Paesani, G. A. Voth Section F BCEC 160A Excited Electronic States in Chemistry and Biology: Theory and Experiment DNA and RNA Bases T. J . Martinez and S. Matsika, M. Merchân,

Presiding

1:20 697. Reaction and transport phenomena in nanoscale networks undergoing structural changes. O. Orwar 2:00 698. Confocal 3-D single particle tracking and spectroscopy on single moving particles. H. Cang, C. S. Xu, H. Yang 2:40 699. Quantitative fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. B. Kraemer, P. Kapusta, S. Ruettinger, F. Koberling, B. Ewers, V. Buschmann, U. Ortmann, M. Patting, M. Wahl, R. Erdmann 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 700. Dissecting transcriptional regulation one repressor at a time. R. Phillips 4:00 701. Using feedback to beat the Boltzmann distribution. A. Cohen, W. E. Moerner 4:40 702. Elasticity of short DNA molecules: A combined experimental and theoretical study. Y. Seol, J. Li, P. C. Nelson, T. T. Perkins, M. D. Betterton 5:00 703. Fluorescence characterization of protease inactivation using single molecules confined in optically trapped aqueous nanodroplets. M. E. Greene, N. Mushero, T. Jianyong, A. Gershenson, L. S. Goldner Section Β BCEC 157C

Organizers

Presiding

8:20 689. Light-driven enzymatic DNA repair: What's hot and what's not. R. J. Stanley, G. Kodali, S. Saddiqui, Z. Hou, M. Narayanan 9:00 690. On the nature of long-lived singlet excited states in DNA. B. Kohler, T. Takaya, C. Su, C. E. Crespo-Hernândez 9:40 691. Hydrogen bonding in the guanosine-cytidine base pair promotes ultrafast nonradiative electronic relaxation. N. K. Schwalb, F. E. E. Temps 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 692. Femtosecond exciton dynamics in DNA. T. Fiebig 10:30 693. Ultrarapid dynamics process is nucleic acid oligomers and photoreceptor protein analogs. D. S. Larsen, A. Jailaubekov, C. To, S. E. Bradforth 11:10 694. Radiationless decay mechanism of cytosine: An ab initio study with comparisons to cytosine analogs. K. Kistler, S. Matsika 11:30 695. Finite temperature excited states of cytosine base in the native DNA environment. M. Valiev, K. Kowalski 11:50 696. Dynamics and mechanism in donor-acceptor bridged pi-stacked tertiary ureas. T. A. Zeidan, Q. Wang, T. Fiebig, F. D. Lewis Advanced Materials for Conversions and Separations in Energy Applications Fuel Cells and Electrocatalysis/ Separations and Catalysis Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS Current Techniques in Molecular Simulation of Biological Systems Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS and BIOHW Recent Advances in Studies of Molecular Processes at Interfaces Ions at Interface Sponsored by COMP, Cosponsored by PHYS

120-TECH

H. Yang, Organizer,

Organizers

Structural Determination, Refinement, and Modeling of Large Biomolecuiar Complexes Computational Methods Cosponsored by BIOL J. Ma, M. R. Diehl, and S. Huo, Organizers J-W. Chu,

2:00 710. Computational studies of ion dynamics in biological channels. S. Noskov, S. Yulia 2:40 711. Withdrawn. 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 712. Large ion channels: Role of inter­ actions with penetrating molecules. S. M. Bezrukov 4:00 713. Statistical determinants of ionic complexation: A basis for selective perme­ ability in ion channels. D. L. Bostick, C. L. Brooks III 4:20 714. Insights on the structural proper­ ties of the anthrax ion channel from elec­ trophysiological measurements and model­ ing. E. R. Chan, B. J. Nablo, T. L Nguyen, J. J. Kasianowicz, V. M. Stanford 4:40 715. Gas permeability of lipid mem­ branes and aquaporins. S. M. Saparov, P. Pohl, M. L Zeidel, J . C. Mathai Section D BCEC 157B Emergence of Function in Molecular Assemblies Molecular Electronics and Electronic and Magnetic Materials Cosponsored by COLL R. Hernandez and N. C. S e e m a n , Organizers D. Evans, Organizer,

Presiding

1:20 716. Phase transitions and memory switching in self-assembled Ge2Sb2Te5 nanowires. R. Agarwal 2:00 717. Structure and dynamics of a designed, extended conjugated chromophore-amphiphilic peptide complex by molecular dynamics simulation. H. Zou, M. J. Therien, J. K. Blasie 2:20 718. Assemblies on surfaces: Emer­ gence, chirality and potentials. M. A. Ratner 2:40 Intermission. 3:10 719. Molecular doping of organic semi­ conductors. A. Kahn, C. K. Chan 3:50 720. Controlling assemblies using periodic nanoporous hosts: From optical to magnetic materials. S. H. Tolbert 4:30 721. Linker-controlled energy and charge sharing within chlorophyll a assem­ blies. R. F. Kelley, M. J. Tauber, M. R. Wasielewski

Presiding

1:20 704. QM/MM structural determination of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. E. M. Sproviero, J. A. Gascon, J. P. McEvoy, G. W. Brudvig, V. S. Batista 2:00 705. Multiscale modeling of gating motion in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. X. Cheng, I. Ivanov, J. A. McCammon 2:40 706. Restraint of protein refinement at moderate resolution in PrimeX using the all-atom force field OPLS. J. A. Bell, Y.Cao 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 707. New approaches to protein struc­ ture prediction. Y. Zhang 4:00 708. Physics-based modeling of biomo­ lecuiar dynamics: Application to protein folding and aggregation. H. Lei, Z-X. Wang, T. Wang, H. Liu, C. Wu, J. Li, Y. Duan Section C BCEC 158

J. C. Mathai,

Presiding

1:20 709. Ion transport by gramicidin at 120 degrees centigrade. J. Cuppoletti, D. H. Malinowska, S. S. Birn

Section F BCEC 160A Excited Electronic States in Chemistry and Biology: Theory and Experiment Gas and Liquid Environments T. J . Martinez and S. Matsika, S. E. Bradforth,

Organizers

Presiding

1:20 728. Conformational^ controlled disso­ ciation of ions. A. G. Suits, M. H. Kim, L Shen 2:00 729. MMVB for conjugated hydrocarbon cations: Method development and applica­ tion to photochemistry in interstellar clouds. K. F. Hall, M. J. Bearpark, A. M. Tokmachev, M. Boggio-Pasqua, M. A. Robb 2:20 730. Exploring electronic structure and nuclear dynamics in tropolone. L. A. Burns, D. Murdock, P. H. Vaccaro 2:40 Intermission. 2:55 731. Chemical reactions in excited electronic states: Photodissociation of N3CI and N3H, and color tuning and reaction mechanism of luciferase biolumi­ nescence. Κ. Morokuma, I. Kerkines, Z. Wang, P. Zhang, L. W. Chung, M. Lundberg, S. Hayashi 3:35 732. Excited-state photoacidity: The interplay between solvation and electronic structure. N. Ben-Menachem, S. Keinan, N. Munitz, E. Pines 3:55 733. Probing the solvent effect on curve crossing in a photodissociation reaction in liquid water. C. A. Rivera, S. E. Bradforth, N. Winter, R. V. Harper, I. Benjamin 4:15 734. Substituent effects on dynamics at conical intersections: Alpha.beta enones. A. M. D. Lee, J. D. Coe, T. J. Martinez, A. Stolow 4:35 735. Photodissociation and excited states dynamics of the SH radical. X. Zheng, J. Wu, Y. Song, J. Zhang Advanced Materials for Conversions and Separations in Energy Applications Fuel Cells and Electrocatalysis Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by PHYS

Section Ε BCEC 159

POLY

Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solution Pure Water

Division of Polymer Chemistry

D. M. Neumark and K. D. Jordan, Organizers

C. Landry-Coltrain and

J. M. Weber,

Κ. Ε. Uhrich, Program Chairs

Presiding

SUNDAY MORNING 1:20 722. Dynamics of nanoscopic water. M. D. Fayer, D. E. Moilanen, E. Fenn, D. B. Spry, A. Goun, Ν. Ε. Levinger 2:00 723. Role of water in proton-coupled electron transfer reactions. S. Hammes-Schiffer 2:40 724. Physical origins of methane aggre­ gation in water. K. Szalewicz, O. Akin-Ojo 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 725. Solvation dynamics at biological interfaces. S. A. Corcelli

Biological Ion Channels: From Molecular Structure to Cellular Function Permeation and Selectivity Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL R. D. Coalson and M. Kurnikova, Organizers

4:00 726. Solvent adsorbate control of pro­ ton activity at the surface and in the inte­ rior of ice nanocrystals. J. P. Devlin, V. Buch 4:40 727. Conformational locking in the gas phase. T. V. Nguyen, D. W. Pratt

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Cosponsored by BIOHW J. Hagen, D. E. Morse, S. V. Patwardhan, K. Shiba, D. W. Smith Jr., M. E. Van Dyke, I. Yamashita, L. E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W. Hawthorne, and C. W. Widenhouse, Organizers S. J . Clarson, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 1. Be a scientist, save the world! Nanotechnology and energy. W. Adams, A. Jaffe, R. E. Smalley 9:20 2. Engineering life into materials. C. D. Montemagno 10:00 Intermission.

POLY

10:20 3. Nanostructure construction by protein supramolecules in wet nanotechnology. I. Yamashita 11:00 4. Novel families of ionene biomaterials. S. R. Williams, E. Borgerding, J. M. Layman, T. E. Long 11:30 5. Muscles from synthetic block copolymers. A. J. Ryan

Polymer Science of Everyday Things Polymeric Materials with Blood Contact A. B. Salamone, D. Bott, and R. S. Moore, Organizers

Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Stone Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers, Presiding 8:20 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 6. Metal coordination as synthon for the synthesis of polymeric materials. M. Week, C. R. South, V. Pinon III 8:55 7. Metallosupramolecular conjugated polymers. C. Weder 9:20 8. Self-assembly of block copolymer micelles directed by metal-ligand interac­ tions. P. Guillet, C-A. Fustin, C. Ott, U. S. Schubert, J-F. Gohy 9:45 9. Synthesis of well-defined terpyridinefunctionalized polystyrene by anionic polymerization. R. P. Quirk, M. Olechnowicz, C. Wesdemiotis, M. J. Polce 10:05 Intermission. 10:25 10. Polyesters and metal-coordinating ligands: A happy marriage? R. Hoogenboom, A. Winter, V. Marin, H. Hofmeier, U. S. Schubert 10:50 11. Metallobiomaterials with dibenzoylmethane polylactide macroligands. C. L. Fraser, G. Zhang, A. Pfister 11:15 12. Tailor-made supramolecular build­ ing units prepared by anionic polymeriza­ tion techniques. C. Ott, C. Guerrero-Sanchez, U. S. Schubert 11:35 13. Withdrawn. Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β Special Symposium in Honor of Sir Fraser Stoddart S. Rowan,

Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Otis

Organizer

8:30 14. Well-defined block copolymers through Η-bonding: Unique properties and morphologies. C. J. Hawker, K. E. Schaefer, M. J. Kade, E. J. Kramer, W. B. Lee, R. Elliott, G. H. Fredrickson, E. Meijer 9:00 15. Self-assembled urethane and urea "pseudo" polymers. W. Hayes, P. Woodward, A. Clarke, D. Hermida Merino, A. T. Slark 9:20 16. Investigations into supramolecular polymer architectures. S. J. Rowan 9:40 17. Microblock ionomer-membranes: Enhancement of fuel cell performance through control of ionomer sequencedistribution. H. M. Colquhoun, Z. Zhu, W. Mortimore, F. P. V. Paoloni, N. M. Walsby, D. Thompsett 10:10 18. Templated supra-macromolecular assemblies. D. Chun, D. J. Milliron, A. Nelson 10:30 19. Discrete aromatic stacking via the self-assembly of interpenetrated coordina­ tion cages. M. Fujita 11:00 20. Single-walled carbon nanotube spectroscopic and electronic field-effect transistor measurements: A combined approach. A. Star 11:20 2 1 . Multifunctional materials via selfassembly. M. Week 11:40 22. Nanostructuring surfaces into three dimensions: Combining lithography and self-assembly. J. Preece 12:00 23. The synthesis of large and small molecules using olefin metathesis cata­ lysts. R. H. Grubbs

W. J. Feast,

Presiding

K. J . Wynne, Organizer,

Presiding

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 24. Polymer-based embolization devices. G. Kaul, S. Keenan, J. O'Gara, S. Puri, R. Richard 9:00 25. Drug eluting coronary stents. M. Boden, R. Richard, M. Schwarz, F. Strickler 9:30 26. Sutures and shoelaces. P. Calvert 10:00 Intermission. 10:30 27. Cardiovascular catheters. V. Davé 11:00 28. If you were a blood cell would you like my material? The question of blood compatibility in blood filtration. M. Bertolucci 11:30 29. Current technologies in patients with chronic wounds. H. Brem Section Ε

Herman Mark Scholar Award Symposium Herman Mark Young Scholar Award in Honor of Gregory Tew C. Landry-Coltrain, R. Dhamodharan,

Organizer Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 30. Self-assembly of macromolecules and small molecules across the scales. S. I. Stupp 9:05 3 1 . Printable electronics: From living synthesis of conducting polymers to high mobility transistors. R. D. McCullough 9:35 32. Ionic liquid marbles and ghosts. T. McCarthy, L. Gao 10:05 Intermission. 10:25 33. Understanding and manipulating protein-protein interactions in membranes. W. F. DeGrado 10:55 34. An organic building block approach to novel macromolecular archi­ tectures. J. S. Moore 11:25 35. Designing polymers with strong similarity to biology. G. Tew

Section F Westin Boston Waterfront Douglas General Papers: Functional Materials

J. W a n g ,

Undergraduate Polymer Science Symposium Sponsored by SOCED, Cosponsored by POLY SUNDAY AFTERNOON Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C

D. Garcia,

10:00 42. Synthesis of graft copolymer of syndiotactic polystyrene and PMMA via activation of inert C-H bonds and atom transfer radical polymerization. J. Shin, L Browell, S. M. Jensen, C. Bae 10:20 43. Synthesis and properties of func­ tional composites formed from a respon­ sive polymer and titania nanoparticles. C. A. Coutinho, V. K. Gupta 10:40 44. Ring-opened polyphenethylnorbornene and its hydrogenated derivatives. J. P. Bishop, R. A. Register 11:00 45. ATRP of sugar-carrying amphiphilic graft copolymer using PVDF as macroinitiator. J-Y. Wang, Y-Y. Xu, F. Zhang, Y-L. Qian, B-K. Zhu 11:20 46. Soluble polyisobutylene-supported reusable catalysts for olefin cyclopropanation. J. Tian, D. E. Bergbreiter 11:40 47. Acidity of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) and a comparison with analogous polyelectrolytes. G. Wegner, B. Bingôl, W. H. Meyer

Organizer Presiding

8:00 36. Combination of ATRP and RAFT via "click" chemistry. M. J. Nasrullah, A. Vora, D. C. Webster 8:20 37. Synthesis of functional polymers with complex architectures by combination of ATRP and click reactions. H. Gao, K. Matyjaszewski 8:40 38. Phenols as accelerators for copper mediated—living radical polymerization in nonpolar solvents—set vs. ATRP? P. M. Wright, G. Mantovani, D. M. Haddleton 9:00 39. Atom and reverse atom transfer radical graft copolymerization of methylmethacrylate on cellulose. K. C. Gupta 9:20 40. Stimuli-responsive star-shaped polymers by living cationic polymerization: New methodologies for effective synthesis and stable gold nanoclusters. S. Kanaoka, N. Yagi, S. Kontani, Y. Fukuyama, S. Aoshima 9:40 4 1 . Synthesis of well-defined ROMP/ anionic block copolymers. S. B. Myers, R. A. Register

Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Cosponsored by BIOHW S. J. Clarson, D. E. Morse, S. V. Patwardhan, K. Shiba, D. W . Smith Jr., M. E. Van Dyke, I. Yamashita, L. E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W . Hawthorne, and C. W. Widenhouse, Organizers J. Hagen, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 48. Polysaccharide-derivatized materials as controlled and responsive protein delivery vehicles. K. L. Kiick 2:00 49. Self-assembling polymer-peptide conjugates: Toward scaffolds for regenerative medicine. P. Jing, J. H. Collier 2:30 50. Directing cell migration using oneway microarrays. G. Kumar, C. C. Ho, C. C. Co 3:00 5 1 . Polylactide-paclitaxel nanoparticles with controlled sizes and toxicities. R. Tong, J. Cheng 3:20 Intermission. 3:30 52. Nanoporous polymer nanocomposites and biomaterials from high internal phase emulsions. M. S. Silverstein 4:00 53. Silicone elastomers: Treatments for obesity. C. W. Widenhouse 4:30 54. Electroactive controlled release thin films. D. J. Schmidt, K. C. Wood, N. Zacharia, P. T. Hammond 4:50 55. Nanoparticle mediated oral delivery of insulin. E. Cabane, Ζ. Boukhal, J. P. Claverie, Y. G. Durant 5:10 56. Nanosized drug carrier systems from hodrophobically modified hydroxyethyl starch. J. Kressler, A. Beesher, K. Màder

Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Stone Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers C. L. Fraser and D. G. Kurth,

Presiding

1:00 57. Nanomolecular architectures: The application of crystal engineering to metallodendritic assembly. G. R. Newkome, C. N. Moorefield, P. Wang, S. Li, X. Lu 1:25 58. Rigid ττ-conjugated 2,2':6',2"-terpyridines as building blocks for new supramo­ lecular assemblies. A. Winter, M. Chiper, E. Tekin, D. A. M. Egbe, U. S. Schubert 1:45 59. Supramolecular macromolecules containing terpyridine in the side chain. G. Tew, R. Shunmugam, K. Aamer 2:05 60. Synthesis, characterization and micelle formation of supramolecular ABA triblock copolymers. M. A. R. Meier, D. Wouters, C. Ott, P. Guillet, C-A. Fustin, J-F. Gohy, U. S. Schubert 2:30 6 1 . Metallo-supramolecular polymers: Self-assembly, structure and properties. D. G. Kurth 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 62. Probing selectivity of ultrasound induced chain scission in reversible coordi­ nation polymers. J. M. Paulusse, J. P. Huijbers, R. P. Sijbesma 3:35 63. Theoretical modeling of equilibrium metallo-supramolecular gels. S. Wang, C-C. Chen, E. E. Dormidontova 3:55 64. Investigating the effects of lanthanide ions in metallo-supramolecular polymers and gels. S. J. Rowan, W. Weng, A. M. Jamieson 4:20 65. Tuning the size and morphology of metallo-supramolecular micelles. P. Guillet, C-A. Fustin, D. Wouters, S. Hoeppener, U. S. Schubert, J-F. Gohy 4:40 66. Iron(ll) tris(bipyridine)-centered star block copolymers based on a PEG macroinitiator. G. L. Fiore, J. L. Klinkenberg, A. Pfister, C. L. Fraser Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C National Starch & Chemical Company Award for Outstanding Graduate Research in Polymer Science and Engineering W . T. Ford,

Organizer

1:45 67. Biologically-derived, non-planar, microlens arrays. K. J. Henderson, E. T. Samulski, L E. Euliss, J. DeSimone 2:10 68. Progress in alternate proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells. J. E. McGrath 2:35 69. Supramolecular nanominietics: Replication of viruses, micelles, and other soft, self-assembled nanoscale objects. B. Maynor, I. LaRue, J. P. Rolland, A. A. Pandya, Z. Hu, S. S. Sheiko, J. DeSimone 3:00 70. Microfluidic large scale integration. S. R. Quake 3:25 Intermission. 3:40 7 1 . Dynamic balance: Sustaining a culture of innovation. R. L. Henn 4:05 72. Graduate students and entrepreneurship. J. M. Desimone 4:30 Award Presentation, R. Chandran. 4:35 73. Putting perfluoropolyethers to work. J. P. Rolland, J. M. DeSimone

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

TECH-121

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

POLY

Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Otis Polymer Science of Everyday Things Polymeric Materials with Tissue Contact K. J . Wynne, A. B. Salamone, and R. S. Moore, Organizers E. Luo,

Presiding

D. Bott, Organizer,

Presiding

1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 74. Polymers that allow safe and unique properties for first aid dressings. W. K. Dunshee 2:00 75. Skin healing with liquid bandages. A. B. Salamone 2:30 76. Diaper chemistry: Developing poly­ mers for babies and their parents. L. E. Drechsler 3:00 Intermission. 3:30 77. Polymeric catheters for bladder management: Current practice, problems and possibilities for the future. W. J. Feast 4:00 78. Three millennia of condoms. A. J. Ryan 4:30 79. Personal lubricants: Enhancing intimacy with polymer science. M. J. Fevola, L. Gentner, N. Ahmad, J. J. LiBrizzi

2:00 90. Polyurethane foams reinforced by modified carbon nanotubes. M. Kacperski, P. A. Waske, Y. G. Durant, R. P. Johnson 2:20 9 1 . Covalent layer-by-layer assembly using aminated MWNTs and silica nanoparticles. K-S. Liao, D. Bergbreiter 2:40 92. Relationship between bound fraction and glass transition temperature of poly(methyl methacrylate) adsorbed on modified silica surfaces. R. Madathingal, S. L. Wunder 3:00 93. Self-assembly of poly(styrene-b-2vinylpyridine) on neutral substrates. S. Ji, P. F. Nealey, P. Gopalan 3:20 94. Hard and flexible coatings based on nanoparticle-filled hyperbranched polymers. L Fogelstrôm, E. Malmstrom, M. Johansson, A. Huit 3:40 95. Structure and properties of polyethylene nanofibers from molecular dynamics simulations. S. Curgul, K. J. Van Vliet, G. C. Rutledge 4:00 96. Nanotechnology in coffee rings. Z. Lin, S. W. Hong, J. Xu 4:20 97. Combinatorial design of polymeric stabilizers for size-controlled synthesis of monodisperse gold nanoparticles in water. Z. Wang, B. Tan, I. Hussain, N. Schaeffer, M. Brust, A. I. Cooper 4:40 98. Synthesis and montmorilloniteintercalated behavior of dendritic molecules. R-J. Jeng, T-Y. Juang, C-C. Tsai, Y. C. Chen, T-M. Wu, S. A. Dai S U N D A Y EVENING

Section Ε

Section A

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Herman Mark Scholar Award Symposium Herman Mark Scholar Award in Honor of Craig Hawker

General Papers: Functional Materials

C. Landry-Coltrain,

C. W a n g and J. W a n g ,

J. M. Fréchet,

Organizer

Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 80. Supramolecular approach to nanoparticle-polymer composites. D. Chun, G. F. Eade, J. L Hedrick, D. J. Milliron, A. Nelson, R. C. Pratt, C. G. Wade 1:35 8 1 . Investigations into new supramolecular polymers. S. Rowan 2:05 82. Functional macromolecular architectures as versatile platforms for innovative vectors in nanomedicine. E. Harth 2:35 83. Organic/inorganic nanocomposite materials from well-defined polymers and ferromagnetic nanoparticles: Novel building blocks for meso-scale assembly. J. Pyun 3:05 Intermission. 3:25 84. From dendrimers to supramolecular and covalent nanostructures. K. L. Wooley 3:55 85. Functional polymers and other molecules at active surfaces and in layered assemblies: Designing for properties. J. M. J. Frechet 4:25 86. Facile chemistry for the synthesis of polymeric nanostructures: From cardiovascular disease to microelectronics. C. J. Hawker Section F Westin Boston Waterfront Douglas General Papers: Polymers in Nanotechnology Cosponsored by BIOHW D. Garcia,

Organizer

R. Madathingal,

Presiding

1:00 87. Annexin-A5 binding block copolymer nanoparticles. V. Schmidt, C. Giacomelli, F. Lecolley, J. Lai-Kee-Him, A. R. Brisson, R. Borsali 1:20 88. Novel magnetic nanocomposite based on thiol-ene photopolymers. M. Qaddoura, U. Hafeli 1:40 89. Novel synthesis of hierarchically structured block copolymer/layered silicate nanocomposites. R. E. Behling, E. W. Cochran

122-TECH

D. Garcia,

Organizer Presiding

6:00-8:00 99. Macromolecular assembly controlled by inclusion associations of α-, β- or 7-cyclodextrin. X. Guo, L. Li, L Fu, R. K. Prud'homme, S. F. Lincoln 100. Selectivity of lipase (Novozyme 435) in pegylated and siloxane polymers. R. Tyagi, M. K. Pandey, V. B. Tucci, R. Kumar, J. Kumar, V. S. Parmar, A. C. Watterson 101. Relative reactivity of cationic monomers: Isobutylene, styrene and ring substituted styrènes. N. Kolishetti, R. Faust 102. Continuous atom transfer radical polymerization. T. Noda, A. J. Grice, D. M. Haddleton 103. Novel synthetic method of thermosetting poly(phenylene ether) in water droplets/ toluene-heterogeneous system. J. Nunoshige, Y. Shibasaki, M. Ueda 104. Synthesis of polyisobutenyl succinic anhydrides: Product distribution and proposed reaction mechanism. R. Rausa 105. Aggregation induced luminescence of polyisobutene succinic anhydrides and imides. A. Pucci, R. Rausa, F. Ciardelli 106. Dielectric spectroscopy of polyguanidine polymers. E. R. Garland, D. R. Stevens, L. Guy, H-Z. Tang, Β. Μ. Novak, L. I. Clarke 107. Efficient synthesis of telechelic hydroxyallyl polyisobutylenes, a precursor to thermoplastic polyurethanes. R. Rajkhowa, R. Faust 108. Electrochemical and optical behavior of bis-imidazolium ionic liquids. W. Lee, Y. Kim, J. Y. Kim, K. D. Ahn, E. Kim, T. H. Kim 109. Synthesis and characterization of novel xylyl-based polyanhydrides and copoly­ mers with salicylate-based poly(anhydrideesters). C. Wang, Κ. Ε. Uhrich 110. High performance optical fiber coatings based on perfluorocyclobutyl (PFCB) aryl ether polymers. S. M. Budy, S. T. lacono, W. Hawkins, P. Foy, J. Ballato, D. W. Smith Jr. 111. Hyperbranched poly(arylene ether sulfonejs using an A 2 + BB'B" approach: Effects of reactivity. Z. Yu, M. Simons, E. Fossum 112. A facile synthesis route to hyper­ branched polymers via olefin metathesis. I. A. Gorodetskaya, R. H. Grubbs

113. Lipase (Novozyme 435) catalyzed chemoselective one pot synthesis of surfac­ tants. T. Farrell, R. Tyagi, M. K. Pandey, V. S. Parmar, A. C. Watterson 114. Self-assembly of the complexes of DNA with PAMAM dendrimers. C-J. Su, H-L. Chen, U-S. Jen, H-K. Lin, W-L. Liu 115. Modular design of photo-regulated chiroptical switching elements: Amide-based oligomers. G. D. Jaycox, E. D. Felton 116. Synthesis of high molecular weight polymers using ROMP. M. Wathier, S. S. Stoddart, M. W. Grinstaff 117. Polymerizations of 2-ethylhexyl methac­ rylate in fluorinated solvents. R. Karnati, W. T. Ford 118. Synthesis and polymerization of a new pyrrolidinone methacrylate monomer. J-F. Morizur, L. J. Mathias 119. Cobalt porphyrin mediated living radical polymerization of acrylic acid in water. C-H. Peng, B. B. Wayland 120. Block copolymers by a one pot, "green" process using ARGET ATRP in the pres­ ence of air. W. Jakubowski, L. Mueller, K. Matyjaszewski 121. Synthesis of multisegmented and degradable polymers by atom transfer radical cross-coupling (ATRC). R. Nicolay, K. Matyjaszewski 122. Atom transfer radical dispersion polymer­ ization of styrene in ethanol. K. Min, K. Matyjaszewski 123. Atom transfer radical polymerization in the presence of CuO—mechanism and kinetics study. W. Tang, H. Dong, Y. Kwak, K. Matyjaszewski 124. "Click" coupling of block copolymers prepared by ATRP. P. L. Golas, N. Tsarevsky, K. Matyjaszewski 125. Comparing copper, ruthenium, and osmium atom transfer radical polymeriza­ tion catalyst activity. W. A. Braunecker, W. C. Brown, K. Matyjaszewski 126. Comparison of (ArO)2TiCIX (X = CI, Cp) complexes in the living ring opening poly­ merization of caprolactone. A. D. Asandei, L Tang, G. Saha, M. Gilbert, T. A. Hanna, LLiu 127. Room temperature synthesis of vinylidene fluoride/vinylethoxysilane copoly­ mers with under uv irradiation. A. D. Asandei, Y. Chen 128. Cp2TiCI-Catalyzed styrene living radical polymerization initiated from 4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl chloride. A. D. Asandei, G. Saha 129. Cp2TiCI-Catalyzed graft copolymerization of pentafluorostyrene and dodecylfluoroheptyl acrylate from poly(glycidyl methac­ rylate) copolymers. A. D. Asandei, G. Saha 130. Design and synthesis of novel crosslinked polydimethylsiloxanes for use in flame retardant applications. V. B. Tucci, M. K. Pandey, R. Tyagi, V. S. Parmar, J. Kumar, A. C. Watterson 131. Development of hybrid particles using 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane: Evaluation of reversed-phase chromatographic perfor­ mance. K. Wyndham, N. Lawrence, K. Glose, J. Cook, D. Walsh, D. Brousmiche, P. Iraneta, B. A. Alden, C. Boissel, T. H. Walter 132. Preparation, isolation and evaluation of novel N-acyloxytrialkylammonium salts as initiators for free radical polymerization of methacrylates under photochemical, ther­ mal and accelerant promoted thermal conditions. O. Ansong, S. Jansen, Y. Wei, H. Lu, S. Li, Y. Guo, G. Pomrïnk 133. Evaluation of poly(methyl methacrylateb-butyl acrylate-b-methyl methacrylate) and poly(styrene-b-butyl acrylate-b-styrene) as stent coatings for delivery of paclitaxel. S. G. Brito, F. Strickler, K. Chan, M. Schwarz, M. Boden

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

134. Evaluation of poly(methyl methacylrateb-n-butyl acrylate-b-methyl methacrylate) as a stent coating for paclitaxel delivery. F. Strickler, S. G. Brito, M. Schwarz, N. Teigen, M. Boden 135. Flow-induced crystallization of model bimodal polyethylene copolymers. D. Smirnova, J. A. Komfield 136. Molecularly imprinted polymeric nanoparticles. M. J. Barasc, Y. G. Durant, S. Roy, J. P. Claverie 137. Self-healing phenomenon during the electrical breakdown of a spin-coated polyester dielectric. N. Venkatasubramanian, J. T. Strieker, M. F. Durstock, T. D. Dang, K. J. Wiacek, S. Fries-Carr 138. Poly(2,7-carbazoles) and polyindolo[3,2bjcarbazoles as field effect transistor. N. Blouin, S. Wakim, Y. Tao, M. Leclerc 139. Synthesis of end-functionalized polymers with various sequences by living cationic polymerization and their thermosensitive behavior. H. Shimomoto, S. Kanaoka, S. Aoshima 140. Synthesis of stimuli-responsive polymers by living cationic polymerization and their self-assemblies through ion complex formation. Y. Oda, T. Tsujino, S. Kanaoka, S. Aoshima 141. Thermal degradation of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) obtained by gamma radiation. E. Vargiin, A. Usanmaz 142. Catalytic curing and improved pyrolytic conversion of poly(methylcarbosilane). S-Y. Kim, M-H. Kim, Y-J. Kim, H-G. Woo, D-H. Kim, B-H. Kim, J. Jun, M-K. Han 143. Hybrid organic-inorganic polymer electrolytes based on poly(oxyethylene)s containing oligo(ethyleneglycol) and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane in the side chain. H-S. Ryu, J-C. Lee 144. Light-initiated polymerization of methyl methacrylate with p-X-C6H4SiH3 (X = F, CH3, OCH3)p. B-H. Kim, J. Jun, S-Y. Kim, M-H. Kim, Y-J. Kim, H-G. Woo, M-K. Han, H.Li 145. Highly absorbing superabsorbent polymers. T. K. Mudiyanselage, D. C. Neckers 146. Ring opening metathesis polymers as matrix materials for platinum(ll)porphyrin. M. Sandholzer, K. Stubenrauch, K. Waich, T. Mayr, G. Trimmel, F. Stelzer, C. Slugovc 147. Synthesis and characterization of pendant nitro group containing poly(arylene ether)s and amine functionalized polymers therefrom. A. Parthiban, S. Mahmasoni, D. Y. Kusuma, H. Yu, T. R. Babu Rao, C. L. L. Chai 148. Defect control of shrink materials for 248nm wavelength lithography. J . S. Oh, J. Kim, J. H. Kim, Y. H. Kim, T. S. Kim 149. Withdrawn. 150. Isotactic polystyrene with controlled molecular weight using olefins as chain transfer agents. B. T. Gall, F. Pelascini, H. Ebeling, J. Okuda, R. Miilhaupt 151. Synthesis and characterization of NLO polymers containing dendritic structures. Y. C. Chen, S. A. Dai, R-J. Jeng 152. Synthesis and characterization of polyvinyl benzyl amine) and its derivatives. W. H. Ting, S. A. Dai, W. C. Su, R-J. Jeng 153. Stable second-order nonlinear optical poly(amide-imide)-inorganic materials via sequential self-repetitive reaction. H. L. Lin, S. A. Dai, R-J. Jeng 154. Photoresponsive poly(malonic esters) and their applications to optical memory media. Y-K. Han, M-J. Lee 155. Block copolymers of styrene and lactide with varying lactide content. A. Parthiban, A. Likhitsup, H. Yu, C. L. L. Chai 156. New method for the synthesis of polyisobutylene-Woc/c-poly(methyl methacrylate) by using double diphenylethylene monoanion. T. Higashihara, D. Feng, R. Faust 157. Synthesis and characterization of hyperbranched polymer by cationic ring-opening polymerization of 3,4-epoxycyclohexanemethanol. Y. Kitajyo, M. Tamaki, H. Kaga, N. Kaneko, T. Satoh, T. Kakuchi 158. Synthesis and characterization of novel triphenylamine derivatives containing ether bonds in the main chain. K. Yamada, J. Sim, S. Yokokura, H. Sato 159. Synthesis and properties of sulfonated poly(phenylene). K. Nakabayashi, Y. Shibasaki, M. Ueda

POLY 160. Facile synthesis of tadpole-shaped dendrimers based on aromatic polyam­ ides, i. Washio, Y. Ito, Y. Shibasaki, M. Ueda 161. High refractive index sulfur-containing polyacrylates with high Abbe numbers. R. Okutsu, Y. Shibasaki, M. Ueda 162. Controlled ring-opening polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone using polymer-sup­ ported scandium catalyst. A. Takasu, M. Oshimura, T. Hirabayashi 163. New dual catalytic system for combina­ tion of chain polymerization and step polymerization: Ring-opening polymeriza­ tion of epsilon-caprolactone and succes­ sive dehydration polycondensation with dicarboxylic acid using same catalyst. A. Takasu, T. Hisashi, N. Yuuki, T. Hirabayashi 164. Evaluation of stimuli responsive de novo β-hairpin peptides. Y. Hirano, N. Nishishita, Y. Morimoto 165. Precise tuning of thermoresponsive property of poly(/\/-isopropylacrylamide)s by combination of ATRP and "click" chem­ istry. R. Kakuchi, A. Toda, A. Narumi, R. Sakai, T. Satoh, K. Sugiyama, C. W. Macosko, A. Hirao, T. Kakuchi 166. Preparation of copolymer consisting of ethylenedioxythiophene and triphenylamine units. Y. Matsuno, J. Sim, H. Sato 167. Preparation of surface reactive core-shell type nano-associates entrapping enzyme in the core. A. Kawamura, C. Kojima, M. lijima, A. Harada, K. Kono 168. Synthesis and thermoresponsive prop­ erty of poly(/V-isopropylacrylamide) with aryl chain-end and its cyclodextrin-inclusion complex. A. Narumi, Q. Duan, Y. Miura, T. Satoh, H. Kaga, T. Kakuchi 169. Preparation and binding properties of a self-assembled film based on modified cyclodextrin and diazoresin. X. Tian, J. Zhi, W. Zhao, Y. Pan, J. Shi, B. Tong, Y. Dong 170. Relationship between functional groups and dielectric properties of hybrid films. G. Xie, D. Sun 171. Synthesis of amphiphilic ABA triblock copolymer with well-defined glycopolymer segments via ATRP. Y-Y. Xu, J-Y. Wang, Y-L. Qian, F. Zhang, B-K. Zhu 172. Studies on the thermal properties of star polymer with â-cyclodextrin core. Y. Jiang, L Du, F. Lu, Y. Wu, W. Xu 173. Studies on activity and stability of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator. J. Gang, C. Cao, J. Shao 174. Emulsion polymerization of styrene using SMA-g-MPEG as surfactant. H. Wang, C. Tian, J. Yu, F. Liu 175. Mechanical properties and morphology of tremolite/ABS composites. X. Liu, J. Fang, Z. Li, F. Liu 176. Synthesis and characterization of soluble branched polymer via free radical copolymerization of styrene and divinylbenzene. C. Tian, J. Yu, H. Wang, F. Liu 177. Synthesis and aggregation-induced emission of tetraphenylethylene derivatives and their blends with poly(methyl methacrylate). Y. Hong, Y. Dong, H. Tong, M. HauBler, J. W. Y. Lam, Β. Ζ. Tang 178. Synthesis and properties of a pyrazolinecontaining hyperbranched polyarylene. H. Peng, N. Zhang, Β. Ζ. Tang 179. Pyridylphosphine ligand for iron-based atom transfer radical polymerization. T. T. L. Nguyen, Z. Xue, H. D. Q. Dang, S. K. Noh, W. S. Lyoo 180. Atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate using pyridylphos­ phine as a ligand. Z. Xue, J. Y. Kim, S. K. Noh, W. S. Lyoo 181. Preparation of porous P(MMA-EGDMA) particles by seeded two-step swelling method. Y. Cui, Z. Hou, R. Li, C. Kan

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

182. Nanocomposite of polyaniline/carbon nanotube as Pt catalyst carrier for metha­ nol electrocatalytic oxidation. Y. Xu, X. Peng, Y. Deng, G. Lei, Y. Zheng, Y. Ma, LDai 183. Preparation of Pt catalyst on PANI/C composite and its role on electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol. X. Peng, Y. Xu, Y. Deng, Y. Zheng, G. Lei, Y. Ma, L Dai 184. Synthesis of Fe304 polymer magnetic composite nanoparticles with carboxylate groups in self-emulsification. C. Zhou, W. Liu, G. Xu, X. Z. Kong 185. Electrochemical properties of the selfassembled films based on polyanilines and carboxylated polyanilines. M. Xiao, J. Zhi, B. Tong, W. Zhao, J. Shi, Y. Pan, Y. Dong 186. Preparation of highly crosslinked monodispersepoly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) microspheres by two-stage dispersion polymerization. M. Cao, B. Tong, J. Zhi, J. Shi, Y. Dong 187. Withdrawn. 188. Preparation of polyurethane and acrylic hybrid latexes. X. Zhu, X. Jiang, Z. Zhang, X. Z. Kong 189. Formation and fragmentation of a revers­ ible polymer network. H. Huo, C. Wu 190. Rheological behaviors and structural transitions in a polyethersulfone modified epoxy system during phase separation. S. Li, Y. Yu, M. Wang, G. Zhan 191. Two-dimensional time resolved light scattering used in the study on process of polymerization induced phase separation. X. Tang, L. Zhao 192. Viscoelastic and molecular weight effect on phase separation in PEI modified epoxy blends. W. Gan, Y. Yu, S. Li Section Β BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

205. Preparation of polystyrene based surface modifiers for nano-objects through living radical polymerization technique. S. C. Hong, J. H. Woo, I. H. Choi, Y. J. Lee, S-S. Lee, M. Park 206. Nano-encapsulation of multiple fluorophores in thin films of diblock copolymer micelles. S. I. Yoo, K-S. Kim, B-H. Sohn 207. Chemical modification of C60 by destruc­ tive electrophilic substitution reaction in polyphosphoric acid/phosphorus pentoxide. D-H. Lim, H-J. Lee, L-S. Tan, J-B. Baek 208. In situ synthesis of Nylon 610 containing functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes via interfacial polymerization. J-Y. Jeong, H-J. Lee, L-S. Tan, J-B. Baek 209. In situ polymerization of polybenzoxazole in the presence of carbon nanotubes in polyphosphoric acid. S-M. Eo, S-J. Oh, L-S. Tan, J-B. Baek 210. One-pot purification of single-walled carbon nanotube in a mild polyphosphoric acid. S-W. Han, S-J. Oh, L-S. Tan, J-B. Baek 211. Synthesis of environmentally benign material sesbania gum-stabilized Ag nanoparticles. X. J. Feng, G. Gao, W. Xu 212. Synthesis of Si02/PS core/shell nanospheres with a self-templating method. Q. Zhang, Y. Zhai, R. Li, F. Liu, G. Gao 213. Synthesis of ZnS/PMAA/PMMA nanocomposite hybrids via catalytic chain transfer polymerization (CCTP). S. Chen, L. Chen, L Guo, Q. Li, J. Wang 214. Synthesis of ZnS nanocrystals prepared by PMAA-b-PBA block copolymers via catalytic chain transfer polymerization (CCTP). S. Chen, L Chen, J. Wang, L. Guo, Q. Li 215. Electro-optical properties of confined structured multilayer films prepared by the spin-assembly method. H. Kim, J. Cho, D. Y. Kim, K. Char MONDAY MORNING

General Papers: Polymers in Nanotechnology Cosponsored by BIOHW

Section A

D. Garcia, Organizer

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A

C. Wang and J. Wang, Presiding 6:00-8:00 193. Synthesis, molecular and morphological characterization of second generation dendritic copolymers of butadiene and isoprene with different microstructures. A. Avgeropoulos, S. Rangou, E. L. Thomas, V. Krikorian 194. Hydrogel encapsulated quantum dots. T. Cai, J. Li, J. Zhang, A. Lin, M. Marquez, Ζ. Hu, A. Neogi 195. Nanoparticle dispersion utilizing polyhe­ dral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). R. D. Cook, P. A. Wheeler, R. Misra, S. E. Morgan 196. Preparation and properties of effective epoxy/clay nanocomposites with exfoliated reactive flame retardant clay. W. S. Wang, Y. W. Wu, H. S. Chen, Y. Chen-Yang 197. Enhancing dispersion and properties of MWNT-polymer nanocomposites by con­ trolled noncovalent interactions. D. Linton, M. D. Dadmun 198. Polymer-modified opal nanopores. 0. Schepelina, I. Zharov 199. Functionalized nanoparticles using active ester monomers as shell component. N. Metz, B. Lange, P. Theato, R. Zentel 200. Fabrication of ordered anodic alumina pretextured from block copolymer micelles. B. Kim, S. Park, T. P. Russell, T. McCarthy 201. Thermal degradation of polypropylene. R. Bernstein, S. M. Thornberg, R. A. Assink, A. N. Irwin, J. M. Hochrein, J. R. Brown, D. K. Derzon, S. B. Klamo, R. L Clough 202. Sequential formation of nanopores in thin films of block copolymer mixtures. H. Mao, T. P. Russell 203. Preparation of stable superhydrophobic surfaces: Poly(p-xylylene) conformai coat­ ing. J. A. Lee, T. J. McCarthy 204. Hydrolytic degradation of montmorillonite/ poly(e-caprolatone)-based polyurethane nanocomposites. E. H. Jeong, H. J. Jeon, T. G. Kim, J. H. Youk

Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Cosponsored by BIOHW S. J. Clarson, J. Hagen, S. V. Patwardhan, K. Shiba, D. W. Smith Jr., M. E. Van Dyke, I. Yamashita, L. E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W. Hawthorne, and C. W. Widenhouse, Organizers D. E. Morse, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 216. Physico-chemical studies of pro­ tein surface interactions. C C Perry, P. Roach 9:00 217. Using branched macromolecules to sense surface properties with molecular resolution. S. S. Sheiko, F. C. Sun, H-l. Lee, K. Matyjaszewski, D. Shirvaniants, M. Rubinstein 9:20 218. Oligosaccharide-modified polymers as nucleic acid transfection agents. J. M. Layman, D. Appelhans, B. Voit, T. E. Long 9:40 219. Oriented immobilization of anti­ body fragments on polymer brushes for highly sensitive biorecognition. R. Iwata, Y. Iwasaki, K. Akiyoshi 10:00 220. Designing biocompatible and activatable nanoscale carriers of bioactive agents. A. Almutairi, M. Berezin, R. Rossin, M. J. Welch, C. J. Hawker, K. L. Wooley, J. M. J. Fréchet 10:30 Intermission. 10:50 221. Preparation and biodégradation of nanogels as carriers for carbohydrate drugs. D. J. Siegwart, J. K. Oh, K. Matyjaszewski 11:20 222. Synthesis and characterization of nanocarrier containing antioxidant 4-methylcoumarin. M. K. Pandey, R. Tyagi, V. S. Parmar, V. B. Tucci, J. Kumar, T. Shea, A. C. Watterson 11:40 223. Targeted, linear-dendritic diblock copolymer systems for DNA vaccination. D. K. Bonner, Κ. Ο Wood, D. Nguyen, L. Tashima, Q. Leng, J. Chen, R. S. Langer, P. T. Hammond

12:00 224. Deformation and fracture of protein materials: Balancing strength, energy dissipation and robustness. M. J. Buehler, T. Ackbarow, S. Keten Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Stone Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Organometallic Polymers, Metallopolymers and Nanoparticles Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers R. J. Puddephatt, B. Hasenknopf, and F. Jaekle, Presiding 8:00 225. Isotactic, syndiotactic and heterotactic architectures in self-assembled metal-containing polymers. R. J. Puddephatt, C. A. Wheaton 8:25 226. Investigation of acyclic diene metathesis as a method to synthesize organometallic polymers with molybdenum dimers in the backbone. G. V. Shultz, D. R. Tyler 8:50 227. Diversity-oriented synthesis of ττ-conjugated polymers by reactions of regioregular organotitanium polymers. I. Tomita, W. M. Zhou, M. Otonashi, K. Fukuda 9:15 228. Boron functionalization of polysty­ rene: From luminescent materials to blockcopolymer nanostructures. F. Jaekle, Y. Qin, K. Parab, C. Cui 9:35 229. Photodegradation of metal-contain­ ing polymers: Secondary thermal transi­ tions and the cage-effect in solid-state polymers. B. C Daglen, D. R. Tyler 10:00 230. Polymer-functionalized gold nanorods and their self-organization into ring-like arrays. E. R. Zubarev, B. P. Khanal 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 231. Polymer-nanoparticle composites from block copolymer precursors. R. B. Grubbs, L. B. Sessions, A. Sundararaman, A. A. Bouchard, J. A. Garber 10:55 232. Preparation of anisotropic crystal­ line metallopolymers using ττ-conjugated Schiff base-nickel complex. H. Houjou, Y. Watanabe, K. Araki 11:20 233. Polyoxometalates as molecular building blocks. S. Favette, C. Allain, B. Hasenknopf, L. Ruhlmann 11:45 234. Exciton dynamics in self-as­ sembled conjugated materials for organic electroluminescence. V. A. Montes, P. AnzenbacherJr. Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Macromolecular Architectures Cosponsored by BIOHW K. Muellen, Organizer P. Bauerle, Presiding R. C. Advincula and S. Valiyaveettil, Organizers, Presiding 8:55 Introductory Remarks. 9:00 235. High triplet energy conjugated polymer hosts for electroluminescence. A. B. Holmes, S. E. Watkins, K. L. Chan, G. A. McCluskey, R. Borthwick, S. Y. Cho, A. C. Grimsdale 9:30 236. Synthesis and properties of substi­ tuted polyacetylenes: Recent advances. T. Masuda, F. Sanda, M. Shiotsuki 10:00 237. Novel thiophene-based architec­ tures and topologies. P. Bauerle 10:30 Intermission. 10:40 238. Polymer semiconductor nano­ structures with 1-, 2-, and 3-D confine­ ments: Synthesis, self-assembly, and device applications. S. A. Jenekhe

TECH-123

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

POLY

11:10 239. Synthesis and characterization of pentacene-based oligomers and polymers. T. Okamoto, Z. Bao 11:30 240. Soluble and processable hyperbranched conjugated polyelectrolytes. P. Taranekar, Q. Qiquan, H. Jiang, K. S. Schanze, J. R. Reynolds Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Otis Polymer Science of Everyday Things The Bionic Person K. J. Wynne, D. Bott, and R. S. Moore, Organizers R. J. Mrsny,

Presiding

A. B. Salamone, Organizer,

Presiding

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 241. The challenge of spinal disc replacement. A. J. Clemow 9:00 242. Silicones in humans: From body art to life saving medical devices. J. M. Lambert 9:30 243. The polymer chemistry of contact lenses: Improving comfort with bulk and surface modifications. R. S. Ward, J.Jacob 10:00 Intermission. 10:30 244. Intraocular lenses. J. F. Kunzler 11:00 245. Hyaluronic acid: From essential body component to valuable medical products. A. J. Coury 11:30 246. From willow bark to polyaspirin: Discovery and innovations. K. E. Uhrich Section Ε Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β Herman Mark Scholar Award Symposium Herman Mark Senior Scholar Award in Honor of Krzysztof Matyjaszewski C. Landry-Coltrain, H. Hall Jr.,

Organizer

Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 247. Investigation of LCP polymeriza­ tion by Maldi-TOF spectroscopy using novel tailor-made matrices. A. Somogyi, A. B. Padias, R. Bates, P. Shu, H. Hall Jr. 8:35 248. Active-dormant species interconversion in ring-opening polymerizations. S. Penczek, P. Kubisa, A. Duda 9:05 249. Copolyoxetane soft block polyurethanes for polymer surface modifica­ tion. K. J. Wynne 9:35 250. Understanding the role of the catalyst in ATRP: Toward better polymer­ ization control. N. V. Tsarevsky 10:05 Intermission. 10:25 251. From well defined block copoly­ mers to active carbon nanostructures with tunable electronic properties. T. Kowalewski 10:55 252. Reactivity ratios in surface-initi­ ated copolymerizations. D. L. Patton, K. A. Page, K. L. Genson, M. J. Fasolka, K. L. Beers 11:25 253. ATRP as a tool for synthesis of nanostructured functional materials. K. Matyjaszewski Section F Westin Boston Waterfront

Polymers from Renewable Resources G. W. Coates,

9:15 256. Synthesis and properties of repeating sequence copolymers of PLGA. R. M. Stayshich, J. Li, T. Y. Meyer 9:40 257. Water-soluble poly(hydroxyalkanoate)s. C. Scholz, J. Sparks 10:05 Intermission. 10:30 258. Organo-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of o-carboxyanhydrides. D. Bourissou 10:55 259. Synthesis of chain end functionalized poly(ester)s by organic catalysis as a powerful tool for block copolymer construc­ tion. A. P. Dove 11:20 260. Polyesters from renewable resources: Organocatalytic strategies for controlled polymerization reactions. R. M. Waymouth, J. L. Hedrick, R. C. Pratt, F. Nederberg, B. G. G. Lohmeijer, D. A. Culkin, O. Coulembier, N. E. Kamber, W. Jeong, M. K. Kiesewetter, E. J. Shin MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Cosponsored by BIOHW S. J . Clarson, J . Hagen, D. E. Morse, K. Shiba, D. W. Smith Jr., M. E. Van Dyke, I. Yamashita, L E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W. Hawthorne, and C. W. Widenhouse, Organizers S. V. Patwardhan, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 261. A synthesis approach to under­ stand the role of peptide motifs in mineral­ ization. K. Shiba 2:00 262. Interactions of biomolecules with inorganic materials: Principles, applications and future prospects. S. V. Patwardhan, C. C. Perry 2:30 263. Directed laboratory evolution of biomineralizing enzymes. L. A. Bawazer, D. P. Kolodin, M. Izumi, D. E. Morse 2:50 264. Understanding silica nanostructure formation using natural structures and bio-inspired techniques. M. J. Doktycz, M. Hildebrand, S. T. Retterer, D. P. Allison 3:10 265. Toward artificial diatoms: Struc­ ture-function studies of oligoamine-induced silica condensation. D. Robinson, B. A. Simmons, R. N. Zuckermann 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 266. Utilizing two capabilities of a single peptide aptamer for constructing nano­ structures. K-l. Sano, K. Shiba 4:10 267. Interactions of aluminium nanoclusters with proteins. O. Deschaume, A. Fc jrnier, C. C. Perry 4:30 268. Synthesis and characterization of water soluble and amphiphilic polyethyl­ ene glycol) coated magnetite nanoparticles. Q. Xie, A. A. Williams, R. D. Gandour, A. R. Esker 4:50 269. Polymer modified gold and gado­ linium nanoparticles for targeting, imaging, and treatment of cancer cells. M. D. Konopacki, S. G. Boyes

1:50 272. Redox-responsive and macroporous polymeric microcapsules from water-soluble poly(ferrocenylsilanes). Y. Ma, W. Dong, M. A. Hempenius, H. Môhwald, G. J. Vancso 2:10 273. Self-assembly of polyferrocenylsilane-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) diblock copolymers in solution. M. A. Winnik, H. Wang, L Shen, G. Guerin, I. Manners 2:35 274. Templated self-assembly of poly(styrene-b-ferrocenyldimethylsilane) block copolymers using substrate topography. C. Ross, J. Y. Cheng, V. P. Chuang, G. J. Vancso 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 275. Engineering of interfaces and macromolecular nanotechnology with poly(ferrocenylsilanes). G. J. Vancso, M. I. Giannotti, M. A. Hempenius, Y. Ma, H. Schonherr, W. Shi, J. Song, E. Tocha, S. Zou 3:40 276. Micellization of PFS block copolymers: A bottom-up approach for novel nanomaterials. I. Manners, M. A. Winnik, X-S. Wang, H. Wang, K. Liu

Presiding

U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers

124-IECH

M. A. Winnik and G. J. Vancso,

C. Landry-Coltrain,

Organizer

J. M. DeSimone, Organizer,

Presiding

F. D. Blum,

Presiding

4:25 297. Novel biomedical materials. R. S. Langer

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Nanostructured Materials and Nanocomposites Cosponsored by BIOHW

R. C. Advincula and S. Valiyaveettil, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 279. Nanoconfinement for organic/ inorganic hybrid materials. K. Muellen, R. Bauer, C. Clark Jr., M. Klapper, L Zhi 2:30 280. Gold nanoparticle-polyaniline nanocomposites. H. Xia, H. Chung, C. Sow, H. S. Chan 3:00 281. Nanocomposites based on conjugated polymers and rodlike nanoparticles. C. Weder 3:30 Intermission. 3:40 282. Template electrosynthesis and structural characterization of various multisegmented metal-conjugated polymer nanowires. V. Callegari, S. M. Demoustier-Champagne, O. Reynes, L. Gence, S. Melinte, V. Bayot 4:00 283. Irradiation and metal-containing conjugated-polymer nanocomposites. F. D. Blum, Z. Li, S. K. Pillalamarri, M. F. Bertino 4:30 284. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured carbon nanotubes/organic materials composites. A. Baba, F. Sato, N. Fukuda, H. Ushijima, K. Yase

Westin Boston Waterfront Otis Polymer Science of Everyday Things Polymers Deliver K. J. Wynne, A. B. Salamone, and D. Bott, Organizers A. J. Ryan,

Section F Westin Boston Waterfront Douglas Polymers from Renewable Resources M. A. Hillmyer,

Organizer

G. W. Coates, Organizer,

Presiding

1:25 298. Mechanistic insights gained from studies of lactide polymerization by slow (M = AI) and fast (M = Ca) metal coordi­ nate catalysts. M. H. Chisholm, J. Gallucci, K. T. Quisenberry, G. Yaman, Z. Zhou 1:50 299. Insights into the mechanisms of cyclic ester polymerizations catalyzed by metal complexes. C. M. Silvernail, W. B. Tolman, M. A. Hillmyer 2:15 300. Group 4 metal initiators for the stereoselective polymerization of raclactide. M. D. Jones, A. J. Chmura, C. J. Chuck, M. G. Davidson, M. D. Lunn 2:40 301. Single-site rare earth catalysts for immortal ROP of lactide and ROP of morpholine-2,5-dione. A. Amgoune, P. Castro, C. M. Thomas, J-F. Carpentier 3:05 Intermission. 3:20 302. Production of aliphatic polycarbon­ ates from carbon dioxide and oxiranes and oxetanes. D. J. Darensbourg 3:45 303. Plastics with reduced environmen­ tal impact: C 0 2 as a comonomer for polymer synthesis. S. D. Allen 4:10 304. Branched polylactides and polylactide particles. L. M. Pitet, K. P. McNamee, D. M. Knauss

Presiding

R. S. Moore, Organizer, 8:20 Introductory Remarks. 8:25 254. Mother Nature as a source of new materials: Everything old is new again. J. A. Moore 8:50 255. Synthesis and characterization of isosorbide carbonate-lactide copolymers. O. Betiku, M. Jenni, K. Ludescher, E. Meierdierks, J. Lunt, J. D. Schroeder

Herman Mark Award in Honor of Robert Langer

Organizer

Section C

Organizer

M. A. Hillmyer, Organizer,

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β

K. Muellen,

4:05 277. Synthesis of AB diblock and ABA triblock copolymers comprised of polyisobutylene and poly(vinylferrocene) segments. T. Higashihara, R. Faust 4:20 278. Strained [1]metallacyclophanes with aluminum and gallium in bridging positions: New monomers for ring-opening polymerizations. J . Miiller, C. L Lund, J. A. Schachner, J. W. Quail

Section D

Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Organometallic Polymers, Metallopolymers and Nanoparticles Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW

Section Ε

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 291. Role of artificial proteins in disman­ tling the barriers between polymer chemis­ try and biology. D. A. Tirrell 1:35 292. Tissue engineering in the musculo­ skeletal system: Disease and repair. J. Elisseeff 2:05 293. Paradigm shifting medical device creation: Leveraging material science and technology into entrepreneurial opportu­ nity. M. S. Williams 2:35 294. Designing novel biodegradable polymers: From polyanhydrides to polymer drugs. Κ. Ε. Uhrich 3:05 Intermission. 3:25 295. Hydrogel-based local drug deliv­ ery: Guidance from the pioneer. A. J. Coury 3:55 296. Organic delivery vehicles for prob­ ing and treating biological systems: Adapt­ ing fabrication processes from the elec­ tronics industry for use in nanomedicine. J. M. DeSimone

Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Stone

2:30 287. Polymers delivering benefits to our daily lives. M. Drzewinski, M. J. Jurek 3:00 Intermission. 3:30 288. Principle of OROS® technologies and successful development of various OROS® products. L. C. Dong, P. Shivanand 4:00 289. The role of silicone elastomers in treatments for obesity. C. W. Widenhouse 4:30 290. Using polymers to improve the delivery of drugs. R. J. Mrsny

Presiding

Presiding

1:00 270. Polyferrocenylsilanes: New multi­ functional materials. I. Manners 1:25 271. Functionalized cycloheptatrienylcyclopentadienyl sandwich complexes as building blocks in metallo-supramolecular chemistry. M. Tamm, A. Kunst, S. Buschel

1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 285. Osmotic drug delivery: The science and engineering behind blood pressure tablets and other osmotic pharmaceuticals. A. G. Thombre 2:00 286. Patches: Hormone/pain control/ nicotine. J-C. Chen

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

POLY 4:35 305. New polylactides from a-hydroxyacids derived from renewable resources. G. L Baker, M. R. Smith III 5:00 306. Perfluoropolyether-co-polylactide segmented copolymers: Surface, biodégradation, and Theological properties. D. Haynes, A. Singh, G. Harrison, C. C. Yang, K. J. L Burg, D. W. Smith Jr.

Section Β

Section D

Westin Boston Waterfront Stone

Westin Boston Waterfront Otis

Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Materials with Special Properties Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW

40 Years of Macromolecules Cosponsored by ACS Publications, PMSE, and PRES

Undergraduate Research Poster Session Polymer Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by PMSE, POLY, and SOCED

U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers

MONDAY EVENING

W . K. Chan and M. Rehahn,

Section A

8:10 315. Metal containing polymers with wide absorption range for photovoltaic applications. W. K. Chan, K. W. Cheng, C. S. K. Mak, W. Y. Tarn, A. B. Djurisic 8:35 316. Conjugated organometallic poly­ mer containing both a lumophore and a redox center in the main chain. P. D. Harvey 9:00 317. Platinum-acetylide oligomers: Triplet exciton and negative polaron struc­ ture and dynamics. K. S. Schanze, J. R. Keller, K. D. Glusac, E. O. Danilov, S. Mcllroy, P. Sreearunotha, J. R. Miller 9:25 318. From design to assembly of lumi­ nescent metal-based molecular functional materials. V. W. Yam 9:45 319. Functional nanostructured phos­ phorescent materials driven by weak closed-shell metal-metal interactions and metal-ligand coordination. C-C. Kwok, S-C. Yu, Ι. Η. Τ. Sham, C-M. Che 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 320. Polyfluorene-based iridium com­ plex polymers for organic light-emitting diodes. M. Rehahn, J. Langecker 10:50 321. Copolymers by radical polymer­ ization containing phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes. C. Ulbricht, C. R. Becer, A. Winter, U. S. Schubert 11:10 322. Luminescent materials based on lanthanide-containing conducting metallopolymers. X-Y. Chen, X. Yang, B. J. Holliday 11:30 323. Optoelectronic properties of conducting metallopolymers incorporating well-defined metal binding sites. A. Dennis, R. C Smith 11:45 324. Blue fluorescent host- red phos­ phorescent guest bearing polynorbornene. F. Niedermair, G. Kremser, F. Stelzer, C. Slugovc

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Sci-Mix C. Landry-Coltrain,

Organizer

8:00-10:00 104-107,109-112,118,120,123,126-127, 131-132,141,145,147,150,159-160, 184,194-195,197,199-200, 202, 208. See previous listings. 400-401, 403, 406-408, 410-411, 415, 417, 419-421, 424-426, 432, 434, 439, 441442, 449, 458, 461-462, 469-471, 473, 477-478, 480-481, 485, 487, 499-501, 504. See subsequent listings. TUESDAY MORNING Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Session V Cosponsored by BIOHW S. J . Clarson, J . Hagen, D. E. Morse, S. V. Patwardhan, D. W . Smith Jr., M. E. Van Dyke, I. Yamashita, L. E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W . Hawthorne, and C. W . Widenhouse, Organizers K. Shiba, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 307. Enzyme-catalyzed polymer synthesis and modification reactions. R. A. Gross 9:00 308. Biocatalytic and bioinspired routes to new silicon containing organic-inorganic hybrids and polymers. S. J. Clarson 9:30 309. Enzymatic routes to fluorosilicone copolymers. A. S. Palsule, Y. Poojari, D. R. Stauss, V. Hadzivrettas, S. J. Clarson, R. A. Gross 9:50 310. Enzymatic synthesis and microstructure analysis of silicone polyesteramides. B. Sharma, A. Azim, H. Azim, R. Gross, E. Zini, M. L. Focarete, M. Scandola 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 311. Aligned carbon nanotube membranes as biomimetic platforms. B. J. Hinds 11:00 312. Enzymatic copolymerization of organosiloxanes. Y. Poojari, A. S. Palsule, D. R. Stauss, V. Hadzivrettas, S. J. Clarson, R. A. Gross 11:20 313. Enzyme-mediated cross-linking of silicone polymers. P. M. Zelisko, K. R. Arnelien, T. C. Dudding, R. Simionescu, H. Stanisic 11:40 314. A virus-based single-enzyme nanoreactor. M. Comellas-Aragones, H. Engelkamp, B. J. M. Verduin, J. J. L M. Cornelissen, R. J. M. Nolte

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Presiding

Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Hybridization of Nanomaterials Cosponsored by BIOHW K. Muellen and S. Valiyaveettil, Organizers J. D. McNeill,

Presiding

8:00 331. Expanding options in polyphosphazene science. H. R. Allcock 8:30 332. Living stars. N. Hadjichristidis 9:00 333. In situ and real-time studies of simultaneous living anionic copolymeriza­ tion process and reaction-induced selfassembly by using a combined SANS, UV-vis, and SEC method. T. Hashimoto 9:30 334. Multi-strand polymerization toward functional polymer material. M. Antonietti 10:00 Intermission. 10:30 335. Polymers and polymer assem­ blies in therapeutic applications. J. M. J. Frechet 11:00 336. Macromolecules prepared using olefin metathesis. R. H. Grubbs 11:30 337. Macromolecules: The editors' perspective. T. P. Lodge, R. W. Lenz, A-C. Albertsson

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 325. Dendron-hybridized nanoparticles: Energy transfer and electrochemical crosslinking. R. C Advincula 9:35 326. Quantum dots covered with welldefined oligo(phenylene vinylene). P. K. Sudeep, T. Emrick 10:05 327. Bioconjugated polymer dot nano­ particles. J. D. McNeill, C. Wu, C. J. Szymanski, Y. Zheng 10:35 Intermission. 10:45 328. Conjugated polymer-gold nanoparticle nanocomposites. B. Sih, M. O. Wolf 11:15 329. New hybrid materials obtained via molecular recognition of diaminopyrimidine functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) and thymine functionalized CdSe semicon­ ductor nanocrystals. J. De Girolamo, P. Reiss, A. Pron 11:35 330. Conjugated polymer functional­ ized gold nanoparticles and surfaces. M. S. Yavuz, J. F. Rusling, T. A. P. Seery, G. A. Sotzing

RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Cosponsored by BIOHW S. J . Clarson, J . Hagen, D. E. Morse, S. V. Patwardhan, K. Shiba, M. E. Van Dyke, I. Yamashita, L. E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W . Hawthorne, and C. W. Widenhouse, Organizers

Section Ε D. W . Smith Jr., Organizer, Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β Polymers and Liquid Crystals New Concepts in LC/ Polymer Systems Cosponsored by BIOHW C. A. G u y m o n ,

Organizer

D. L. Gin, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 338. Liquid crystalline behavior in selfassembling peptide and conjugated sys­ tems. S. I. Stupp, S. Zhang, A. Mata, M. Greenfield, R. Capito 9:05 339. Design, synthesis, and application of benzobis(imidazolium) salts as a new class of photoluminescent ionic liquid crystals. C W. Bielawski, A. J. Boydston 9:40 340. Self-organization of ionic liquids: Liquid-crystalline low-dimensional ion conductors. T. Kato, M. Yoshio, T. Ichikawa, H. Shimura, T. Mukai, A. Hamasaki, H. Ohno 10:15 Intermission. 10:25 341. Aligning shape persistent poly­ mers in liquid crystal solutions. T. M. Swager 11:00 342. Aligned phases of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles and binary microphase separated blends. P. Keng, B. D. Korth, J. Pyun 11:35 343. Liquid crystal polymers as direct­ ing medium: Creation of organized quan­ tum dots composites. R. V. Talroze, G. A. Shandryuk, E. Matukhina, A. S. Merekalov, R. B. Vasiliev, A. M. Gaskov Section F

Presiding

R. C. Advincula, Organizer,

T. P. Lodge, Organizer,

11:20 350. Renewable polymer nanocom­ posites. J. R. Dorgan, B. Braun, M. J. Sobkowicz, K. W. Gneshin 11:45 351. Comparison of nanosized cal­ cium carbonate and organoclay polylactide (PLA) nanocomposites: Toughening and reinforcing effects. J. Zhang, L. Jiang, M. P. Wolcott

Westin Boston Waterfront Douglas Polymers from Renewable Resources G. W . Coates,

1:30 352. Functional materials based on clay aerogels. D. A. Schiraldi, M. D. Gawryla, J. R. Johnson III, J. Griebel 2:00 353. Effect of nanophase particle con­ centration on the deformation during glass transition of a polymer nanocomposite. J. L. Abot, F. Wang 2:30 354. Crosslinking polymer brushes for the fabrication of quasi-2-D "micro-ob­ jects". J. E. Comrie, W. T. S. Huck 2:50 355. DNA block copolymers: How to combine biological and synthetic macro­ molecules to generate nanoobjects. F. E. Alemdaroglu, M. Safak, A. Herrmann 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 356. Quantification of complex topolo­ gies in biological and synthetic macromol­ ecules using neutron and X-ray scattering. G. Beaucage, A. S. Kulkami 3:55 357. Interfacial effects of nanometer fluorinated segments on energy controlled responsive polymeric films. D. Perahia 4:25 358. Positional assembly of tempera­ ture-responsive biopolymers. R. L Teeuwen, H. Zuilhof, F. A. de Wolf, J. C. M. van Hest 4:45 359. Rational design and self-assembly of symmetric DNA star motifs. Y. He, Y. Tian, C. Mao 5:05 360. Attaching and patterning nanopar­ ticles on copolymer templates. M. D. McConnell, M. H. Lee, R. J. Composto, S. Yang Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Stone Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Materials with Special Properties Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers

Organizer

M. A. Hillmyer, Organizer,

Presiding

Presiding

8:25 344. Renewable green polymers. A-C. Albertsson 8:50 345. New synthesis of functional poly­ mers using renewable resources. S. Kobayashi, H. Uyama, T. Tsujimoto, M. Kuwabara 9:15 346. Synthesis and degradation of biodegradable plastics. M. Sokolsky-Papkov, A. J. Domb 9:40 347. New polymer intermediates from renewable resources. J . Millis 10:05 Intermission. 10:30 348. Natural product feedstocks for the synthesis of polymeric nanofilms. C M. Snively, J. Lauterbach 10:55 349. Entanglement models for biobased polymer rheology: Percolation or packing? R. P. Wool

V. M. Rotello, J . M. Papanikolas, and M. A. R. Meier, Presiding 1:00 361. Integration of particle-polymer self-assembly with top-down fabrication techniques. V. M. Rotello 1:25 362. Thin film characterization of metallo-supramolecualar assemblies. D. Wouters, C. Ott, J. M. Kranenburg, M. Chiper, B. G. G. Lohmeijer, Α. V. Kyrylyuk, U. S. Schubert 1:45 363. Surface bottom-up synthesis of metal complex oligomers and polymers and their electrofunctionalities. H. Nishihara, Y. Nishimori 2:10 364. Functional properties and opto­ electronic applications of multifunctional metal-organic phosphorescent materials and polymers. W. Y. Wong

TECH-125

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

POLY

2:30 365. Spintronic device applications of CoFe alloy nanoparticle thin films derived from a highly metallized polyferrocenylsilane. K. Liu, S. Aouba, A. Gougam, L Friebe, W. Y. Chan, S. B. Clendenning, Z-H. Lu, Η. Ε. Ruda, I. Manners 2:50 366. Direct growth of semiconductor nanoparticles within a conducting polymer matrix. M. L. Mejia, K. Agapiou, J. H. Rivers, X. Yang, R. A. Jones, B. J. Holliday 3:05 Intermission. 3:25 367. Ultrafast energy transport dynam­ ics in Ru(ll) and Os(ll) loaded polymers. T. J. Meyer, J. M. Papanikolas 3:50 368. Side-chain functionalized polymers for organic light emitting diode applica­ tions. A. Kimyonok, M. Week 4:10 369. In situ chemical synthesis of polypyrrole-Ag nanocomposite. C-S. Ha, M. H. Ullah, I. Kim 4:30 370. The kinetics and mechanism of the self-assembly of metal nanoparticles in block copolymers. O. Gazit, R. Tannenbaum 4:45 371. Amorphous coordination polymers: Sol-gels, xerogels and aerogels. B. Moulton, B. Luisi, S. Han, K. D. Rowland Jr. Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Self-Assembly and Thin Films Cosponsored by BIOHW R. C. Advincula, S. Valiyaveettil, and K. Muellen, Organizers

Section Ε

TUESDAY EVENING

Section Β

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β

Section A

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Poster-Session Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW

Polymers and Liquid Crystals Lyotropic and Amphiphilic LC/Polymer Systems Cosponsored by BIOHW D. L. Gin and C. A. Guymon, J. Pyun,

Organizers

Presiding

1:30 385. Self-assembly of rod amphiphiles into stimuli-responsive nanostructures. M. Lee 2:05 386. Photopolymerization kinetics in polymerizable lyotropic liquid crystalline systems. L. Sievens-Figueroa, C. A. Guymon 2:30 387. New approaches to the design of nanoporous catalysts and membranes based on polymerized lyotropic liquid crystal assemblies. D. L. Gin, C. S. Pecinovsky, M. Zhou, X. Lu, T. J. Kidd, J. E. Bara, X. Zeng, B. J. Elliott, R. D. Noble 3:05 Intermission. 3:25 388. Silica nanocasting of lyotropic liquid crystals: Material science or an analytical tool? M. Antonietti 4:00 389. Nanostructured polymeric net­ works generated from lyotropic liquid crystals. J. D. Clapper, C. A. Guymon 4:35 390. Liquid crystal behavior and photoinduced birefringence in azobenzene surfactomesogens complexed with oppo­ sitely-charged polyelectrolytes. Q. Zhang, C. G. Bazuin, C. J. Barrett Section F Westin Boston Waterfront

• J . C. Grunlan and Ε. Ε. Nesterov, Presiding Polymers from Renewable Resources 2:00 372. Conjugated polyelectrolytes: Mac­ romolecular assemblies and nanostructured films. K. S. Schanze 2:30 373. Facile fabrication of organic semi­ conducting microribbons by solution-phase self-assembly of conjugated molecules. W. H. Lee, D. H. Kim, K. Cho 2:50 374. UV-resistant poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) films: Layer-by-layer assem­ bly with absorbing particles. J. C. Grunlan, T. Dawidczyk 3:10 Intermission. 3:40 375. Conjugated polymer brushes and patterned surfaces. I. W. Moran, J. J. Peterson, E. C. Hagberg, S. B. Jhaveri, K. R. Carter 4:10 376. Carbazole substituted unsymmetrical hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronenes: Syn­ thesis, optical properties and self-assem­ bly. V. Sivamurugan, J. Subbiah, S. Valiyaveettil 4:40 377. Complex organic photovoltaic architectures through self-assembly and electropolymerization. Ε. Ε. Nesterov, E. Hwang Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Otis 40 Years of Macromolecules Cosponsored by ACS Publications, PMSE, and PRES T. P. Lodge, Organizer,

Organizer Presiding

1:25 391. Biomass as a source of photopolymerizable monomers and polymers. J. V. Crivello 1:50 392. Novel monomers and polymers from plant oils. A. Rybak, P. Fokou, T. Jacobs, M. A. R. Meier 2:15 393. Formation of wheat proteins-based natural polymer networks through polymer grafting and cross-linking reactions. X.Zhang 2:40 394. Soy protein based resins and cellulose fiber reinforced high strength green composites. A. N. Netravali 3:05 Intermission. 3:20 395. Structure and properties of seg­ mented polyurethanes from vegetable oil-based polyols. Z. S. Petrovic, Y. Xu, W. Zhang 3:45 396. Soy-based polymers and their applications. S. Z. Erhan, Z. Liu 4:10 397. Triglycerides as feedstocks for polyurethanes. D. A. Babb, A. B. Larre, A. K. Schrock, D. Bhattacharjee, M. F. Sonnenschein 4:35 398. Fatty acid methyl esters as reac­ tive diluents in coil-coatings. K. Johansson, M. Johansson 5:00 399. Novel bioplastics and composites from natural oils. R. C. Larock

Presiding

1:00 378. Chemical sensors based upon polymer electronics. T. M. Swager 1:30 379. Nonionic amphiphilic block copoly­ mers: Bigger and better. F. S. Bates 2:00 380. Single molecule studies of polymer dynamics. S. Chu 2:30 381. The role of polymer materials in advanced electronics. E. Reichmanis 3:00 Intermission. 3:30 382. Synthesis of novel macromol­ ecules on messenger RNA templates. D. A. Tirrell 4:00 383. Engineered drug therapies enabled by fabrication processes from the electronics industry. J. DeSimone 4:30 384. ATRP after 12 years. K. Matyjaszewski

126-TECH

M. A. Hillmyer,

G. W . Coates, Organizer,

RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC

Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Cosponsored by BIOHW S. J . Clarson, J. Hagen, D. E. Morse, S. V. Patwardhan, K. Shiba, D. W . Smith Jr., M. E. Van Dyke, I. Yamashita, L. E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W. Hawthorne, and C. W . Widenhouse, Organizers 6:00-8:00 400. Amphiphilic diblock copolymers from chiral monomers using Reversible Addi­ tion-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization. J. Skey, R. K. O'Reilly 401. Dihydroxy terminated polybutylmethacrylate: A precursor for dendrimer-linear polymer hybrid synthesis. G. A. Bonzi, S. P. Rannard, A. I. Cooper 402. Dimension of linear polymer and polymer brush of a polyampholyte in aqueous solutions with various ionic strengths. Y. Matsuda, M. Kobayashi, M. Annaka, K. Ishihara, A. Takahara 403. DNA block copolymer micelles: Synthe­ sis, morphologies and interactions with living systems. F. E. Alemdaroglu, N. C. Alemdaroglu, P. Langguth, A. Herrmann 404. Electrostatic self-assembly of doubleresponsive block copolymer with oppo­ sitely charged surfactant. M. Annaka, K. Morishita 405. Grafting of poly(dimethylsiloxane) onto poly(styrene-Woc/c-lsobutylene-Woc/fstyrene). T. Higashihara, U. Ojha, R. Faust, F. Strickler 406. In situ raft polymerization from a streptavidin macrochain transfer agent. K. L. Heredia, G. Graver 407. Ion responsive polymeric vesicles. L. Theogarajan, S. Desai, M. Baldo, C. Scholz 408. Nanogels of hydrophobized dendritic polysaccharide and interaction with pro­ teins. Y. Ozawa, N. Morimoto, K. Akiyoshi 409. Nanoprobe for optical molecular imaging. S. Zheng, R. Wang, A. Qiao, Z. Yang, J. Gelovani, C. Li 410. Novel synthesis of neoglycopolymers by a combination of "click chemistry" and living radical polymerization. J. Geng, G. Mantovani, D. H. Haddleton 411. Perfluorocyclobutyl polymers as a host material for phosphorescent lr[lll] com­ plexes. A. R. Neilson, K. Zhu, C. M. Topping, J. Ballato, D. W. Smith Jr. 412. Polylactide-doxorubicin nanoparticles with controlled sizes and high loadings. R. Tong, J. Cheng 413. Preparation of octane-succinyl-chitosan and micellar solubilization of puerarin. W. Sui, C. Yin, Y. Wang, S. Dong 414. Smart array of polymer beads using a removable polymer template on the glass surface. J . Lee, O. Kim, J. Jung, K. Na, D. Kim, S. Park, J. Hyun 415. Synthesis of perfluoropolyether-copolylactide copolymers using ring opening polymerization and transesterification reactions. D. Haynes, D. W. Smith Jr. 416. Thermosensitive properties of telechelic hydrophobically modified poly(n-isopropylacrylamide) in water. K. Nishizono, T. Fujimoto, F. M. Winnik, M. Annaka 417. Toward phosphorus-containing polymers via SET LRP and ATRP. C. Fidge, G. Otter, G. Woodward, D. M. Haddleton

U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers, Presiding 6:00-8:00 418. Coordination polymer gels. K. D. Rowland Jr., B. Moulton, B. Luisi 419. (Metallo)supramolecular click chemistry vs. click chemistry in polymer science. R. Hoogenboom, B. C. Moore, U. S. Schubert 420. (Metallo-supramolecular)block copoly­ mers in solution: Microscopic study of micellization. D. Wouters, C. Ott, M. Chiper, M. A. R. Meier, U. S. Schubert 421. Supramolecular assembly of watersoluble poly(ferrocenylsilanes): Multilayer structures and properties on flat interfaces. Y. Ma, M. A. Hempenius, E. S. Kooij, W. Dong, H. Môhwald, G. J. Vancso 422. Toward thermosenzitive metallo-terpyridine supramolecular polymers. M. Chiper, D. Fournier, R. Hoogenboom, U. S. Schubert 423. New terpyridine-functionalized poly(ester)s and metallo-polymers. A. Winter, U. S. Schubert 424. Novel polysiloxane-functionalized terpyridines and their transition metal complexes. S. Landsmann, M. Chiper, A. Winter, U. S. Schubert 425. Supramolecularly assembled functional nanocages. A. O. Moughton, R. K. O'Reilly 426. Photophysical characteristics and anion binding studies of triarylborane functionalized polystyrene. K. Parab, K. Venkatasubbaiah, Y. Qin, F. Jâkle 427. Side chain terpyridine motifs for supramolecular materials. R. Shunmugam, G. N. Tew 428. Design of polymerizable phosphorescent iridium(lll) complexes. C. Ulbricht, N. Rehmann, E. Holder, K. Meerholz, U. S. Schubert 429. Photodegradable polymers with organometallic dimers in the backbone: Synthesis, characterization, and degradation studies. B. C. Daglen, G. V. Shultz, D. R. Tyler 430. Construction of functionalized catalysts using monoclonal antibodies with nonchiral rhodium complexes. H. Yamaguchi, T. Hirano, H. Kiminami, A. Harada 431. Employing reversable addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization to synthesize alkyne-functional amphiphilic diblock copolymers. A. A. Bouchard, L. B. Sessions, A. Sundararaman, R. B. Grubbs 432. Functionalized homo-and heteroleptic terpyridine complexes via cis-[Ru(2,2':6'2'terpyridine)(DMSO)CI2]. C. Ott, U. S. Schubert 433. Mesoporous materials for enzyme adsorption. M. Park, S. S. Park, I. Kim, C-S. Ha 434. A terpyridine functionalized 5-arm starshaped polymer for the fluorometric detection of transition metal ions. M. A. R. Meier, U. S. Schubert 435. New metallo-supramolecular architectures based on polymers functionalized and rigid ττ-conjugated terpyridines. M. Chiper, A. Winter, D. A. M. Egbe, U. S. Schubert Section C BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Cosponsored by BIOHW R. C. Advincula,

Organizer

6:00-8:00 436. Self-assembly of p-phenylenevinylene oligomers. C. Grenier

POLY

437. A novel template for the formation of water-soluble conducting polymers. F. Bruno, S. Nagarajan, R. Nagarajan, J. Kumar, L A. Samuelson 438. Anomer-selective synthesis of poly(/> ethynylphenyl hexopyranoside)s: Effects of anomeric configuration on their stimulus response and lectin detection. I. Otsuka, T. Hongo, A. Narumi, R. Sakai, T. Satoh, H. Kaga, T. Kakuchi 439. Biological and sensing applications of water-soluble poly(paraphenyleneethynylene)s. R. Phillips, l-B. Kim, U. H. F. Bunz 440. Crystalline structure of a conjugated semiconducting copolymer, poly{[2,5-di(2(2-ethoxy-ethoxy) ethoxy)-1,4- phenylene vinylenej-alt-1,4- [phenylene vinylene]} (DTEO-alt-PV). C-L. Yeh 441. Fluorescent conjugated polymers as chemsensors. W. Gui, W. E. Jones Jr. 442. Layer-by-layer assembly of poly(3,4ethylenedioxythiophene): Tailoring film growth and sheet resistance. T. Dawidczyk, J. C. Grunlan 443. New conjugated conducting polymers containing benzobisthiazole derivative and pyridine. I. T. Kim, S. H. Kim, D. W. Lim 444. Novel donor-acceptor bulk-heterojunction material: Polythiophene-titanium oxide hybrid with excellent organic-inorganic compatibility. Y-M. Chang 445. Novel light emitting benzofluorene polymers. S. Zheng, G. Bennett, Q. Phan 446. Novel light emitting polymers containing benzimidazole. S. Zheng, Q. Phan, K.M.Vaeth 447. Novel semiconducting polymer bearing thiazolothiazole unit for organic field-effect transistors. I. Osaka, G. Sauvé, R. Zhang, R. D. McCullough 448. Organic-inorganic nanocomposites prepared by grafting conjugated polymers onto quantum dots. Z. Lin, J. Xu, J. Wang, M. Mitchell, M. Jeffries-EL 449. Organoborane substituted polythiophenes. H. Li, A. Sundararaman, K. Venkatasubbaiah, F. Jàkle 450. Poly(p-phenylenevinylene) derivatives containing electron-transporting 1,10phenanthroline segments. D. Yu, K. Zhu, P. K. Kristensen, T. G. Pedersen, R. Wimmer 451. Preparation of spatially isolated oligothiophene fluorophore and their emission properties. K. Takagi, M. Momiyama, J. Ohta, S-l. Matsuoka, M. Suzuki 452. Self-assembly of a phenanthrylene amphiphile with oligo(ethylene oxide) dendrons. D. J. Hong, M. Lee 453. Soluble polyphenylene homopolymers with a controlled polymer chain structure. I. Natori, S. Natori, H. Sato 454. Syhtnesis, characterization and application of new copolymer with benzobisthiazole derivative and thiophene derivative. I. T. Kim, S. J. Lee, S. W. Lee 455. Synthesis and anion sensing property of poly(phenylacetylene) bearing urea derivative of L-leucine as pendant. R. Kakuchi, S. Nagata, R. Sakai, T. Yonekawa, I. Otsuka, T. Satoh, T. Kakuchi 456. Synthesis and characterization of novel poly(p-phenylenevinylene) derivatives containing phosphine oxide moiety. S. J. Yoon, J . M. Ku, M. J. Yoon, T-H. Yoon 457. Synthesis and chiroptical property of poly(phenylacetylene) bearing maltohexaose. T. Hongo, I. Otsuka, A. Narumi, R. Sakai, T. Satoh, H. Kaga, T. Kakuchi 458. Synthesis of fluorescent conjugated polymer sensors with varying percentage loading of oligopyridine anion receptors. C. N. Malele, S. S. Pinnock, W. E. Jones Jr. 459. Synthesis of poly(m-methoxyaniline) with high crystallinity by emulsion polymerization. X. Yiting, Z. Yifang, L. Guangcai, D. Lizong, W. Huihuang 460. Synthesis of silylated styrenic monomers and copolymerization with 1,3-cyclohexadiene. nanoporous and nanorelief composite materials. A. Avgeropoulos, K. Misichronis, S. Rangou 461. Tuning the properties of alternating copolymers from perfluorobenzene and thiophene derivatives. Y. Wang, M. D. Watson

Section D BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Imaging Techniques for the Characterization of Polymers and Polymer-Derived Materials M. T. Cicerone and H. Jinnai,

Organizers

6:00-8:00 462. Single molecules of polymers: AFM imaging under liquid medium. Y. Roiter, S. Minko Section Ε BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Polymers and Liquid Crystals Cosponsored by BIOHW D. L. Gin and C. A. G u y m o n ,

Organizers

6:00-8:00 463. Structure and evolution of ordered domains in deeply quenched polyethylene melt. N. Lacevic, R. H. Gee, L. E. Fried 464. Quantifying orientation and dynamics at the liquid crystal/alignment layer interface. C. M. Snively, D. B. Chase, J. Rabolt 465. Rheo-NMR investigation of director oscillations in tumbling nematic liquid crystals. C. Schmidt, I. Quijada-Garrido, N. Sinyavsky 466. Synthesis and physical properties of naphthalene based side chain LC. G. Coimbatore, B. Sadashiva 467. Morphological sudies of Bragg reflection gratings written in holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals by thiol-ene photopolymerization. J. M. Wofford, L. V. Natarajan, R. L. Sutherland, V. Tondiglia, P. F. Lloyd, T. J. Bunning 468. Synthesis and characterization of endfunctionalized polyisobutylenes for Sharpless-type click reactions. U. Ojha, R. Faust 469. Density functional calculations as a probe of hydrogen bond strength and mesophase stability in supramolecular liquid crystalline polymers and small, mol­ ecules. C. J. Cook, D. K. Witte, J. A. Phillips, Κ. Ν. Wiegel 470. Supramolecular liquid crystalline poly­ mers and small molecules formed from 2-pyridone assemblies. D. K. Witte, Κ. Ν. Wiegel 471. Elucidating the structure of hyperbranched side-chain liquid crystalline polyacrylates. A. Singh, C. Pugh 472. Preparation of supramolecular discotic liquid crystals containing hydrogen bonds. S. J. Lee, M. You, J. W. Kim, S. W. Lee, J. Y. Jho 473. Role of the chemical structure and order of polymer matrix on the properties of nanocomposites with CdSe quantum dots. G. A. Shandryuk, A. S. Merekalov, V. Bykov, G. N. Bondarenko, R. B. Vasiliev, A. M. Gaskov, R. V. Talroze 474. Surface-induced structure formation of polymer dispersed liquid crystals on chemically patterned substrate. Z. Lin, J. Wang, J. Xia, S. W. Hong, F. Qiu, Y. Yang 475. Synthesis and characterization of a novel series of liquid crystalline ionomers. C. Wu, J-M. Song, J-S. Kim Section F BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Polymers from Renewable Resources M. A. Hillmyer and G. W. Coates, Organizers 6:00-8:00 476. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of amylosegrafted chitosan and chitin. Y. Kaneko, S-l. Matsuda, J-l. Kadokawa 477. Dimensional characterization of cellulosic nanowhiskers using multi-angle-laser-light scattering and electron microscopy. B. Braun, J. R. Dorgan

478. Renewable plastic composites with carbon nanospheres derived from cellu­ lose. M. J. Sobkowicz, J. R. Dorgan, K. W. Gneshin 479. Adjustable wettability of methyl methacrylate modified ramie fiber by ATRP. Z-T. Liu, C. Sun, Z-W. Liu, J. Lu 480. Back pressure equal channel angular consolidation (BP-ECAC): A new method to process renewable natural polymer materials. X. Zhang 481. Biobased plasticizers for poly-vinyl chlo­ ride. M. M. McCallum, D. Fan, C. Y. Lee, D. K. Mohanty, D. J. LeCaptain 482. Comb-like ionomeric copolymer: Itaconic anhydride-co-stearyl methacrylate. S. Shang, S. J. Huang, R. A. Weiss 483. Novel group 4 initiators for the produc­ tion of biocompatible polymers. M. D. Jones, A. J. Chmura, C. J. Chuck, M. G. Davidson, M. D. Lunn 484. Phosphazene bases for the organocatalytic living ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters. L. Zhang, F. Nederberg, R. Pratt, R. Waymouth, J. L. Hedrick, C. G. Wade 485. Photocatalytic synthesis of difuran derivatives for use as biorenewable heatresistant monomers. C. Comer, G. A. Aurand, J. L. P. Jessop 486. Stable biomimetic redox catalyst obtained by enzyme catalyzed amidation of Iron porphyrin. S. Nagarajan, R. Nagarajan, F. F. Bruno, L. A. Samuelson, J. Kumar 487. Stereoselective ring opening polymeriza­ tion of racemic-lactide. A. J. Chmura, M. G. Davidson, M. D. Jones, A. A. D. Tulloch 488. Synthesis and characterization of a hydrophobic derivative of succinyl-chitosan. W. Sui, Y. Wang, S. Dong, Y. Chen 489. Synthesis of branched polylactides from oleic acid derived monomer. E. B. Vogel, M. R. Smith III, G. L Baker 490. Polymerization of poly(itaconic acid). M. Cao, Y. G. Durant 491. Selective end-group functionalization of poly(lactide)s prepared by living ringopening polymerization. M. J. Stanford, A. P. Dove 492. Synthesis and NMR studies of PLGA copolymers prepared with sequence and stereochemical control. R. M. Stayshich, K. Damodaran, T. Y. Meyer 493. Synthesis and ring-opening polymeriza­ tion of cyclic diesters derived from malic acid. R. J. Pounder, A. P. Dove 494. Structure and mechanical properties of lignosulfonate/waterborne polyurethane blends. W. Xia, G. Cui, J. Wen, J. Huang 495. Styrene biosynthesis in microorganisms. N. R. Washburn, A. Dinin 496. Formation of cellulose gel with ionic liquid and preparation of regenerated cellulose from the gel. J-l. Kadokawa, M-A. Murakami, Y. Kaneko Section G BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition Cosponsored by AGFD T. E. Long and C. D. Thatcher,

Organizers

6:00-8:00 497. Folate targeted glutathione antioxidant delivery systems and their impact on intracellular oxidative status. B. S. Lepene, S. R. Williams, T. E. Long, C. D. Thatcher 498. Preparation and characterization of novel chitosan/resistant starch films. A. Aigster, J. D. Goff, S. Hannah 499. Design and synthesis of biodegradable polyanhydrides based on plant and foodderived antimicrobials for biofilm preven­ tion. A. L. Carbone, L. E. Rosenberg, M. L. Chikindas, K. E. Uhrich

Section Ή BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Scaffolds and Matrices for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications Cosponsored by BIOHW M. E. Van Dyke, J . Yoo, and B. Harrison, Organizers 6:00-8:00 500. Characterization of collagen-modified poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels for use as corneal implants. A. M. Oelker, M. W. Grinstaff 501. Design of nanostructured hydrogel com­ posites with functionalized helical rosette nanotubes as in situ curable orthopedic materials. L. Zhang, S. Ramsaywack, H. Fenniri, T. J. Webster 502. Designing cell adhesion 3-D-materials used of self-assembly peptides. N. Nishishita, Y. Hirano 503. In vitro dorsal root ganglia viability in a mimetic nerve guidance conduit environ­ ment. J. Griffin, M. Song, A. L Carbone, Κ. Uhrich 504. Moldable and chemoselective polyesters for use in biology. Μ. Ν. Yousaf, D. G. Barrett 505. Tissue engineered cartilage formation with 3-D and dynamic environments. S. H. Kim, Y. Jung, S-H. Kim, Y. H. Kim, B. G. Min WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Cosponsored by BIOHW S. J . Clarson, J . Hagen, D. E. Morse, S. V. Patwardhan, K. Shiba, D. W . Smith Jr., I. Yamashita, L. E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W . Hawthorne, and C. W. Widenhouse, Organizers M. E. Van Dyke, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 506. Synthetic glycopolymers and protein bioconjugates from living radical polymerization. D. M. Haddleton, G. Mantovani, D. Brayden 9:00 507. Biotin end-functional star polymers via TMM LRP and click chemistry. S. Cauët, G. Mantovani, V. Ladmiral, D. M. Haddleton 9:20 508. Functionalizing polyesters and polycarbonates: Covalent tagging of alcohols for ring-opening polymerization. R. C. Pratt, F. Nederberg, R. M. Waymouth, J. L. Hedrick 9:40 509. Tuning the stimuli-response of hyperbranched polymers prepared by RAFT. B. S. Sumerlin, A. P. Vogt 10:00 510. Reactive dérivâtes of 4-vinylbenzoic acid: Building blocks for defined functional polymeric architectures. P. Theato, K. Nilles, D. Klinger 10:20 511. Toward direct PEGylation of tyrosine fragments. G. Mantovani, M. W. Jones, D. M. Haddleton 10:40 Intermission. 11:00 512. Multifunctional polymeric microcarrier. H. Y. Cho, S. J. Kim, H. L Kim, I. Jo, E. Ryu, B. G. Kim, S-W. Kim, H-J. Paik 11:20 513. Synthesis of functional artificial biopolymers. J. K. Montclare

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-127

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

POLY

11:40 514. Synthesis, properties and surface characterization of polyisobutylene-based thermoplastic elastomers containing poly(methylmethacrylate-co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) as hard blocks. D. Feng, A. Chandekar, J. E. Whitten, R. Faust 12:00 515.1H NMR characterization of helical folding in ortho-phenylene ethynylene oligomers. M. M. Slutsky, G. N. Tew Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Stone

10:35 Intermission. 10:45 530. Electronic properties and applica­ tions of conjugated polyelectrolytes. T-Q. Nguyen, A. Garcia, R. Yang, G. Bazan 11:15 531. Mesophase formation in poly(3alkylthiophene)s containing long chain alkyl groups. B. L. Lucht, Y. Wang, A. Mills, W. B. Euler 11:35 532. New poly (2,7-carbazole) deriva­ tives for solar cell applications. A. Michaud, N. Blouin, G. David, M. Leclerc

11:05 545. Well-defined liquid crystal net­ works from telechelic polymers. Y. Xia, R. Verduzco, R. H. Grubbs, J. A. Kornfield 11:30 546. Anisotropic gelation induced by a rod-like polyelectrolyte. H. Furukawa, Y. Shigekura, W. Yang, Y. Osada, J. P. Gong Section F Westin Boston Waterfront Douglas General Papers: Functional Materials

Section D Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Materials & Applications Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers

D. Garcia, Westin Boston Waterfront Otis

B. Harrison and J . Yoo, H. Maeda, J-F. Gohy, and R. K. O'Reilly, Presiding 7:55 516. Supramolecular coordination chemistry based on acyclic oligopyrroles. H. Maeda 8:20 517. Metal-containing conjugated oligoand polythiophenes. C. Moorlag, M. O. Wolf 8:45 518. Synthesis and applications of structurally-dynamic metallopolymers based upon N-heterocyclic carbenes. C. W. Bielawski, K. A. Williams, A. J. Boydston 9:10 519. Supramolecular organization of Schiff base complexes: Gels, fibers, and metallopolymers. J . K-H. Hui, M. J. MacLachlan 9:30 520. Sensing chemical warfare agents with terpyridine based macromolecules. R. Shunmugam, G. N. Tew 9:50 521. Nanomagnetic polymers. Z. M. AL-Badri, M. Zhang, R. Shunmugam, T. P. Russell, G. Tew 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 522. Pincer metal complexes bound to nanosized supports: Homogeneous cata­ lysts and biosensors. G. van Koten, H. P. Dijkstra, R. J. M. Klein Gebbink 10:45 523. Metalloporphryin nanoparticles as supramolecular catalysts. C. M. Drain, G. Smeureanu 11:05 524. Functional hollow polymeric nanocages. R. K. O'Reilly, A. D. levins 11:25 525. Macroscale and nanoscale inves­ tigation of metallo-supramolecular hybrid organogels. D. M. Loveless, M. J. Serpe, S. L. Jeon, S. L. Craig 11:40 526. Medium-induced control and switching of nonlinear optical responses in dipolar Iron(ll) pentacyanide complexes. K. Clays, B. J. Coe

M. Johnson,

Scaffolds and Matrices for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications Cosponsored by BIOHW Organizers

M. E. Van Dyke, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 533. Protein biomaterial designs to direct cell and tissue outcomes. X. Wang, C. Vepari, L. Abraham, A. Murphy, X. Wang, D. L Kaplan 9:00 534. Biocompatible and tunable elastic hyaluronic acid hydrogel for adult stem cell differentiation. F. Rehfeldt, S. Cai, D. E. Discher 9:20 535. Inorganic-organic hydrogels with tunable properties. Y. Hou, K. R. Regan, C. A. Schoener, M. S. Hahn, M. A. Grunlan 9:40 536. Toward sequential growth factor delivery from scaffold surfaces. M. L. Macdonald, N. Brenner, G. Endale, N. Rodriguez, R. Langer, P. T. Hammond 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 537. Organic sol-gel chemistry as a flexible synthetic route to tissue engineer­ ing scaffolds. P. Borgaonkar, S. Sharma, M. Chen, S. Bhowmick, D. F. Schmidt 10:40 538. An organocatalytic route to func­ tional and biodegradable hydrogels. F. Nederberg, R. C. Pratt, A. F. Mason, R. M. Waymouth, J. L. Hedrick 11:00 539. Synthesis and characterization of highly crosslinked hyaluronan hydrogels. Ν. R. Washburn, S. A. Bencherif, Α. Srinivasan, J. Hollinger, F. Horkay, K. Matyjaszewski 11:20 540. Biodegradable star-shaped PEGPLLA block copolymer-cholesterol conju­ gate exhibiting sol-gel transition as an injectable scaffold for tissue engineering. Y. Ohya, K. Nagahama, T. Ouchi Section Ε Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β

Section C Polymers and Liquid Crystals Elastomeric and Network LCs Cosponsored by BIOHW

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Structure-Property Relationships Cosponsored by BIOHW R. C. Advincula and K. Muellen, Organizers J. Locklin,

Presiding

S. Valiyaveettil, Organizer,

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 527. Controlling the nm-scale architec­ ture of conjugated polymer chains and bulk heterojunctions. B. J. Schwartz 9:35 528. Correlating molecular structure to field-effect mobility: The investigation of side-chain functionality in phenylenethiophene oligomers. J. Locklin, A. Sung, Z. Bao 10:05 529. Thermochromic polydiacetylene micro- and nanocrystals: Comparison with bulk crystals. X. Wang, D. Sandman, S. Chen, S. Gido

128-TECH

D. L. Gin,

Organizer

C. A. G u y m o n , Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 541. Creating work with light: Photoresponsive liquid crystalline elastomers based on azobenzene. T. J. Bunning, T. J. White, V. P. Tondiglia, L V. Natarajan, R. Vaia, S. V. Serak, V. A. Groshik, N. V. Tabiryan 9:05 542. Shape memory phenomena in liquid crystalline elastomers and networks. P. T. Mather, K. A. Burke, H. Cho 9:40 543. Polymerization kinetics and phase separation effects in holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals. T. J. White, L. V. Natarajan, V. P. Tondiglia, T. J. Bunning, C. A. Guymon 10:05 Intermission. 10:30 544. Functionalized liquid crystal networks: Toward soft actuators and organic zeolites. D. J. Broer, C. Luengo Gonzalez, C. L. Van Oosten, K. D. Harris, C. W. Bastiaansen, J. Lub

Organizer Presiding

8:00 547. Electrochemical supercapacitors based on poly(xylyl viologen). D. Irvin, J. D. Stenger-Smith, J. A. Irvin 8:20 548. Electroluminescence of poly(methyl methacrylate)-based random copolymers containing carbazole and oxadiazole pendant groups. D. D. Evanoff Jr., J. B. Carroll, J. R. Lawrence, J. M. Houchins, R. D. Roeder, C. F. Huebner, S. E. Hayes, Z. J. Hunt, S. Foulger 8:40 549. Maximum contrast from electrochromic materials: Limitations of dual systems. J. Padilla, V. Seshadri, G. A. Sotzing, T. F. Otero 9:00 550. Quantum amplified holographic recording in dewarbenzene-substituted glassy polymers. D. R. Robello, M. Mis, L. Ferrar, T. G. Brown, Y. Li 9:20 551. Self-assembly of chromogenic dyes: Humidity sensing materials and piezochromic behavior. J. Kunzelman, B. R. Crenshaw, M. Kinami, C. Weder 9:40 552. Siloxane-based hole injection materials for organic light emitting diodes. D. L. Witker, S. Xu, P. J. Schalk, T. Suzuki 10:00 553. Thermo- and pH-responsive copolymers based on oligoethyleneglycol methacrylates. R. Hoogenboom, C. R. Becer, S. Hahn, D. Foumier, U. S. Schubert 10:20 554. Functionalization of poly(propargyl acrylate) crystalline colloidal arrays through click chemistry. D. D. Evanoff Jr., S. E. Hayes, Y. Ying, G. H. Shim, J. R. Lawrence, J. B. Carroll, R. D. Roeder, J. M. Houchins, C. F. Huebner, S. Foulger 10:40 555. Functionalized vinyl-type polynorbornene: Synthesis and characterization of norbornene-styrene copolymers with excellent thermostability and optical prop­ erties. T. B. Hoang, Y. Tsunogae, S. Nojima, T. Shiono 11:00 556. Group transfer polymerization of acrylates and methacrylates using N-het­ erocyclic carbene catalysts. M. D. Scholten, J. L. Hedrick, R. M. Waymouth 11:20 557. Oligomerization of 1,1-diphenylethylene in the end-capping reaction of poly(styryl)lithium. R. P. Quirk, C. A. Garces, M. J. Polce, C. Wesdemiotis 11:40 558. Synthesis of click/ester and click/ether dendrimers based on AB2- and CD2-monomers. P. Antoni, D. Nystrom, C. J. Hawker, A. Huit, M. Malkoch WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Cosponsored by BIOHW S. J . Clarson, J. Hagen, D. E. Morse, S. V. Patwardhan, K. Shiba, D. W. Smith Jr., M. E. Van Dyke, I. Yamashita, L. E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W. Hawthorne, and C. W . Widenhouse, Organizers

1:30 559. Synthetic versatility of trifluorovinyl aromatic ether monomers and intermedi­ ates. D. W. Smith Jr., A. R. Neilson, S. T. lacono, S. M. Budy, C. M. Topping, R. S. Hernandez 2:00 560. Processing and modification of marine derived DNA for use in optoelec­ tronic device applications, J. Hagen, J. G. Grote, S. J. Clarson 2:30 561. Creation of self-sterilizing surfaces through plasma polymerization. R. G. Dillingham 3:00 562. Inkjet printing of insoluble biopolymer and polymer complexes. P. Calvert, S. Limem, S. Iyengar, P. K. Patra 3:30 Intermission. 3:50 563. Electrowetting: Applications in optics, lab-on-chip, textiles, and opportuni­ ties for development of new hydrophobic polymers. J. Heikenfeld 4:20 564. Coulomb-staircase effect in siliconnanodisk structures fabricated using dam­ age-free CL neutral beam etching. S. Samukawa 4:50 565. Helix-mediated supramolecular device and self-assembly for efficient energy/electron transport. O-K. Kim, M. F. Pepitone, J. S. Melinger, G. G. Jemigan, S. Chung, D. Lowy Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Stone Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Materials & Applications Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers R. Hoogenboom, Y. Chujo, and H. Sleiman, Presiding 1:00 566. Main chain type conjugated hybrid polymers. Y. Chujo 1:35 567. Supramolecular ABA triblocks: Understanding reaction parameters and designing new materials. M. Chiper, M. A. R. Meier, D. Wouters, U. S. Schubert 1:55 568. Coordination ROP in solution and solvent-free synthesis of MOFs. S. L. James 2:20 569. Lanthanide-containing polymers as elemental tags for antibody based assays. X. Lou, G. Zhang, I. Herrera, R. Kinach, O. Ornatsky, V. Baranov, M. Nitz, M. A. Winnik 2:40 570. Formation of concentric ferromag­ netic nanotubes from self-assembled phospholipids with extraordinary magneti­ zation. M. Yu, M. W. Urban 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 571. Responsive electronic transition metal based materials. T. M. Swager 3:40 572. Assembling metals and nanopar­ ticles one by one with DNA. H. F. Sleiman, F. A. Aldaye, H. Yang, M. A. Slim 4:05 573. Europium-containing polymers as humidity-sensing materials. A. C. Knall, A. Pein, N. Noormofidi, F. Stelzer, C. Slugovc 4:20 574. Conjugated polymer-metal com­ posites as naked eye sensor arrays for biogenic amines in water. M. S. Maynor, T. K. Deason, T. L. Nelson, R. W. Tilford, J. J. Lavigne 4:40 575. Highly coloured organometallic thermoplastics: Polymers incorporating azo dyes. A. S. Abd-EI-Aziz, P. O. Shipman, D. J. Winram

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

POLY

Section C

Section Ε

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Fabrication and Devices Cosponsored by BIOHW

Polymers and Liquid Crystals

K. Muellen,

C. W . Bielawski,

LC Polymers Cosponsored by BIOHW D. L. Gin and C. A. G u y m o n ,

Organizers

THURSDAY MORNING

Section C

Section A

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Biorelated Concepts Cosponsored by BIOHW

Synthetic and Biological Macromolecules for Emerging Nanotechnologies Cosponsored by BIOHW

K. Muellen,

T-Q. Nguyen,

Organizer Presiding

R. C. Advincula and S. Valiyaveettil, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 576. Novel strategies for the fabrication of solution processed multilayer oleds: Oxetane crosslinking without photoacid. K. Meerholz 2:30 577. Regioregular polythiophenes: Transistor optimization and sensors. R. D. McCullough, G. Sauvé, J. R. Cooper, M. C. lovu, I. Osaka, D. N. Lambeth, B. Li, L. Weiss, G. Fedder, T. Kowalewski 3:00 578. Measuring and controlling exciton diffusion in organic semiconductors. I. D. W. Samuel 3:30 Intermission. 3:40 579. Spin casting with alkanethiols: A new approach toward high efficiency bulk heterojunction solar cells. G. C. Bazan, J. Peet, M. Daniel, T-Q. Nguyen, A. J. Heeger, J. Y. Kim 4:10 580. High performance functionalized asymmetric linear acenes for organic TFTs. M. L. Tang, A. D. Reichardt, Z. Bao 4:30 581. Electrical and gas sensing properties of conjugated polymer nanostructures. Y. Cao, J. Kim, T. S. Mayer, T. E. Mallouk

Presiding

1:30 591. Effects of liquid crystallinity on the self-assembly of rod-coil block copolymers. R. A. Segalman, B. D. Olsen 2:05 592. Hierarchical nanostructures of mesogen jacketed bent-core liquid crystal­ line block copolymers. Κ. Κ. Tenneti, X. Chen, C. Y. Li, X. Wan, Q-F. Zhou, L. Rong, B. S. Hsiao 2:30 593. Self-assembly of polypeptidebased rod-coil block copolymers. A. D. Richardson, D. A. Savin 3:05 Intermission. 3:25 594. From rod to coil: Tuning the con­ formational characteristics via side-chain liquid crystals. E. W. Cochran, S. H. Kim 4:00 595. Architectural effects in side-chain liquid crystalline polymers: Hyperbranched SCLCPs. C. Pugh, A. Singh 4:35 596. Morphology of side chain liquid crystalline block copolymers: Influence of liquid crystal content. E. Verploegen, T. Zhang, L. Tian, P. T. Hammond Section F Westin Boston Waterfront Douglas General Papers: Functional Materials D. Garcia,

Organizer

A. L. Carbone,

Presiding

Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Otis Scaffolds and Matrices for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications Cosponsored by BIOHW M. E. Van Dyke and J . Yoo, B. Harrison, Organizer,

Organizers

Presiding

1:30 582. A versatile strategy for the fabrication of core-sheath structured nanofiber yarns. X. Li, C. Yao 1:50 583. Ampicillin-based poly(anhydrideamide) coatings for medical devices. M. L Johnson, R. Casas, D. V. Patwardhan, S. K. Pollack, K. E. Uhrich 2:10 584. Cell encapsulation hydrogel matrix "cell-container" prepared by spontaneous reversible gelation between water-soluble phospholipid polymer bearing phenylboronic acid moiety and polyols. T. Konno, K. Ishihara 2:30 585. Covalent surface modification of degradable polymers. A-C. Albertsson, M. Kallrot, U. Edlund 2:50 Intermission. 3:10 586. Cytocompatible phospholipid polymer hydrogel scaffold with bioconjugation of cell adhesive peptide sequence. K. Ishihara, E. Maeta, M. Takai, T. Konno 3:30 587. Preparation of aligned porous biodegradable polymers by directional freezing. H. Zhang, A. I. Cooper 3:50 588. Preparation of zein/poly(lactide-coglycolide) continuous nanofiber yams by coupled electrospinning. C. Yao, X. Li, T. Song 4:10 589. Ring opening metathesis polymers as macroinitiator-coinitiator systems for the photopolymerization of acrylates. M. Sandholzer, M. Schuster, R. Liska, C. Turecek, F. Varga, F. Stelzer, C. Slugovc 4:30 590. Tunable biomineralization in gel interior: Electrophoresis approach provides smart ion delivery. J. Watanabe, M. Akashi

1:00 597. ATRP as a tool to obtain functional surface modifications on biofiber based surfaces: Dual-responsive grafts. E. Malmstrôm, J. Lindqvist, D. Nystrôm, E. Ostmark, P. Antoni, M. Johansson, A. Huit 1:20 598. Superhydrophobic biofiber surfaces obtained via ATRP and postfunctionalization reactions. D. Nystrôm, J. Lindqvist, E. Ôstmark, P. Antoni, M. Malkoch, M. Johansson, E. Malmstrôm, A. Huit 1:40 599. Synthesis and activity of novel antimicrobial surfaces. A. E. Madkour, J. M. Dabkowski, K. Nusslein, G. N. Tew 2:00 600. Incorporation of amide-functionalized SWNT in silica network through sol-gel processing. R. Narain, K. Babooram 2:20 601. Synthesis of radiopaque, iodinated salicylic acid-derived poly(anhydrideesters) using melt-condensation and solution polymerization techniques. A. L Carbone, M. Song, Κ. Ε. Uhrich 2:40 602. Versatile functionalization of poly­ vinyl alcohol) for grafting of biofunctional building blocks. D. A. Ossipov, J. Hilbom 3:00 603. Graft copolymerization of polyacrylamide-based cationic water-soluble polymers. J-S. Presello, R. Subramanian 3:20 604. Impact of blockyness and tacticity on the self-assembly of amphiphilic copolymers in water. R. C. W. Liu, A. Pallier, M. Brestaz, Ν. Pantoustier, C. Tribet 3:40 605. Membrane transport behavior and the lability of chloride on polyphosphazenes bearing bulky substituents. F. F. Stewart, J. R. Klaehn, C. J. Orme 4:00 606. Multi-partial post-polymerization functional group inter-conversion of regio­ regular poly(thiophene)s. T. Israsena Na Ayudhya, J. J. Lavigne 4:20 607. PEGylation of shell crosslinked nanoparticles and their biodistribution assessment. G. Sun, J. Xu, A. Hagooly, R. Rossin, Z. Li, D. A. Moore, M. J. Welch, K. L. Wooley 4:40 608. New methodology for the anionic synthesis of alkoxysilyl-functionalized polymers. R. P. Quirk, M. Ocampo, R. L King, M. J. Polce, C. Wesdemiotis

S. J . Clarson, J . Hagen, D. E. Morse, S. V. Patwardhan, K. Shiba, D. W. Smith Jr., M. E. Van Dyke, L. E. Drechsler, D. M. Haddleton, W . Hawthorne, and C. W . Widenhouse, Organizers I. Yamashita, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 609. Hydrophobic silsesquioxane nano­ particles. J. M. Mabry, A. Vij, S. T. lacono 9:00 610. Formation and reaction of poss derivatives. Y. Kawakami 9:30 611. Determination of thickness and refractive indices of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane thin films by multiple inci­ dent media ellipsometry. U. Karabiyik, M. Mao, A. R. Esker, S. Satija 9:50 612. Manipulation of free-standing polysaccharide nanosheets and their application on a nano-adhesive plaster. S. Takeoka, T. Fujie, Y. Okamura 10:10 613. Viscoelastic nanocomposite hydrogels: Influence of polymer Mw and ionic strength on structure. G. Schmidt, P. Schexnailder, E. Loizou, P. Butler, L. Porcar Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Stone Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Dendrimers, Hyperbranched Systems, Stars and Others Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW U. S. Schubert, I. Manners, and G. R. Newkome, Organizers Β. Ζ. Tang, D. Astruc, and I. D. W . Samuel, Presiding 8:05 614. Supramecular metallodendrimers as nanoreactors for molecular recognition. D. Astruc, C. Omelas, J. Ruiz Aranzaes, E. Cloutet 8:40 615. Alkynylruthenium dendrimers: Syntheses and multiphoton absorption. M. G. Humphrey, M. P. Cifuentes, M. Samoc 9:05 616. Cobalt-containing hyperbranched poly(silylenearylene)s. J. Liu, M. HauGler, J. W. Y. Lam, A. Qin, Β. Ζ. Tang 9:30 617. Fine controlled metal-assembly in dendrimers. K. Yamamoto 9:55 Intermission. 10:15 618. Homogeneous electron transfer between redox-active cluster core den­ drimers. C. B. Gorman, Y-R. Hong, A. Sharma 10:35 619. Mimicking of iron-sulfur cluster proteins: Synthesis and electrochemical behavior of amphiphilic dendrimers. A. Sharma, N. Kim, C. Gorman 10:55 620. Phosphorescent dendrimers: Efficient solution-processed OLED materi­ als. J. C. Ribierre, A. Ruseckas, K. R. Knights, S. V. Staton, P. L. Bum, I. D. W. Samuel 11:15 621. Click chemistry and dendrimer synthesis as tools for designing efficient optical power limiting platinum(ll) acetylides. R. Westlund, E. Glimsdal, M. Lindgren, C. Lopes, E. Malmstrôm 11:30 622. Amphiphilic poly(2-oxazoline)s bearing palladium carbene complexes for C-C coupling reactions in micellar catalysis. D. Schônfelder, R. Weberskirch, O. Nuyken 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

S. Zauscher,

Organizer Presiding

R. C. Advincula and S. Valiyaveettil, Organizers, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 623. Biosensors based on a cationic polythiophene: Detection of dna and proteins. M. Leclerc, A. Najari, H. A. Ho 9:35 624. Water-soluble conjugated polymers and their complexes for biosensory applications. I-B. Kim, R. Phillips, U. H. F. Bunz 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 626. Biomimetic synthesis of water soluble conducting copolymers. F. Bruno, S. A. Fossey, S. Nagarajan, R. Nagarajan, J. Kumar, L. A. Samuelson 10:45 627. Fabrication of bioconjugated and hybrid polymeric nanostructures by fieldinduced scanning probe lithography. A. Garcia, A. Hucknall, M. Johannes, R. Clark, A. Chilkoti, S. Zauscher 11:15 625. Withdrawn. Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Otis Imaging Techniques for the Characterization of Polymers and Polymer-Derived Materials X-Ray, Force, and Electron Microscopies M. T. Cicerone,

Organizer

H. Jinnai, Organizer,

Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 628. Imaging of mechanical properties for surface and internal phase of multiphase polymer thin films. H. Sugihara, K. Oya, H. Murase, K. Tanaka, K. Akabori, T. Kajiyama, A. Takahara 8:45 629. Transmission electron microtomography of multicomponent block copolymer systems. R. J. Spontak, J. T. Weaver, A. O. Gozen, V. Abetz, S. D. Smith, J. Genzer, D. A. Agard 9:25 630. Structural imaging with a modem transmission electron microscope. M. Kawasaki, H. Furukawa 10:05 631. LV-TEM imaging of nanosilica formation in thermoreversible block copolymer gel. J. Texter, R. Schwarz, P. Stepan 10:30 632. Characterizing polymers through molecular visualization. S. S. Sheiko, F. C. Sun, J. R. Boyce, S. Y. Yu 10:55 633. Nanostructured morphology of polymer conetworks: Resolving the controversy between AFM and TEM images for disordered nanophase separated multicomponent polymers. R. Thomann, B. Ivan, G. Erdôdi, A. Domjân, J. Scherble, R. Mulhaupt 11:20 634. Polymerization shrinkage of polymeric dental composites characterized by X-ray microcomputed tomography. S. Lin-Gibson, J. Sun 11:45 635. Synchrotron X-ray tomography of flame retardants in polymers. L. G. Butler 12:10 636. Blowing bubbles in PMMA with the SEM. J. Kraut, R. Hiesgen, L. Ge, J. Texter

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

TECH-129

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

POLY/PMSE Section Ε

Section Β

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β

Westin Boston Waterfront Stone

Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition

General Papers: Polymers in Nanotechnology Cosponsored by BIOHW

Cosponsored by AGFD and BTEC T. E. Long and C. D. Thatcher,

Organizers

D. Garcia,

Organizer

T. W . Smith and M. J . Nasrullah, S. E. Duncan,

Presiding

Presiding

9:00 637. Synthesis and association of phosphonium cation-containing polyesters for food packaging applications. E. B. Anderson, T. E. Long, S. Unal

1:00 656. Phosphoric acid induced micelliza­ tion of styrene-ethylene oxide block copolymers. T. W. Smith, M. Ayubali, M. Kotlarchyk, A. Langner

9:20 638. Suitability of poly(styrene) for food packaging. B. A. Howell 9:40 639. Heat seal design and optimization. R. D. Moffitt 10:00 640. Health benefits of dietary resis­ tant starch, a non digestible fermentable glucose polymer. M. J. Keenan, J. Zhou, A. M. Raggio, K. L. McCutcheon, R. T. Tulley, M. Hegsted, H. G. Bateman, I. Brown, A. Birkett, S. S. Newman, R. J. Martin 10:20 Intermission. 10:40 641. Development of antioxidant peptides from milk protein. S. Hogan, K. Zhou 11:00 642. Psyllium derivatives and their health beneficial properties. L. L. Yu, Z. Cheng 11:20 643. Controlled release of active ingredients from polymer food packaging by molecular encapsulation with cyclodextrins. J. L. Koontz, J. E. Marcy

1:20 657. Novel resins containing amide and phosphate functional groups and their role in metal ion complexation in aqueous solutions. A. N. Pustam, S. D. Alexandratos

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A General Papers: Functional Materials D. Garcia, J. Griffin,

Organizer Presiding

1:00 644. Continuous copolymerization of vinylidene fluoride with hexafluoropropylene in supercritical carbon dioxide. T. S. Ahmed, J. M. DeSimone, G. W. Roberts 1:20 645. Controlled synthesis of fluorinated block copolymers with pendant sulfonates. S. Hvilsted, I. Dimitrov, K. Jankova 646. Withdrawn. 1:40 647. Controlled dispersion polymeriza­ tion in supercritical carbon dioxide by RAFT. A. M. Gregory, K. J. Thurecht, S. M. Howdle 2:00 648. Degradable polyurethanes based on imine and acetal chemistry. M. Kacperski, P. A. Waske, Y. G. Durant, R. P.Johnson 2:20 649. Dynamic mechanical behavior of polymers containing silica nanoparticles. A. Kraft, V. Arrighi, P. M. E. Adams, G. Karotsis, A. McAnaw, I. J. McEwen, L. Ragupathy, C. Waring 2:40 650. Glass binding polymers: Persistent and renewable antibacterial coatings for surfaces. V. Sambhy, B. R. Peterson, A. Sen 3:00 651. Influence of polymer architecture on anticorrosion coating efficiency. A. S. Quincy, Y. G. Durant 3:20 652. Synthesis of ion sequestration particles for anticorrosion coatings. Z. Z. Zguris, Y. G. Durant 3:40 653. Materials engineering and fabrica­ tion of colloidally based, color tailorable organic light emitting devices. C. F. Huebner, S. Foulger, J. R. Lawrence, D. D. Evanoff Jr., J. B. Carroll, J. M. Houchins, Y. Ying 4:00 654. Micellization of multiblock copoly­ mers on surfaces. C-A. Fustin, H. Huang, R. Hoogenboom, U. S. Schubert, J-F. Gohy 4:20 655. Microporous organic polymers for methane storage. C. D. Wood, D. Bradshaw, E. Stôckel, B. Tan, A. Trewin, M. J. Rosseinsky, A. I. Cooper

130-TECH

1:40 658. A kinetic study for the reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide: Slow and fast initiation. R. Narain, H. Bouchekif 2:00 659. Block copolymer surface modifiers to enable new groundwater remediation technologies based on nanoscale zero valent iron particles. K. Sirk, N. B. Saleh, T. Phenrat, H-J. Kim, P. L. Golas, G. V. Lowry, K. Matyjaszewski, R.D.Tilton 2:20 660. Controlled design of amphiphilic block-copolymers using ring-opening polymerization and click chemistry. P. Lundberg, P. Antoni, L. Fogelstrôm, M. Malkoch, A. Huit 2:40 661. Grafting of poly(e-caprolactone) from microfibrillated cellulose films—for biocomposite applications. H. Lônnberg, L. Fogelstrôm, E. Malmstrôm, Q. Zhou, H. Brumer, T. T. Teeri, S. Samir, L. Berglund, A. Huit 3:00 662. Loading capacity of copolymer micelles enhanced by specific interactions. C. Giacomelli, V. Schmidt, R. Borsali 3:20 663. Polyelectrolyte multilayers used to design mechanically responsive films. P. Schaaf, J. Voegel, P. Lavalle Sr., J. Hemmerlé, D. Mertz, P. Marie, V. Roucoules 3:40 664. Polymer networks based on dendrimer monomers. C. Nilsson, N. Simpson, M. Malkoch, M. Johansson, E. Malmstrôm 4:00 665. Synthesis and self-assembly of symmetric abcba pentablock copolymers. A. J. Meuler, M. A. Hillmyer, F. S. Bates 4:20 666. Synthesis and study of thermoresponsive miceller assemblies from amphiphilic triblock copolymers. A. Sundararaman, T. Stephan, R. B. Grubbs 4:40 667. Water-soluble core cross-linked star polymers with a degradable, disulfidefunctionalized core. T. K. Goh, A. Blencowe, S. E. Shaw, G. G. Qiao

3:00 671. Morphological, photophysical and thermal properties of luminescent organicinorganic hybrids based on DCN and TEOS. A. Martinez-Richa, M. Trejo-Duran, R. Vera-Graziano, E. Alvarado-Mendez, V. Castaho 3:30 672. Synthesis and characterization of Donor-Acceptor functionalized PPV diblock copolymers for photovoltaics. D. Zepeda, J. P. Ferraris 3:50 673. Self-assembly of o-phenylene ethynylene fnacrocycles. J. Jiang, S. H. Seo, J. Y. Chang, G. Tew Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Otis Imaging Techniques for the Characterization of Polymers and Polymer-Derived Materials Optical and Other Microscopies H. Jinnai,

Organizer

M. T. Cicerone, Organizer,

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 674. Microstructure characterization of drug-polymer composite coatings. M. K. McDermott, D. V. Patwardhan, R. Casas, Β. J. Dair, C-S. Kim, S. K. Pollack, D. M. Saylor, J. M. Softer, J. Toy, C. X. Wang 2:00 675. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging of drug distribution and release from polymer films. H. Wang, E. Kang, I. K. Kwon, J. Robinson, K. Park, J. X. Cheng 2:25 676. Two-photon fluorescence and FLIM 3-D imaging in polymer films. Z - L Huang, K. D. Belfield 2:50 677. Fluourescent tags for amino res­ ins. A. Philbrook, C. J. Easton, S. Eamshaw 3:15 678. Optical ellipsometry: Characteriza­ tion of polymer structural transformations. B. Feinberg, G. Y. Georgiev, P. Cebe 3:40 679. Imaging analysis of a poly(glycolide-co-lactide) monofilament during in vitro degradation. M. Deng, D. Burkley, R. Vetrecin, G. Chen 4:05 680. Spatially-resolved polymer degra­ dation via ESR imaging: Software devel­ opment and prospects. S. Schlick, K. Kruczala 4:30 681. Neutron imaging of an electricallystimulated water gradient in ionic polymer metal composite actuators. J. K. Park, K. A. Page, D. S. Hussey, R. B. Moore

R. C. Advincula, K. Muellen, and S. Valiyaveettil, Organizers D. Zepeda and A. L. Briseno,

Section Ε

Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering Ε. Β. Coughlin, Program Chair

40 Years of Macromolecules (see POLY, Tue) Fuel Cell Technology: Polymer Elec­ trolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems (see FUEL, Sun, Mon) Surfactants and Polymers for Per­ sonal, Home and Hearth Care (see COLL, Tue, Wed, Thu) Herman Mark Award in Honor of Robert Langer (see POLY, Mon) Herman Mark Scholar Award Sympo­ sium (see POLY, Sun, Mon) SOCIAL EVENTS: Breakfast: Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu PMSE/POLY Break Room: Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu PMSE/POLY Hospitality Suite: Tue Reception: Mon Social Hour: Tue BUSINESS MEETINGS: Executive Committee Meeting: Sun PMSE Business Meeting: Mon SUNDAY MORNING Section A

New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Electronically Active Polymers

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Β Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition Sensory Issues in Food Packaging Cosponsored by AGFD and BTEC

Ε. Β. Coughlin,

T. E. Long and C. D. Thatcher,

8:00 1 . Effects of aggregation on the emis­ sive properties of PPV oligomers. G. A. Sherwood, R. Cheng, T. M. Smith, J. Wildeman, D. J. Yaron, L A. Peteanu 8:20 2. Nanoscale organization in thin films of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) block copolymers. R. Zhang, M. C. lovu, G. Sauvé, J. R. Cooper, A. E. Javier, D. M. Smilgies, R. D. McCullough, T. Kowalewski 8:40 3. Submicron scale pattern of poly (ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) grafted on flexible polymer substrates. S. G. Im, P. J. Yoo, P. T. Hammond, K. K. Gleason 4. Withdrawn. 9:00 5. Morphological control for multicomponent organic electronics using rod-coil block copolymers. B. D. Olsen, Y. Tao, X. Li, M. F. Toney, J. Wang, R. A. Segalman 9:20 6. New polyurethanes with carbazole and OXD derivate as hole-transporting layer for organic light emitting diodes. C-H. Ku 9:40 Intermission. 10:00 7. Probing morphological effects of OLED using first principle calculations. P. Yang, E. R. Batista, S. Tretiak, A. B. Saxena, R. L. Martin, D. L. Smith

Organizers

1:00 682. To eat or not to eat: Fish fresh­ ness assessment using a conjugated polymer. T. L. Nelson, I. Tran, M. S. Maynor, J . J . Lavigne 1:30 683. Collagen films with antioxidant for flavor protection in pet food. S. F. O'Keefe, D. M. Greene Lakins, C. Alvarado 2:00 684. Sensory impacts from polymer pipes interacting with drinking water oxi­ dants. A. M. Dietrich

Presiding

1:30 668. Facile conversion of precursor aromatic ladder polymers and oligomers. W. Niu, A. Sharma, W. J. Behof, C. B. Gorman 2:00 669. One-dimensional nanostructured η-channel ladder polymer transistors. A. L Briseno, Y. Xia, S. A. Jenekhe 2:30 670. Disubstituted polyacetylene brushes grown via surface directed met­ athesis polymerization. S. B. Jhaveri, K. R. Carter 2:50 Intermission.

PMSE

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom D

E. B. Anderson and J . L. Koontz, Presiding

Conjugated Polymer Materials and Hybrids: Synthesis, Macromolecular Assemblies, and Nanostructures Materials Processing Cosponsored by BIOHW

3:15 686. Flavor and aroma of food and package interactions: Perception and communication. S. E. Duncan

OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Presiding

Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom C

2:30 Intermission. 2:45 685. Packaging solutions for sensory degradation in foods and beverages due to photooxidation. J. B. Webster, S. E. Duncan, J. E. Marcy, S. F. O'Keefe, S. N. Sims

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Ε. Κ. Lin,

Organizer

Presiding

PMSE 10:20 8. Synthesis, characterization, optical and electroluminescent properties of novel fluorene-acceptorpolyfluorene-based copolymers/polyblends and their applica­ tion for color tunable devices. C-H. Kuo, K-R. Lin, W-K. Cheng, K-H. Hsieh 10:40 9. Study of fuel cells thin film mor­ phologies by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering . T. Irita, T. P. Russell, X. Li, M. Kondo, H. Aoyama 11:00 10. Inorganic modification of ionic block copolymers for high temperature pern application. M. K. Mistry, N. R. Choudhury, N. K. Dutta, S. Holdcroft Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Polymers and Biology Ε. Β. Coughlin, R. N. DeMartino,

Organizer Presiding

8:00 1 1 . Effect of polyelectrolyte tacticity on protein-polyelectrolyte interaction. H. Zhang, J-M. Guenet, R. Curtis 8:20 12. In vitro biomineralization induced by self-assembled extracellular matrix pro­ teins. X. Ba, Y. Meng, Y. Huang, H. Furedi-Milhofer, S. Y. Kwak, S. Ge, Y. Qin, M. Rafailovich, E. DiMasi, N. Pernodet 8:40 13. Interfacial peptides for the cellularization of titanium implants. S. R. Meyers, X. Khoo, D. J. Kenan, M. W. Grinstaff 9:00 14. Locally controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor from biodegradable hollow capsules. Y. Itoh, M. Matsusaki, T. Kida, M. Akashi 9:20 15. Novel fibrillar protein hydrogel as tissue engineering scaffolds. H. Yan, J. E. Gough, A. Nykanen, J. Ruokolainen, A. F. Miller 9:40 16. Novel semicrystalline PVA hydrogel as load bearing cartilage substitute. H. Bodugoz Senturk, E. Oral, J. Choi, J. Hsiang Kung, C. E. Macias, O. K. Muratoglu 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 17. Peptide surface modification of p(HEMA-co-MMA)-/>PIB-fr-p(HEMA-coMMA) block copolymers to enhance endothelialization. U. Ojha, D. Feng, A. Chandekar, J. E. Whitten, R. Faust 10:40 18. Preparation and characterization of an artificial peptide with repetitive sequences. S. Gerber, K. Kirchhof, J. Kressler, C. E. H. Schmelzer, C. Scholz, T. C. Hertel, M. Pietzsch 11:00 19. Reversible encapsulation of DNA into semipermeable polymer capsules. A. N. Zelikin, A. L. Becker, Q. Li, K. Wark, F. Caruso 11:20 20. Synthesis and characterization of engineered proteins with controllable properties for use in spinal cord nerve regeneration. K. S. Straley, S. C. Heilshom 11:40 2 1 . Tailored protein-based nanocarriers. G. Mihov, R. Gropeanu, C. Kuhlmann, H. Luhmann, T. Weil 12:00 22. Transition metal binding in designed peptide block copolymer micelles. A. D. Richardson, S. Banerjee, J. C. Wright, M. A. Case, D. A. Savin

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Adams New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Nanomaterials

New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Synthesis

3:10 Intermission. 3:25 57. Withdrawn. 3:45 58. Synthesis and characterization of a novel RAFT agent with epoxy group. A. Vora, M. J. Nasrullah, D. C. Webster 4:05 59. Synthesis and characterization of polycarbosilane-gf-PMMA copolymers. K. Oh, J. Hyun, C. Y. Ryu, L. V. Interrante 4:25 60. Click chemistry approach to gra­ phitic structures. J. Hoogboom, M. Juricek, J. Lauko, J. Rehak, T. Woltinge, K. van de Ruit, K. F. Flipse, A. E. Rowan 4:45 6 1 . Siloxane block copolymer synthesis. R. Chakraborty, M. D. Soucek

Ε. Β. Coughlin,

Section C

Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Ε. Β. Coughlin,

Organizer Section A

E. Harth,

Presiding

8:00 23. Amphiphilic homopolymers: An alternate approach to self-assembled nanostructures. E. N. Savariar, S. V. Aathimanikandan, S. Thayumanavan 8:20 24. Effect of geometric shape on nanodispersion of carbon nanotubes and lay­ ered platelets. J-J. Lin, Y-F. Lan, K-L. Wei, Y-N. Chan 8:40 25. Effects of chemical structure of unsaturated polyester on the volume shrinkage characteristics for unsaturated polyester-montmorillonite nanocomposites. Y-J. Huang, S-M. Hsu, C-C. Chu, C-Y. Chu, Y. Andriani 26. Withdrawn. 9:00 27. Exfoliation of natural clays by amphiphilic copolymers to nanoscale silicate platelets and their antimicrobial behavior. J-J. Lin, C-C. Chu, M-L Chiang 9:20 28. Impact modifier intercalant usage in layered silica based polymeric nanocom­ posites. C. Bagcioglu, S. Sen, Y. Yagci, T. Nugay, N. Nugay 9:40 Intermission. 10:00 29. Influence of specific interactions in controlling the state of dispersion of MWNT in co-continuous polymer blends. S. Bose, A. R. Bhattacharyya, A. R. Kulkami 10:20 30. Initial and sequential surface modification of electrospun nano/microfibers. X. Sun, Q. Peng, H. G. Borner, G. Ν. Parsons, R. J. Spontak 10:40 3 1 . Nanometer-scale tuning of colloi­ dal photonic crystals by layer-by-layer self assembly of well-defined polyferrocenylsilane polyelectrolytes. Z. Wang, G. Masson, F. C. Peiris, G. A. Ozin, I. Manners 11:00 32. Preparation and characterization of poly(acrylic acid) grafted magnetite nanoparticles. D. Wu, L. Jiang, R. Jin 11:20 33. Preparation of superparamagnetic polyimide/{gamma}-Fe 2 03nanocomposite films. D. Wu, J. Zhan, G. Tian, Z. Wu, R.Jin 11:40 34. Synthesis and design of electroactive, site isolated nanostructures for applications in bimodal imaging and device technology. C. T. Adkins, T. A. Croce, S. K. Hamilton, E. Harth Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott 50 Years after the Discovery of Polymer Single Crystals: A Look Back, Current Discoveries and Future Opportunities Polymer Single Crystals—Past, Present and Future S. Z. D. Cheng,

J. Rzayev,

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 4 1 . Free radical synthesis of rubbers made entirely from highly unsaturated vegetable oils and derivatives. M. Valverde, R. C. Larock 1:50 42. Functionalized norbornene polyacetals for use in photoresist applications. J. R. Adams, R. P. Callahan, W. J. Durand, C. L. Steger, C. G. Willson 2:10 43. Hybrid polymers based on polyolefins and non-polyolefins as functional materials. N. Kawahara, J. Saito, S. Matsuo, H. Kaneko, T. Matsugi, N. Kashiwa 2:30 44. N-Heterocyclic carbene-mediated zwitterionic polymerization: An expedient organocatalytic route to cyclic polyesters. W. Jeong, E. J. Shin, D. A. Culkin, J. L. Hedrick, R. M. Waymouth 2:50 45. Rod-coil diblock polymerization from a bifunctional NMRP initiator. R. J. I. Knoop, G. J. M. Habraken, M. Henning, C. E. Koning, A. Heise 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 46. Synthesis and morphological study of styrene/acetoxystyrene/hydroxystyrene block-random copolymers. J . D. Quinn, R. A. Register 3:45 47. Synthesis and performance of acrylamide-dimethylaminoethylacrylate methyl chloride quaternary salt copolymer as flocculant. R. Subramanian, P. Reed, S.Zhu 4:05 48. Synthesis of dihydroxy poly(ethylene-co-butadiene) oligomers via metathetical depolymerization. F. Lucas, A. Leblanc, F. Peruch, S. Cariotti, C. Boisson, A. Deffieux 4:25 49. Synthesis of silicone resins contain­ ing polystyrene and poly(f-butyl acrylate) grafts using ATRP and "click" chemistry. M. J. Nasrullah, D. C. Webster 4:45 50. Synthesis of antibacterial zeolitepolyurethane composites. K. Kamisoglu, E. A. Aksoy, B. Akata, N. Bac, H. Hasirci 5:05 5 1 . Synthesis of [bis(pyridine)salen]Zn"-based coordination polymers and their application in enantioselective separations. S-H. Cho, T. Gadzikwa, G. A. Emberger, R. Q. Snurr, S. T. Nguyen, J. T. Hupp Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Synthesis

Organizer

A. J . Lovinger, Organizer,

Westin Boston Waterfront ' Grand Ballroom D

Westin Boston Waterfront Adams Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Pore Generation Cosponsored by BIOHW M. S. Silverstein and N. R. Cameron, Organizers B. F. Chmelka, Organizer,

Presiding

1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 62. Ultra-high pore volume, ultra-high surface area porous polymers. D. C. Sherrington, A. Watt, R. Baudry, N. R. Cameron 2:00 63. Microporous polymers: Synthesis, properties and simulation. A. I. Cooper, J. Jiang, A. Trewin, F. Su, B. Tan, E. Stôckel, H. Niu, N. L. Campbell, A. Ganin, C. Dickinson, M. J. Rosseinsky, Y. Khimyak, C. D. Wood 2:30 64. Polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs): Multifunctional organic materials. N. B. McKeown, B. S. Ghanem, K. J. Msayib, M. Carta, P. M. Budd, J. D. Selbie 2:50 65. Microporous polyboronate esters. R. W. Tilford, W. R. Gemmill, S. J. Mugavero, H-C. zur Loyte, J. J. Lavigne 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 66. Porous polyurethane dispersions. A. Lubnin, S. Lenhard, V. Woodward 3:40 67. Proposed synthesis of ultrahigh surface area hyper-cross-linked nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. J . D. B. Fay, N. R. Cameron 4:00 68. Mesoporous crosslinked polymers tailored from (semi-)IPNs: Scope and limitations. D. Grande, G. Rohman 4:20 69. Reversibly photo-cross-linkable honeycomb materials. L A. Connal, R. Vestberg, C. J. Hawker, G. G. Qiao Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott 50 Years after the Discovery of Polymer Single Crystals: A Look Back, Current Discoveries and Future Opportunities Novel Structures and Morphologies A. J . Lovinger,

Organizer

S. Z. D. Cheng, Organizer,

Presiding

Presiding Ε. Β. Coughlin,

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 35. Fifty (plus) years of polymer nanoscience (art). P. H. Geil 9:10 36. On the crystallization habits and morphology of Nylon 66. F. Khoury 9:40 37. Polymer single crystals: What about the impact of the folds? B. A. Lotz 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 38. Self assembled machines, in lamellar crystals, driven by stress or elec­ tric fields. D. H. Reneker 10:55 39. Fifty-year development of the understanding of motion and defects in macromolecular crystals based on thermal analysis, structure analysis and computer simulation. B. Wunderlich 11:25 40. Tuning surface and interface properties through crystal engineering. S. Z. D. Cheng, H. Xiong, R. Van Horn, W. Zhang

M. Week,

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 52. Understanding dendrimer architec­ ture using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. R. Hourani, M. A. Whitehead, A. K. Kakkar 1:50 53. Control of polycarbonate dendrimer surface functionality. H. Willcock, A. I. Cooper, S. P. Rannard 2:10 54. Synthesis of hyperbanched polyglycerol via ring-opening polymeriza­ tion of glycidol in a microstructured reac­ tor. D. Wilms, J. Nieberie, J. Klos, H. Lowe, H. Frey 2:30 55. Facially amphiphilic dendrimers on surfaces. Y. Chen, A. V. Ambade, D. R. Vutukuri, S. Thayumanavan 2:50 56. Hierarchical polymeric material with chiral selectivity. R. Valluzzi, L. Liu

1:30 70. Asymmetric curvature of growth faces of polymer crystals. M. A. Shcherbina, G. Ungar 2:00 7 1 . Branching in spherulites of chain folded polymer crystals: Periodic rings and correlation length. A. Toda, M. Okamura, M. Hikosaka, H. Kajioka 2:30 72. Crystallization control using optically active (chiral) polymers. D. Maillard, R. E. Prud'homme 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 73. Single lamella crystals of polyethylene accessible by catalytic emulsionpolymerization. C. Weber, A. Chiche, G. Krausch, S. Rosenfeldt, M. Ballauff, I. Gôttker-Schnetmann, S. Mecking, L. Hamau 3:45 74. Intimate relationship between structural change in crystal lattice and morphological change during the phase transition of polymer crystal. K. Tashiro

TECH-131

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

PMSE

4:15 75. Local structures in polymer single crystals evidenced by high-resolution electron microscopy. M. Tosaka, M. Tsuji 4:45 76. Grain boundaries, dislocations, and vacancies in polymer and organic molecu­ lar crystals. J. Chen, C. Shaw, D. C. Martin Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW MONDAY MORNING

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom D

Organizer

L. Francis, Organizer,

Presiding

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 77. Cycle of life: Estimating service life after film formation. S. G. Croll, B. R. Hinderliter 8:35 78. Sorption and diffusion of water in biobased polymer films. J. A. Meisner, R. A. Caimcross 9:05 79. Drying defects tunable by periodic air blowing: A simple modeling. M. Yamamura, T. Uchinomiya, Y. Mawatari, H. Kage 9:35 80. Network instability that causes macrovoids in phase inversion mem­ branes: Cryo-SEM evidence and theoreti­ cal development. S. S. Prakash 10:05 Intermission. 10:35 8 1 . Layer-by-layer assembly of thin multifunctional coatings. J. C. Grunlan 11:05 82. Measuring and modeling cure conversion and stress: Retrospective and prospects in coating processes. A. V. McCormick, D. J. O'Neal, K. B. Richter, L. F. Francis 11:35 83. Pattern generation by wrinkling in a two-layer coating. S. K. Basu, L. F. Francis, A. V. McCormick, L. E. Scriven Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε Hierarchically Ordered Functional Materials Biological and Biomimetic Strategies for Creating Ordered Materials R. Beyer, M. VanLandingham, and R. A. Vaia, Organizers C. M. Mello,

Presiding

8:30 84. Molecular biomimetics: Genetically engineered polypeptides as building blocks in materials and medicine. M. Sarikaya 9:00 85. Biosynthetically derived polypep­ tides as templates in materials design. K. L. Kiick 9:30 86. Forward and inverse design of hierarchically-ordered functional assem­ blies from anisotropic nanocolloids. S. A. Glotzer 10:00 Intermission.

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

132-TECH

Section C

Westin Boston Waterfront Commonwealth Blrm C

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε

Polypeptide and Protein Materials Synthesis Cosponsored by BIOHW

Hierarchically Ordered Functional Materials Mesoscale

T. J . Deming and H. Schlaad,

Organizers

R. Beyer, M. VanLandingham, and R. A. Vaia, Organizers

Presiding R. I. MacCuspie,

N. R. Cameron, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 90. Fabrication of biodegradable scaf­ folds via supercritical carbon dioxide foaming: Effect of polymer composition and processing conditions. S. M. Howdle, K. M. Shakesheff, H. Tai 9:00 9 1 . Polymeric nanoparticles designed for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. M. Shi, K. Ho, M. S. Shoichet 9:30 92. Cell adhesion molecules-targeted polymeric worm micelles as selective in vivo drug delivery systems against endo­ thelial cells. M. A. Hies, Y. Kim, V. V. Shuvaev, S. Zaitsev, S. Cai, D. E. Discher, V. R. Muzykantov 9:50 93. Characterization of a nanoporous poly(1,8 octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) biodegradable elastomer. R. A. Hoshi, G. A. Ameer 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 94. Design of polyester-based 3D materials as scaffolds for bladder tissue engineering. G. Rohman, J. J. Pettit, S. Baker, N. R. Cameron, J. Southgate 10:40 95. Emulsion-templated porous poly­ mers enabling 3-D cell growth. R. Carnachan, M. Bokhari, N. Cameron, S. Przyborski 11:00 96. Porous materials containing biode­ gradable polymers: High internal phase emulsion synthesis. Y. Lumelsky, J. Zoldan, S. Levenberg, M. S. Silverstein 11:20 97. Model porous polymer blends as a route for controlled release. P. Salehi, P. Sarazin, B. D. Favis 11:40 98. Nanopattemed hydrogels as scaffolds for cardiac tissue regeneration. A. Ranjan, T. J. Webster

Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott 50 Years after the Discovery of Polymer Single Crystals: A Look Back, Current Discoveries and Future Opportunities Semi-Crystalline Polymers in Hybrid, Complex and Bio-Related Systems S. Z. D. Cheng and A. J . Lovinger, Organizers

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 106. Control of copolypeptide architec­ ture using transition metal initiators for amino acid N-carboxyanhydride polymer­ ization. T. J. Deming 8:25 107. Ammonium-mediated polymeriza­ tion of amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides: Kinetic investigations. H. Schlaad, M. Meyer 8:45 108. Living ring opening polymerization of aminoacid-N-carboxyanhydrides. J. Cheng, H. Lu 9:05 109. Chemistry of the molecules of life: Total synthesis of enzymes for biological research. S. B. H. Kent 9:35 110. Protein engineering, a versatile technique in materials science. J. C. M. van Hest 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 111. Cationic protein polymers as scaffolds for multivalent and polyvalent ligand display, in solution and in crosslinked hydrogels. A. E. Barron, N. Davis, S. Ding, L Karfeld, P. B. Messersmith 10:40 112. Biosynthetically derived glycopolypeptides for the manipulation of multi­ valent binding events. K. L. Kiick 11:00 113. "Clicked" glycoprotein mimics as multivalent displays for lectins and cells recognition. J. Geng, G. Mantovani, L. Tao, D. A. Mitchell, D. M. Haddleton 11:20 114. Synthesis of peptide and protein polymer conjugates by ATRP and RAFT polymerization. H. D. Maynard Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Organometallic Polymers, Metallopolymers and Nanoparticles Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW MONDAY AFTERNOON

Presiding

8:30 99. Morphological changes upon adding nanotubes or acid groups to polyethylene. K. I. Winey 9:00 100. On the shish kebab structure of carbon nanotube induced polymer crystalli­ zation. C. Li, L. Li, B. Li, B. Wang 9:30 101. Tailoring onion-like morphology in polylactide-containing block copolymers. L. Sun, L Rong, B. S. Hsiao, L. Zhu 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 102. Polymer single crystal mediated Au nanoparticle assembly. B. Li, C. Y. Li 10:45 103. Low voltage TEM and Scherrer analysis of Bombyx mori silk fiber crystal­ lites. L. F. Drummy, R. R. Naik, B. L. Farmer 11:15 104. Beta pleated sheet crystals in silk fibroin. X. Hu, D. L. Kaplan, P. Cebe 11:45 105. Hierarchic structure of shishkebab by neutron scattering in a wide Q range. T. Kanaya, G. Matsuba, Y. Ogino, K. Nishida

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom D Tess Award Symposium in Honor of L. E. (Skip) Scriven Latex and Particulate Coatings L. Francis,

Organizer

C. Huh, Organizer,

Presiding

Presiding

Section A

Section D

R. G. Alamo,

Section Β

Η-A. Klok, Organizer,

Westin Boston Waterfront Adams

M. S. Silverstein and B. F. Chmelka, Organizers

Tess Award Symposium in Honor of L. E. (Skip) Scriven Drying, Curing and Microstructure of Coatings

Section Ε

J. J . L. M. Comelissen,

Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Biomedical and Biodegradable Materials Cosponsored by BIOHW

Section A

C. Huh,

10:30 87. Chemically functionalized viral capsids for light harvesting and diagnostic imaging. M. B. Francis 11:00 88. Bacteriophage Q-B: An example of a hierarchically ordered functional device. S. D. Brown, E. Jung, E. Strable, M. G. Finn 11:30 89. Petrification to form functional hybrid materials. G. Gupta, P. Atanassov, S. Rathod, T. L Ward, G. P. Lopez

Presiding

1:30 115. Silica nanoparticle crystals and ordered coatings using Lys-Sil and a novel coating device. M. A. Snyder, J. A. Lee, T. M. Davis, L. E. Scriven, M. Tsapatsis 2:00 116. Influence of the colloidal stability of latex particles on their distribution in drying films. J. L Keddie, P. Ekanayake, A. M. Konig, T. G. Weerakkody, N. Barber, D. Johannsmann, R. P. Sear, P. J. McDonald 2:30 117. Flow-controlled compaction of latex coatings. J. M. de Santos, E. G. Arlinghaus, L. E. Scriven 3:00 Intermission. 3:30 118. Capillary forces and stress devel­ opment in drying latex coating. L. A. Pekurovsky, L. E. Scriven 4:00 119. New controlled environment vitrifi­ cation system for preparing wet coatings for cryo-SEM. H. Ge, W. J. Suszynski, H. T. Davis, L. E. Scriven 4:30 120. Tess award presentation in honor of L. E. (Skip) Scriven. L. E. Scriven 5:00 Concluding Remarks.

1:30 121. Reaching for the stars: Layered polyvalent self-assembly of hyperbranched pigment arrays. J . Sly, C. S. Bonifacio, L. Chang, K. L Glab, V. Y. Lee, M. McNeil, C. M. Jefferson, J. E. Frommer, W. P. Risk, R. D. Miller 1:50 122. Nanopattemed functional polyelectrolyte multilayers. C. C. Buron, B. Nysten, B. Muls, J-L. Habib-Jiwan, A. M. Jonas 2:10 123. Investigation of the structure of the emitting centers in the spontaneously formed poly (4-vinyl pyridine) gel. E. Vaganova, N. Berestetsky, S. Yitzchaik, A. Goldberg, E. Wachtel 2:30 124. Magnetic assembly of functional­ ized ferromagnetic colloids as templates for 1 -D ordered mesostructures. S. E. Bowles, I. Shim, J. J. Benkoski, A. Karim, T. Kowalewski, M. Schalnat, R. J. Davis, J. A. Pemberton, J. Pyun 2:50 Intermission. 3:20 125. Novel self-assembling pearlnecklace microstructure induced by partial wetting in ternary polymer blends. N. Virgilio, P. Desjardins, G. L'Espérance, B. D. Favis 3:40 126. Replica molding of high-aspectratio hydrogel micropillar arrays and study of their pattern collapse. D. Chandra, J. A. Taylor, S. Yang 4:00 127. Stimuli responsive colloidal systems: Hierarchical assembly and fabrication of ultrahydrophobic surfaces. M. Motornov, R. Sheparovych, R. Lupitskyy, E. MacWilliams, S. Minko 4:20 128. Structured multiple percolated polymer blends. S. Ravati, N. Virgilio, J. Zhang, B. D. Favis 4:40 129. Complex formation between oppositely charged cylindrical brushes and dendrimers. S. Duschner, D. Stôrkle, M. Maskos, M. Schmidt Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Adams Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Pore Generation Cosponsored by BIOHW N. R. Cameron and B. F. Chmelka, Organizers M. S. Silverstein, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 130. Mechanically robust nanoporous plastics from multicomponent block copolymers. M. A. Hillmyer, L. Chen, A. J. Meuler, D. A. Olson, F. S. Bates 2:00 131. Simple route to highly oriented and ordered. S. Park, J-Y. Wang, B. Kim, T. P. Russell 2:30 132. Synthesis of porous polymers by hard and soft templates. M. Antonietti, A. Thomas, P. Kuhn 3:00 Intermission. 3:10 133. Multiple strategies toward nanoporous thin films from block copolymers. C-A. Fustin, N. Lefèvre, P. Guillet, B. G. G. Lohmeijer, U. S. Schubert, J-F. Gohy 3:30 134. Mesoporous inorganic/blockcopolymer and carbon films. B. F. Chmelka, G. L Athens 3:50 135. Effect of stereochemistry and stereocomplexation of polylactides on organosilicate nanostructure. S. H. Kim, F. Nederberg, R. C. Pratt, J. Choi, L. Zhang, C. G. Wade, R. M. Waymouth, J. L. Hedrick 4:10 136. Design of mesoporous materials with controlled porosity and functionality from nanostructured diblock copolymers. B. Gorzolnik, J. Penelle, D. Grande

PMSE 4:30 137. Block copolymer template with carbon dioxide for nanocellular and porous structures. H. Yokoyama, L Li, C. Dutriez, K. Sugiyama 4:50 Division Business Meeting. Section D

M O N D A Y EVENING

Section C

Section Ε

Section A

Westin Boston Waterfront Adams

Westin Boston Waterfront Commonwealth Blrm C

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Diffusion, Adsorption, and Reaction Cosponsored by BIOHW

Sci-Mix

Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott

Ε. Β. Coughlin,

50 Years after the Discovery of Polymer Single Crystals: A Look Back, Current Discoveries and Future Opportunities Panel Discussion on Opportunities and Challenges in Crystalline Polymers S. Z. D. Cheng,

Organizer

A. J. Lovinger, Organizer,

Presiding

Presiding

8:00-10:00 148, 231, 242, 253, 259, 261-262, 264-267, 279, 281, 283, 296, 299-300, 304-309, 313-316, 318, 321, 334-335, 338, 344, 346, 354-356, 358, 361, 364, 375-376, 386, 391-394, 399, 406-407, 413, 416, 418-419, 422, 424. See subsequent list­ ings. TUESDAY MORNING

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:45 138. Panel discussion on opportunities and challenges in crystalline polymers. A. J. Lovinger 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 Open Discussion.

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom D

Section Ε

T. D. Hahn, Organizer,

Westin Boston Waterfront Commonwealth Blrm C

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 149. Why nanoconfinement may lead to the development of polymer glasses that do not physically age. R. D. Priestley, L. J. Broadbelt, J. M. Torkelson 9:05 150. Plastic near-infrared photodetectors utilizing low band gap polymer. Y. Yao, Y. Liang, L. Yu, Y. Yang 9:35 151. Facile preparation of fluorinated conjugated polymers possessing tunable photoluminescence and chemical sensing. S. T. lacono, S. M. Budy, J. D. Moody, R. C. Smith, D. W. Smith Jr. 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 152. Aptamer incorporated polyelectrolyte multilayer films targeting influenza virus's hemagglutinin binding region. S. Kidambi, I. Lee, C. Chan 10:50 153. Liquid crystalline co-elastomers displaying one-way shear shape memory. K. A. Burke, P. T. Mather 11:20 154. Ultra-strong, transparent polymer nanocomposites with stiffness characteris­ tic of individual nanoscale clay platelets. P. Podsiadlo, A. K. Kaushik, B. S. Shim, A. M. Waas, E. M. Arruda, N. A. Kotov 11:50 Concluding Remarks.

Polypeptide and Protein Materials Characterization Cosponsored by BIOHW T. J . Deming and Η-A. Klok, D. T. Kamei,

Organizers

Presiding

H. Schlaad, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 139. Molecular "hole punchers" and their mechanisms: From synthetic antimi­ crobials to HIV protein transduction domains. G. C. L. Wong 2:00 140. Hydrogels for cell encapsulation and injectable delivery via peptide folding and consequent self-assembly. D. J. Pochan 2:30 141. Non-invasive studies of proteins and DNA fragments by SEC and SEC coupling methods. T. Hofe, M. Gray 2:50 142. Influence of network parameters on the properties of dynamic, proteinbased hydrogels. Ζ. Sui, W. J. King, W. L. Murphy 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 143. Polypeptide-based polymersomes as biomimetic nanocarriers. W. Agut, C. Sanson, D. Taton, A. Soum, C. Schatz, S. Lecommandoux 3:45 144. Microstructure and rheology of amphiphilic block copolypeptide gels. V. Breedveld 4:05 145. Analytical ultracentrifugation for the characterization of proteins and protein assemblies. P. Schuck 4:25 146. Polypeptide multilayer nanofilms for cell and tissue engineering. D. T. Haynie, J. S. Rudra, N. Palath, L. Zhang, H. Handa, G. Mao 4:45 147. Collapse and folding of a small protein observed with force-clamp spec­ troscopy. J. M. Fernandez Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Organometallic Polymers, Metallopolymers and Nanoparticles Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW Undergraduate Research Poster Session Polymer Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by PMSE, POLY, and SOCED

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

Section A

ICI Student Award Symposium Presiding

B. F. Chmelka, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 161. Nanoparticle-induced porosity in rubbery 1,2-polybutadiene and its effect on gas permeability. S. Matteucci, V. A. Kusuma, B. D. Freeman 9:00 162. Conductive polypyrrole/polyurethane composite foams as sensors for volatile organic chemicals. Y. Wang, G. A. Sotzing, R. A. Weiss 9:20 163. Diffusion of entangled linear poly­ mer chains through a porous thin gel network by using specially prepared small core-shell particles. C. Wu, Q. Song 9:40 164. Nanoporous polymers for hydro­ gen storage. J. Germain, J. M. J. Frechet, F. Svec 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 165. Atom transfer radical polymeriza­ tion initiated from surfaces of ordered mesoporous silicas. M. Kruk, B. Dufour, E. B. Celer, T. Kowalewski, M. Jaroniec, K. Matyjaszewski 10:30 166. Intrinsic microporosity in polyimides. P. M. Budd, J. D. Selbie, M. A. Awal, N. B. McKeown, B. S. Ghanem, K. J. Msayib, D. Fritsch 10:50 167. Structure-property relationships in PEG-based hydrogels for potential hydrophilic membrane coating materials. A. C. Sagle, M. M. Sharma, B. D. Freeman 11:10 168. New insights into the relationship between internal phase level of emulsion templates and gas/liquid permeability of open porous polymer foams. S. S. Manley, N. Graeber, A. Menner, F. Stepanek, G. F. Hewitt, A. Bismarck 11:30 169. Electrochemical gating using a responsive polymer gel membrane. I. Tokarev, M. Orlov, E. Katz, S. Minko Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott .

Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε

50 Years after the Discovery of Polymer Single Crystals: A Look Back, Current Discoveries and Future Opportunities Crystalline Polymers Under Nano-Confinements or External Fields

Hierarchically Ordered Functional Materials New Assembly Mechanisms and Nanoparticulate Materials R. Beyer and R. A. Vaia,

M. S. Silverstein and N. R. Cameron, Organizers

Organizers

M. VanLandingham, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 155. Controlling nanoscale surface assembly using ditopic nucleobase-containing monomers. S. J. Rowan, A. M. S. Kumar, S. Sivakova, J. D. Fox, R. E. Marchant 9:05 156. Nanostructured block copolymers with inspiration from biology. B. D. Mather, M. B. Baker, S. R. Williams, R. Beyer, T. E. Long 9:35 157. Modeling energy transduction in composite materials that encompass chemo-responsive gels. V. Yashin, O. Kuksenok, A. C. Balazs 10:05 Intermission. 10:35 158. Entropically dominated selfassembly in multicomponent granular systems. M. Benedict, J. F. Maguire 11:05 159. Incorporation and selective local­ ization of bio-nanoparticles in thin film of water-insoluble block copolymer. T. P. Russell, D. Shin, L K. Molnar, S. H. Kim, T. Xu 11:35 160. Synthesis of asymmetrically functionalized nanoparticles via polymer single crystals. C. Y. Li, B. Li

S. Z. D. Cheng and A. J. Lovinger, Organizers L. Z h u ,

Polypeptide and Protein Materials Properties Cosponsored by BIOHW T. J . Deming, Η-A. Klok, and H. Schlaad, Organizers D. A. Savin and S. Lecommandoux, Presiding 8:00 177. Virus capsid proteins as building blocks for nanoreactors and new materi­ als. J. J. L. M. Cornelissen, I. C. Reynhout, A. J. Dirks, F. D. Sikkema, M. Comellas-Aragones, A. de la Escosura Navazo, R. J. M. Nolte 8:30 178. Protein engineering methods for analysis of structure-function relationships in protein-based elastomeric materials. V. P. Conticello 9:00 179. Metallopolymer-peptide conju­ gates: Synthesis and self-assembly of polyferrocenylsilanesend-functionalized with a β-sheet forming tetrapeptide seg­ ment. S. Tangbunsuk, G. R. Whittell, M. Ryadnov, D. Woolfson, I. Manners 9:20 180. Self-assembly of A-B-C nanofibers and their applications. J. D. Hartgerink, H. Dong, V. Gauba, K. Galler, S. E. Paramonov 9:40 181. Biological routes to inorgamic material synthesis. J. M. Slocik, M. K. Gupta, L. F. Drummy, M. M. Tomczak, R. R. Naik 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 182. Combining self-assembling cyclic peptides with soft polymers for the design of shape-defined nanostructures. M. A. Biesalski 10:35 183. Polymer vesicles as nanocompartments for cascade reactions. W. P. Meier 10:55 184. Self-assembly of amyloid peptide fragments and filaments. I. W. Hamley, M. J. Krysmann 11:15 185. Switch it on: Controlled peptideguided assembly of polymer-peptide conjugates. H. G. Borner, J. Hentschel 11:35 186. Multiresponsive vesicles from well-defined polypeptides: Formation of gene vesicles. H. latrou, N. Hadjichristidis 40 Years of Macromolecules Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by ACS Publications, PMSE, and PRES Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Materials with Special Properties Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC

Presiding

8:30 170. Crystallization of perfectly linear polyethylene inside nanodomains. S. B. Myers, R. A. Register 9:00 171. Crystallization of the chiral block copolymers with helical nanostructures. R-M. Ho, Y-W. Chiang 9:30 172. Manipulation of athermal nuclei in a levitated droplet of aqueous polyethylene oxide. J. A. Komfield, A. P. Olsen, R. C. Flagan 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 173. Investigating homogeneous nucleation and phase transformations in iPP nanodroplets using temperature con­ trolled AFM. L. Kailas, C. Vasilev, J. K. Hobbs 10:45 174. Dynamic formation of shearinduced shish-kebab structure in highly entangled melts of UHMWPE/HDPE blends. B. S. Hsiao, J. K. Keum, F. Zuo 11:15 175. Aspects of crystallization in poly­ mer blends. J. M. Schultz 11:45 176. Crystallization kinetics of linear polyethylene under nanoscopic cylindrical confinements. K. Shin, E. Woo, J. Huh, Y. Jeong

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom D Beyond Biocompatibility: Characterization of Functional Biomaterials Hydrogels and Nanoparticles S. Lin-Gibson,

Organizer

M. L. Becker, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 187. Controlling novel photocrosslinked biomaterial properties through macromer structure. C. Chung, D. M. Brey, J. L. Ifkovits, J. A. Burdick 2:05 188. Tailoring the architecture of tissue engineering scaffolds using crosslinked carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels. L. Lombardo, C. Guarraia, R. Reeves, A. Ribeiro, J. B. Leach 2:25 189. Biopolymer gels and ions. F. Horkay

TECH-133

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

PMSE 2:55 190. NMR studies of RGD-functionalized hydrogels. C. V. Rice, S. M. Carter, K. J. Meyer 3:15 Intermission. 3:35 191. Glassy, block-copolymer surfac­ tants as in vivo and in vitro nanoparticle stabilizers. T. A. Taton, Y. Shibasaki, B-S. Kim, A. J. Young, Y. Chen, C. Zuo 4:05 192. Preparation and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide-containing polydiacetylenic liposomes. Y. Cai, E. D. de Muinck, R. B. Grubbs 4:25 193. Labeling of shell crosslinked nanoparticles (SCKs) for MRI. Z. Li, D. Banerjee, J. Zheng, J. Xu, G. Sun, P. K. Woodard, D. A. Moore, K. L. Wooley 4:45 194. Preparation of shell crosslinked nanoparticles containing pH-sensitive crosslinkers for drug delivery. Y. Li, W. Du, G. Sun, K. L. Wooley 5:05 195. Drug delivery with polymeric nano­ particles through cell surface tags. Y. Iwasaki, H. Maie, K. Akiyoshi Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε Hierarchically Ordered Functional Materials Nanoscale R. Beyer, M. VanLandingham, and R. A. Vaia, Organizers S. J . Diamanti,

Presiding

1:30 196. Thermoresponsive "particle pumps": Activated release of organic nanoparticles from hierarchical macroporous polymers. H. Zhang, A. I. Cooper 1:50 197. Quasi-transparent hybrid particles using atom transfer radical polymerization. L. Bombalski, H. Dong, K. Matyjaszewski, M. R. Bockstaller 2:10 198. Nanoparticle liquids for reconfigu­ rable electronic materials. R. I. MacCuspie, A. M. Elsen, S. Patton, J. D. Jacobs, S. Diamanti, M. Arlen, A. A. Voevodin, R. Vaia 2:30 199. Post-functionalization of polymer brushes for patternable nanoparticle adsorption. S. Diamanti, S. Arifuzzaman, A. M. Elsen, S. Wargacki, R. Naik, J. Genzer, R. Vaia 2:50 Intermission. 3:20 200. Self-assembly and dynamics of peptide-functionalized polyphenylene dendrimers. G. Floudas, A. Gitsas, M. Mondeshki, H. W. Spiess, K. Muellen 3:40 201. Biomimetic modular design for high-strength, high-toughness materials. A. Kushner, V. Gabuchian, E. Johnson, Z. Guan, J. T. Roland 4:00 202. Critical strand length controls the mechanical resistance of beta-sheets. M. J. Buehler, S. Keten 4:20 203. Hierarchical self-assembly of hydrogen-bonded block copolymer com­ plexes in organic solvents. N. Lefèvre, C-A. Fustin, J-F. Gohy 4:40 204. Side chain liquid crystalline block copolymer thin films: Effects of thermal annealing upon morphology. E. Verploegen, D. Boone, P. T. Hammond

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

134-TECH

Section C

Section Ε

Westin Boston Waterfront Adams

Westin Boston Waterfront Revere

Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Pore Generation Cosponsored by BIOHW

Polypeptide and Protein Materials Applications Cosponsored by BIOHW Η-A. Klok and H. Schlaad,

M. S. Silverstein and B. F. Chmelka, Organizers N. R. Cameron, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 205. Periodic polymer/air structures for photonics and phononics. C. Koh, J-H. Jang, M. Maldovan, T. Gorishnyy, T. Choi, E. L. Thomas 2:00 206. Macroporous films, colloidal beads and fibers. Y. Xia 2:30 207. Nano- and microporous ion-conducting layer-by-layer assemblies. J. L. Lutkenhaus, K. McEnnis, P. T. Hammond 2:50 208. Salt-induced electrospinning method for producing porous nylon 6 nanofibers. M. Afshari, A. Gupta, X. Zhang, A. Tonelli, S. Khan, R. Kotek 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 209. Delivery system for self-healing metal oxide films. H. A. Liu, Β. Ε. Gnade, K. J. Balkus Jr. 3:40 210. Thin polyethylene terephthalate films voided in supercritical carbon dioxide. W. Wirges, O. Voronina, M. Wegener, R. Gerhard 4:00 211. Preparation and characterization of silica- and pore gradient gels for soft actuator. T-A. Asoh, M. Matsusaki, T. Kaneko, M. Akashi 4:20 212. Reversibly porating polymeric materials. F. Yan, D. England, H. Gu, J. Texter Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott 50 Years after the Discovery of Polymer Single Crystals: A Look Back, Current Discoveries and Future Opportunities Structure-Property Relationships and Technological Applications

J. Cheng,

Presiding

T. J. Deming, Organizer,

40 Years of Macromolecules Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by ACS Publications, PMSE, and PRES Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Materials with Special Properties Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC T U E S D A Y EVENING

G. Ungar,

Section A

1:30 213. Influence of constitutional defects on the crystallization properties of isotactic polypropylene: A tool to predict the poly­ morphic behavior. C. De Rosa, F. Auriemma, O. Ruiz de Ballesteros, G. Talarico 2:00 214. Effect of nucleating agents on fractionated cyrstallization of polypropyl­ ene. A. Hiltner, D. S. Langhe, Y. Jin, Ε. Ε. Baer 2:30 215. Enhanced nucleation of semicrystalline polymers: Specificity and versa­ tility of nucleating agents toward isotactic polypropylene crystal phases. A. Thierry, C. Mathieu, D. Alcazar, B. A. Lotz 2:50 216. Synthesis and surface properties of a semicrystalline poly(fluorooxetane). Y. Zheng, K. J. Wynne 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 217. Room temperature liquid crystal­ line material with crystalline IT stacks and its crystallization. S. Jin, C. Xue, Y. Xu 3:45 218. Holographic polymer dispersed semicrystalline polymers and block copoly­ mers. M. Birnkrant, C. Y. Li, L. V. Natarajan, V. P. Tondiglia, P. F. Lloyd, R. L Sutherland, T. J. Bunning 4:05 219. Solid-state packing and hole transport of functionalized pentacenes in solution-processed organic thin-film tran­ sistors. J. Chen, S. S. Subramanian, C. K. Tee, M. Shtein, J. E. Anthony, D. C. Martin 4:25 220. Structure of elastomeric olefin copolymers. P. Dias, H. Wang, A. A. Taha, S. P. Chum, A. Hiltner, Ε. Ε. Baer

Presiding

1:30 221. Artificial extracellular matrix pro­ teins. D. A. Tirrell 2:00 222. Self-assembling peptide systems for cancer, stem cell, and gene therapies. S. I. Stupp, S. M. Standley, S. Soukasene, C-Y. Koh 2:30 223. Supramolecular nanocarriers assembled from block copolymers for gene and drug delivery. K. Kataoka 3:00 224. Elastin biopolymers for drug deliv­ ery. A. Chilkoti 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 225. Great balls of fire: Icosahedral virus platforms for materials synthesis. E. Strable, D. E. Prasuhn Jr., S. D. Brown, E. Kaltgrad, M. G. Finn 3:55 226. Block copolypeptide vesicles for drug delivery. D. T. Kamei 4:15 227. pH Responsive heterodimeric coiled coil peptide motifs as building blocks for novel supramolecular biomedi­ cal materials and therapeutics. B. Apostolovic, Η-A. Klok 4:35 228. Intracellular delivery of pharmaceu­ tical nanocarriers by cell-penetrating pep­ tides. V. Torchilin 4:55 Concluding Remarks.

S. Z. D. Cheng and A. J . Lovinger, Organizers Presiding

Organizers

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Joint PMSE/POLY Poster Session Ε. Β. Coughlin, Organizer,

Presiding

6:00-8:00 50 Years After the Discovery of Polymer Single Crystals: A Look Back, Current Discoveries and Future Opportunities. 148. Multi-sensitive hydrogel thin films: From synthesis to application. C. Corten, A. Linger, B. Menges, D. Kuckling 229. Miscibility and crystallization behaviors of PEO and PLA, PLLA or PLLA/PDLA stereocomplex blends. W. Cao, L. Sun, LZhu 230. Surface effects on PHB crystallization. O. E. Farrance, J. K. Hobbs, R. A. L. Jones 231. Crystal orientation of polyethylene oxide) in a defect-free 1D confined system of poly(ethylene oxide)-£>-polystyrene diblock copolymer single crystals. M-S. Hsiao, J. X. Zheng, H. Xiong, R. Van Horn, R. P. Quirk, B. Lotz, E. L. Thomas, S. Z. D. Cheng 232. Crystal phases of PVDF/OMS nanocomposites prepared at low supercooling. B. S. Ince-Gunduz, K. Burke, P. Cebe, M. Koplitz, M. Meleski, A. Sagiv 233. Effect of comonomer type on the crystal­ lization rate and crystalline morphology of random propylene copolymers up to 21 mol% comonomer. K. Jeon, Y. Chiari, H. Palza, R. G. Alamo

234. Flow-induced cystallization precursor structure in high molecular weight isotactic polypropylene/low molecular weight linear low density polyethylene blends. J. K. Keum, F. Zuo, Y. Mao, B. S. Hsiao 235. Crystallization kinetics of blocky olefin copolymers. D. U. Khariwala, A. A. Taha, S. P. Chum, A. Hiltner, Ε. Ε. Baer 236. Structure and morphology of porphyrin based discotic liquid crystals. R. R. Kulkarni, Q. Li, K. U. Jeong, M. F. Durstock, B. L. Farmer, F. W. Harris, S. Z. D. Cheng 237. Phase transitions and structures of organic photovoltaic materials. S. Leng, R. M. Moustafa, J. Hu, S. Jin, J. Jing, K-U. Jeong, R. V. Horn, B. R. Kaafarani, F. Harris, S. Z. D. Cheng 238. Atrp of pmma on gold nanoparticles immobilized on peo single crystals. B. Wang, B. Li, C. Y. Li 239. Self assembly of gold/p4vp-pcl hybrid system. T. Lin, R-M. Ho 240. Influence of strain on shear-induced crystallization of poly(ethylene oxide). Y. Mao, F. Zuo, R. H. Somani, J. K. Keum, B. S. Hsiao 241. Strain-induced crystallization of vulca­ nized rubber filled with carbon black and carbon nanotubes studied by synchrotron x-ray scattering. H. H. Song, M. K. Kang, H-J. Jeon, G. Kwag, H. Choi 242. Studies on crystallization of isotactic polystyrene from dilute solution using dynamic light scattering method. K. Taguchi, A. Toda, Y. Miyamoto 243. Tethered polymer chains on single crystal surfaces. R. Van Horn, J. X. Zheng, H. Xiong, R. P. Quirk, B. Lotz, E. L. Thomas, A-C. Shi, S. Z. D. Cheng 244. In situ observation of the growth of helices in a main-chain chiral liquid crystal­ line polyester. J. Wang, Y. Tu, S. Z. D. Cheng, F. W. Harris 245. Probing orientation fluctuations prior to the crystallization of a polyethylene. Z. Xiao, Y. A. Akpalu 246. Supramolecular self-assembly in a diskcube dyad molecule based on triphenylene and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (poss). L. Cui, J. P. Collet, L. Zhu Beyond Biocompatibility: Characterization of Functional Biomaterials. 247. Novel drug releasing biomimetic coating: Helical rosette nanotubes. Y. Chen, T. J. Webster, H. Fenniri Hierarchically Ordered Functional Materials. 248. Nanostructure quantification in polymerclay nanocomposites. S. K. Basu, A. Tewari, P. D. Fasulo, W. R. Rodgers 249. Carbon nanotube-filled epoxy: Electrical conductivity improvement with templating clay. J. C. Grunlan, L Liu 250. Multifunctional nanocomposites of soft polymer colloids and carbon nanotubes. J. L. Keddie, T. Wang, I. Jurewicz, A. B. Dalton, C. Creton, M. Manea, J. M. Asua 251. Lipophobicity on hierarchically structured superhydrophobic surfaces. D. Wu, R. J. Vrancken, B. G. H. van Loenen, R. A. T. M. van Benthem, G. de With, W. Ming 252. Chemically induced exfoliation in clay systems using photopolymerizable surfac­ tants. K. Owusu-Adom, C. A. Guymon Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems. 253. Materials for patterned porous films. B. Erenturk, K. R. Carter 254. Effect of acidic and ionic groups on the swelling and thermal behavior of poly (2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) based hydrogels. Ν. Bait, B. Grassl, S. Djadoun 255. Designing porous thermosets from polycyanurate networks modified by oligo(e-caprolactone). D. Grande, N. Lacoudre, C. Lorthioir, K. Gusakova, O. Grigoryeva, A. Fainleib 256. Functionalized porous networks obtained from semi-IPNs: Evaluation in ion-ex­ change chromatography. G. Rohman, M-C. Millot, D. Grande 257. Functional (semi-)interpenetrating poly­ mer networks as precursors to porous nanoreactors. D. Grande, S. Mamache, N. Lacoudre, R. Denoyel

PMSE 258. Nanoscale porous networks derived from oligoester-containing semi-IPNs: SEM, DSC, and NMR investigation of morphology. G. Da Costa, C. Gaillet, D. Grande Polypeptide and Protein Materials. 259. Biodendrimer-based hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue repair. P. N. Bansal, L. Degoricija, N. S. Joshi, B. Snyder, M. W. Grinstaff 260. Amphiphlic block copolypeptide stabilized emulsions. J. Hanson, C. Chang, S. Graves, T. G. Mason, T. J. Deming 261. Hierarchical organic-silica compositefibers by peptide-guided organization. S. Kessel, D. Eckhard, H. G. Borner 262. Hydrogels assembled from pentablock copolypeptides. T. J. Deming, Z. Li 263. Mechanism study of hexamethyldisilazane mediated ring-opening polymerization of aminoacid-n-carboxyanhydrides. H. Lu, J. Cheng 264. Spider silk-like block copolymers. 0. S. Rabotyagova, M. J. Curtis, P. Cebe, D. L Kaplan Relaxation Behavior of Polymeric Materials. 265. Devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction in nylon-6. H. Chen, P. Cebe 266. Gas transport properties of polymeric nanocomposites based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes. N. Hao, M. Bôhning, A. Schônhals 267. Dielectric relaxation behavior of PVDF/ OMS nanocomposites. L. Yu, B. S. Ince-Gunduz, P. Cebe General Papers/New Concepts in Polymeric Materials. 268. Comparison of (ArO)2TiCIX (X = CI, Cp) complexes in styrene polymerizations initiated by epoxide radical ring opening. A. D. Asandei, Y. Chen, M. Gilbert, T. A. Hanna, L Liu 269. Cp2TiCI-catalyzed styrene living radical polymerization initiated from (1-bromoethyl)benzene. A. D. Asandei, Y. Chen 270. Room temperature copolymerization of vinylidene fluoride with hexafluoropropene and POSS-methacrylate under UV irradiation. A. D. Asandei, Y. Chen 271. Effect of nanoparticle on the electrohydrodynamic instability of polymer/nanoparticle thin film. J. Bae, E. Glogowski, S. Gupta, T. Emrick, T. P. Russell 272. Crosslinked polymer composites as proton exchange membrane (PEM) materials in fuel cell applications. Z. Bai, M. Yoonessi, M. F. Durstock, T. D. Dang 273. Comparison of HR El MS and HR F MALDI MS for the group IVB metallocene polyamines containing the plant growth hormone kinetin in their backbones. C. E. Carraher Jr., G. Barot, D. M. Chamely-Wiik 274. Organotin polymers from the hormone dienestrol- HR F MALDI MS results. C. E. Carraher Jr., Y. Ashida, G. Barot 275. Polymeric cisplatin derivatives of tilorone and tilorone 11,567- HR F MALDI MS. C. E. Carraher Jr., G. Barot 276. Ability of dibutyltin polyamine derivatives of diaminopyrimidines to inhibit ovarian, bone, colon, lung, and breast cancer cells. K. Shahi, M. R. Roner, A. J. Battin, C. E. Carraher Jr. 277. HR F MALDI TOF MS of a series of organotin polyamines derived from diaminopyrimidines employing 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as the matrix. A. J. Battin, C. E. Carraher Jr. 278. MMA insertion in cationic diimine palladium (II) alkyl complexes. S. Borkar, A. Sen 279. Synthesis of polymers for micro- and nanopatterning of oriented proteins. R. M. Broyer, H. D. Maynard, Κ. L. Christman, Ζ. P. Tolstyka 280. Flow properties of natural rubber com­ posites filled with defatted soy flour. L. Jong, J. A. Byars 281. Encapsultion and cellular delivery of antisense genes by poly (ethylene oxide)poly(lactic acid) bilayer polymersomes. S. Cai, D. E. Discher 282. Hydrogel encapsulated quantum dots. T. Cai, J. Li, J. Zhang, A. Lin, M. Marquez, Ζ. Hu, A. Neogi

283. Poly (ethylene oxide)-poly (ε-caprolactone) micelles in different morphologies: Advantages of worm-like micelles for paclitaxel delivery in lung cancer therapy. S. Cai, T. Minko, D. E. Discher 284. El F MALDI MS of zirconocene and hafnocene polyethers containing diethylstilbestrol. C. E. Carraher Jr., Y. Ashida 285. F HR MALDI TOF MS of organotin polyethers containing the hormone diethylstilbestrol. C. E. Carraher Jr., Y. Ashida, G. Barot 286. F MALDI and El MS for methotrexate and the cisplatin polymeric derivative. C. E. Carraher Jr., G. Barot 287. HR TOF F MALDI MS for the titanocene polyether containing the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol. C. E. Carraher Jr., Y. Ashida 288. Tubular nanostructures from degradable core-shell cylinder microstructures. C-K. Chen, Y-W. Chiang, R-M. Ho 289. Polymer filled anodized alumina mem­ brane: A study of post aspect ratio. D. F. Cheng, K. R. Carter, T. J. McCarthy 290. Preparation of the biodegradable poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) foams with closed-cells. S-K. Lim, S-G. Jang, S-l. Lee, K-H. Lee, l-J. Chin 291. Ion induced morphology change of polyaniline. C-F. Chen, W-Y. Chiu 292. Nucleation mechanism and morphology of composite latex particles, polystyrene/ Fe 3 0 4 , via miniemulsion polymerization using AIBN as initiator. Y-D. Luo, C-A. Dai, W-Y. Chiu 293. Preparation of PS-b-PBA block copoly­ mer and kinetic model analysis. K-H. Kuo, W-Y. Chiu, K-C. Cheng 294. Reaction kinetics of maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene as the reactive compatibilizer. M. J. Choi, K. H. Lee 295. Controlling the location and position of metallic nanoparticles in block copolymers. J. G. Cordaro, N. Gupta, K. van Berkel, B. W. Messmore, C. J. Hawker 296. Properties and morphology of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer/organoclay nanocomposites. L. Cui, X. Ma, D. R. Paul 297. Superhydrophobic nanoporous mem­ brane for bioethanol production. Y. Ding, B. Bikson 298. Production and characterization of chitosan and alginate multilayer membranes containing copper. R. G. de Paiva, M. M. Beppu 299. Study of the swelling dynamics of porous hydrogels based on poly(chitosan-g-acrylic acid) for oral colon targeting-drug delivery system. H. Dong, Y. Shao, Y. Yin, X. Ji, S. Zhang, H. Zheng 300. Electrospinning of thiolated polyvinyl alcohol)/wheat gluten fibers. J. Dong, R. S. Pâmas, A. D. Asandei 301. Block copolymer characterization. Z. Boukhal, E. Cabane, Y. G. Durant 302. Facile synthesis of diphenylethylene end-functional polyisobutylene and its applications for the synthesis of poly(isobutylene-fc-methyl methacrylate). D. Feng, T. Higashihara, R. Faust 303. Modeling of modulus and stress of in situ cured polymers as functions of monomer conversion. L. Feng, B. I. Suh 304. Transcription of synthetic polymers: Synthesis by template-directed olefin metathesis. D. C. Friedman, D. Benitez, D. Lanari, K. C-F. Leung, J. F. Stoddart 305. Polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles based on chitosan and the primary study on their drug-loaded properties. Y. Zheng, W. Yang, C. Wang, S. Fu 306. Model predicting delivery of saquinavir in nanoparticles to human monocyte/macrophage (mo/mac) cells. E. D. Gamsiz, L. Shah, M. M. Amiji, R. L. Carrier 307. Ionic liquids for surface analysis. L. Gao, T. J. McCarthy 308. Synthesis and characterization of new itaconate-based polymerizable surfactant. S. Ghosh, J-F. Morizur, L J. Mathias 309. Preparation and characterization of poly(butylene terephthalte) (PBT)/clay nanocomposites using thermally stable imidazolium surfactant. S. K. Goswami, B. R. Nayak, L. J. Mathias 310. One-step synthesis of an alkoxyamine initiator and its polymerization efficacy. A. C. Greene, Q. Xia, E. Jackson, R. B. Grubbs

311. Cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of a dendrimer-encapsulated camptothecin. A. P. Griset, M. T. Morgan, Y. Nakanishi, D. J. Kroll, M. A. Camahan, M. Wathier, N. H. Oberlies, G. Manikumar, M. C. Wani, M. W. Grinstaff 312. Novel polymer hydrogels constructed by cyclodextrin inclusion association: The binding structure as observed by 1 H-NOESY-NMR. X. Guo, J. Wang, L Li, C. R. Pacheco, L. Fu, R. K. Prud'homme, S. F. Lincoln 313. Mechanical stability of peptidomimetic β-sheets revealed by steered molecular dynamics simulations. D. L. Guzman, J. T. Roland, Z. Guan, H. Keer, T. Ritz 314. Effects of polyol, isocyanate, and addi­ tives on poly(ester urethane)urea scaf­ folds: Material and in vivo histological properties. A. E. Hafeman, J. M. Davidson, S. A. Guelcher 315. Synthesis of boehmite polyolefin nanocomposites by in situ polymerization. T. S. Halbach, R. Mulhaupt 316. Peptide-guided assembly of bioconjugates obtained by RAFT radical polymer­ ization. J. Hentschel, H. G. Borner 317. Synthesis and characterization of triazole tethered polyphosphazene for fuel cell application. M. Higami, R. C. Woudenberg, S. Granados-Focil, O. Yavuzcetin, M. T. Tuominen, E. B. Coughlin 318. Novel synthesis routes toward polylysines. C. H. Ho, J. C. Tiller 319. Novel liquid thermal polymerization resists for nanoimprint lithography. W-C. Liao, S. L-C. Hsu 320. Preparation of fluorine-containing polybenzimidazole /montmorillonite nanocomposite membranes for fuel cell applications. S-W. Chuang, S. L-C. Hsu, C-L. Hsu 321. Role of water molecules in the thermal crystallization of silk fibroin protein. X. Hu, D. L. Kaplan, P. Cebe 322. Nanoparticles montmorillonite filled poly(ethylene terephthalate) nanocompos­ ites by in situ polymerization. S. Hwang, S. S. Im 323. Monomer recovery of waste organic resources by liquid phase decomposition in high temperature water. A. Ikeda, H. Tagaya 324. Hyperbranched polymers with polymeriz­ able groups from dental filling monomers. A. Soltész, T. Fonagy, M. Szesztay, B. Ivân 325. Hyperbranched polystyrene by quasiliving carbocationic polymerization combined with Friedel-Crafts self-grafting. G. Kasza, P. Werner Groh, M. Szesztay, B. Ivân 326. Phase behavior of poly(ethylene-co-1,4dimetyl cyclohexane terephthalate) copolyesters blend with polycarbonates (or branched polycarbonates) and their interaction energies. M. Y. Jeon, L. U. Kim, C. K. Kim 327. Withdrawn. 328. Study of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), poly(methacrylic acid), and their copolymers for oral colon-specific drug delivery. Y. Gao, X. Ji, Y. Yin, H. Dong, H. Zheng 329. Study of swelling kinetics of sodium alginate-graft-acrylic acid hydrogels. X. Ji, Y. Yin, H. Dong, Y. Gao, H. Zheng 330. Bacterial cellulose hydrogels incorporating silver nanoparticles. R. Jung, Y. Kim, H. S. Kim, H-J. Jin 331. Effect of metal ion-carbonyl interactions on the compatibility and the crystallization behavior of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyhexanoate)/poly(butylene succinate) ionomer blends. L. Jung Seop, N. Isao, I. Seung Soon

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

332. Study on the stability of bisphenol-Abased polybenzoxazine in aprotic polar solvents. H. D. Kim, J. S. Yoo 333. Carbon nanotubes and silk fibers-reinforced biodegradable composites. H. S. Kim, M. Kang, H-J. Jin 334. Synthesis and characterization of metal oxide nanoparticles stabilized by polyethylene oxide)-folate conjugate. S-Y. Choi, D. H. Go, H. J. Jeon, Y. W. Kim, J. Y. Lee, H-O. Ryu, J. Kim 335. Synthesis and characterization of polyethylene oxide-b-sulfadimethoxinyl methacrylamide) via ATRP technique. K. M. Kim, J. Kim, H. S. Park, S-Y. Choi, H. J. Jeon, D. H. Go, H-O. Yoo, H. S. Kim 336. Interaction of poly(styrene-co-sodium methacrylate) ionomers with long chain aliphatic dibasic salt additives. M. Luqman, J-S. Kim 337. Spin-assisted assembly of multilayers of polyelectrolytes with fluorophores. K-S. Kim, S. I. Yoo, B-H. Sohn 338. Anti-adhesion surface treatments of molds for high resolution unconventional lithography and applications. M. Kim, M. J. Lee, J. Kim, C. J. Choi, M. K. Jo, E. Jeon, Y. S. Kim 339. Development on new chromium based tetramerization catalyst systems: Chiral recognition on chromium metal center by sterically demanding diphenylphosphinobutane. S-K. Kim, K-R. Wee, T. K. Han, M-A. Ok, J. Ko, S. 0 . Kang 340. Synthesis of (diarlylamido)(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)titanium(IV) complexes and their use in catalysis for ethylene polymerization at high temperature. S-K. Kim, T-J. Kim, J. S. Hahn, M-A. Ok, J. Ko, S. 0 . Kang 341. Polyolefin catalytic activity of 2-phenylphenolate titanium complexes by electro push-pull aryl substituents. T-J. Kim, S-K. Kim, J. S. Hahn, M-A. Ok, J. Ko, S. 0 . Kang 342. Unprecedented high catalytic activity of aryloxo titanium complexes in high temperature olefin polymerization: Ancillary ligand effects of 2-phenylphenol in halftitanocene complexes. T-J. Kim, S-K. Kim, J. S. Hahn, M-A. Ok, J. Ko, S. 0 . Kang 343. Investigation of amphiphilic biaryl dendrimer structures using protein recognition. A. Klaikherd, B. S. Sandanaraj, D. Vutukuri, S. Thayumanavan 344. NEXAFS and dynamic contact angle measurements of polystyrene treated with ultraviolet-ozone and annealed above Tg. R. J. Klein, D. A. Fischer, J. L. Lenhart 345. Mechanical properties of sulfonated polystyrene ionomer mixtures. K-H. Ko, J-M. Song, J-K. Choi, J-S. Kim 346. Brush-modified polymer surfaces. D. Koylu, K. R. Carter 347. Advantages and limitations of biocatalysts in amphiphilic conetworks. R. S. Ladisch, N. Bruns, J. C. Tiller 348. Preparation of electrospun cellulose membrane for EAPap actuator. E-H. Lee, H-M. Kim, K-S. Kim, l-J. Chin 349. Partially sulfonated polystyrene-b-poly(dimethylsiloxane) as proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cell. W. Lee, H. Kim, H. Chang 350. Application of type II collagen grafted PCL porous scaffold in cartilage tissue engineering. K-Y. Chang, L-H. Hung, Y-D. Lee 351. Cross conjugated poly(para-phenylenes) with strong ir-ir stacking force: Synthesis and characterization. H. Li, N. B. M. Hanafiah, S. Valiyaveettil 352. Volume shrinkages and mechanical properties of various fiber-reinforced hydroxyethylmethacrylate-polyurethane /unsaturated polyester composites. S-P. Lin, J-H. Shen, J-L. Han, Y-R. Lee, J-T. Yeh, F-C. Chang, K-H. Hsieh 353. Synthesis of bionanoparticle-polymer conjugates via in situ atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) reaction. T. Li, S. Li, Q. Zeng, Q. Wang 354. Novel method to prepare osteocondutive-osteoinductuve materials composed of chitosan and recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2. K-Y. Chang, C-H. Chang, Y-H. Lin, C-C. Jiang, K-H. Hsieh 355. High refractive index thin films of epoxy resin compounded with T1O2 nanoparticles. Y-M. Lin, J. L. H. Chau, A-K. Li, W-F. Su, K-S. Chang, T-L. Li, S. L-C. Hsu

TECH-135

PMSE

356. Synthesis and photopolymerization study of phenyl substituted disilacyclobutane compounds. X. Liu, C. Y. Ryu, L. V. Interrante 357. Electrospinning of self-assembled inclu­ sion complexes of polyethylene oxide) with urea. Y. Liu, C. Pellerin 358. Controlled release profile of hyoscyamine from carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles in vitro. Y. Lou, H. Yang, F. Zhao, Q. Song, X. Yan 359. Plasticization of sulfonated polystyrene ionomers with amphiphilic bifunctional amines: Dynamic mechanical and morpho­ logical studies. M. Luqman, J-S. Kim 360. Structure and property of high flux cellu­ lose membranes fabricated by ionic liquid. H. Ma, L Rong, K. Yoon, B. S. Hsiao, B.Chu 361. Phosphorescent, surfactant-free chitosan nanoparticles. S. Marpu, Z. Hu, M. A. Omary 362. Anhydrous proton conduction: Effect of heterocycle nature and backbone mobility. S. Martwiset, R. C. Woudenberg, S. Granados-Focil, 0 . Yavuzcetin, M. T. Tuominen, E. B. Coughlin 363. Porous scaffolds containing highly ori­ ented anisotropic nanoparticles. D. J . Massa, T. Ν. Blanton, D. Majumdar 364. Novel design of polymer surfaces for immobilization of functional proteins. H. Matsuno, Y. Nagasaka, K. Kurita, T. Serizawa 365. Automatic continuous online monitoring of complex polymerizations. J. McConville, I. Willoughby, G. Saunders, S. O'Donohue, C. LaClair 366. Development of a new packing material with intermediate surface polarity for size exclusion chromatography. J . McConville, G. Saunders, L Gilbert, I. Willoughby, C. LaClair 367. Extrapolation of polymer aging in waste storage with the use of high energy beam: Toward an understanding of mechanisms by the analysis of radicals, gas and iixiviation products formed. C. Moulin, B. Amekraz, A. Dannoux, V. Dauvois, S. Esnouf 368. Schizophyllan, β - Ι ^ Ι υ ο θ η , - ο ^ ο β η ι ί η β conjugates as non-viral vector. T. Nagasaki, A. Uno, K. Koumoto, K. Sakurai, S. Shinkai 369. Effects of graft densities on separation of bioactive compounds on temperature responsive polymer brush surfaces. K. Nagase, J. Kobayashi, A. Kikuchi, Y. Akiyama, H. Kanazawa, T. Okano 370. Inhibition of bacteria, fungi, and yeast by polymeric organotin and group IVB metallocene polyether compounds containing the synthetic hormone diethylstilbestrol. Y. Naoshima, K. Nagao, Y. Ashida, C. E. Carraher Jr. 371. Alignment of MWNTs using electrospun MWNT-g-PLLA nanofibers. Y-W. Jang, C-H. Park, l-J. Chin 372. Preparation of electrospun membrane for low-fouling ultra-filtration. C-H. Park, K-S. Kim, l-J. Chin 373. Influence of ionic diffusion in oligomer electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells. J. H. Park, K. J. Choi, J. Kim, Y. S. Kang, S-S. Lee 374. Mechanical properties of styrene-cotigrate inomers. J-J. Park, J-S. Kim 375. Improved elevated temperature Nation® membrane proton conductivity by in situ generation of metal oxide nano-particles. Y. P. Patil, K. A. Mauritz 376. PEGylated ultrathin capsules of a poly(carboxylic acid) with tunable permeability. S. Pavlukhina, V. Kozlovskaya, S. A. Sukhishvili 377. Comparison of properties of two polymer latices modified mortars. L. Liu, X. Qin, Z. Wang, J. Zhang, Q. Pan, M. Pei 378. Effect of starch swelling on the compos­ ite modulus of low- and high-gluten wheat flours and carboxylated styrene-butadiene latex. S. C. Peterson, L. Jong 379. Relating mechanical behavior to polyamide/clay nanocomposites morphology. E. Reynaud, D. F. Schmidt, V. Appaji, H. Patel 380. Olefin polymerization behavior of a chiral, C2-symmetric Ni α-diimine complex. J. M. Rose, A. E. Cherian, G. W. Coates

136-TECH

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 381. Modulation of enzyme substrate selectiv­ ity using cationic polymers. R. Roy, B. S. Sandanaraj, A. Klaikherd, S. Thayumanavan 382. F MALDI MS results for polyphosphonate and polyphosphate ester-amides containing the antiviral acyclovir. T. S. Sabir, C. E. Carraher Jr. 383. Synthesis of polyphosphate and polyphosphonate amide esters containing the antiviral acyclovir. T. S. Sabir, C. E. Carraher Jr. 384. Influence of selective sulfonation on acrylic graft copolymer morphology. T. Saito, B. D. Mather, F. L. Beyer, T. E. Long 385. Rigid amorphous fraction in polymer nanocomposites. A. Sargsyan, A. Tonoyan, S. Davtyan, C. Schick 386. Synthesis and characterization of polylactide macroinitiator and amphiphilic diblock copolymer. S. Shi, Y. Xia, J. Liu, X. Chen 387. Studies of structural and electrical modifi­ cation in poly (ethyleneterephthalate) induced by 120 MeV silicon ion beam. V. Singh, P. Kulriya, T. Singh, A. Srivastava 388. Study on self-assembled suprastructure of amide dendron in different organic solvents using SAXS and SANS. H. H. Song, H-J. Jeon, M. K. Kang, C. Kim 389. Enhancement of long-term stability of CaS:Eu 2 + by the surface coating with PMMA/silica nanocomposite for the LED application. J. Song, M. Y. Jeon, J. W. Kim, C-K. Kim 390. Effects of the addition of long chain alkyl amines and carboxylic acids on the dynamic mechanical properties of styrenecomethacrylate ionomers. J-M. Song, K-H. Ko, J-S. Kim 391. Synthesis of functionalized amphiphilic scorpion-like macromolecules for biomedi­ cal applications. S. M. Sparks, J. Wang, L. del Rosario, K. E. Uhrich 392. Influence of ionic strength on the struc­ ture and properties of PEO-laponite films. E. A. Stefanescu, W. H. Daly, 1.1. Negulescu, J. C. Garno, G. Schmidt 393. Preparation and properties of iPP/ boehmite nanocomposites. R. C. Streller, R. Miilhaupt 394. Synthesis and study of alkyne-functionalized amphiphilic diblock copolymer assem­ blies for metal incorporation. A. Sundararaman, J. A. Garber, E. J. Robertson, R. B. Grubbs 395. Preparation of porous materials by high temperature water treatment of PVC. S. Takayama, M. Kimata, H. Tagaya 396. Electrospinning of polyisobutylene ther­ moplastic elastomers. S. N. Taghizadeh, R. Faust, J. Mead 397. Facile preparation of poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized, water-soluble, multiwalled carbon nanofibers. K. K. C. Tse, X. Tang, M. Hau3ler, J. W. Y. Lam, E. Hammel, B. Z. Tang 398. Synthesis of ferrocene-containing polyacetylenes via click chemistry and their use as precursor for magnetic ceramics. C. K. W. Jim, A. Qin, J. W. Y. Lam, M. Hâu3ler, B. Z. Tang 399. Telechelic poly(NIPAAm) by RAFT polymerization. L. Tao, H. D. Maynard 400. Synthesis and thermal properties of trehalose-based synthetic polymers with flexible oligo(dimethylsiloxane) units. N. Teramoto, M. Unosawa, M. Shibata 401. Application possibilities of preparative size exclusion chromatography in a HTE workflow. H. M. L. Thijs, M. A. R. Meier, H. H. P. van Ε φ , U. S. Schubert 402. Synthesis of poly(dimethylsiloxane-a/fethylene glycol) for hydrogel applications. M. A. Tapsak, E. W. Thursby 403. Preparation and characterizations of the perlite/poly(vinyl alcohol) and organic modified montmorillonite (OMMT)/poly(vinyl alcohol) composites. H. Tian, H. Tagaya 404. Novel release system with enzymatic trigger. J . C. Tiller, G. Metral, J. Wentland 405. Novel anticancer orthopedic materials: Nanostructured selenium. P. Tran, T. J. Webster 406. Synthesis of aminooxy end-functionalized polymers by RAFT polymerization for bioconjugate formation. V. Vâzquez-Dorbatt

407. Self-assembling nanoporous structure for sensing the biomolecules. L. Wang, G. C. Walker, D. H. Waldeck 408. Functionalizable poly(carbonate-coester)s for the preparation of covalentlylabeled nanoparticles. J . B. Wolinsky, M. W. Grinstaff 409. Melting and reorganization of polymer crystals studied by fast scanning calorimetry. A. Wurm, A. Minakov, C. Schick 410. Network-structured composites of waterborne polyurethane grafted nitro-lignin as center. W. Xia, G. Cui, H. Zhang, J. Huang 411. Bulky chromophore incorporated into the methacrylate/silica hybrid matrix of the NLO materials by a free-radical polymerization. G. Xie, D. Sun 412. Preparation and performance research of caboxymethyl chitin/chitosan sponge. Y. Xu, L Wang, C. Zhan, H. Zheng 413. Studies on properties of core-shell acrylic-polyurethane emulsion modified by epoxy resin. Y. Yi, F. Ye, H. Chou, H. Zheng, J. Guan, B. Li 414. Novel dental restorative composites prepared from an organic matrix without an additional diluent. S. H. Yoo, M. Y. Jeon,' 6. K. Kim 415. Actuation factors for controlling performance of ionic polymer metal composite actuator. B. R. Yoon, J. Y. Lee, H. S. Wang, S. W. Lee, S. J. Park, J. Y. Jho 416. Preparation of low density porous materials using polyethylene and organic crystal diluents. J. Yoon, A. J. Lesser, T. J. McCarthy 417. Effects of incorporation of VLDPE on the mechanical properties of polypropylene/ clay nanocomposites. J. H. Shim, J. H. Joo, J. H. Choi, K. S. Yoo, J-S. Yoon 418. High flux nanofiltration membranes based on interfacially polymerized polyamide on nanofibrous scaffolds. K. Yoon, C. Pang, B. S. Hsiao, B. Chu 419. Donor-acceptor functionalized PPV di-block copolymers for plastic solar cells. D. Zepeda, J. J. Gutierrez, J. P. Ferraris 420. Synthesis and STM study of porphyrins with sulfur linkers attached on the porphyrin ring antipodally. W. Zhang, W. Xi, P. L. Burn, J. J. Davis 421. Properties of ultra-thin conjugated monolayer films. X. Zhang, S. Unarunotai, M. J. Schultz, J. S. Moore, J. A. Rogers 422. Hydrogel-based biodegradable bone replacement material. D. Zhao, G. Liu, E. Saiz, A. P. Tomsia 423. Swelling kinetics of physically crosslinked carboxymethyl chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels. G. He, H. Zheng, R. Zhao 424. Preparation and characterization of galactosylated chitosan nanoparticles as a targeting drug carrier. F. Zheng, K. Ling, J. Li, J. Chen 425. Preparation and characteristics of dualcrosslinked carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) microcapsules. H. Zheng 426. Preparation and characterization of the hydrogel of carboxymethyl chitin grafted acrylic acid. H. Zheng, X. Q. Zou, F. He 427. Preparation of polystyrene/polyurethane core/shell nanoparticles by emulsion polymerization of styrene using anionic polyurethane as the surfactant. Y. Zhu, Y. Chen, L Zhang, H. Zheng 428. Shear-induced crystallization of olefin block copolymer via in-situ synchrotron x-ray studies. F. Zuo, Y. Mao, J. K. Keum, B. S. Hsiao, H. Chen, D. Chiu, S-Y. Lai Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Poster-Session Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW

WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom D Beyond Biocompatibility: Characterization of Functional Biomaterials Functional Materials S. Lin-Gibson,

Organizer

M. L. Becker, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 429. Taking advantage of charge in the design of functional biomaterials: From gene delivery vectors to nanofiber drug delivery. J. M. Layman, M. T. Hunley, T. E. Long 9:00 430. Electrospun enzyme-carrying polyurethane nanofibers for use in biosensors. R. Narayanan, S. Wu, D. H. Reneker, P. Wang 9:20 431. Engineering ligands for characterizing biomaterials using combinatorial phage display. M. D. Roy, E. J. Amis, M. L. Becker 9:50 432. Multivalent peptide dendrimers for targeting. B. A. Helms, I. van Baal, P. T. H. M. de Graaf-Heuvelmans, M. Merkx, E. W. Meijer 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 433. Highly effective biomimetic contact biocidal polyurethanes as polymeric surface modifiers (PSMs). P. Kurt, L. Wood, D. Ohman, L J. Gamble, K. J. Wynne 10:50 434. Biocompatible Η-bonded polymer multilayers: Tuning of film destruction. I. Erel Unal, S. A. Sukhishvili 11:10 435. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid aggregation with sulfated glycopolymers. Y. Miura, K. Yamamoto, K. Kobayashi 11:30 436. Laser light scattering study on aggregates in traditional Chinese medi­ cine. Y. Zhuang, J. Yan, W. Zhu, L Chen, X. Xu, D. Liang Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε Relaxation Behavior of Polymeric Materials Confined Dynamics and Nanocomposites R. Colby and J. K. Maranas, J. Runt, Organizer,

Organizers

Presiding

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 437. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy on the molecular dynamics in thin polymer layers. F. Kremer, A. Serghei 9:00 438. Model studies of the effects of confinement and nanocomposite formation on polymer glass transition temperature and physical aging. J . M. Torkelson, R. D. Priestley, P. Rittigstein, M. K. Mundra, L. J. Broadbelt, W. F. Jager, C. B. Roth 9:30 439. Dynamics of confined polymer films measured via thermal wrinkling. K. A. Page, D. L. Patton, R. Huang, C. M. Stafford 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 440. Confinement effects on the struc­ ture and dynamics in intercalated polymer/ layered silicates nanohybrids. S. H. Anastasiadis, K. Chrissopoulou, A. Afratis, S. Fotiadou, E. P. Giannelis, B. Frick

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

PMSE 10:45 441. Glass transition and dielectric relaxation of thin films of labeled polymers. K. Fukao, A. Harada, R. D. Priestley, J. M. Torkelson 11:15 442. Structure property relationships of polymeric nanocomposites based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes. N. Hao, M. Bôhning, A. Schônhals 11:45 443. Glass transition behavior of polymer nanocomposites. S. E. Harton, H. Yang, T. Koga, S. K. Kumar Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Adams Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Low-k Materials Cosponsored by BIOHW N. R. Cameron and B. F. Chmelka, Organizers M. S. Silverstein, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 444. Methods for porosity characterization of porous SiLK dielectric films. B. G. Landes, C. Mohler, G. F. Meyers, B. J. Kern, S. Maganov, J. Quintana, S. J. Weigand 9:00 445. Bridged oxycarbosilane polymers: Porous organosilicates are not necessarily fragile. R. D. Miller, G. Dubois, T. Magbitang, W. Volksen, R. H. Dauskardt, M. Gage 9:30 446. Challenges of plasma damage of low dielectric constant materials. M. R. Baklanov, A. M. Urbanowicz, S. Vanhaelemeersch 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 447. Neutron and x-ray measurements of pore size distributions in low-k thin films. B. J. Bauer, R. C. Hedden, M. S. Silverstein, H-J. Lee, C. L Soles, D-W. Liu, E. K. Lin, W-L. Wu 10:40 448. Nanoimprint patterning of high modulus, spin-on organosilicate glasses: The impact on pattern quality and porosity. H. W. Ro, H-J. Lee, A. Karim, D. W. Gidley, D. Y. Yoon, C. L. Soles 11:00 449. Thermally cross-linkable cyclolinear polycarbosilanes (CLPCS) as low-k materials. J. S. Rathore, L. V. Interrante 11:20 450. Nanoporous Si w O x C y H z thin film deposited by plasma as low k for microelectronics. L. Favennec, V. Jousseaume, A. Zenasni, G. Gerbaud, P. Maury 11:40 451. Nanoporous thin films based on norbornene copolymers. S. Oh, K. Char Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott 50 Years after the Discovery of Polymer Single Crystals: A Look Back, Current Discoveries and Future Opportunities Polymer Crystallization- Theory, Modeling and Simulation S. Z. D. Cheng and A. J. Lovinger, Organizers

10:00 Intermission. 10:15 455. New paradigms for polymer crystallization. M. Muthukumar 10:45 456. Chain-folding via intramolecular crystal nucleation: Theory and simulations. W.Hu 11:15 457. Molecular simulation of the effect of olefin block copolymer microstructure on lamellar thickness. J. D. Weinhold, G. R. Marchand, S. P. Chum 11:45 458. On the nucleation of chain-folded crystals: Insights from MD simulation. H. Meyer Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Materials & Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW

3:00 Intermission. 3:15 471. Rate-dependence of yielding in ethylene-methacrylic acid copolymers. R. C. Scogna, R. A. Register 3:45 472. Mechanical response of rubber at high strain rates. C. M. Roland, R. Bogoslav, J. A. Pathak, J. N. Twigg, P. H. Mott 4:15 473. Stress development and relaxation in crosslinked dimethacrylate polymers. H. Lu, M. Trujillo-Lemon, J. Ge, S. M. Newman, J. W. Stansbury 4:45 474. Relaxation properties of polyethyl­ ene oxide) copolymer networks: Influence of short-chain pendant groups. M. A. Boms, S. Kalakkunnath, M. K. Danquah, V. A. Kusuma, B. D. Freeman, D. S. Kalika

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Section C

Section A

Westin Boston Waterfront Adams

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom D Beyond Biocompatibility: Characterization of Functional Biomaterials Cell-Material Interactions M. L. Becker,

S. Lin-Gibson, Organizer,

M. S. Silverstein, Organizer, 1:30 459. Integrin-specific bioadhesive polymer brushes on titanium implants to engineer cell responses and osseointegration. A. J . Garcia, T. A. Pétrie, K. L. Burns, J. Ε. Raynor, D. M. Collard 2:00 460. Osteogenic differentiation of mes­ enchymal stem cells on biomineralized collagenenous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. H. Castano-lzquierdo, C. Mao 2:20 461. Mapping cell distribution in amor­ phous scaffolds using confocal micros­ copy. J. Sun, N. J. Lin, M. T. Cicerone, S. Lin-Gibson 2:40 462. Understanding how materials properties can be used to control cellular behavior. L. M. Pakstis, D. J. Pochan, J. P. Dunkers 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 463. Phosphorlyation of reflectin pro­ teins associated with changes in adaptive reflectance in the squid, Loligo pealeii. M. Izumi, J. C. Weaver, D. E. Morse 3:50 464. Identifying "optimal" biomaterial properties using well-defined material gradients. M. L. Becker, K. A. Aamer, N. D. Gallant, A. W. Morgan, C. G. Simon Jr., K. E. Roskov, Y. Yang 4:20 465. Shape effects of nanoparticles conjugated with cell-penetrating peptide (HIV Tat PTD) on CHO cell uptake. K. Zhang, Z. Chen, D. S. Germack, Y. Zhang, H. Fang, J-S. A. Taylor, K. L. Wooley 4:40 466. Micropatterned self-assembled monolayer gradient libraries. K. L. Genson, M. J. Fasolka 5:00 467. Elucidating the effect of cooling rate on the morphologies of polyhydroxyalkanoates. Y. Xie, Y. A. Akpalu 5:20 Concluding Remarks.

Presiding

1:30 475. Designing constricted microchannels to selectively entrap soft particles. G. Zhu, A. Alexeev, A. C. Balazs 2:00 476. Highly porous POSS-polymer nanocomposites synthesized within high internal phase emulsions. J. Normatov, M. S. Silverstein 2:20 477. Porous clay aerogel/polymer composites. D. A. Schiraldi, M. D. Gawryla, J. R. Johnson III, J. Griebel 2:40 478. No soap required! Particle-stabi­ lized emulsion templates for reinforced highly porous polymer foams. A. Menner, M. S. Shaffer, A. Bismarck 3:00 Intermission. 3:10 479. Structural color from layer-by-layer assembled nanoporous multilayers. Z. Wu, D. Lee, R. E. Cohen, M. F. Rubner 3:30 480. New concentrated emulsion ternplating strategies as a route to highly porous polymer composite foams. A. Menner, N. Graeber, A. Bismarck 3:50 4 8 1 . Templating 3-D titania photonic crystals from holographically patterned microporous polymers by electrodeposition. Y. Xu, Y. Dan, J. H. Moon, X. Zhu, A. T. Johnson, S. Yang 4:10 482. Chitosan-clay aerogel via water based system. S. Chirachanchai, T. Ponyomma 4:30 Concluding Remarks. Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott 50 Years after the Discovery of Polymer Single Crystals: A Look Back, Current Discoveries and Future Opportunities Polymer Crystallization- Experimental Approaches

Presiding

8:30 452. Homogeneous primary crystal nucleation: The case for the fringed micelle. B. Crist 9:00 453. Growth kinetics of polymer crystals in bulk. T-Y. Cho, W. Stille, G. Strobl 9:30 454. What can molecular simulation reveal about the crystallization and structure of semicrystalline polymers? G. C. Rutledge

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε Relaxation Behavior of Polymeric Materials Crystalline Polymers; Polymer Networks J. Runt, R. Colby, and J . K. Maranas, Organizers C. M. Roland,

Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom D New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Advanced Materials

Presiding

Section Β A. Toda,

Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Materials & Applications Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW THURSDAY MORNING

Nano- and Micro-Scale Porous Polymer-Based Systems Nanoparticles and Microparticles Cosponsored by BIOHW N. R. Cameron and B. F. Chmelka, Organizers

Organizer

4:00 487. Semicrystalline and superlattice structures in linear and branched oligo­ mers. X. Zeng, F. Xie, G. Ungar, S. M. King 4:20 488. Growth of a polymer crystal from ultrathin film: Thickness diffusion field with effective diffusion coefficient. K. Taguchi, A. Toda, Y. Miyamoto 4:40 489. Upper superheating limit in poly­ mer crystals studied by ultrafast nanocalorimetry. A. Minakov, A. Wurm, C. Schick 5:00 490. Reaching elementary processes in polymer crystallization via growth twins in isotactic poly(vinylcyclohexane) single crystals. D. Alcazar, B. A. Lotz, E. L. Thomas, A. Kawaguchi, A. Thierry, S. Z. D. Cheng

Presiding

1:30 468. Direct evidence of coexisting amorphous, mesomorphic and crystalline phases in PEN from dielectric spectros­ copy. M. Wubbenhorst 2:00 469. Using the beta-relaxation as a probe to follow real-time polymer crystalli­ zation in model aliphatic polyesters. M. Soccio, A. Nogales, N. Lotti, T. A. Ezquerra 2:30 470. Role of relaxation studies in deter­ mining phase structure of semicrystalline polymers. P. Cebe, H. Chen

Ε. Β. Coughlin,

Organizer

G. Y. Georgiev,

Presiding

8:00 491. Dissolution of polyvinyl alcohol) hydrogels quantified using UV-vis spectro­ photometry. C. E. Macias, H. Bodugoz Senturk, O. K. Muratoglu 8:20 492. Effect of humidity on the thermal properties and morphology of laponite/ PEO multilayered films. E. A. Stefanescu, 1.1. Negulescu, W. H. Daly, G. Schmidt 8:40 493. Superhydrophobic polymer derived ceramic fibers. S. Sarka, A. Chunder, W. Fei, L. An, L Zhai 9:00 494. Tuning pH swelling and permeabil­ ity of hydrogen-bonded multilayer capsules via polymer hydrophobicity. V. Kozlovskaya, S. A. Sukhishvili 9:20 495. Unique nanostructures through PEGylation of hyperbranched fluoropolymer (HBFP) scaffolds. W. Du, Y. Li, C. Cheng, K. T. Powell, K. L. Wooley 9:40 496. Versatile surface coatings com­ posed of new inorganic/organic hybrid materials. D. Kessler, P. Theato 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 497. Water assisted injection molding of glass fiber reinforced PA-6 composites. S-J. Liu, C-C. Shih 10:35 498. Synthesis of AB 2 -type starshaped ethylene-styrene block copolymers by combining Pd-diimine catalyzed ethyl­ ene living polymerization with ATRP. X. Tang, Z. Ye 10:55 499. Rapid fabrication of microblocks onto glass substrates by soft-mold roller embossing. S-J. Liu, Y-C. Chang, C-Y. Chang, S-Y. Yang, K-H. Hsieh Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε

S. Z. D. Cheng and A. J . Lovinger, Organizers

Relaxation Behavior of Polymeric Materials Blends, Solutions, Ion-Containing Polymers

K. Tashiro,

J. Runt and R. Colby,

Presiding

1:30 483. Heterogeneous distribution of entanglements in the polymer melt and its influence on crystallization. S. Rastogi, D. Lippits, S. Talebi, B. Wang 2:00 484. Crystallization of polyethylenes containing halogens: Precise vs. random placement. R. G. Alamo, K. Jeon, E. Boz, A. J. Nemeth, K. B. Wagener 2:30 485. Temperature and molecular weight dependence of crystal growth rate for chain folding crystallization. N. Okui, S. Umemoto 3:00 Intermission. 3:30 486. Crystallization and thickening kinetics of monolayer PEO lamellae on mica surfaces. E-Q. Chen, D-S. Zhu, Y-X. Liu, A-C. Shi, S. Z. D. Cheng

Organizers

J. K. Maranas, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 500. Effect of pressure on the dynamic heterogeneity of compatible polymer blends. G. Floudas, K. Mpoukouvalas, A. Gitsas 9:00 501. Importance of thermodynamic interactions in the dynamics of miscible polymer blends. M. D. Dadmun, S. Y. Kamath, M. A. Arien, W. A. Hamilton 9:30 502. Dynamics of polycyclohexylmethacrylate, neat and in blends with poly-amethylstyrene. C. M. Roland, R. Casalini 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 503. Polystyrene single chain relax­ ation in a model asphalt mixture. L. Zhang, M. L. Greenfield

TECH-137

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

PMSE/PROF

10:45 504. Solvent effects on polyelectrolyte charge and conformation in solution. S. Dou, R. H. Colby 11:15 505. Counterion effects on ion mobility and mobile ion concentration of doped polyphosphazene and polyphosphazene ionomers. R. J. Klein, D. T. Welna, A. L Weikel, H. R. Allcock, J. Runt 11:45 506. Molecular dynamics, ion mobility and mobile ion concentration in polyethyl­ ene oxide)-based polyurethane ionomers. D. Fragiadakis, S. Dou, R. H. Colby, J. Runt Section C Westin Boston Waterfront Adams New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Advanced Materials Ε. Β. Coughlin, R. Kasi,

Organizer

Presiding

8:00 507. B-lactoglobulin fibres under capil­ lary flow. V. Castelletto, I. W. Hamley 8:20 508. Bamboo is a suitable substrate for polymerizations when swollen with super­ critical CO2. S. A. Eastman, A. J. Lesser, T. J. McCarthy 8:40 509. Degradation of amorphous tie chains during hydrolysis of cotton cellu­ lose. C. H. Stephens, P. M. Whitmore, H. R. Morris 9:00 510. Bubble growth mechanism in polymer foaming on paper board. S. K. Annapragada, S. Banerjee, T. Patterson 9:20 511. Coupled electrospinning of con­ tinuous Poly (vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropy-lene) nanofiber yarns. T. Song, X. Li 9:40 512. Withdrawn. 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 513. Hysteresis and stress relaxation studies for a fibrous collagen material: Chrome-free leather. C-K. Liu 10:35 514. Effect of molecular weight and crystallization conditions on high pressure crystallized ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. E. Oral, O. K. Muratoglu 10:55 515. Effect of sol molecular weight on the mechanical properties and sol migra­ tion in polymer gels. R. A. Mrozek, P. J. Cole, J. L Lenhart 11:15 516. lonomer stabilized nobel metal colloids for catalytic applications. S. Mayavan, N. R. Choudhury, N. K. Dutta Section D Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Release/Diffusion Ε. Β. Coughlin, P. Cebe,

Organizer

Presiding

8:00 517. Controlled release of micro-encap­ sulated cross-linker in powder coatings. D. Senatore, T. A. ten Cate, J. Laven, R. A. T. M. van Benthem, G. de With 8:20 518. Encapsulation of dodecanol, an insect pheromone component, by coacervation of acacia gum and gelatin and its release therefrom. X. Gu, J. Lian, X. Zhu, W. Liu, X. Z. Kong 8:40 519. Effect of salt's nature on thermal stabilities of poly(styrene-co-butyl acrylate) (PSBA) /clay systems. N. Cherifi, L. Billon, J. C. Dupin, S. Djadoun 9:00 520. Enhanced water permeability through hydrophobic polymers comprising metal oxide ceramic fillers. T. Zimrin, S. Margel, Y. F. Haruvy 9:20 521. Turbidity control by poly-aluminumchloride(PAC) in enhanced filtration pro­ cess. Y. Gao, W. Li, J . He 9:40 522. Toward spin on barrier layers. M. Memesa, Y-J. Cheng, J. Perlich, P. Muller-Buschbaum, J. S. Gutmann 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 523. Fabrication of double-surface reflective and conductive metallized poly­ meric films via surface modification. Z. Wu, S. Qi, J. Zhan, R. Jin, D. Wu

138-TECH

10:35 524. Fabrication of double-surfacesilvered polyimide films using ODPA/ODA as the polymer matrix. R. Jin, S. Qi, Z. Wu, D. Wu 10:55 525. Enhancement corrosion resis­ tance of (3-glycidoxylpropyl)silsesquioxane hybrid films and its validation by gas-molecule diffusion coefficients using MD simulation. L. Hu, W. Zhao, Q. Guo Metal-Containing and Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers and Materials Dendrimers, Hyperbranched Systems, Stars and Others Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by PMSE and BIOHW THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom D New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Advanced Materials Ε. Β. Coughlin, P. Cebe,

4:45 541. 2-D Viscoelastic behavior of poly(1-alkylene-co-maleic acid) at the air/water interface. C. Kim, A. R. Esker, H.Yu

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 526. Light scattering study of welldefined flexible polyelectrolytes with two cationic sites per monomeric unit. M. Osa, G. Mountrichas, K. Hong, S. Pispas, P. F. Britt, J. W. Mays 1:50 527. Limitations of order in sphereforming block copolymer thin films aligned under shear. A. P. Marencic, M. W. Wu, R. A. Register, P. M. Chaikin 2:10 528. Mechanistic aspects of the thread­ ing of polymers in processive rotaxane catalysts. J. A. A. W. Elemans, R. G. E. Coumans, P. Hidalgo Ramos, A. B. C. Deutman, A. E. Rowan, R. J. M. Nolte 2:30 529. Microtibological study of lubricant systems for magnetic tape industry. M. S. Farahat, M. A. Nix, B. Brunson, D. E. Nikles 2:50 530. Morphological effect on conduc­ tance of polymer/MWNT nanofiber mats. D. R. Stevens, S. Ojha, S. McCullen, W. Roberts, T. Hoffman, R. Gorga, L. I. Clarke 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 531. Nanoclay effect on relaxation and thermo-mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites. K. Y. Mya, C. Ling, C. He, P. K. Pallathadka 3:45 532. Photorheometry: A tool for charac­ terizing high-performance adhesives and coatings. J . D. Schall, A. F. Jacobine, J. G. Woods, R. N. Coffey 4:05 533. Preparation of UV-curable silver paste utilized to make the EMI shielding films. C-K. Huang, C-H. Chan, M-D. Jiang, J-S. Hsu, Y - L Tsai, J-L Han, K-H. Hsieh 4:25 534. Thermal and dielectric behavior of [ethylene-methacrylic acidj/graphite com­ posite materials. M. E. Rogers, K. A. Mauritz Section Β Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom Ε Relaxation Behavior of Polymeric Materials Polymer Dynamics J . Runt and J . K. Maranas, R. Colby, Organizer,

2:00 536. Molecular mobility of poly(phenyl methyl siloxane) investigated by thermal, dielectric and neutron spectroscopy. A. Schônhals, C. Schick, H. Huth, B. Frick, M. Mayorova, R. Zorn 2:30 537. Are density fluctuations controlling the breadth of the segmental relaxation in glass-forming liquids and polymers? W. Liu, R. H. Colby, E. A. Clark, J. E. G. Lipson 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 538. Comparison of united atom force field performance with respect to polymer dynamics. E. K. Boland, J. Liu, J. K. Maranas 3:45 539. Thermal stability and relaxation of polymeric nanoimprinted structures. K. J. Alvine, Y. Ding, H. W. Ro, B. Okerberg, J. F. Douglas, A. Karim, D. Hines, C. Soles 4:15 540. Importance of polymer-polymer interfaces on the glass transition temperature in polymer multilayer films and nanostructured blends. C. B. Roth, J. M. Torkelson

Organizers

Presiding

1:30 535. Temperature variations of segmen­ tal and chain dynamics: Why are they different? A. Sokolov

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Section C

1:50 553. Role of stereochemistry in diffusion of polypropylene melts: Comparison of simulation and experiment. N. Waheed, E. D. von Meerwall, W. L. Mattice 2:10 554. Nanocomposites of polyurethane elastomers for high-rate and large-strain applications. J. J. Huang, S. M. Liff, G. H. McKinley, M. C. Boyce 555. Withdrawn. 2:30 Intermission. 2:45 556. Spectroscopic study of polymer crystallization and orientation in nanorods. H. Wu, W. Wang, H. Yang, Z. Su 3:05 557. Time dependent thermal conduc­ tivity in the polyalphaolefine (PAO) oils. H. Hong, B. Wright, X. Wang, W. Roy 3:25 558. Study of the thermal stability and kinetics of decomposition of poly(3,5dimethylphenyl acrylate). N. Hamidi, R. Massoudi 3:45 559. Twinkling fractal theory of the glass transition and yield. R. P. Wool

PROF Division of Professional Relations C. J. Bannochie, Program Chair

Westin Boston Waterfront Adams New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Advanced Materials

O T H E R S Y M P O S I A O F INTEREST:

Ε. Β. Coughlin,

Organizer

Being a Responsible Chemist: Ethics, Politics, and Policy (see YCC, Mon)

M. W. Grinstaff,

Presiding

1:30 542. "Smart" polymers and their use for glucose monitoring in human plasma. K. E. S. Medlock, G. J. Worsley, G. A. Tourniaire, F. K. Sartain, H. E. Harmer, M. J. Thatcher, A. M. Horgan, J. Pritchard 1:50 543. Surface-tethered poly(acrylic acid) brushes as functional thin film for biosen­ sor application. V. P. Hoven, P. Akkahat 2:10 544. Microgels and linear polymers as polymeric supramolecular receptors for proteins. A. F. Tominey, J. Liese, D. Ewen, A. Kraft 2:30 545. Electrospinning and surface prop­ erties of chitosan/PEO nanofibers. K. Desai, K. Kit, J. Li, S. Zivanovic, M. Davidson 2:50 546. Functional nanoparticles from DNA block copolymers. F. E. Alemdaroglu, A. Herrmann 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 547. Self-assembly of an amphiphilic random polymer bearing donor-acceptor type azo chromophores. Y. Deng, Y. He, X. Wang 3:45 548. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic composites based on c/s-polyisoprene and CoFe 2 04 nanoparticles. J. C. Rubim, G. V. M. Jacintho, P. A. Z. Suarez, P. M. Kosaka, D. F. S. Petri 4:05 549. Super highly oxygen permeable silicone hydrogels. Y-C. Lai, W. Lang, Ε. Τ Quinn, D. V. Ruscio 4:25 550. Crosslinking and stabilization of T1O2 nanoparticle filled polymeric mem­ branes for gas separations. L. Shao, J. Samseth, M-B. Hâgg 4:45 551. Polyimides and their derivatives for gas separation applications. J. R. Klaehn, C. J. Orme, T. A. Luther, E. S. Peterson, J. M. Urban-Klaehn

SOCIAL EVENT: Henry Hill Award Reception, 5:00-6:30 pm: Tue BUSINESS MEETING: Executive Committee Meeting, 5:30-7: 00 pm: Mon SUNDAY MORNING Section A Sheraton Boston Back Bay Blrm C Progress of Chinese-Americans in Academia Z. Huang, Organizer,

Presiding

8:40 Introductory Remarks. 8:45 1 . Setting priorities. Z. S. Zhou 9:15 2. Searching for powerful stereoselec­ tive catalysis in organic synthesis. L. Deng 9:45 3. Design and development of small molecules of biological interests. X. Guan 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 4. Tiptoeing along the border between chemistry and biology. J . O. Liu 11:00 5. Fluorescence sensing technologies in demanding situations. L. Zhu 11:30 6. Research in the rapidly evolving field of bioorganic and medicinal chemis­ try. B. Wang Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Preparing for a Successful Transition from Graduate School to Work Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Section D

Section A

Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott

Sheraton Boston Back Bay Blrm C

New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Characterization

Progress of Chinese-Americans in Academia

Ε. Β. Coughlin,

B. W a n g , Organizer,

S. Eastman,

Organizer

Presiding

1:30 552. Polymorphism and elasticity in polymers. F. Auriemma, C. De Rosa, Ο. Ruiz de Ballesteros, S. Esposito

Presiding

1:00 7. Developing new multifunctional nanomaterials for biological and biomedi­ cal applications. W. Lin 1:30 8. A sweet journey started from Shang­ hai. Z. Guo

PROF/SCHB

2:00 9. Few-walled carbon nanotubes for bulk applications. J . Liu 2:30 10. Researches DIY, sort of. L Zhong 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 11. Improving cancer chemotherapy through the design of prodrugs and new inhibitors of protein-protein interaction. LHu 3:45 12. Building a "metal bridge" between chemistry and biology. Y. Lu 4:15 13. From molecular synthesis to "Se" structures at the atomic level. Z. Huang Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Career Perspectives and Insights into Life after Graduate School Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR

3:05 22. Making open innovation a part of your DNA. S. R. Brummet 3:35 Intermission. 3:50 23. Open innovation: The importance of culture. T. Balsano 4:20 24. Open innovation providing new chemical career options. J. K. Borchardt Being a Responsible Chemist: Ethics, Politics, and Policy Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by Committee on Ethics, CEPA, and PROF Many Faces of Chemistry: Merck Index Women in Chemistry Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and CHED

3:35 36. The value of values as career guides. J. D. Burke 4:05 Concluding Remarks. Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by Committee on Chemists with Disabilities, Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, YCC, PROF, and PRES

The ADVANCE Project Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by PROF WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Sheraton Boston Beacon A

Section A

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2

Many Faces of Chemistry: Sisters in Science Cosponsored by WCC and CMA

Sheraton Boston Back Bay Blrm A

Sci-Mix

Age Discrimination: Information for the Mature Chemist Cosponsored by CEPA

C. J . Bannochie,

L. P. Greenblatt, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 14. Wisdom of age: Age discrimination in the high powered workplace. M. D. Greenbaum 9:05 15. Age discrimination and the EEOC. B. Nidus 9:35 16. Do I have a good case? Proving age discrimination with circumstantial evidence. N. S. Shilepsky 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 17. Middle aged or older and sepa­ rated from employment: Don't always think age discrimination. J. S. Ackerstein 10:50 18. Aging workforce: Opportunities for organizational and professional innovation. M. Pitt-Catsouphes, T. McNamara 11:20 19. Can a business case be made for 50+ workers? D. Russell 11:50 Concluding Remarks. Being a Responsible Chemist: Ethics, Politics, and Policy Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by Committee on Ethics, CEPA, and PROF Many Faces of Chemistry: ACS Scholars' Contributions to the Chemical Sciences Sponsored by CMA, Cosponsored by PROF, WCC, and YCC Many Faces of Chemistry: The Merck Index Women in Chemistry Award Symposium Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and CHED MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Sheraton Boston Back Bay Blrm A Opportunities in Open Innovation Cosponsored by BMGT and CEPA J. K. Borchardt,

Organizer

P. A. Mabrouk, Organizer, Organizer

8:00-10:00 24. See previous listings. 25. Faces of chemistry. A. A. Aldridge 26. The need for higher-order (soft) skills in our global economy. B. E. Moriarty 27. Asian women chemists in the USA. M. F. Chen, E. A. Nalley 28. Advancing professionalism: The Henry Hill award. E. A. Nalley 37. See subsequent lisl Academic Employment Initiative Sponsored by ΑΕΙ, Cosponsored by Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, WCC, and PRES

Section A

Henry Hill Award Recipient Howard Peteré: An Alternative Career of Service to the Profession Cosponsored by CHAL, CEPA, and CMA

SCHB

SOCIAL EVENTS: Exec. Committee: Sun Reception: Tue BUSINESS MEETING: Division Business Meeting: Mon

Presiding

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:10 29. Our award recipient: The early years. P. F. Rusch 9:50 30. Starting a new ACS division as illustrated by accomplishments with Chemistry and the Law. H. Dubb 10:30 3 1 . Howard Peters' work with other divisions, sections, and outreach. S. B. Peters 11:10 32. The career of an ACS volunteer. J . A. Walsh From Peptide Bond Formation to Functional Proteins: Symposium in Honor of Ada Yonath Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by Committee on International Activities, CHED, PROF, and BIOL

SUNDAY MORNING Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Preparing for a Successful Transition from Graduate School to Work Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR

Presiding

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

Presiding

2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 33. Ted and Arlene Wick Light: A personal tribute. J. M. Sophos 2:35 34. Sustainability as an ACS volunteer. E. M. Diggs 3:05 35. Informal class in mentoring: Ted and Arlene's shining volunteer example. D. J. Eustace

BCEC 212 Pre-Retirement Planning Issues to Consider Cosponsored by CEPA S. Shah, Organizer,

Presiding

TUESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 260 True Stories of Small Chemical

J. H. Lauterbach, R. J . Versic,

Organizer

Presiding

8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 10. Starting Chirosolve Inc. N. A. Vaidya 9:00 11. Just keep believing and hold on for the ride! L. J. Jones 9:30 12. On the road again . . . the lifestyle, not the song!. J. DeMenna TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Best Steps for Chemical Entrepreneurs Cosponsored by YCC

BCEC 257A

S. Shah,

M. S. Chorghade, Organizer,

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Section A

G. Arnold,

Organizer

Section A

Henry Hill Award Recipients Ted and Arlene Light: Careers of Service to the Profession Cosponsored by CEPA and CMA

Organizer

8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 3. Working as a solo practitioner after early retirement from industry. J. H. Lauterbach 8:35 4. What is your reason to get into consulting? J. E. Sabol 9:05 5. Business beginnings. G. Arnold 9:35 Intermission. 9:50 6. What a chemical professional needs to know about professional liability insurance before starting a consulting business. H. Cifuentes, J. Parr 10:20 7. Internet marketing and website development for small businesses. J. E. Sabol 10:50 8. Call an expert! T. M. Smith 11:20 Concluding Remarks.

BCEC 260

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Sheraton Boston Beacon G

Working as a Solo Practitioner after Early Retirement from Industry

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

SIG Sessions Cosponsored by CEPA L. P. Greenblatt, Organizer,

2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 20. Transitioning your R&D toward open innovation. B. Munos 2:35 2 1 . Engaging a global scientist commu­ nity in extra-organizational innovation. P. A. Lohse, E. Ivanov, M. Yu, M. Albarelli, E. Madrigal, K. Mallik, W. Lou, J. A. Panetta

BCEC 212

2:00 9. Preretirement considerations: Financial and otherwise. S. Shah

J. H. Lauterbach, Program Chair

Sheraton Boston Beacon G

H. Dubb, Organizer,

Presiding

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 37. History of African-American women chemists: Pioneer members of the women chemist committee. J. E. Brown 1:35 38. A certain restlessness. E. Hopkins 2:05 39. Crossing the roads that unite R&D and business careers. D. J. Phillips 2:35 Intermission. 2:50 40. Sisters speak on research in the academy. G. Barabino 3:20 4 1 . Congratulations, if this is how you want to spend your life! S. L. Neal 3:50 Panel Discussion.

Division of Small Chemical Businesses

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

J. H. Lauterbach,

WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

MONDAY EVENING

MONDAY MORNING

2:00 1 . The role of cultural diversity on global teams. S. Shah 3:30 Intermission. 3:45 2. The seventh dollar of sales. J. H. Lauterbach Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Career Perspectives and Insights into Life after Graduate School Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR

Organizer

2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:10 13. Best steps for the chemical entrepreneur: Part one. G. Arnold, J. Balog, T. Miller, E. D. Rodriguez, S. Shah, T. Woolf 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 14. Best steps for the chemical entrepreneur: Part two. G. Arnold, J. Balog, T. Miller, E. D. Rodriguez, S. Shah, T. Woolf 4:25 Concluding Remarks. Chemical Logistics and Informatics Challenges for Companies Small, Medium and Large I Know the Data is Around Here Somewhere Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by SCHB and BMGT WEDNESDAY MORNING Intellectual Property and Licensing Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHAL, SCHB, and BMGT

TECH-139

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

BTEC/CATL

mua Biotechnology Secretariat J. Finley, Program Chair SUNDAY MORNING Nucleic Acid Enzymology Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

WEDNESDAY MORNING Eli Lilly Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, CARB, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Symposium in Honor of Perry Frey Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW THURSDAY MORNING Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by AGFD and BTEC

SUNDAY AFTERNOON THURSDAY AFTERNOON Chemical Approaches to Protein Function Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Plant Genomics Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BTEC

Polymer Design for Foods and Nutrition Sensory Issues in Food Packaging Sponsored by POLY, Cosponsored by AGFD and BTEC

Pfizer Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW

MONDAY MORNING Section A

MONDAY MORNING Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC

2:30 1 1 . Growth and catalytic properties of ultrathin films of Au supported on TiO. S. Axnanda, M. Chen, D. W. Goodman 2:50 12. Methanol adsorption and decomposition over unreduced ceria surface: A density functional theory study. D. Mei, N. A. Deskins, M. Dupuis, Q. Ge 3:10 13. Nanoscale chlorine induced restructuring of Au(111). W. Gao, D. S. Pinnaduwage, L Zhou, R. J. Madix, C. M. Friend 3:30 14. Nanostructured alloy catalysts. J . Luo, L. Wang, X. Shi, S. Lu, C. J. Zhong 3:50 15. Size of gold particles on preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide. C-T. Yeh 4:10 16. Withdrawn. 4:30 17. Water-gas shift on metal nanoparticles supported on well-defined surfaces: Active phase and reaction mechanism. J. A. Rodriguez

CATL

BCEC 261

Catalysis & Surface Science Secretariat J. G. Chen, Secretary General and B. Zhou, Program Chair

Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL G. Gadda,

Organizer

J. P. Roth, Organizer, Plant Genomics Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BTEC The Emerging Technologies and Capabilities of Metabolomics Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL

SUNDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 261

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Nanotechnology in Catalysis V Cosponsored by COLL, l&EC, and PETR

Biomarker Discovery Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BTEC and BIOHW

J. G. Chen, Organizer,

Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC Murray Goodman Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by John Wiley & Sons, ANYL, MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW Nano-Biochemistry and Technology Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOT, BIOHW, BTEC, and BIOL TUESDAY MORNING Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC Repligen Award Symposium Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by MEDI, BTEC, and BIOHW RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC TUESDAY AFTERNOON Genetic Screening and Diagnostic Testing: Do You Really Want to Know? Sponsored by COMSCI, Cosponsored by BTEC

Presiding

9:00 1. Tuning the molecular and electronic structures of catalytic active sites with oxide support nanoligands. I. E. Wachs, E. I. Ross, W. V. Knowles, A. Burrows, C. J. Kiely, M. Wong 9:30 2. Novel synthesis of gold-, and copperdoped cerium oxide nanocatalysts. M. Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, R. Si, W. Deng, J. Raitano, S. Banerjee, I. P. Herman, S-W. Chan 10:00 3. Cation and anion doping of nanostructured titania for visible light photocatalysis. S. I. Shah 10:30 4. Dendrimer templates for supported Au and Au-M (M=Ni, Cu, Co) CO oxidation catalysts. B. D. Chandler, J. D. Gilbertson, C. G. Long 10:50 5. Nanostructured membrane catalysis in the ODH of cyclohexane. H. Feng, J. W. Elam, J. A. Libera, H. H. Wang, H. Kung, M. C. Kung, P. C. Stair 11:10 6. Activity and characterization of nano MnOX catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NOX with NH3 at low temperature. J . Li, J. Chen, J. Hao 11:30 7. A hybrid biobattery: Generation of electricity using nanocatalytic system. J. Wei, A. S. Bedekar, S. Malin, S. Sundaram 11:50 8. Novel catalysts based on magnetic nanoparticles. G. J. Price, C. Frost, P. P. Plucinski, U. Laska SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Genomics of Obesity Sponsored by BIOHW, Cosponsored by AGFD, BIOL, BIOT, MEDI, and BTEC Mechanism of Action of Natural Products Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by BIOT, MEDI, ORGN, BTEC, and BIOHW Molecular Imaging Visualization of Biological Processes at the Molecular Level Sponsored by BIOL, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOT, MEDI, BTEC, PHYS, and BIOHW RNA Interference Based Therapeutics Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by BIOL, BIOT, COMP, MEDI, ORGN, PMSE, POLY, and BTEC

140-TECH

Section A BCEC 261 Nanotechnology in Catalysis V Cosponsored by COLL, l&EC, PETR J . G. C h e n , Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 9. First principles investigation of adsorption and dissociation of AsH3 and H2Se on Zn2Ti04 (010) surface. S. Hao, D. Sholl, J. K. Johnson 2:00 10. Fischer Tropsch elementary steps on Fe(100). D. Curulla Ferre, J. W. Niemantsverdriet

Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 18. Hydrocarbon oxidation at carboxylate-bridged diiron centers. L. J. Murray, M. S. McCormick, C. E. Tinberg, M. Zhao, S. J. Lippard 9:20 19. Algal biohydrogen production from water: A future renewable energy option. M. Seibert 10:00 20. Proton-coupled electron transfer in soybean lipoxygenase: Dynamical behavior and kinetic isotope effects. S. Hammes-Schiffer 10:45 2 1 . Biocatalysis using phenol oxidase and peroxidases. S. G. Burton 11:25 22. Laboratory evolution of P450 alkane monooxygenases. R. Fasan, F. H. Arnold

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A BCEC 261 Photocatalysis J. N. Eckstein, Organizer,

Presiding

1:30 28. Doped semicoductor nanoparticle materials for solar hydrogen conversion. D. Raftery, E. Reyes, K. Reyes, Y. Sun, G.Li 2:00 29. New materials and morphologies for photocatalytic materials. K. S. Suslick, R. Helmich 2:30 30. Nitrogen-doped ceramics for solar driven photocatalysis. X. Qiu, Y. Zhao, C. Burda 3:00 3 1 . Visible light photoreduction of cr(VI) in aqueous solution using iron-containing zeolite tubes. R. Kanthasamy, S. C. Larsen 3:30 32. Photoreduction of C 0 2 over reactive DC magnetron sputtered T1O2 thin films. L. Chen, M. E. Graham, G. Li, K. A. Gray 3:50 33. Solar fuel applications of titania nanocomposites: Solid-solid interfaces for photoreduction of carbon dioxide. G. Li, L. Chen, N. Dimitrijevic, T. Rajh, K. A. Gray 4:10 34. Photocatalyzed soot oxidation on titanium dioxide thin films. P. Chin, G. W. Roberts, D. F. Ollis 4:30 35. Photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli in natural water sources using a microwave-treated T i 0 2 catalyst. S. Ede, L. Hafner, G. Will 4:50 36. Photodegradation methyl orange on the surface of lanthanum-doped titania thin film coated on light leakage fiber. Y. Tao, T. Xin, Z. Rui, Z. Lin WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A BCEC 261 Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL

M O N D A Y EVENING Catalysis Posters Sponsored by COLL, Cosponsored by CATL

J. P. Roth and G. Gadda,

TUESDAY MORNING

A. Kohen,

Section A

8:30 37. Probing catalysis in cholesterol oxidase using atomic resolution crystallography. A. Vrielink, A. Y. Lyubimov 9:10 38. Flavin-dependent oxidation of alcohols. G. Gadda 9:50 39. Oxygen reactivity in quinocofactor catalysis and biogenesis. J . P. Klinman 10:35 40. Redox tuning over 100s of mV via Η-bonding and control of redox-coupled protons, in superoxide dismutase. A-F. Miller, E. Yikilmaz, J. Porta, L. E. Grove, Y. Bronshteyn, J. Xie, A. Vahedi-Faridi, D. W. Rodgers, T. C. Brunold, G. E. O. Borgstahl

BCEC 261 Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL J. P. Roth,

Organizer

G. Gadda, Organizer,

Presiding

8:30 23. Heme enzymes: Oxidation catalysts of precision and power. S. K. Chapman 9:10 24. Iron-catalyzed arene cis-dihydroxylation modeling the action of Rieske dioxygenases in biodégradation. L. Que Jr., Y. Feng, C-Y. Ke 9:50 25. Bacterial cytochrome P450 enzymes as oxidative catalysts. P. R. Ortiz de Montellano, C. R. Nishida, A. Puchkaev, J. Lampe, W. Ho, T. L. Poulos 10:35 26. Green catalytic oxidations with oxidases and peroxidases. R. A. Sheldon 11:20 27. Application of Marcus Theory to understanding catalysis of enzymatic C-H oxidation. J. P. Roth

Organizers

Presiding

11:10 4 1 . Enantioselective oxidations with dehydrogenases/NADH oxidase. A. S. Bommarius, A. M. Orville, G. T. Lountos 11:45 42. Computational studies of the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the Co-S bond-containing glutahionylcobalamin (GSCbl) and the genera­ tion of ROS by the metal bound amyloidbeta (1-42) peptide. R. Prabhakar

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

CATLVCEPA/CMA/COMSCI/SOCED WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

MONDAY EVENING

Section A

Academic Employment Initiative Sponsored by ΑΕΙ, Cosponsored by Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, WCC, and PRES

BCEC 261

.

Strategies in Enzymatic Oxidation Catalysis Cosponsored by BIOL and COLL G. Gadda and J. P. Roth, Organizers R. Prabhakar, Presiding 1:30 43. 20G Oxygenases: The most versa­ tile of oxidising enzymes? C. Schofield 2:15 44. Fe(ll) and a-ketoglutarate-dependent halogenases in natural products biosynthesis. D. P. Galonic, S. Hrvatin, E. W. Barr, J. M. Bollinger Jr., C. Krebs, C. T. Walsh 2:35 45. Mechanism of benzylsuccinate synthase: A radical solution to toluene metabolism. E. N. G. Marsh, L. Li 2:55 46. Hydride and proton transfer in enzymatic systems: Studies of dihydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase. A. Kohen 3:35 47. Withdrawn. 3:55 48. Crystal structures of SyrB2 and RebH: Strategies for enzymatic halogenation of natural products. L. C. Blasiak, F. H. Vaillancourt, E. Yeh, A. Koglin, C. T. Walsh, C. L. Drennan 4:15 49. P450 biocatalysis in two-phase emulsions using biomimetic NADH. J. D. Ryan, R. H. Fish, D. S. Clark 4:35 50. Structural basis for cofactor-independent dioxygenation in vancomycin biosynthesis. P. F. Widboom, E. N. Fielding, Y. Liu, S. D. Bruner

ΕϋΗ Committee on Economic & Professional Affairs S. C. Waller, Program Chair SUNDAY AFTERNOON SIG Sessions Sponsored by SCHB, Cosponsored by CEPA MONDAY MORNING Age Discrimination: Information for the Mature Chemist Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CEPA Being a Responsible Chemist: Ethics, Politics, and Policy Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by Committee on Ethics, CEPA, and PROF MONDAY AFTERNOON Being a Responsible Chemist: Ethics, Politics, and Policy Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by Committee on Ethics, CEPA, and PROF Opportunities in Open Innovation Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by BMGT and CEPA Pre-Retirement Planning Issues to Consider Sponsored by SCHB, Cosponsored by CEPA

TUESDAY MORNING Henry Hill Award Recipient Howard Peters: An Alternative Career of Service to the Profession Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CHAL, CEPA, and CMA

Introductory Remarks. Panelist Remarks. Panelist Questions and Answers. Concluding Remarks.

20th Anniversary of National Chemistry Week The Many Faces of Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, and PRES

Henry Hill Award Recipients Ted and Arlene Light: Careers of Service to the Profession Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CEPA and CMA

CMA

Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, INOR, BIOL, and PRES MONDAY EVENING Academic Employment Initiative Sponsored by ΑΕΙ, Cosponsored by Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, WCC, and PRES

Committee on Minority Affairs

TUESDAY MORNING

L. M. Watkins, Program Chair

Section A

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Sheraton Boston Liberty B/C

The Many Faces of Chemistry: International Opportunities for Chemists Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by CMA and WCC

Many Faces of Chemistry: The Role of Two-Year Colleges in Changing the Face of Chemistry Cosponsored by WCC and YCC

MONDAY MORNING

L. M. Watkins, Organizer, Presiding

Section A

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 6. Preparing today's community college students to be tomorrow's scientists: The role ACs can play. J. L. Wesemann 9:00 7. The role of the Division of Under­ graduate Education (DUE) in supporting chemical education in two year community colleges. H. H. Richtol, S. H. Hixson, E. L. Lewis, P. Varma-Nelson 9:25 8. About a two-year college based NSF undergraduate research collaborative: Lessons learned during the first year. T. B. Higgins 9:50 Intermission. 10:05 9. Opportunities to succeed: Science enrichment initiatives at Miami Dade college. L. P. Rodicio 10:30 10. From g.e.D. to M.D. or ph.D.: How Queensborough Community College prepares its students for this goal. P. Svoronos 10:55 11. Undergraduate research in the chemical sciences at the two-year college: Yesterday, today and tomorrow. O. Gaglione, K. Zarrabi 11:20 Concluding Remarks.

Sheraton Boston Liberty B/C Many Faces of Chemistry: ACS Scholars' Contributions to the Chemical Sciences Cosponsored by PROF, WCC, and YCC L. M. Watkins and R. J. Hughes, Organizers 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 1. Enhancing the properties of poly(phenylene vinylene) by monomer assem­ bly using inverse electron demand dielsalder cycloaddition. L. Prophyl, W. A. Feld 9:05 2. Spectroscopic and computational studies of nickel superoxide dismutase: Roles of the cysteine-2 and -6 active site ligands. 0. Johnson, T. C. Brunold 9:35 3. Multiscale model modeling. C. P. Calderon 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 4. Synthetic studies toward the total synthesis of norzoanthamine. F. Rivas 10:50 5. Gradient approaches to the exami­ nation of surface energy effects on triblock copolymer thin films. T. H. Epps III, J. N. Lawson, T. Scherr, D. M. DeLongchamp, M. J. Fasolka 11:20 Concluding Remarks. 20th Anniversary of National Chemistry Week The Many Faces of Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, and PRES Many Faces of Chemistry: The Merck Index Women in Chemistry Award Symposium Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and CHED MONDAY AFTERNOON

Sheraton Boston Liberty A/B Many Faces of Chemistry: Stories from ACS Scholars Cosponsored by WCC and YCC L. M. Watkins and R. J. Hughes, Organizers

\mm Committee on Science C. Ribes, Program Chair TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

Many Faces of Chemistry: Merck Index Women in Chemistry Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and CHED

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Please refrain from using cellular telephones and cameras during technical sessions.

2:00 2:10 3:30 3:50

Henry Hill Award Recipient Howard Peters: An Alternative Career of Service to the Profession Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CHAL, CEPA, and CMA TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Sheraton Boston Back Bay Blrm A Creating and Sustaining International Research Collaborations E. J. Amis, Organizer 2:00 1. Lindau meeting of Nobel laureates and students: An international meeting of minds. R. F. Hirsch, H. Blount 2:30 2. Collaborative efforts between Univer­ sity of Massachusetts and China spanning over 30 years. S. L. Hsu, T. Emrick, G. Tew, A. J. Crosby 3:00 3. International cooperation to ensure comparability of chemical measurements worldwide. H. G. Semerjian 3:30 4. Trials and tribulations of international scientific collaborations. A. W. DeGroot, F. van Damme Section Β Sheraton Boston Back Bay Blrm A Genetic Screening and Diagnostic Testing: Do You Really Want to Know? Cosponsored by BTEC J. W. Finley, Organizer 12:00 Introductory Remarks. 12:05 5. Genomic information and the pre­ cautionary principle. G. Comstock 12:20 6. Genetic testing: Do we really want to know? P. Thompson 12:35 Discussion. 1:05 Concluding Remarks.

Hsiaai Society Committee on Education P. Y. Furlan, Program Chair

BUSINESS MEETING: Open Meeting: Mon SUNDAY MORNING Section A Westin Copley Place St. George A/B

Henry Hill Award Recipients Ted and Arlene Light: Careers of Service to the Profession Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CEPA and CMA

Undergraduate Polymer Science Symposium Cosponsored by POLY

Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by Committee on Chemists with Disabilities, Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, YCC, PROF, and PRES

10:30 1. Biopolymers and bioinspired poly­ mers for medical and personal care appli­ cations. S. E. Morgan 11:00 2. Applying the polymer parameters to advanced polymeric membrane systems. J. E. McGrath 11:30 3. Frontiers in alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles: Activities and opportunities. K. O. Havelka

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Many Faces of Chemistry: Sisters in Science Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by WCC and CMA

P. Y. Furlan, Organizer, Presiding

SUNDAY AFTERNOON Connections to Germany: Research and Education Opportunities Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by German Chemical Society, ACS International Activities Committee, CHED International Activities Committee, ACS Northeastern Section, Graduate Student Symposium Planning Committee, SOCED, WCC, YCC, and PRES

TECH-141

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

SOCED/WCC

wcc

MONDAY MORNING Section A Westin Copley Place St. George A/B

Women Chemists Committee

Undergraduate Green Chemistry Symposium

R. D. Libby, J. M. Iriarte-Gross, and A. S. Hinkle, Program Chairs

P. Y. Furlan, Organizer,

Presiding

10:00 4. Green chemistry: An overview. M. M. Kirchhoff 10:30 5. How many ways can we use Mother Nature's building blocks? Utilizing vegetable oils as renewable resources. J. W. Rawlins 11:00 6. Significant environmental impacts on university campuses. J . Emig, L Sharp

SOCIAL EVENTS: Ell Lllly/WCC Travel Award Poster , Session and Reception: Tue Luncheon: Tue ' » . Women in Industry Breakfast: Mon BUSINESS MEETINGS: Executive Committee Meeting: Sat Open Meeting: Sat

Section Β

Eminent Scientist Lecture and Luncheon Featuring Robert W. Lenz Presiding

11:45 Introductory Remarks. 11:50 Luncheon. 12:10 7. Bacterial polyesters: Biosynthesis, biodegradable polymers and biotechnol­ ogy. R. W. Lenz 12:55 Concluding Remarks. MONDAY AFTERNOON Undergraduate Research Poster Session Analytical Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by ANYL and SOCED Undergraduate Research Poster Session Biochemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by BIOT, SOCED, and BIOL Undergraduate Research Poster Session Chemical Education Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by SOCED Undergraduate Research Poster Session Computational Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by SOCED Undergraduate Research Poster Session Environmental Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by ENVR and SOCED Undergraduate Research Poster Session Inorganic Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by SOCED Undergraduate Research Poster Session Medicinal Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by MEDI and SOCED Undergraduate Research Poster Session Nanotechnology Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by SOCED and BIOHW Undergraduate Research Poster Session Organic Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by SOCED Undergraduate Research Poster Session Physical Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by PHYS and SOCED Undergraduate Research Poster Session Polymer Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by PMSE, POLY, and SOCED

SUNDAY AFTERNOON Connections to Germany: Research and Education Opportunities Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by German Chemical Society, ACS International Activities Committee, CHED International Activities Committee, ACS Northeastern Section, Graduate Student Symposium Planning Committee, SOCED, WCC, YCC, and PRES Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Career Perspectives and Insights into Life after Graduate School Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR The Many Faces of Chemistry: International Opportunities for Chemists Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by CMA and WCC

Many Faces of Chemistry: Women at the Forefront Cosponsored by CMA, INOR, BIOL, and PRES

Academic Employment Initiative Sponsored by ΑΕΙ, Cosponsored by Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, WCC, and PRES Successful Student Affiliates Chapters Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by SOCED

Organizers

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 7. Design of polyester and polyester urethane biomaterials. V. Ashby 2:00 8. Virtual screening methods for the identification of lead compounds for drug discovery. W. D. Cornell 2:25 9. Genetic control of the synthesis and assembly of materials for electronics and energy. A. M. Belcher 2:50 Intermission. 3:00 10. Chemistry and technology: advances in renewable fuels and advanced technology vehicles. K. O. Havelka 3:25 1 1 . Biomineralization, biomimetics and biomaterials: Lessons learned from Nature. A. A. Campbell 3:50 12. Crystal growth of intermetallics: Challenges and opportunities. J. Y. Chan 4:15 Concluding Remarks.

Organizer

9:15 Introductory Remarks. 9:30 1 . Rhodium-catalyzed intramolecular [4 + 2] cycloadditions of alkynyl halides. W-J. Yoo, A. Allen, K. Villeneuve, W. Tarn 9:50 2. Tuning the potential of Wurster's crowns: Toward the development of an electrochemical toolbox for redox sensing/ switching. S. C. Dodani, J. W. Sibert 10:10 3. Tetrahydropyran rings from a Mukaiyama-Michael cascade or rearrange­ ment of dihydropyrans. A. Maruniak, M. L. Bolla, S. D. Rychnovsky 10:30 4. One-pot asymmetric synthesis of either diastereomer of tert-butanesulfinylprotected amines from ketones. J . Tanuwidjaja, H. M. Peltier, J. A. Ellman

Photographing or recording meeting sessions and/or activities other than your own are prohibited at all official ACS events without written consent from ACS.

Organizers

8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 24. Obligatory events in the chaperonin cycle. G. H. Lorimer, S. Wehri, A. Atarya 8:50 25. Catalysis and communication in two active sites of the ribosome. R. Green 9:20 26. Generic substrate interactions of the promiscuous chaperone trigger factor. W. A. Hendrickson, E. Martinez-Hackert 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 27. Linking allostery in a specific prokaryotic chaperonin to protein folding. A. Horovitz 10:30 28. The evolving complexity of the ribosome: Forming and protecting nascent proteins. A. Yonath 11:00 Concluding Remarks. Many Faces of Chemistry: The Role of Two-Year Colleges in Changing the Face of Chemistry Sponsored by CMA, Cosponsored by WCC and YCC Undergraduate Chemistry for Liberal Arts Students Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC TUESDAY AFTERNOON

BCEC Exhibit Hall—B2 Many Faces of Chemistry: Merck Index Women in Chemistry Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and CHED Presiding

1:00-3:00

C. B; Koch,

A. S. Hinkle and J . L. Bryant,

Section Β

C. B. Koch,

MONDAY EVENING

RDFD

Westin Boston Waterfront Revere

Section A

Many Faces of Chemistry: The Merck Index Women in Chemistry Award Symposium Cosponsored by CMA, PROF, and CHED

Sheraton Boston Back Bay Blrm Β From Peptide Bond Formation to Functional Proteins: Symposium in Honor of Ada Yonath Cosponsored by Committee on International Activities, CHED, PROF, and BIOL

Section A

MONDAY MORNING

Westin Boston Waterfront Revere

Section A

MONDAY AFTERNOON

A. S. Hinkle and J . L. Bryant, Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Preparing for a Successful Transition from Graduate School to Work Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR

M O N D A Y EVENING Academic Employment Initiative Sponsored by ΑΕΙ, Cosponsored by Chemists with Disabilities, CHED, PROF, CEPA, CMA, CPT, SOCED, WCC, and PRES TUESDAY MORNING

Many Faces of Chemistry: ACS Scholars' Contributions to the Chemical Sciences Sponsored by CMA, Cosponsored by PROF, WCC, and YCC

SUNDAY MORNING

Westin Copley Place St. George A/B

P. Y. Furlan, Organizer,

10:50 5. Optimization of the selective reduc­ tion of α,β-epoxycarbonyls with silyllithium reagents. S. E. Wengryniuk, A. M. Hartel 11:10 6. From organic chemist to drug dis­ covery scientist: A career in diabetes research. E. R. Parmee 11:40 Concluding Remarks.

13. Withdrawn. 14. Withdrawn. 15. Synthesis of bistable azodianiline analogs for applications in light-gated ion channels. H. M. Wisniewska, M. R. Banghart, J. H. Harvey, K. Borges, E. Y. Isacoff, R. H. Kramer, D. Trauner 16. Withdrawn. 17. Gold nanoclusters decorated with bentcore liquid crystals. V. Marx, T. Hegmann 18. Investigation of novel methods for stereo­ selective synthesis involving radical trans­ location. R. R. Parkhurst, I. Rosenstein 19. Pentacovalent phosphorus in organic synthesis: A new route to substituted phosphonates. D. M. Stacy, C. K. McClure 20. Diastereo- and chemoselectivity in nitrenoid amidoglycosylation. R. Gupta 21. Evaluating synthetic fragments of α-synuclein for influence on a-synuclein aggregation behavior. C. Crosswhite, K. Walsham, M. Blattner, J. H. Miwa 22. Library generation utilizing ROMP technol­ ogy and resin bound supports. J. Guerra, D. K. Rayabarapu, P. R. Hanson 23. Phosphoramidate derivatives of hydroxysteroids as inhibitors of prostate-specific membrane antigen. L. Y. Wu, J. Do, M. Kazak, H. Page, Y. Toriyabe, M. O. Anderson, C. E. Berkman Henry H. Whalen, Jr. Award for Excellence in Development and Management within the Chemical Enterprise in Honor of Cynthia Maryanoff, 2007 Recipient Sponsored by BMGT, Cosponsored by WCC Many Faces of Chemistry: Stories from ACS Scholars Sponsored by CMA, Cosponsored by WCC and YCC

Section A Sheraton Boston Back Bay Blrm Β Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry Cosponsored by Committee on Chemists with Disabilities, Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, YCC, PROF, and PRES D. A. Brooks and A. S. Hinkle,

Organizers

2:10 Introductory Remarks. 2:15 29. Careers in analytical chemistry. J. Landis 2:35 30. Careers in global companies. K. C. Glasgow 2:55 3 1 . Teaching at primarily undergraduate serving institutions. L. M. Watkins 3:15 32. Applying what you learned in kin­ dergarten: Careers in chemical manufac­ turing. A. S. Hinkle 3:35 33. Invisible professionals in an invisible science: Careers of chemical technicians. V. M. Mautino 3:55 34. Careers in the pharmaceutical industry. D. A. Brooks 4:15 Concluding Remarks. Undergraduate Chemistry for Liberal Arts Students Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Sheraton Boston Berkeley A/B The ADVANCE Project Cosponsored by PROF S. C h a p m a n ,

Organizer

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 35. Progress for women chemists/ chemical engineers. F. Dixon, H. M. Free

WCC/YCC

8:55 36. ACS academic awareness site visit program: Strengthening our academic foundations. N. M. Tooney, F. Dixon, N. Foster, D. A. McCarthy, S. Chapman 9:15 37. Survey findings from PROGRESS study. S. A. Nolan, J. P. Buckner, C. H. Marzabadi 9:45 38. Focus-group findings from PROGRESS study. C. H. Marzabadi, J. P. Buckner, S. A. Nolan 10:15 Intermission. 10:35 39. Perspectives on "strengthening our academic foundations": Current findings on women faculty at research universities. D. A. McCarthy, Ν. Μ. Tooney, S. Chapman, F. Dixon, N. Foster 10:55 40. Strengthening our academic foun­ dations: What we have seen and learned. S. Chapman, F. Dixon, N. Foster, D. A. McCarthy, Ν. Μ. Tooney 11:15 4 1 . Factors influencing the PhD attri­ tion rate. V. J. Kuck WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Many Faces of Chemistry: Sisters in Science Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by WCC and CMA

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Section A

Sheraton Boston Berkeley A/B

Sheraton Boston Fairfax A

The Many Faces of Chemistry: International Opportunities for Chemists Cosponsored by CMA and WCC

Being a Responsible Chemist: Ethics, Politics, and Policy Cosponsored by Committee on Ethics, CEPA, and PROF

S. Pazicni and A. Mahapatro,

G. T. M a G e e and L. J . Ramillano, Organizers

Organizers

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 1 . Destination B * . D. J. Miller 1:35 2. International opportunities: A new faculty perspective. A. Mahapatro 2:05 Concluding Remarks. Connections to Germany: Research and Education Opportunities Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by German Chemical Society, ACS International Activities Committee, CHED International Activities Committee, ACS Northeastern Section, Graduate Student Symposium Planning Committee, SOCED, WCC, YCC, and PRES Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Career Perspectives and Insights into Life after Graduate School Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR

YCC Younger Chemists Committee

Meeting the Diverse Needs of the 21st Century Nuclear Science Workforce: A Symposium by Graduate Student Scientists in Nuclear and Radiochemistry Nuclear Chemistry/Radiopharmacology Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by YCC

M. Jeffries-EL and G. Thomas, Program Chairs

SOCIAL EVENT: Reception: Sun BUSINESS MEETINGS: Executive Session Meeting: Sun Open Meeting: Sun ~ '

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 3. What is an ethical chemist? J . Kovac 9:35 4. ACS resources in workforce ethics for chemical professionals. F. K. Kravitz 10:00 5. Institutional review boards and human subject ethics. R. Hannigan 10:25 Intermission. 10:35 6. Teaching ethics. G. M. Bodner 11:00 7. Ethics of diversity: Practice and policy. Z. S. Wilson 11:25 8. Conflict of interest: An introduction for chemists. M. Davis 11:50 Concluding Remarks. Many Faces of Chemistry: ACS Scholars' Contributions to the Chemical Sciences Sponsored by CMA, Cosponsored by PROF, WCC, and YCC Meeting the Diverse Needs of the 21st Century Nuclear Science Workforce: A Symposium by Graduate Student Scientists in Nuclear and Radiochemistry Environmental Radiochemistry Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by YCC

SUNDAY MORNING Finding Your Catalyst: Lowering the Barrier From Graduate School to Industry Preparing for a Successful Transition from Graduate School to Work Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by WCC, BMGT, PROF, SCHB, YCC, and INOR Meeting the Diverse Needs of the 21st Century Nuclear Science Workforce: A Symposium by Graduate Student Scientists in Nuclear and Radiochemistry Separation Chemistry Sponsored by NUCL, Cosponsored by YCC

Many Faces of Chemistry: Stories from ACS Scholars Sponsored by CMA, Cosponsored by WCC and YCC TUESDAY MORNING Section A Sheraton Boston Republic A Changing Landscapes of the Bio-Pharma Industry Cosponsored by BMGT M. L. Hurrey,

Organizer

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 13. Multidisciplinary nature of biotech and how that affects the job market. M. S. Chorghade 9:45 14. Translational product development: Applying advances in physical chemistry and materials science to enhance drug discovery and development output. P. Connelly 10:25 15. Changing landscape of dosage forms: Industry needs and science chal­ lenges. S. Wollowitz 11:05 Concluding Remarks.

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A

'

2:05 10. Ethics and intellectual property: What doesn't kill you certainly makes you stronger. S. Thompson 2:30 Intermission. 2:40 1 1 . Authorship/publishing/communica­ tion ethics. E. S. Slater 3:05 12. Ethical issues and practices in federal funding. L. Echegoyen 3:30 Panel Discussion. 4:30 Concluding Remarks.

Sheraton Boston Fairfax A

Many Faces of Chemistry: The Role of Two-Year Colleges in Changing the Face of Chemistry Sponsored by CMA, Cosponsored by WCC and YCC TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Being a Responsible Chemist: Ethics, Politics, and Policy Cosponsored by Committee on Ethics, CEPA, and PROF G. T. M a G e e and L. J . Ramillano, Organizers 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 9. Research ethics and the responsible conduct of research: Scientists in society. S. J. Bird

Best Steps for Chemical Entrepreneurs Sponsored by SCHB, Cosponsored by YCC Many Faces of Chemistry: Careers in Chemistry Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by Committee on Chemists with Disabilities, Committee on Technician Affairs, CMA, YCC, PROF, and PRES The C. Ellen Gonter Environmental Chemistry Awards Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by YCC

The official technical program for the 234th National Meeting is available online at oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/ techprogram/.

DFDFD

YOU WIN!

^sêeSnileL· not a

5 (^ÎMd&uMuU

Missed award banquet

Start Here

LOSE 15

You can't lose with ACS Meetings

POINTS

42nd MWRM

The American Chemical Society has the meet-

KANSAS CITY, MO November 7 - 9

ings you seek. You will find amazing research,

Didn't register early LOSE 2 TURNS

an opportunity to talk with colleagues, to meet the famous and the legendary, and time to network and share ideas. With so many meetings near you. Don't miss this opportunity—you will come out a winner no matter which meeting you attend.

V \

Attend a career workshop

spread across the continent, there must be one

63rd SWRM

4 EXTRA POINTS

LUBBOCK, TX

234th National Meeting

BOSTON, MA August 1 9 - 2 3 www.chemistry.org

Use these travel partners for savings in getting you to and from ACS meetings

November 4 - 7 www.depts.ttu.edu/ chemistry/SWRM07//

AIR TRANSPORTATION

United

American Airlines

(800)521-4041 8 am to 10 pm EST 7 days a week Refer to Meeting Plus Code: 517SM

(800)800-433-1790 8 am to 9 pm EST Refer to Discount Code S19250

Contribute an abstract 8 EXTRA POINTS

AUTO RENTALS

Visit the Exposition Present your research

30 EXTRA POINTS

20th RMRM DENVER, CO August 29 - September 1 www.uwyo.edu/ rmr2007acs-aiche

Avis (800) 331 -1600 www.avis.com Refer toAWD Code: B120799 Hertz (800) 654-2240 www.hertz.com Refer to ID Code: CV# 02UZ0005

7 EXTRA POINTS

41st WRM SAN DIEGO, CA October 10 - 1 3 , 2 0 0 7 . www.wrmacs.org

Attend a poster presentation 20 EXTRA POINTS

59th SERMACS GREENVILLE, SC October 24 - 27 www.sermacs2007.org/

EXPOSITION

RESERVE TIME NOW to visit the ACS National Exposition in Boston. Learn about scientific and industrial trends, discover effective technologies and services, and network with more than 300 companies that serve chemical professionals. Located at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Halls A & Bi, the ACS National Exposition will be open on Monday and Tuesday, Aug. 20-21,9 AM to 5 PM, and Wednesday, Aug. 22,9 AM to 1 PM. Access details at chemistry. org/meetings/boston2007. Product Research. Conduct months' worth of product research in three concentrated days on the exhibit floor. More than 450 booths will showcase services, instruments, publications, computer hardware and scientific software, and a wide array of chromatographic, lab, and safety equipment. Technical personnel will be available to give demonstrations, answer questions, and discuss your specific needs and interests. Internet & Technology. Meeting attendees can utilize free Internet access to check e-mail; correspond with their of-

fices; and access other meeting functions such as the technical program, exhibitor directory, personal scheduler, and registration at the Meeting Mail terminals located throughout the exposition. The Laptop Lane with ports for laptop hookup will also be available on the show floor. Exhibitor Workshops. Many exhibiting companies will host free two-anda-half-hour educational workshops in private rooms at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. Topics range from introducing new products to exploring specific techniques and applications for existing instrumentation. To ensure that you have a seat, register by Aug. 6 at chemistry.org/meetings/boston2007. After Aug. 6, visit the sponsoring company at their booth inside the exposition. Special Events. Continue your networking on the showfloor.Network with your colleagues and vendors in our lounges, participate in prize drawings, purchase professional development books and souvenirs, and pick up your meeting souvenir. All attendees are invited to enjoy treats inside the exposition on Wednes-

day from 10 to 11:30 AM. Look inside your meeting registration credentials for your free ticket. Join us at the C&EN Analytical Pavilion to hear the latest from leaders in the analytical community, identify business trends, and discover new analytical applications. Access details at chemistry, org/analyticalpavilion. Admission Requirements. Exposition admission is complimentary for all national meeting registrants; however, your badge is required to enter the exposition. Individuals who want to visit the exhibits without registering for the technical component of the national meeting can obtain an expo-only badge for $35. Students with school identification can obtain an expo-only badge for $10. Registration can be handled online, by mail, or in person at ACS Registration located in the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, North Lobby, from Saturday through Thursday. ACS Exhibitor Directory. Make the most of your time by creating your personal exposition map using the ACS Exhibitor Directory & ExpoPlanner at acsboston. expoplanner.com.

,MÀU

* ' : noHTta

r«,

«•

^Tt*v

EXPO-1

EXPOSITION!

EXHIBITORS The following list of exhibitors is the property of the American Chemical Society. Any unauthorized use of this list, or any part therof, either directly or indirectly, is strictly pro­ hibited. AAAS/SCIENCE, 1200 New York Avenue, Wash­ ington, DC 20005, 202-326-6417, e-mail: membership@aaas.org, Internet: www.aaas.org The American Association for the Advancement of Science, AAAS, publishes SCIENCE and is the world's largest general scientific society. An inter­ national membership organization, AAAS works to advance science and serve society. AAAS pro­ grams in science policy, international coopera­ tion, and science education help make the world a better place. 413#415 AAPPTec, 6309 Shepherdsville Road, Louisville, KY 40228, 502-968-2223, fax: 502-968-3338, Internet: www.aapptec.com AAPPTec, Advanced Automated Peptide Protein Technologies— Established leader in the field of fully automated, flexible, reliable and proven Peptide Synthesizers for over 20 years for research and industrial scale synthesis. Call AAPTec for Peptide and Organic Synthesizers, Custom Peptides, Resins for pep­ tide research, including surface resins. Reagents and Amino Acids for peptide chemistry, Spirit HPLC Peptide, Protein and Organic Columns and Syringe Filters, Sharp Freeze Dryer, ACTEvap tvaporator/Lyophilizer. AAPPTec—Leader m peptide research and peptide products from syn­ thesis through purification. 1047 AAPS (Amer Assoc, of Pharm Sci.), 2107 Wilson Blvd., #700, Arlington, VA 22201, 703-243-2800, e - m a i l : a a p s @ a a p s . o r q , I n t e r n e t : www. aapspharamceutica.com The American Associa­ tion of Pharmaceutical Scientists is composed of more than 13,000 international scientists who have joined together to serve both society and shared professional interests. AAPS members come from industry, academia, government, and private institutions. Members are engaged in research, teaching, product development, quality control, clinical testing, regulatory affairs, admin­ istration, management, and any other activity having a common denominator of pharmaceuti­ cals and medicinal agents. 365 Abacalab, Inc., 811 N. Franklin Street, Wilming­ ton, DE 19806,877-522-2252, fax: 302-213-9179, e-mail:info@abacalab.com, Internet: http://www. abacalab.com/ Abacalab provides hand-held computing tools for laboratory scientists. The Chemistry Labacus™ 2.0 was released in Summer 2007, bringing Sigma-Aldrich catalog data to the lab in mobile electronic form. Labacus™ stream­ lines structure sketching, chemical calculations and access to reference information in the labo­ ratory. This enables chemists to focus on mean­ ingful experimental work and eliminates data entry busywork. Labacus™ has been adopted in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries and in academia. Labacus™ is distributed by Chemglass, Inc. 1427 Abbott Laboratories, 200 Abbott Park Road, Dept. 0585, Bldg. AP51, Abbott Park, IL 60065, 847-936-6161, fax: 847-938-3280, e-mail: katherine.beardman@abbott.com, Internet: www. Abbott.com Abbott is a global, broad-based health care company devoted to the discovery, development, manufacture and marketing of pharmaceutical and medical products, including nutritionals, devices and diagnostics. The com­ pany employs over 65,000 people and markets products in over 130 countries. 867 Accelrys, 10188 Telesis Court, San Diego, CA 92121, 858-799-5000, fax: 858-799-5100, e-mail: solutions@accelrys.com, Internet: www.accelrys. com Accelrys has been delivering software and

2-EXPO

service solutions to pharmaceutical, biotechnol­ ogy, and industrial chemical research organiza­ tions for over twenty years. With expertise in life and materials science modeling and simulations, informatics, nanotechnology and εαβήϊιΐ^ oper­ ating platform technology, Accelrys' multidisciplinary solutions span the research and development continuum. 819,821 Ace Glass, Inc., 1430 N.W. Blvd., PO Box 688, Vineland, NJ 08360, 800-223-4524, fax: 800-5436752, e-mail:sales@aceglass.com, Internet: www. aceglass.com Ace Glass has been manufacturing innovative research glass and equipment for over 70 years. We have our famous Photochemistry and Ultrasonic products on display for application in Nanotechnology. Ace has the largest display of laboratory glassware at ACS. We are also display­ ing our bench scale glass reactors and equip­ ment. Ace fabricates pilot plant reactors from 150mL up to 300Liters in size and can make cus­ tom pilot plants and other glassware for various applications. We will have several large scale Pilot Plants on display. Ace will also feature our new DynaBloc systems and Radleys reaction blocks. Ace will also feature Instatherm, Chromatography and Vacuum Equipment and many other new products. We will display products from Lauda, Heidolph, Corning, IKA and Julabo. 227 ACS Chemlnsight, 1155 16th Street NW, Wash­ ington, DC 20036, 202-872-6349, fax: 202-8726336, e-mail:Chemlnsiqht@acs.org, Internet: www.Chemlnsight.org Chemlnsiqht is a scientific expert matching service of ACS, providing experts in chemistry and allied sciences to solve problems in law ana business. Experts are invited to register their profiles at our website, so that firms seeking their expertise can contact them. A National Directory of Experts will also be pub­ lished and distributed to over 60,000 business, legal and forensic accounting firms to further open contact and engagement opportunities for registered experts. 635 ACS Diversity Programs, 1155 16th Street, NW, Room 0-1116, Washington, DC 20036, 202-8726334, fax: 202-776-8003, e-mail:f_dixon@acs.org, We encourage you to take advantage of the many resources available within the ACS Depart­ ment of Diversity Programs! Visit the diversity booth for information about scholarships, profes­ sional development programs, recognition pro­ grams, networking opportunities, and member resources, which are all essential to ensure a poof of talented future chemists. Members of the fol­ lowing ACS committees will be at the booth: Chemists with Disabilities, Minority Affairs, Women Chemists Committee, Technician Affairs, and Younger Chemists, as well as the depart­ ment's staff. Free gifts will also be available! 634 ACS Education, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washing­ ton, DC 20036, Internet: chemistry.org/education The Education Division of the American Chemical Society has products and programs for kindergar­ ten through professional education. Students, teachers, and ACS members can all find informa­ tion that can help their efforts in increasing sci­ ence literacy. We also have information on the Directory of Graduate Education (DGR) and the ACS Approval Program for undergraduate pro­ grams. Our booth is staffed with knowledgeable ACS staff who can answer questions regarding our wide variety of programs and products. 636 ACS Meetings & Expositions, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036, 800-227-5558, fax: 202-872-6128, e-mail:reglmtgs@acs.org, Inter­ net: www.chemistry.org/meetinqs Get informa­ tion on opportunities available at 2008 ACS National Meetings & Expositions in New Orleans, LA (April 6-10) & Philadelphia, PA (August 17-21). Meet members planning 2007-2008 ACS Regional Meetings and collect information on presenting, participating, exhibiting, and spon­ soring. Advance registration is open for all fall meetings, and abstracts programs for several. Attendees will enjoy cutting-edge programming & networking with colleagues. All abstracts appear on CAS, and ACS Books is adding

regional meeting symposia to the ACS Sympo­ sium Series. o37 ACS Member Insurance, 1155 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036,800-227-5558, fax: 6037, e-mail:memins@acs.org, Internet: www. chemistry.org/insurance The ACS Member Insur­ ance Program offers a variety of plans to fit your needs. The plans which are affordable, portable and convenient are designed with you in mind. Members can select plans that best fit their needs from Term Life Insurance, 10 Year Level Term, Hospital Indemnity, Disability Income, Accidental Death & Dismemberment, Long Term Care, Auto & Homeowners Plus, Professional Liability, Short Term Medical, Excess Major Medical and the Health Insurance Brokerage Service. 927 ACS OLGA, 1155 16th St. NW, Washington, DC 20036, 202-872-4386, Internet: www.chemistry. org/government Stop by for your chance at a prize!!! Working with American Chemical Society members, the ACS Office of Legislative and Gov­ ernment Affairs promotes public policy that advance the chemical enterprise and its practition­ ers. Strong member participation ensures that chemists are heard in the development of laws, regulations, and key programs. The government affairs booth gives ACS members the opportunity to learn about ACS's Legislative Action Network, Local Section Government Affairs Committees, Policy Fellowships, and more. 931 ACS Publications, 1155 16th Street, N.W., Wash­ ington, DC 20036, Partner with the ACS Cycle of Excellence and enjoy the prestige and benefits of contributing as an author, editor, or reviewer. Visit the ACS Publications booth for outstanding presen­ tations and learn about the new ACS Nano journal, the international forum for discovering and publish­ ing the best full-length articles in nanoscience and nanotechnogy. Get full details on the exciting new AuthorChoice option that offers you unrestricted web access to your published article. Also featured will be the expanding ACS Legacy Archives that provides you with more than 3 million pages of original, essential chemistry dating back to the first issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. At the C&EN section of the booth, you can explore Chemjobs, C&EN advertising ben­ efits and C&EN Online-the auickest way to get breaking news in the chemical industry. Print cop­ ies of the latest issues are also available. 527 ACS Store, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036, 800-ACS-5558, fax: 202-872-6067, e-mail:acsstore@acs.org, Internet: www. chemistry.org/store Visit the ACS store to pur­ chase chemistry-themed items such as t-shirts, beaker mugs, the famous "Mole" dolls, and our fun new beach towel. Don't forget to pick-up your commemorative national meeting pin, an ACS Store exclusive. At this booth you can also see presentations from ACS tour speakers, take your picture with the ACS mole and learn about the Salutes to Excellence program and what is planned for this year's National Chemistry Week 20th Anniversary celebration. You can also buy merchandise online. 727 ACS Web Presence, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036, The American Chemical Society is reinventing your online experience! Chemistry.org is undergoing a major revitalization, and the updated website is scheduled to launch in the third quarter of this year. Visit the Web Presence team in Boston to find out what you can expect to see in the first release of the new website. We will share the top improvements that will help you get the most out of your new online experience. At our booth, you will be able to test drive the new visual design and learn how we are overhauling content on the site so you can find and retrieve information better than before. Our goal is to provide a faster and easier way for you to get access to information from ACS when you need it. Stop by our booth and attend our events to experience web fitness in action. We are gearing up, training and getting ready for Launch Day! 627

Vdesis, Inc., 27 McCullough Drive, New Castle, )E 19720, 302-323-4880, fax: 302-323-4879, !-mail:sbaylis-powell@adesisinc.com, Internet: wvw.adesisinc.com Adesis, Inc. is a chemistry)ased contract research organization (CRO) ocusing on the expedient syntheses of bioactive mall molecules, from mg to kgs. The company, η confidential collaborations with life science :ompanies, conducts projects for the discovery \nd synthesis of investigational bioactive mol­ ecules; molecular scaffolds; building blocks and \dvance intermediates; reference standards competitor drugs and investigational agents); md early stage proof-of-concept (POP) projects ο validate biological hypotheses. We also pro­ vide in-stock advanced intermediates for medici)al chemists (pyridines, azaindoles, etc.). 1326 advanced Chemistry Development Inc., 110 'onge Street, 14th Floor, Toronto, ON, CANADA /I5C 1T4, 416-368-3435, fax: 416-368-5596, !-mail:info@acdlabs.com, Internet: www.acdlabs. :om Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc., ACD/Labs) serves chemical, pharmaceutical, aca­ demic and government institutions worldwide vith cutting-edge software that facilitates deciion-making and helps to streamline research and development efforts. Our solutions for scientists \nd managers include fast and accurate predicion of molecular physical properties, property>ased structure design, metabolite identification, ^reformulation, analytical data processing and nterpretation, chemical nomenclature, and •hemical databasing. 1026 advanced Electron Beams, 301 Ballardvale itreet, Wilmington, MA 01887, 978-658-8600, !Xt. 211, fax: 978-658-7999, e-mail: jepstein@ ieb.com, Internet: www.aeb.com Advanced Elecron Beams offers compact, cost effective, low energy electron beam technology for Curing and J olymer Treatment, Sterilization, and Pollution \batement applications. AEB's unique approach ο electron beams enables highly efficient and iexible integration into in-line production pro­ cesses. With a highly scalable solution, AEB sup­ ports customers from R&D to pilot to production. 249 advantage Business Media, 100 Enterprise Dr., iuite 600, Box 912, Rockaway, NJ 07866, Interlet: www.advantagebusinessmedia.com Advanaqe Business Media—A leading publisher of nformation used by the scientific K&D commu­ nity. Journals include: LABORATORY EQUIP­ MENT, annual supplier directories, market or echnology supplements, newsletters, Internet>ased publications and online trade shows. FREE ubscriptions are available. 1138 Vdvion, 19 Brown Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850, 607166-9162, fax: 607-257-5761, e-mail:info@ dvion.com, Internet: www.advion.com Advion is ι premier provider of bioanalytical services and inovators of microfluidic devices for the life sci­ ences. Advion will feature its TriVersa NanoMate, he latest development in automated nanoelecrospray to combine LC/MS, fraction collection \nd chip-based infusion into one system. Advion vill also showcase the MinuteMan, a modular, liqlid flow based microchemistry system with the \bility to combine both microscale and macrocale process steps for high yield of multiple PET ompounds in two minutes. 1241 Agilent Technologies, 2850 Centerville Road, Vilmington, DE 19808, 800-227-9770, fax: 302•33-8916, Internet: www.agilent.com/chem \giient is a leading provider of life sciences and \na\ytical instrument systems to scientists in life ciences, pharmaceutical, environmental and •hemical industries, worldwide. The company )ffers scientists the range of instruments induci­ ng LC-MS, HPLC, Bioanalyzer, Micro array soluions, ICP-MS, GC, and GC-MS systems, as well is services needed for success in acquiring and iterpreting genetic and chemical information— rom sample handling, to analysis to data man­ agement and reporting. 1203 Agilent Technologies AFM, 4330 W. Chandler ilvd., Chandler, AZ 85226, 480-756-5900, fax:

480-756-5950, e-mail:afm-info@agilent.com, Internet: www.aqilent.com/find/afm Agilent Technologies oners a wide range of highprecision atomic force microscopes (AFM) to meet your unique research needs. Agilent's highly configurable instruments allow you to expand the system's capabilities with industryleading environmental/ temperature systems and fluid handling that enables superior control for electrochemistry, material science, polymer and life-science applications. Agilent delivers excep­ tional worldwide support, provided by experi­ enced AFM application scientists and technical service personnel. 1205 Ahura Scientific, Inc., 46 Jonspin Rd., Wilming­ t o n , MA 0 1 8 8 7 , 9 7 8 - 6 4 2 - 2 5 6 2 , e - m a i l : kcookinham@ahurascientific.com, Internet: www. ahurascientific.com. 427 Air Science USA, 610 Center Road, Ft. Myers, FL 33919, 239-489-0024, fax: 239-489-0922, e-mail: INFO@AIR-SCIENCE.COM, Internet: www.airscience.com Air Science USA offers a range of products designed to protect laboratory person­ nel and/or samples. Whether you are using auto­ mated equipment, handling chemical powders, biological hazards, or require a clean air environ­ ment, Air Science can provide the total solution. Our ductless fume hoods with fully automated filter saturation detection systems and back-up safety filters enable us to conform to all relevant safety standards. Some of our products include PCR Workstations, downflow benches, acid hoods, weighing enclosures and laminar flow and biological safety cabinets. 1312 AirClean Systems, 3248 Lake Woodard Dr., Raleigh, NC 27604, 919-255-3220, fax: 919-2556120, e-mail:info@aircleansystems.com, Internet: www.aircleansystems.com Ductless fume hood technology since 1992. Manufacturer of polypro­ pylene ductless fume hoods, powder-weigning enclosures, and laminar flow workstations. AirClean Systems® offers the widest range of appli­ cation capability due to filter capacity, innovative safety features, and construction material. Appli­ cation-specific products for your needs, shipped fully-assembled and manufactured in the USA. 1308 Akzo Nobel/EKAf 281 Fields Lane, Brewster, NY 10509, 845-276-8223, fax: 845-277-1406, e-mail: pat.preuss@eka.com, Internet: www.kromasil. com Kromasil® is a spherical silica media for ana­ lytical to process-scale HPLC applications. Kromasil has superior mechanical and chemical stability with high available surface area. Products include Kromasil 100À as Silica, C4, C8, C18, Phenyl and Amino; Kromasil 60À as Silica, Diol and Cyano; Kromasil 300Â; Chiral phases as TBB, DMB and the new Cellulose based CelluCoat phase. 1043 Aldrich/Sigma-Aldrich, 6000 N. Teutonia Avenue, Milwaukee, Wl 53209, 414-438-3850, e-mail:sandy.adam@sial.com, Internet: sigmaaldrich.com Aldrich/Sigma-Aldrich provides over 85,000 chemicals and17,000 laboratory equipment items, including materials for your Chemical Synthesis, Materials Science and Drug Discovery. Learn about our heterocyclic building blocks for Organic and Medicinal chemistry, and pick up new literature on asymmetric synthesis, ionic liquids, and nanotechnology. Visit oour website and use our improved substructure search tool or browse over 1 million pages of technical information. 519,521 Alfa Aesar-A Johnson M a t t h e y Co., 26 Parkridqe Road, Ward Hill, MA 01835, 800-3430660, -fax: 800-322-4757, e-mail:info@alfa.com, Internet: www.alfa.com Alfa Aesar is a leading manufacturer and supplier of research chemicals, metals and materials. With nearly 30,000 products, Alfa Aesar is your source for small pack sizes for research as well as semi-bulk and bulk quantities. New literature is available covering new life science product lines, including agars and agaroses, culture media for molecular biology and peptones for molecular biology. Many other interesting new compounds have been added, including

boronic acids, hypervalent iodine reagents and a new range of macromolecules 418,420 Alputon Inc., 1479 Zhangheng Rd., Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park, Shanghai 201203, CHINA, 86-215137-0700, fax: 86-21-5132-3311, e-mail:libingyu@ alputon.com, Internet: www.alputon.com World class technology platform for parallel synthesis and through put MS-triggered HPLC purification of compound libraries, dedicated for nit generation, hit •follow-up and lead optimization of drug discovery. Experienced scientific teams with proven track record in biotech and pharmaceutical industry. Over 25,000 s. feet of the state of the art facility for discovery chemistry, process chemistry and bioanalytical chemistry. It will be expanded to 120,000 s.feet by end of 2007. Unparalleled capabilities and capacity, top quality and uniquesness but competitive price! 350 American Laboratory (Intl Sci Com), 30 Controls Dr., Shelton, CT 06484, 203-926-9300, fax: 203926-9310, e-mail:iscpubs@iscpubs.com, Internet: www.iscpubs.com Our publications are edited for North American chemists and life scientists for the application of instrumentation to analytical chemistry, bio-analysis and applied spectroscopy. Editorial includes application notes, technical articles, and information on current laboratory instrumentation. St. Andrews conducts research which serves an international group of clients who are seeking reliable marketing intelligence to help them make critical sales and marketing decisions. 1060 American Peptide Company Inc., 777 East Evelyn Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, 800-926-8272, fax: 408-733-7604, e-mail:sales@amehcanpeptide. com, Internet: www.americanpeptide.com American Peptide Company, Inc. (APC) offers comprehensive selections of pre-manufactured catalog peptides in convenient aliquots, a complete spectrum of non-GMP custom synthesis services from array screens to mg and kg of researchgrade peptides, and full-scale cGMP manufacturing of pharmaceutical-grade peptides for clinical studies. Our newest large-scale cGMP peptide manufacturing plant is located in Vista, California. With offices in the USA, Japan, and China, APC is dedicated to delivering high-quality peptides to pharmaceutical and biotech companies. 1114 Ametek, 801 S. Illinois Ave., Oak Ridge, TN 37831. 1402 Analogix, Inc., 171 Industrial Dr., Burlington, Wl 53105, 262-767-9111, fax: 262-767-1879, e-mail: sales@ana-logix.com, Internet: www.ana-loqix. com Analogix, Inc. manufactures innovative flash purification instruments, consumables, and accessories. Our instrument performance and quality consumables have helped establish us as a leader in the drug discovery industry. In collaboration with Interchim in Europe, we also provide fine chemicals and HPLC product solutions. Visit the Analogix, Inc. booth to find out the benefits of our excellent products and services. 661,663 Anasazi Instruments Inc., 4101 Cashard Ave., Suite 103, Indianapolis, IN 46203, 317-783-4126, fax: 317-783-7083, e-mail:sales@aiinmr.com, Internet: www.aiinmr.com Anasazi Instruments manufactures NMR spectrometers using 60 and 90MHz permanent magnets. The Eft FT-NMR spectrometer is a rugged, reliable and easy to use NMR instrument and is ideal for chemical education and basic research. The Eft can be configured for 1H, 13C or multinuclear observation (19F, 31P-29SÎ). The high performance of the Eft instrument is achieved using automated shim and calibration procedures, eliminating the need for an NMR expert to maintain the instrument. The Eft runs most 1D/2D FTNMR methods. 538 AnaSpec Inc., 2149 O' Toole Avenue, San Jose, CA 95131, 408-452-5055, fax: 408-452-5059, e-mail:service@anaspec.com, Internet: www. anaspec.com AnaSpec, Inc. is a leading provider of integrated proteomics solutions™ for worldwide life science research. With a vision for innovation through synergy, AnaSpec offers expertise in three primary technologies: peptides, detection reagents, and combinatorial chemistry. 1028

EXPO-3

EXPOSITION Anton Paar USA, 10215 Timber Ridge Drive, Ashland, VA 23005, 800-722-7556, fax: 804-5509074, e-mail:info.us@anton-paar.com, Internet: www.anton-paar.com Anton Paar is the world leader in several areas of scientific instrumentation. Density Measurement, Rheology, Viscometry and Microwave Synthesis are the main areas of our business. Located in Richmond, Virginia with offices all over the US, we provide sales and application support to our customers. A special focus is set on after sales support and service with a factory trained team of engineers and scientists to safeguard your investment. 1236,1238 Apollo Scientific Ltd., Bredbury, Stockport, Cheshire, SK6 2QR, UNITED KINGDOM. 662 Apple Computer, Inc., One Infinite Loop, MS303-3CE, Cupertino, CA 95014, 408-9961010, Internet: www.apple.com Apple ignited the personal computer revolution in the 1970s with the Apple II and reinvented the personal computer in the 1980s with the Macintosh. Today, Apple continues to lead the industry in innovation with its award-winning computers, OS X operating system and iLife and professional applications. Apple is also spearheading the digital media revolution with its iPod portable music and video players and iTunes online store, and will enter the mobile phone market this year with its revolutionary iPhone. 1151 Aries Filterworks, 160 Cooper Rd., West Berlin, NJ 08091, 856-768-9600, fax: 856-768-9601, e-mail:aries@resintech.com, Internet: www. arieswater.com Aries Filterworks—Manufactures Ultrapure Type I water systems, general deionization units and water purification cartridges for the scientific community. Replacement cartridges fit most major brands of water systems. The Gemini Ultrapure water system incorporates Multipass UV and microprocessor controlled dispensing function for the most critical applications. Aries Filterworks, a division of ResinTech, Inc., is intimate with the core technology of deionization. Products are made in the USA using ResinTech's premium resins, carbons, and specialty médias. 1328 Asahi Spectra Co., Ltd., Gardenia Bldg. 4F, 2-13-1, Kamijujo, Kita-Ku, Tokyo, JAPAN 1140034, 81-33-909-1151, fax: 81-33-909-1152, e-mail:info@asahi-spectra.com, Internet: www. asahi-spectra.com Asahi Spectra manufactures precise optical filters and Xenon Light Sources. MAX-301, 300W xenon light source achieves no heat illumination with your desirable wavelength. The combination of our proprietary mirror module and bandpass filter brings high power illumination in UV range for you. Especially, the MAX301 is most suitable for UV illumination, chemical reaction, photochromic research, fluorescence illumination, and any material lighting related to Chemical research because of its heatless and monochromatic light. 640 ASDI Inc., 601 Interchange Blvd., Newark, DE 19711, 302-266-6891 x114, fax: 302-266-8296, e-mail:rbroadrup@asdi.net, Internet: www. asdi.net ASDI Inc., established in 1988, is a premier provider of research-enabling technologies and products. ASDI has considerable synthetic chemistry expertise in providing intermediate scale custom synthesis, hit-to-lead expansion, and lead generation libraries. Product lines include HTS, building block, and fragment screening collections. Our ability to provide analytical and materials management services enables acceleration of the research process. 163 Asemblon, Inc., 15340 NE 92nd Street, Suite B, Redmond, WA 98052, 425-558-5100, fax: 425869-1836, e-mail:bnorton@asemblon.com, Internet: www.asemblon.com Asemblon specializes in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Asemblon synthesizes high-purity alkanethiols and has an R&D project to store hydrogen covalently bonded in a proprietary liquid. Asemblon was founded by several of the world's foremost SAMs experts such as Dr. Buddy Ratner who heads our Scientific Advisory Boardf. Our staff has 30 years

4-EXPO

of combined experience in surface science and self-assembly. Rely on Asemblon's SAMs experience for a wide variety of surfaces and chemistries. 337 Astatech Inc., Keystone Business Park, 2525 Pearl Buck Road, Bristol, PA 19007, 215-7853197, fax: 216-785-2656, e-mail:xqwu@astatechinc. com, Internet: www.astatechinc.com AstaTech, Inc. provides high-value pharmaceutical intermediates and services including custom synthesis and manufacturing, and contract R&D. We have served pharmaceutical/biotech industries worldwide through our optimal global value chain out of US, Canada and China for over 9 years. We specialize in the building block compounds (BBCs) of advanced unnatural amino acids and derivatives, N-based heterocyclic compounds such as pyrrolidines, piperidines, piperazines, pyrimidines, indoles, quinolines, thiazoles and azetidines, and specialty boronic acids. We can supply them from grams to metric tons. 552 Asylum Research, 6310 Hollister Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93117, 805-696-6466, fax: 805-6966444, e-mail:sales@asylumresearch.com, Internet: www.asylumResearch.com Asylum Research manufactures advanced Atomic Force/Scanninq Probe Microscopes for many applications including material and life science, polymers, physics, chemistry and more. Featured is the MFP-3D AFM with sensored-closed loop operation in all three axes for low noise and precise measurements. Top and bottom optical access allow simultaneous AFM and advanced optical capabilities. Built-in features include nanolithography and advanced 3D rendering. Environmental accessories include the PolyHeater, BioHeater, Closed Fluid Cell, Humidity Sensor. Ask us about the new Nanolndenter. 1134 Aureus Pharma, 174, quai de Jemmapes, Paris, FRANCE 75010, 33-14-018-5757, fax: 33-14-0185758, e-mail:info@aureus-pharma.com, Internet: www.aureus-pharma.com Aureus Pharma delivers a novel solution combining a knowledge management system with data mined from the scientific literature to accelerate new drug discovery. Aureus Pharma offers pharmaceutical researchers structured AurSCOPE knowledge databases containing biological and chemical information related to pharmaceutical^ important themes. Current knowledge databases include GPCR, Ion Channel, Kinase, hERG Channel and ADME/ Drug-Drug Interactions. These knowledge databases can be accessed by AurQUEST a web based user interface. 215 Automated Sample Prep—ASP, 58 Felton Street, Waltham, MA 02453, 781-788-8118, fax: 781-891-6665, e-mail:onlineinfo@fms-inc.com, Internet: http://www.automated-sample-prep, com Power-Sep protein Purification System, small or large scale purification. Flow rates .02ml-1000 ml/min. Real time plotting of pH, UV, Conductivity. Fully programmable Pressurized Extraction system. This high pressure system allows multiple pressure and temperature set points to be programmed in the same run. Automated pHstat allows multiple set points to be programmed in one run. Real time plotting of pH, Temperature and reaction rate. 1434 Avantium Technologies BV, Zekeringstraat 29, Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS 1014 BV, 31-20-586-8080, fax: 31-20-586-8085, e-mail: info@avantium.com, Internet: www.avantium. com Avantium provides innovative highthroughput experimentation services and technologies that enable customers to maximize the return on their R&D. A distinctive line of equipment has evolved out of our workflow: Crystal 16™—A desktop parallel crystallizer for medium-throughput crystallization studies. Flowrence™—A parallel fixed bed reactor system suited for gas and liquid phase, as well as trickle flow operation. Block96™—A modular highpressure reactor station that can be used for parallel screening of catalyst and process parameters for pharmaceutical, agrochemical and fine chemical companies. 937

B8cWTek, Inc., 19 Shea Way, Suite 301, Newark, DE 19713, 302-368-7824, fax: 302-368-7830, e-mail:meqk@bwtek.com, internet: www.bwtek. com Leader in performance-to-cost spectrometers and lasers for real world applications. Stateof-the-art portable Raman spectrometers and VisNIR diffuse reflectance spectrophotometers. Low cost CCD, PDA, InGaAs and PbS array spectrometers in 200-2900nm wavelength range. DPSS lasers, high power diode lasers in 355-2000nm. Narrow linewidth and stablized CleanLaze™ lasers at 785nm and custom wavelengths for Raman spectroscopy. Fiber optic light sources and accessories also available. B&WTek, Inc. also provides OEM manufacturing in ISO 9001/13485 environment. 352 BACHEM, 3700 Horizon Drive, King of Prussia, PA 19406, 610-239-0300, fax: 610-239-0800, e-mail:sales@usbachem.com, Internet: www. bachem.com Bachem is an independent company specializing in the production of peptides ana other biochemicals. Products offered include enzyme substrates and inhibitors, amino acid derivatives, peptide antibodies and immunoassay kits. Services include cGMP manufacturing, bulk production, as well as custom peptide, organic, cytotoxic and cytostatic molecule production. With multiple cGMP compliant facilities, Bachem is an ideal partner for API manufacturing. Bachem, located worldwide, works on a global scale and holds a leading position in its field. 913 Bentham Science Publishing, P.O. Box 446, Oak Park, IL 60301-0446, 708-308-4203, fax: 312-9967107, e-mail:morrissy@bentham.org, Internet: www.bentham.org Bentham Science are publishers of over 80 expert titles of interest to the pharmaceutical, medical and bio-medical research community. We are happy to offer your institution a FREE online trial to all titles. For information, visit our stand, online, or contact sales@bentham. org. 431,433 Berghof/America, 3773 NW 126th Avenue, Building 1, Coral Springs, FL 33065, 800-5445004, fax: 954-344-2008, e-mail:berghof@ berghofusa.com, Internet: www.berghofusa.com PFA Bottles. Acid Purification/Distillation Apparatus with all exposed parts to the medium offluoropolymers. Fluoropolymer Microwave Digestion Systems with pressure controlled venting, for small sample prep in acid resistant, noncontaminating vessel. World's only High Pressure Reaction Vessels with complete fluoropolymer lining (cap and vessel). Fluoropolymer Labware, Cap Liners, Fittings, Self Adhesive Bench Protectors, Stirrers, Sleeves, Adapters, Filters, Heaters, Tubing, Film, Sheet, Rod. Tedlar and FEP Gas Sampling Bags. Fluoropolymer custom machining, fabrication and coating. 1029 Bio-Rad, Informatics Division, Two Penn Center Plaza, Suite 800, 1500 John F. Kennedy Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19102-1737, 267-322-6931, fax: 267-322-6932, e-mail:informatics.usa@bio-rad. com, Internet: www.knowitall.com AwardWinning Software & Database Solutions for: Spectroscopy—KnowltAll spectral data management, searching, processing, analysis, Sadtler Spectra NMR, IR, Raman, MS, NIR. Metabolomics—from raw data processing to biomarker identification Chemometrics, Cneminformatics, Structure Drawing & Publishing (ChemWindow) In Silico ADME/Tox Profiling, Lead Optimization, Med Chem. Find out about the new KnowltAll U, a resource enabling campus-wide access to over 1.2 million spectra (NMR, IR, UV-Vis, Raman, MS) and software tools for spectroscopy, cheminformatics, chemometrics. 1012,1014 Bio-Rad, Life Sciences, 2000 Alfred Nobel Dr., Hercules, CA 94547, 510-741-5052, e-mail:olqa_ padilla@bio-rad.com, Bio-Rad Laboratories offers a full line of instruments and consumables for the life science researcher. Visit our booth and see our full line of products for use in Genomics, Proteomics, and Process Chromatography. 863

Bioanalytical Systems, Inc., 2701 Kent Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47906, 765-463-4527, fax: 764-497-1102, e-mail:basi@bioanalytical.com, Internet: www.bioanalytical.com BASi is a pioneer in the development and manufacture of unique instruments for electrochemistry and licjuid chro­ matography, serving academia and industry. Pri­ mary is trie pc-controlled Epsilon, available in sev­ eral configurations, including a 4-channel potentiostat for use as an EC detector for LC and a single-chanel potentiostat/galvanostat ideal for cyclic voltammetry and other EC techniques. BASi also has a substantial contract research organization serving the pharmaceutical industry.

BioMed Central, Middlesex House, 34-42 Cleve­ land Street, London, UNITED KINGDOM W1T 4LB, 44-20-7323-0323, fax: 44-20-7631-9926, e-mail:info@chemistrycentral.com, Internet: www.chemistrycentral.com Chemistry Central, launched August 2006, is an independent pub­ lishing platform providing immediate free access to peer-reviewed research in all fields of chemical sciences. Chemistry Central Journal is divided into 55 subjects, edited by senior chemists who form the Editorial Advisory Board. Articles are open access (universally accessible online without charge). Authors retain copyright to their work. Costs to publish in Chemistry Central journals are covered by article processing charges, typically paid by the author's institution/funder. 1245 Biotage, 1725 Discovery Drive, Charlottesville, VA 22911, 434-979-2319, fax: 434-979-4743, e-mail:info@biotage.com, Internet: www.biotage. com Biotage offers the largest range of innova­ tive and integrated discovery chemistry tools for synthesis, work-up, purification, evaporation and analysis. With solutions for research and develop­ ment through clinical trials and manufacturing, Biotage focuses on removing process bottlenecks using automation, while improving success rates with reproducible results. This scope of expertise is unique to Biotage and allows us to offer unprecedented customer service and technical support. 903 Blue Flame Technology, 431 Kentucky La., Fairview, TX, USA 75069, 972-562-0004, fax: 972562-9896, e-mail:bft@blueflametech.com, Inter­ net: www.blueflametech.com We specialize in designing quartz burners. We fabricate Surface mix and Premix burners, from 1 to 300 jets. They are designed to deliver hiqh energy levels and ultra high purity flame. Mounting systems are available for our quartz burners. We assist our clients in choosing a burner, best suited for their individual application. Consultinq services are also, available. Please visit our website. 1260 BookFactory, 2302 S. Edwin C. Moses Blvd., Dayton, OH 45408, 937-226-7100, fax: 614-3885635, e-mail: sales@bookfactory.com, Internet: www.bookfactory.com BookFactory is a leading producer of standard and custom laboratory notebooks and loq books. Find out why 9 of the world's top 12 pharmaceutical companies buy from us. With design, printing, and binding all in-house, we make your custom archival quality lab books and log books extremely fast. Find out why everyone is switching to BookFactory. With offices in Dayton, OH, and London, UK we can serve your global needs. 1421 Borochem SAS, Immeuble Emergence, 7, rue Alfred Kastler, 14000 Caen, FRANCE, 33-231 9 4 5 0 7 3 , fax: 3 3 - 2 3 - 1 4 6 2 6 5 1 , e - m a i l : info@borochem.fr, Internet: www.borochem.fr Borochem designs, develops and manufactures innovative and exclusive organoboron building blocks particularly for medicinal chemistry and parallel synthesis laboratories. International phar­ maceutical, cosmetic, biotechnological, agrochemical industries and catalogue companies are our main customers. Our core products are boronic acids and esters, boro-ammo acids and halogeno heterocyclic compounds. BoroChem

also provides custom synthesis and contract research. Our production capabilities are avail­ able from milligram for complex molecules to kilo scale. All our products are rigorously analyzed for purity. Analyses include GC-Mass, LC-MS and NMR in-house. 238 Boron Molecular, P.O. Box 12592, Res. Triangle Park, NC 27709, 919-981-4441, fax: 919-9814442, e-mail:sales@boronmolecular-usa.com, Internet: www.boronmolecular.com Boron Molecular is a specialist fine chemicals manufac­ turing company providing building-block com­ pounds, focusinq on boronic acids, boronic esters, biaryls, cubanes and specialist chemistry services to the global pharmaceutical, biotech­ nology, fine chemicals and materials markets. Boron Molecular has the capacity to supply its products from grams to multi-kilogram quantities and is committed to providing value to its cus­ tomers through its extensive range of differenti­ ated products, dependable quality, competitive pricing and excellent customer service. 202 BrandTech Scientific, 11 Bokum Road, Essex, CT 06426, 860-767-2562, fax: 860-767-2563, Inter­ net: www.brandtech.com BrandTech Scientific supplies liquid handling devices, corrosionresistant oil-free vacuum pumps, and stainless steel support jacks. Products include the Dispensette® dispensers; Transferpette® pipettes; and VACUUBRAND® self-adjusting vacuum sys­ tems that require no preprogramming. New products include electronic pipettes; PFA labware for trace analysis; Class A plastic volumetric labware, and disposable UV-transparent solventresistant cuvettes. 561 Breakpoint Books & More, 26761 Royalton Rd., Columbia Station, OH 44028, 800-968-9622, fax: 440-236-5686, e-mail:dave@breakpointbooks. com, Internet: http://chemistry.org/meetings/ boston2007 Network and purchase publications that may assist you in developing soft skills nec­ essary to excel in the workplace. 160 Brinkmann Instruments, Inc., One Cantiague Road, Westbury, NY 11590-0207, 516-334-7500, fax: 516-334-7521, e-mail:info@brinkmann.com, Internet: www.brinkmann.com Brinkmann Instru­ ments in partnership with its global suppliers presents its latest products. We offer a compre­ hensive line of potentiometric and Karl Fisher titrators, from basic dedicated units to fully auto­ mated, computerized systems. We also offer pH/ion meters, colorimeters, electrodes, and spray drying equipment. Our electrochemistry products include Metrohm Voltammetry/Trace Analysis systems and CVS Analysis in addition to the EcoChemie product line of Potentiostats/ Galvanostats and Surface Plasmon Resonance systems. Further featured products are Heidolph bench top and Industrial Rotary Evaporators and Process Chemistry Workstations, Lauda heating and cooling circulators, chillers, Integral XT circu­ lators for reactor chemistry, Kinematica Polytron Homogenizers, overhead stirrers, Radleys Discov­ ery Technologies Carousel Reaction Stations and heating blocks and Tornado stirring devices, AirClean Fume Enclosures. 943,945,947 Brookfield Engineering, 11 Commerce Boule­ vard, Middleboro, MA 02346. 246 Brookhaven Instruments, 750 Blue Point Road, Holtsville, NY 11742-1832, 631-758-3200, fax: 631-758-3255, e-mail:info@bic.com, Internet: www.bic.com Innovative instrumentation for par­ ticle, polymer, and protein characterization. Fea­ tured instruments include particle size, zeta potential, and molecular weight analyzers. All instruments include easy-to-use, leadinq-edge software. For size measurement, use our dynamic light scattering (DLS) and disc-centrifuqe instru­ ments. Eliminate electro-osmotic effects with Brookhaven Instruments zeta potential analyzers. Measure zeta potential by particle electrophore­ sis and phase analysis. Use Brookhaven Instru­ ments for polymer solution characterization,

including determination of absolute molecular weight by static light scattering. 203 Brooks/Cole, Thomson, 10 Davis Drive, Belmont, CA 94002, 650-595-2350, e-mail:valerie. leonhardt@thomson.com, Internet: www. thomsonedu.com/chemistry Brooks/Cole, an imprint of Thomson Learning, is your premier Chemistry publisher—providing materials for every way you teach and every way students learn. Our complete list of products reflects our commitment to providing the best and most innovative resources for instructors and students. To experience some of our cutting-edqe prod­ ucts, such as OWL, ThomsonNow, and classroom response technology, please stop by our booth or visit our website. 1003,1005 Bruker, 19 Fortune Drive, Billerica, MA 01821, 1-888-4BRUKER, BRUKER AXS provides Advanced X-ray Solutions in chemical, materials and life sciences, including industry-leading small molecule CCD systems with highest sensitivity for protein crystallography. BRUKER BIOSPIN designs, manufactures and distributes enabling life science and analytical research tools based on magnetic resonance core technology. Technol­ ogy platforms include NMR, EPR, pre-clinical MRl and superconducting magnets. BRUKER DALTONICS is a leading supplier of innovative life science tools based on mass spectrometry. Small molecule exact mass capability with MicroTOF, MicroTOF Q (Qq TOF) and other MS technolo­ gies including MALDl-TOF/TOF, high capacity ion trapand Q-q-FTMS, BRUKER OPTICS offers FT-IR, N-NIR and Raman spectrometers for qual­ ity control, raw material identification as well as research applications. 1119 Buchi Corporation, 19 Lukens Drive, Suite 400, New Castle, DE 19720, 302-652-3000, fax: 302652-8777, e-mail:bassano.m@buchi.com, Inter­ net: www.mybuchi.com Dedicated to reliability, automation and safety, products include Vacuum systems, Syncore synthesis systems, Spray drying, Spray chilling, Melting point systems, Flash and Preparative chromatography, Soxhlet extractors, Automated Kjeldahl systems and FT-NIR systems as well as a range of Support Solutions from Method development, Application support and direct Buchi® Service Department. 1351 Buck Scientific, 58 Fort Point Street, East Norwalk, CT 06855, 800-562-5566, fax: 203-8530256, e-mail:sales@bucksci.com, Internet: www. bucksci.com BUCK Scientific is a renowned Primary manufacturer of compact, efficient and economical Analytical Instruments for all Applica-. tions from basic Testing to advanced Research. Unique "Stable-Beam" AAS (the ONLY one made in America!), D2-Corrected Cold-Vapor Mercury, the World's only Top-Loading Microwave Sys­ tems, hiqh-Performance IR, Colorimeters to HiRes UV-vis Spectrophotometers, Fluorometers and all configurations for GC / HPLC comprise the most COMPLETE Lab selection from the Biggest Little Instrument Company left in America! 615 C Technologies Inc., 757 Route 202/206, Bridgewater, Ν J 08807, 908-707-1009, fax: 908-7071030, e-mail:mvemieri@ctechnologiesinc.com, Internet: www.ctechnologiesinc.com C Technolo­ gies designs and manufacturers Fiber Optic Devices for UV/Vis analysis. Our latest device, Solo VPE, enables users to dynamically vary pathlength. Uses include: Rapid Compound Charac­ terization, Concentration Measurement, Dilution Targeting, and Method Development. Markets include, Biotech, Chemical & Pharmaceutical. 348 C&EN Analytical Pavilion, American Chemical Society, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036, 202-872-4486, fax: 202-872-4410, e-mail: expo@acs.org, Join us on Tuesday at the C&EN Analytical Pavilion to hear the latest from leaders in the analytical community, identify business trends, and discover new analytical applications. 1261

EXPO-5

EXPOSITION I C/D/N Isotopes, 88 Leacock Street, Pointe Claire, Quebec, PQ, CANADA H9R 1H1, 800565-4696, fax: 514-697-6148, e-mail:info@ cdnisotopes.com, Internet: www.cdnisotopes. com Since 1993, C/D/N Isotopes has provided its customers with superior quality and exceptional service. Researchers from around the world depend on C/D/N Isotopes as the company for deuterium labelled compounds. Most of our products are manufactured exclusively by C/D/N Isotopes. They are the direct result of inquiries from customers. Our Custom Synthesis capabili­ ties allow us to develop products that our cus­ tomers need at a reasonable price. Our Quality Control ensures that the isotopic enrichment ana chemical purity of our products meet the highest standards. 616 California Pacific Lab Safety, 14 Commercial Blvd., Suite 113, Novato, CA 94949,415-883-2600, fax: 415-532-1662, e-mail:carel@calpaclab.com, Inter­ net: www.calpaclab.com Manufacturer of Safety Ecological (ECO) Funnels, Chromatography Fun­ nels, secondary containers and solid waste con­ tainers for the fume hood. ECO Funnels reduce harmful emissions in laboratories and solve the open waste container problem. Made of HDPE with a lid that has a gasket, positive latch and sturdy hinge. Available with variety of screw cap sizes, containers and HPLC adapters. Justrite and Eagle safety cabinets and canisters. Safety eye­ wear, gloves, safety coated glass bottles. 817

Carbolite Inc., P.O. Box 7,110 South Second St., Watertown, Wl 53094, 800-543-6208, fax: 800543-6209, e-mail:sales@carbolite-usa.com, Inter­ net: www.carbolite.com Carbolite offers an exten­ sive line of laboratory heat processing furnace and oven products for use in the research, testing and pilot plant environment. Furnaces are pro­ vided for operation to 1800C, oven products to 600C and incubators to 80C. Product range includes multiple chamber sizes of box, tube and bottom and top loading furnaces, ovens, incuba­ tors and sterilizers. Carbolite also provides modi­ fied or special furnace and oven products and custom engineered equipment are available to meet specific customer requirements. 442 CEM Corporation, PO Box 200,3100 Smith Farm Road, Matthews, NC 28106, 704-821-7015, fax: 704-821-7894, e-mail:info@cem.com, Internet: www.cem.com CEM Corporation is a leading pro­ vider of innovative, advanced microwave labora­ tory systems for chemical synthesis, bioscience applications, and sample preparation. Our awardwinning systems provide fast, reproducible results in rugged, flexible platforms and are avail­ able with a variety of vessels and accessories. The compact, modular Discover® System offers unmatched versatility with options for automa­ tion, peptide synthesis, and more. We offer lab books and teaching kits. CEM supports education in the sciences with academic awards and grants.

351

Cambridge Crystallographic Data Ctr, 12 Union Road, Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM CB2 1EZ, Internet: www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre provides scientific software solutions for chemistry research and education, crystallography, rational drug design and pharmaceutical materials development, including: The Cambridge Structural Database System: Access the world's repository of vali­ dated crystal structure data for small organic and metal-organic compounds. Search and visualise structures. Analyse molecular dimensions, confor­ mational preferences, pharmacophore patterns and intermolecular interactions. Life Science appli­ cations including: Relibase+ (search, retrieval and analysis of protein-ligand complexes) and GOLD (protein-ligand docking). 233,235

Chase Education Finance, 100 City Hall Plaza, Level 3, Boston, MA 02108, 617-399-8000, fax: 617-399-8050, e-mail:cbrock@cfsloans.com, Internet: www.acs.ed-loans.com Chase Education Finance is a division of JP Morgan Chase & Co. (NYSE: JPM), a leading global financial services firm with assets of $1.3 trillion and operations in more than 50 countries. The firm is a leader in investment banking, financial services for con­ sumers, small business and commercial banking, financial transaction processing, asset and wealth management, and private equity. A component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, JPMorgan Chase serves millions of consumers in the United States and many of the world's most prominent corporate, institutional and government clients under its JPMorgan and Chase brands. 638

Cambridge Isotope Laboratories, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, MA 01810, 978-749-8000, fax: 978-749-2768, e-mail:cilsales@isotope.com, Internet: www.isotope.com Cambridge Isotope Laboratories is the world leader in the manufac­ ture and separation of stable isotopes and stable isotope labeled compounds. CIL offers the larg­ est inventory of stable isotope labeled com­ pounds including NMR solvents and reference standards, amino acids, buffers, fatty acids, sug­ ars, Bio-Express Cell Growth Media, RNA/DNA products, recombinant protein expression prod­ ucts, metabolites, gases, metals, and environ­ mental contaminant standards. 1400

ChemAxon Ltd., Maramaros Koz 3/a, Budapest, HUNGARY 1037, 361-453-2660, e-mail:sales@ chemaxon.com, Internet: http://www.chemaxon. com/ ChemAxon is a leader in providing cheminformatics software development platforms and applications for the biotechnology, pharmaceuti­ cal and agrochemical industries. With core capa­ bilities for structure visualization, search and man­ agement, property prediction, virtual synthesis, screening ana drug design, ChemAxon focuses upon active interaction with users and software portability to create powerful, cost effective cross platform solutions and programming interfaces to power modern chemmformatics and chemical communication. 1031

CambridgeSoft Corporation, 100 Cambridge Park Drive, Cambridge, MA 02140, 617-5889100, fax: 6 1 7 - 5 8 8 - 9 1 9 0 , e-mail:info@ c a m b r i d g e s o f t . c o m , Internet: www. cambridgesoft.com CambridgeSoft develops, markets and services life science enterprise solu­ tions for pharmaceutical, biotechnology, chemi­ cal companies and academic research organiza­ tions. These solutions integrate across research, discovery, development, trials and manufacturing functions. Software products include enterprise, workgroup and desktop versions of Chem & Bio Office, (Chem & Bio Draw, Struct-Name, ChemNMR, ChemDraw/Excel, Chem & Bio 3D, ChemFinder, Bio Assay, BioViz, Inventory & Ε-Notebook) with knowledge management (Ε-Notebook, Chemistry, Biology, Process Chem­ istry, Compliance Execution, CombiChem, 21CFR11, t-Signatures, Compliant DB & DocManager), chemical and biological informatics (Inventory, BioAssay, Registration & Workflow LIMS) solutions, and scientific database (The Merck Index, R&D Insight/Chemists, ChemACX, Sigma-Aldrich MSDS). Websites include ChemBioFinder.Com and ChemBioNews.Com for indexed database gateway and news and SciStore.Com for e-commerce. 219

6-EXPO

ChemBridge Corporation, 16981 Via Tazon, Suite G, San Diego, CA 92127, 858-451-7400, fax: 858-451-7401, e-mail:sales@chembridge. com, Internet: www.chembridge.com Chem­ Bridge offers an extensive portfolio of advanced discovery chemistry products and contract research services. These include over 650,000 compounds that are diverse or target focused, as well as customized discovery chemistry research services. ChemBridge Corporation together with ChemBridge Research Laboratories, Inc. (CRL) provide a comprehensive portfolio of efficient and cost-effective enabling chemistry solutions for all stages of small molecule drug discovery, from initial hit generation, to hit-to-lead, to lead optimization and pre-clinical candidate identifica­ tion. 643 Chemetall Foote Corp., 348 Holiday Inn Dr., Kings Mountain, NC 28086, 704-739-2501, fax: 704-734-2718, e-mail:foote.lithium@chemetall. com, Internet: www.chemetalllithium.com Chemetall is a leading international specialty fine chemicals manufacturer to the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals business. Chemetall offers lithium compounds including lithium alkyls,

amides, alkoxides, metal hydrides, and grignards. Lithium salts for alkylation, deprotonation, halo­ gen / metal exchange, and various other applica­ tions in organic synthesis are also available. Cesium salts including the carbonate, fluoride, hydroxide, and acetate used as versatile bases combined with the above mentioned products provide the chemist with a wide variety of tools to apply to organic synthesis. 262 Chemglass, Inc., 3800 North Mill Road, Vineland, NJ 08360, 800-843-1794, fax: 800-922-4361, e-mail:customer-service@chemglass.com, Inter­ net: www.chemglass.com For over 60 years our tradition of excellence in manufacturing has made our products an integral part of the chem­ istry performed in laboratories throughout the United States and around the world. As a scien­ tific glassware manufacturer, Chemglass utilizes glass raw materials purchased from primary glass manufacturers and re-works these materials to fabricate standard catalog items and components as well as custom glassware. We have the capa­ bility to produce not only the most complex glass apparatus, but also intricate electronic equip­ ment and customized machined components. Featured products include pilot plant process reactors from 10L-100L, ana benchtop reactors from 100mL-5L. Open air support frames give greater access to peripheral glassware and are constructed using S.S. and Teflon coated alumi­ num components. Also on display is a Huber 405 Unistat Circulator with Tango technology. Other innovative products include: Norell NMR Tubes, OptiTherm Blocks, Pie-Blocks, Blocks for Genevac, Coming Glassware, Pressure Vessels, Wide Mouth Volumetric Flasks, Schlenk Glassware/ Manifolds, Flasks, Rotary Evaporator and Fritted Glassware. 1101,1103,1105,1107,1111,1113 Chemic Laboratories, Inc., 480 Neponset St., Bldg. 7, Canton, MA 02021, 781-821-5600, fax: 781-821-5651, e-mail:lcw@chemiclabs.com, Internet: www.chemiclabs.com Chemic Laborato­ ries, Inc. is a contract chemistry organization, FDA registered and DEA licensed, servicing the phar­ maceutical, biotech, medical device, veterinary medicine, and specialty chemicals industries. We provide expertise in methods development, vali­ dation, extractables and leachables assessment, bio-analytical services, small scale cGMP organic synthesis and formulation development and small scale manufacturing. Chemic offers a commercial line of high-purity excipients, manufactured through proprietary methodology. 113 Chemical Abstracts Service, 2540 Olentangy River Road, Columbus, OH 43210, CAS, a divi­ sion of the American Chemical Society, produces the largest and most complete databases of chemical information. Our content includes sum­ maries of research published in journal articles and patents worldwide plus the OAS Registry of all reported chemical substances. CAS customers include the major chemical and pharmaceutical companies ana university science departments around the world. In 2007, CAS marks its 100th year of connecting scientists with the work of their colleagues, worldwide. 833 Chemical Computing Group, 1010 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, PQ, CANADA H3A-2R7, 514-393-1055, fax: 514-874-9538, e-mail:info@ chemcomp.com, Internet: www.chemcomp.com Chemical Computing Group (CCG) develops and universally distributes the Molecular Operating Environment (MOEtm). MOE is the leading soft­ ware tool for chemical researchers in the pharma­ ceutical and biotechnology fields. Its built-in applications cover the spectrum of drug discov­ ery including: Protein Modeling and Bioinformatics, Pharmacophore Modeling, Cheminformatics and QSAR, High Throughput Discovery, Struc­ ture-Based Design, Molecular Modeling and Simulations Method Development and Deploy­ ment. MOE has a unique architecture and is plat­ form dependent, allowing it to be used corpo­ rate-wide from method developers to computational experts to medicinal chemists. Its customers include a worldwide roster of leading pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Contact us for more information on how MOE can help you. 419

Chemical Society Of Japan, 1-5, KandaSurugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, JAPAN 10,18307, 81-3-3292-6165, fax: 81-3-3292-6319, e-mail: hayashi@chemistry.or.jp, Internet: www. chemistry.or.jp/index-e.html The Chemical Society of Japan (CSJ) publishes two hiqh impact general chemistry journals in English: Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan," which is our flagship journal and "Chemistry Letters," which is popular because of its rapid submission to publication time. Please visit our booth where we will be happy to discuss with you the merits of our two journals along with the other benefits that we offer including online journal access and rapid publication times. 1152 Chemik Co., Ltd., 2225, 55 Yunshi Street, Mingbo, CHINA 315010, 86-574-87296330, e-mail :chemiksales@gmail.com/info@chemik. com, Internet: www.chemik.com Non-GMP Custom Synthesis for Small Molecule Compounds: Serving both early phases of drug discovery and large-scale pharmaceutical production; Small molecule Compounds, especially in Heterocyclic compounds and substituted Benzene rings; An integrated solution—starts from literature research, lab and scales up to kilo or multi-tons manufacturing; 1,000+ products in which are mostly only available from ChemiK in China. 1040

Chromatography Research Supplies, 2601 Technology Drive, Louisville, KY 40299, 502-4916300, fax: 502-491-3390, e-mail:dvandgrift@ chromres.com, Internet: www.chromres.com Chromatography Research Supplies (CRS) is a manufacturer of high-quality consumable supplies used in Gas Chromatography. CRS develops and manufactures specialized items for OEM and private-label markets. Our products include gas filters, electronic crimpers, injection port septa, graphite and V/G ferrules, vials and closures, packed columns and many other products for laboratory use. 1128 Cidrux Pharminformatics B.V., Park Oosterspaarn 6, Haarlem 2036MB, THE NETHERLANDS, e-mail:info@cidrux.com, Internet: www. cidrux.com Cidrux is a software company specialized in cheminformatics. Our computational solutions support lead finding and optimization in the early stages of drug discovery and design. Our flagship product, the Molecule Evoluator, is a desktop application that generates novel molecular structures using evolutionary principles. It supports an interactive search through chemical space by combining the knowledge of the chemist and the power of the computer. Structural features and physicochemical properties are used to tailor evolution. 220

ChemPacific Corporation, 6200 Freeport Center, Baltimore, MD 21224, 410-622-5771, fax: 410-633-5808, e-mail:sales@chempacific.com, Internet: www.chempacific.com Chempacific Corporation provides Contract Research, Custom Synthesis, API and cGMP manufacturing services for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and chemical companies worldwide. ChemPacific specializes in Chiral Synthesis; Unnatural amino acid; Indoles, Indolines and Indazoles; Heterocyclic Synthesis; Nucleosides and Nucleotides; and carbohydrate chemistry. ChemPacific is positioned to serve clients with a state-of-the-art R&D facility in Baltimore, Maryland that handles projects up to Kg scale. Chempacific also performs chemical manufacturing at its 100&percent;-owned facilities, Zhejiang Chempacific in China. 429

CiVentiChem, 1001 Sheldon Drive, P.O. Box 12041; Rsearch Triangle Park, NC, Cary, NC 27513, 919-678-0704, e-mail:bhaskar@cvchem. com, Internet: www.cvchem.com CiVentiChem has been providing research services to pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life science companies for 12 years. We excel in providing quality services in the areas of medicinal chemistry, lead optimization, contract R&D, custom synthesis of pharmaceutical intermediates, NMEs, reference standards, metabolites and focused libraries at our labs in RTP, NC and in Hyderabad, India. We provide chemists on FTE basis in a cost effective manner. If you need any of these services, please contact us. 917

Chemspeed Technologies, 7 Deer Park Drive, Suite L, Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852, 732-3291225, e-mail:us@chemspeed.com, Internet: www. chemspeed.com Chemspeed Technologies is a global developer of innovative products and consumables for R&D laboratories, and a provider of automated workflows and services for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries as well as academia. Chemspeed designs and manufactures automated solutions for reaction and sample preparation, synthesis (including microwave), formulation or process research. 1030,1032

CombiPhos Catalysts, Inc., P.O. Box 220, Princeton, NJ 08542-0220,732-355-0880, fax: 732-3551192, e-mail:sales@combiphos.com, Internet: http://www.combiphos.com CombiPhos Catalysts, Inc. is the sole provider of highly active, airand moisture-stable cross-coupling catalysts (POPd, POPdl, POPd2, PXPd2, PXPd) that have been used in over 300 pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and chemical companies worldwide since 2002. CombiPhos Catalysts, Inc. is the provider of a wide variety of novel pyridine-2-boronic acids/esters, pyrimidine-4-boronic acids/esters, pyrazine-2-boronic acids/esters, and pyridazine3-boronic acids/esters, which are made through catalytic C-B coupling reactions usina catalysts made with technology licensed from the Duront Company. 540

Chiral Technologies, Inc., 800 North Five Points Rd., West Chester, PA 19380, 610-594-2100, fax: 610-594-2325, e-mail:chiral@chiraltech.com, Internet: www.chiraltech.com Chiral Technologies Inc. of West Chester, Pennsylvania, a whollyowned subsidiary of the Japanese fine chemical producer, Daicel Chemical Industries, Ltd, offers a full range of chiral chromatography products and chromatography services for chiral separations. Products include HPLC and SFC columns for analytical, semi-preparative and preparative resolutions. Other products also include bulk chiral stationary phases which are available in 20 micron particle size. 1136 ChiroSolve, Inc., 5941 Optical Court, suite 220, San Jose BioCenter,, San Jose, CA 95138, 408834-8597, fax: 408-694-3844, e-mail:info@ chirosolve.com, Internet: www.chirosolve.com ChiroSolve Inc. offers ChiroSolv kits which can be used to identify chiral resolution process for a racemate within 24 hours that would normally take up to 2 months. Six disposable kits offer 576 combinations of resolving aqent and solvent to screen against a racemate which can be of type acid, base, alcohol, amino acid, aldehyde or ketone. Company is located within Biotechnology incubator (www.sjbiocenter.com) which offers fully equiped biological and chemical testing facilities and administrative infrastructure to start-up companies. 451

Combi-Blocks, Inc., 7949 Silverton Ave., Suite 915, San Diego, CA 92126. 1244

Concentris GMBH, Davidsbodenstr. 63, Basel, SWITZERLAND CH-4056, 41-61-3220655, fax: 41-61-3220656, e-mail:info@concentris.ch, Internet: www.concentris.com Concentris provides high-performance research instruments based on nanomechanical cantilever sensors. Concentris' Cantisens® products give access to applications such as label-free detection of (bio-)molecules or the real-time study of surface-related phenomena. The Cantisens® Research instrument has been designed as an easy-to-use, all-in-one platform for scientific research and application development in the fields of bioloqical, chemical or materials research. Attend a hands-on demonstration of the Cantisens® Research instrument and learn about new products and recent developments. 1262 CONFLEX Corporation, 5631 Palmer Way, Suite C, Carlsbad, CA 92010, 760-930-9277, fax: 509692-4541, e-mail:info@conflex.us, Internet: www. conflex.us Conflex Corporation announces the release of CONFLEX ver.6.0—(http://conffex.us/ pdf/CONFLEX6-NewFeatures.pdf). CONFLEX ver.6.0 performs fast, exhaustive conformation searching and analysis critical to drug discovery

and chemical engineering. Determine conformations of larqe molecules with Parallel CONFLEX and utilize the BARISTA visualization and analysis platform to drill down into CONFLEX output. Available only from Conflex Corporation are the latest, advanced versions of CONFLEX and Parallel CONFLEX. 214 Corning Incorporated, 900 Chelmsford Street, Tower 2, 4th Floor, Lowell, MA 01851, 978-4422200, fax: 978-442-2476, e-mail:clswebmail@ corning.com, Internet: www.corning.com/ lifesciences Corning Incorporated manufactures high quality, high performance research products for life sciences. Corning Life Sciences, the makers of PYREX® and PYREX® VISTA™ glassware and Coming Hot Plates and Stirrers, is a major manufacturer of glass and plastic laboratory equipment for cell culture, drug discovery, liquid handling, and filtration. 1133,1135 Cosa Instrument Corp., 84G Horseblock Rd., Yaphank, NY 11980, Internet: www.cosainstrument.com COSA Instrument, the leader for all of your analytical and laboratory instrument needs. Ask us how we can help you today1. COSA is the national distributor of Mitsubishi instrumentation for 20+years. Providing reliable, affordable solutions to the analytical, process and alternative fuels industries (Biodiesel, Ethanol, Methanol and Coal). COSA is also a distributor ofScinco, which is now offering new improved models of its PDA UV-Vis Spectrophotometer with the widest range of spectroscopic accessories & peripherals. 1237 CrystalMaker Software Limited, Centre for Innovation & Enterprise, Begbroke Science Park, Sandy La., Yarnton, Oxfordshire, UNITED KINGDOM OX51PF, 44-1865-854804, fax: 44-1865854805, e-mail:info@crystalmaker.com, Internet: http://www.crystalmaker.com CrystalMaker Software Ltd develops software for working with crystal/molecular structures and their diffraction patterns, including the award-winning CrystalMaker® (interactive structures visualization) with its real-time photo-realistic graphics. This works seamlessly with our other products: CrystalDiffract™ (x-ray & neutron powder diffraction) and SingleCrystal™ (electron diffraction and stereographic projections). All products feature elegant, easy-to-use interfaces plus crossplatform compatibility for Windows XP/Vista and Mac OS X (PowerPC/Intel). 1118 Daily Prize Raffle, American Chemical Society, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036, 202-872-4486, fax: 202-872-4410, e-mail:expo@ acs.org, Internet: http://chemistry.org/meetings/ boston2007 Visit the Daily Prize Raffle booth from Monday to Wednesday for a chance to win a gift card. Look inside your meeting registration materials for your required tickets. 969 DataApex Ltd., Gallery Science, LLC, 206 Limestone Dr., Bellefonte, PA 16823, 814-360-0130, fax: 209-254-9501, e-mail:dcree@galleyscience. com, Internet: www.galleryscience.com Clarity is advanced chromatography software for acquiring and evaluating data from up to four chromatographs at a time and is compatible with any chromatoqraph. Clarity includes GLP/21 CFR Part 11 compliance. Clarity can control a wide range of chromatography instruments and can be extended by optional modules: SST (system suitability test), PDA (photo-diode array), GPC (gel permeation chromatography), CE (capillary electrophoresis), EA (elemental analysis). Clarity is highly regarded for intuitive use, performance, cost-effectiveness, and technical support. 340 Daxian Chemical Institute Ltd., #179, 10169 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20903, 301-880-0624, fax: 301-434-9366, e-mail: wwang@daxianchem.com, Internet: www. daxianchem.com Daxian Chemical Institute (DC!) supplies privileged pharmaceutical/agro building blocks and intermediates to customers around the world. DCI produces pyrazoles, pyridines, piperazines and pyrimidines, imidazobenzothiazoles and more, widely used by chemical professionals. Do not forget to check out our custom scale up synthesis for items may or may not be listed. Contact us today for a price proposal. Our specialist will be glad to help. 1137

EXPO-7

EXPOSITION DCG Partnership, 4170A Main, Pearland, TX 77581, 2816481894, fax: 2816481895, e-mail: rgrodriguez@dcqpartnership.com, Internet: www.dcgpartnersnip.com DCG Partnership I, Ltd.—manufacturer of Sulfur in Diesel/Biodiesel Qualification Kits for EPA sulfur requirements and custom calibration standards including: Total/ Speciated Sulfur (gas & liquid), Liquefied Petroleum Gas, Product Purity, Natural Gas, Natural Gas Liquids and more. Our standards are NIST traceable by weight and are verified by at least one analytical method. 218 DeLano Scientific LLC, 541-F Cowper St., Palo Alto, CA, USA 94301, 650-283-6945, fax: 650989-4082, e-mail:sales@delsci.com, Internet: http://www.delanoscientific.com DeLano Scientific develops, maintains, and supports the PyMOL Molecular Graphics System: an opensource tool for creation of molecular images, animations, and presentations. PyMOL source code is freely available, and exécutables for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux are. provided to project sponsors through inexpensive subscriptions. If you haven't yet seen PyMOL in action, please stop the by booth for a demonstration! 449 DeltaNu, Inc., 628 Plaza Lane, Laramie, WY, USA 82070,866-301-6328, e-mail:sales@deltanu.com, Internet: www.deltanu.com DeltaNu manufactures Raman spectrometers and accessories for academics, industry, and OEM. We are introducing one of the industries first DNIR spectrometers. This is a 1064 nm based dispersive Raman spectrometer with models for our high performance microscope (ExamineR 1064) and bench top (Advantage 1064) platforms. The Inspector Raman and RockHound are handheld spectrometers used for field work. The NuScope digital microscope can be added to any bench top or portable system for fine laser positioning on a solid specimen. 1329 Dima, 40 Vogell Road, Unit 57, Richmond Hill, ON, CANADA L4B 3N6, 905-737-8066, fax: 905770-0181, e-mail:Sales@dimaglass.com, Internet: www.dimaqlass.com DIMA ULASS is a professional and leading manufacturer of scientific glassware in Canada and around the world. DIMA GLASS offers extensive lines of laboratory glassware for the needs of scientific community. Our lab-glass features low expansion rate, high hardness and high softening point, resists heating and boiling in laboratories, and is suitable for a wide variety of standard experimentation procedures. We strive to achieve excellence in both product quality and customer service. 1038 Dionex Corp., 1228 Titan Way, PO Box 3603, Sunnyvale, CA, USA 94088-3603, 408.737.0700, e-mail:marcom@dionex.com, Internet: www. dionex.com UltiMate™ 3000 Intelligent LC systems deliver optimal performance, reliability, and ease-of-use in analytical, nano/capillary, micro, and semipreparative flow rates. UltiMate 3000 systems are configurable for ultrafast analysis, dual-LC for higher throughput, greater resolution, and. intelligent automation. The ICS-3000 Reaqent-Free™ IC (RFIC™) system delivers powerful capabilities (3-D electrochemical detection), productivity (dual pump option), and performance (RFIC option). Come see our LC/MS and IC/MS systems. View our full range of IC and HPLC systems for colleges and universities. 426,428 Division of Small Chemical Business, 1117 Mineral Springs Rd., Charlotte, NC, USA 28262-4911, 7045984819, e-mail:scooke@sprynet.com, Small Chemical Business Division exnibitinq: Lauterbach & Associates, LLC, 211 Old Club Court, Macon, GA 31210-4708, 478-474-8818/3027, fax: 478-474-0117, Internet www.lauterbachandassociates.com Consultation in toxicology, carbohydrate chemistry, professional publication assistance. Sing-Smart CMC, POB 3531, Vista, CA 92085-3531, 760-598-1717, 619-750-6077(Cell), Lynda@Sing-Smart.com, Internet: www.singsmart.com Sinq-Smart creates high school and college curriculum products which teach through song, colorful slide shows and dance motions. "HOLY MOL-EE! Chemistry for High School," its

8-EXPO

first major product, is highly effective in helping students learn. 714 Eastern Analytical Symposium, P.O. Box 370, Walkersville, MD 21793, 301-682-3701, fax: 301668-4312, e-mail:askeas@aol.com, Internet: www.eas.org Eastern Analytical Symposium seeks to educate and inform with short courses and workshops in various areas of Analytical Chemistry. The latest research is presented in both invited and contributed sessions of the symposium. In addition, hundreds of exhibitors display the latest instrumentation, equipment, products, and services at the exposition. An employment area offers Analytical (Chemists many options for employment. This is an opportunity that should not be missed! Eastern Analytical bymposium & Exposition: November 12-15, 200/, Somerset, NJ. 366 Eberbach Corp., PO Box 1024, 505 S. Maple St., Ann Arbor, Ml 48106, 734-665-8877, fax: 734-6659099, e-mail:ralphboehnke@eberbachlabtools. com, Internet: www.eberbachlabtools.com Eberbachlabtools; Shakers and Mixers, dependable workhorses in a broad spectrum of preparative applications. Reciprocating, Rotating, Tilting, Rocking, and Vibrating. Eberbach Commercial Blender an essential in many Clinical, Institutional and Industrial Lab. Macro and Micro, Stainless and Glass. A variety and economy of blender containers is a major factor in their use as a preparative Tool in the Lab. 460 EDAQ, 2205 Executive Circle, Colorado Springs, CO 80906, 888-965-6086, fax: 719-576-3971, e-mail:MHagen@edaq.com, Internet: www.edaq. com eDAQ manufactures the e-corder—an economical and flexible data recording solution for modern research, e-corder replaces multichannel chart recorders, XY plotters, storage oscilloscopes. The system connects via USB to computers and offers true "plug and play" features. Multiple signal conditioners ana potentiostats are also available, e-corder operates with "Chart", "Scope", "eChem", or "Powefchrom" software. Full calibration, reload-able settings, trigger, data pads, computed functions, GLP time stamps are available to make analysis/evaluation of signals easy. 430 Elementar Americas, Inc., 520 Fellowship Road, Ste. D-408, Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054, 856-787-0022, fax: 856-787-0055, e-mail:info@elementar-inc. com, Internet: www.CHNOS.com Elementar is known for the most complete line of elemental analyzers for CHNOS determination. We are also now representing the SerCon line of Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer systems. The latest EAIRMS consisting of the NEW CUBE elemental analyzer along with the SerCon 20-20 SP will be shown. The Elementar CUBE analyzers feature the latest in micro-engineering and electrons. Only 18.5 inches wide with integrated samplers of 60 or 120 positions without stacking! 362 Elsevier, 30 Corporate Dr., Suite 400, Burlington, MA 01803, 781-221-2122, fax: 781-313-4880, Internet: www.elsevier.com Elsevier is a leading publisher in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and related areas. We publish over 125 highlyrespected journal titles, including prestigious society publications, and numerous new books per year with a range of major reference works and widely-known serials, including high-value titles under the Academic Press imprint. With innovative electronic products and services such as ScienceDirect and Scopus, we continue to refine our portfolio to serve the research needs of educators, researchers and students worldwide. We invite you to review new and best-selling books, learn about the high and increasing Impact Factors of our journals, and view our online products. Explore the World of Chemistry—we look forward to meeting you. 803,805,807 Elsevier/New Scientist, 360 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10010-1710, 888-437-4636, e-mail:Corporate.sales@elsevier.com, Beilstein Database (www.mdl.com/beilstein): Premier reference database in organic chemistry. MDL®

Patent Chemistry Database (www.mdl.com): Chemical reactions, substances and substancerelated information from World, U.S. and European patents since 1976. DiscoveryGate® (www. discoverygate.com): New data sources include PharmaPendium™ drug safety resource and GeneGo pathway analysis platform. Next door, visit the New Scientist/ScienceJobs.com booth. Pick up a special chemistry jobs feature or search vacancies online. Are you hiring? Our sales team is available to discuss your scientific recruitment needs. 702,704,706 EMD Chemicals, 480 South Democrat Road, Gibbstown, NJ 08027, EMD is Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany in the US and Canada. EMD Chemicals is a leading manufacturer of high purity solvents and chemicals, analytical reagents, microbiology media, chromatography, air monitoring equipment and specialty products for laboratory ajpplications. EMD Biosciences, Inc. provides a broad range of innovative life science research products used world-wide in diseaserelated life science research at universities as well as in the pharmaceutical and biotech industry.

313,315 EquipNet, 50 Hudon Road, Canton, MA 02021, 781-821-3482, fax: 617-671-1269, e-mail:sales@ equipnet.com, Internet: www.EquipNet.com EquipNet provides proactive asset management solutions and services for global manufacturers in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The company has earned a reputation for helpinq leading corporations such as Eastman Chemical, Clariant, GlaxoSmithKline, and AstraZeneca maximize their financial return and avoid risk of health, safety and environmental hazards, theft, and Sarbanes Oxley non-compliance. 566 Erlab, Inc., 1980 Turnpike Street, North Andover, MA 01845, 978-975-3336, e-mail:Jgriffin@ erlab.net, Internet: www.captair.com Erlab Inc, supplier of the Captair brand ductless filtering fume hood systems, the only complete ductless fume hoods with ESP*. Available exclusively from ERLAB ESP* or :Erlab Safety Program, is a unique program included with every Captair which insures the safe use of ductless hoods through testing, application verification, dedicated usage and monitoring. ESP* a total safety pkg. which includes a Chemical Listing of over 650 chemicals approved for use, a Test Report showing filtration and containment performance resuls in accordance with the NFX 15-211. 1142 Experience Boston, American Chemical Society, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036, 202-872-4486, fax: 202-872-4410, e-mail:expo@ acs.org, Visit the Boston host city booth from Monday to Wednesday to learn more about the city, purchase souvenirs, and receive discounts. Town Center Federal Bureau of Investigation, 935 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Room 4371, Washington, DC 20535, The FBI's Weapons of Mass Destruction Countermeasures Unit (WMDCU) promotes the FBI's lead role in WMD investigations through the development of initiatives to detect, deter, and prevent a WMD event. The FBI's Chemical Outreach Program brings together law enforcement, emergency response communities, chemical industries, and chemical academia to increase awareness, address suspicious activity, foster communication and provide an opportunity to discuss careers in the FBI. 1051,1053 Fisher Scientific, 2000 Park Lane, Pittsburgh, PA 15275, 412-490-8300, Internet: www.fishersci.com Fisher Scientific is a leading provider of chemicals, equipment, supplies and services for the global scientific research market. Our chemical product offerings provide solutions for Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical, Environmental Testing, Chromatography, Manufacturing Processes, Clinical Analysis, Research & Development and Quality Control. Our expertise in delivering leadinq-edge technologies and products reliably and efficiently helps enable scientific research today for the discoveries of tomorrow. For more information, stop by our booth or visit us online. 1213,1215

FIZ CHEMIE BERLIN, Franklinstrasse 11, Berlin, GERMANY D-10587, 49-30-39977-0, fax: 49-3039977-132, Internet: www.chemistry.de FIZ CHEMIE Berlin is a major scientific information and documentation center for chemistry. Its main activities include the preparation of databases, e-learning material, software packages, books, and printed information services covering chemistry, chemical engineering and related areas. In addition, FIZ CHEMIE maintains specialized Internet search engines for chemistry and medicalpharmaceutical information. 1219,1221 FMS—Fluid Managment Systems Inc., 56 Felton Street, Waltham, MA 02453, 781-891-6522, fax: 781-891 -6665, e-mail:onlineinfo@fms-inc.com, Internet: http://www.fmsenvironmental.com PIE—pressurized extraction system—performs 6 channel extraction in less than 20 minutes. Extraction cell size 5-250ml. Power-Prep Cleanup system—multi column cleanup system for extraction, purification and separation of Dioxin, PCBs, Pesticides and PAHs. One-Step Pressurized Extraction & Clean-Up system. For rapid extraction and cleanup of PCBs, Pesticides and PAHs. This system performs the entire extraction and clean-up for multiple samples in less than Ihour. 1432 Frontier Scientific, P.O. Box 3 1 , Logan, UT 84323, 435-753-1901, fax: 435-753-6731, Internet: www.frontiersci.com FSI is a chemical developer, manufacturer and custom research services provider to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, industrial chemical, government, and academic sectors. FSI specializes in the development of chemical compounds and processes related to porphyrins, phthalocyanines and boronic acids. FSI develops building blocks for small molecule drug discovery, SAR studies, and lead optimization. FSI provides standard catalog products (www.frontiersci.com) with production quantities generally in the milligram to kilogram scale. FSI is a privately held corporation headquartered in Logan, Utah. 1112 Fujitsu Comp. Sys., BioSciences Grp., 200 Lowder Brook Dr., Suite 2100, Westwood, MA 02090, 781-326-7175, fax: 781-326-7179, e-mail: computers_biosciences_sales@us.fujitsu.com, Internet: www.us.fujitsu.com/biosciences The BioSciences Group of Fujitsu Computer Systems offers integrated hardware and software solutions designed to enable experimental scientists to bridge the gap between in silico prediction and experimental validation. Using both proven methodologies and novel approaches, these solutions support the visualization of molecular phenomena, hypothesis development, and experimental validation in chemical research, pharmaceutical design, biotechnology, drug development and materials science research. Visit the Fujitsu booth for demonstrations of our latest range of chemical and materials sciences products including Scigress Explorer and Materials Explorer. 200 Galbraith Laboratories Inc., 2323 Sycamore Dr, Knoxville, TN 37921,865-546-1335, fax: 865-5467209, e-mail:labinfo@qalbraith.com, Internet: www.galbraith.com Galbraith Laboratories, Inc., a contract analytical testing laboratory, provides services to the global marketplace. Analyses are conducted on most sample types for trace determination of Periodic Table elements. Services & Techniques also include Method Development & Validation, Custom Projects, Consulting, and Outsourcing. Analytical Techniques: Spectroscopy, Chromatography, Wet Chemistry, Physical Testing, Micro-Analysis, Multiple Method Options. Quality Assurance & Regulatory Affairs Programs. Technical, Industry-Specific and Regulatory Expertise. FDA Registered. GLP/cGMP compliant. 57 Years Experience. 939,941 Gardner Denver Thomas, Inc., Welch Vacuum Technology, 5621 W. Howard St., Niles, FL 60714, 847-676-8800, fax: 847-677-8606, e-mail: welchvacuum@rtpumps.com, Internet: www. welchvacuum.com. 121 Gelest, Inc., 11 East Steel Road, Morrisville, PA 19067, 215-547-1015, fax: 215-547-2484, e-mail:

ghorvath@gelest.com, Internet: www.gelest.com Gelest manufactures organosilanes, germanes and stannanes in addition to metal-organics in research and commercial quantities. Gelest emphasizes the interaction with customers to enable the performance and utility of its products in an application. 339

for true representative sampling, grinders for particle reduction to