Crystal Structures. Volume II - ACS Publications


lites may serve to trace certain metabolic pathways, or be used as specific inhibitors of some enzymes, Chapter 10, ent,itled. The Designing of Ant,im...
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320 to indiscriminate drug screening. These aspects are discussed in two chapters, while one is devoted to the applications to biochemistry where, amongst other applications, the sntimetabolites may serve to trace certain metabolic pathways, or be used as specific inhibitors of some enzymes, Chapter 10, ent,itled The Designing of Ant,imetaholites, is of special intereat to chcmists, showing as it does the chemical alterations that so far have been used to change physiologically important compounds into antimetaholites. In a. final chapter practical hints are given for the synthesis and tentine of antimetabdites. This book will ~ n ~ u e s t i b n a hbe l y of the greitest value to many different workers: physiologists, biochemists, microbiologists, and pharmacologists. I t is clearly written and contains numerous structural formulas. It has a bibliography of 500 references arranged as they appear in the text and hmoe no substitute for a missing author index. I t h a s a n index of structural formulas and a. rather short subject index.

Far the mast part, the text is written and arranged in the conventional manner. The dincussion of the aliphatic series occupies 352 pages, the aromatic series, 173 pwes. The carhohydrates, amino acids, proteins, terpencs, and sterols (77 pages) are presented in oonseoutive chapters following those on the aromatic series. At the end of the book there are three chapters (45 pages) on heterocyclic systems, ureides, purines, and the common alkaloids. No formal attempt has heen made either t o stress electronic interpretations of the common resotions or to emphasize the electronic configurations of molecules. However, many reaction meohanisms are desoribed adequately. The followine ehrtnees made in this revision are oerhms the

of unsaturated systems, resonance phenomena of many unsaturated systems, dipole-dipole interaction, the displacement reaction, and hiosynthesis of sugars a r e presented. The modern THEODOR YON B R A N D conventions concerning the optical nomenclature of sugars and NATIONAC I N ~ T I OP T HE*LT" ~ ~ amino acids are included, although only the "elongated" pyranose B E ~ H E ~ DM**.~ , ' L * N ~ and furanase structures of the sugars are illustrated. Tho text contains several commendable features. Of these, the syntheses of isotopically labeled molecules, the section on CRYSTAL STRUCTURES. VOLUME I1 the Grignard reaction, and the problems a t the end of each prominent. areperhaps Ralph W. G. Wyckoff, Laboratory of Physical Biology, National chapter style~ is essentidly lucid and readable. Institute of Arthritis end MetahOljc ~ i~ ~ t ~h~ ~~ ~~ ~~ d 1~ - , The d~ . author's ~ ~ , a t times his exposition seems , , ~york, 1951,~ ix + ~ ~publishers, t I ~ ~N~~ ~ pp, However, ~ i ~ ~ somewhat ~ precarious.~ 7 4 figs,256 tables, 2 2 2 5 cm, L~~~~ leaf with binder, For example, certain sections of the text contain statements $10. (First Supplement to ~~l~~~1, 1951, ix+ 136 pp, 64 concerning orgmic acids, bases, and salts which appear to lack preciseness, mainly because of an indefinite distinction between tables. 22 X 2 5 cm. Loose leaf. $4.) t,hn nhnnomena of -dis~orin,tion ioniration. .~ r ~ ~ .. - ~ ~~~~~-~~~ ~ ~ ~~~ . and ~ ~ -~ ~ ~ Teachers of organic chemistry who are considering adoption THEsecond volume of this monumental work maintains the high standard set bv the first. (For review. see 3. CHEM.EDUC.. of B different text for their beginning course might well give this 26, 289 (1949).) - ~ o m p o u n d s o ithe types R.(MX,)g and volume serious consideration. Rr(MXm)~, hydrates and ammoniates, and aliphatic compounds DONALD C. GREGG are systematically and thoroughly covered. As in the previous umvsnsl.r OF VERMONT volume, drawings are presented, illustrating the different strucBanmNoToN. V n n ~ o w ture types; tables of unit oell dimensions, symmetry classes, and atomic coordinates are given; and brief descriptions of esoh structure and its relationship to others are included. The author PRACTICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY has attempted t o cover the literature on this subject completely and he has certainly approached this ideal closely. The First Supplement to Volume I comprises loose leaf sheets Arthur I. Vogel, Head of the Chemistry Department, Wwlwich t o he inserted in the binder containing the previously published Polytechnic, London. Second edition. Longmans, Green and 1033 pp. Illuschapters. This procedure enahlcs one to keep the oampilstion Co., Inc., London and New York, 1951. u i i i X 25.5 om. $10. trated. 16 much more nearly up to date than would he possible if the work were published in ordinary hook form. T m s monumental hook, like its predecessor, is an exceptionally Again the reviewer wishes t o recommend this publication as inclusive collection of experimental techniques, descriptions of an authoritative, essentially complete source of information on apparatus, and syntheses for use in the instructional arganio the results of crystal structure analysis. chemistry laboratory. The unusual scope of this manual has been duly noted in reviews of the previous edition. A text which MAURICE L. HUGGINS contains over 600 preparations, over 300 diagrams of apparatus, RODAH REBEARCH LABORATORIES 185 pages of general experimental techniques and a reasonably ROC HE ST^^, NEW YORK adequate seetian on qualitative organic analysis wouldohviously be prominent among books of its t w e . Mast of the text is identioal with the first edition, so i t can TEXTBOOK OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY hardly be called a revision. The principal additions and changes George Holmes Richter, Professor of Organic Chemistry and occur in the appendix, the index, and the chapter on qualitative Dean. The Rice Institute. Houston. Texas. Third edition. John organic anslysi~. The last has been expanded somewhat, in part York, 1952. vii 762 pp. 17 ~figs. by the addition of a table of bond refractions for the D-line. The wile; & Sons, Inc., ~ e w main additions in the appendix are certain reactions in liquid 85 tables. 15.5 X 23.5 cm. $6.75. ammonia, certain applications of N-hmmosuceinimide, the WolffIN FORMULATING the third edition of this text, the author Kishner reduction, certain reductions with lithium aluminum has continued his objective, that is, to offer the beginning student hydride, eysnoethylation, and syntheses with organolithium a well-modulated, comprehensive, and intensive treatment of the compounds. The section on the Dyson system has been revised. fundamental concepts, reaction syntheses, and nomenclature of Because of the size and intended scope of this book it is inorganic chemistry. Obviously, the text offers the student an evitable that certain omissions and questionshle arrangements opportunity t o obtain a t least a nodding acquaintance with a may attract undue criticism. I t is not the intention of this relot of organic chemistry. Because of the immensit,~and fertility view to do this. However a few points come to mind. Experiof organic chemistry, the attainment of ultimate proficiency, ments and preparations which involve the polysaecharides, the if this is possible, is a. gradual process. Any student who digests large fatty acids, and the simple olefins may seem meager. Synthis text should he a respeetahle resident of the "first strtge" theses for glycine and norleucine are described, but peptide of proficiency. syntheses and the common reactions of the proteins are absent, ~~

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