Excess volume of mixtures of alkanes with aromatic hydrocarbons


Anwei Qin, Dolly E. Hoffman, Petr Munk. J. Chem. Eng. Data , 1992, 37 (1), pp 61–65. DOI: 10.1021/je00005a019. Publication Date: January 1992. ACS L...
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J. Chem. Eng. Data 1992, 37, 61-65

2,00P -

-00.0

0.20

0.40

060

0.80

1.00

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Flgure 5. Variation of AV/cp,cp,, eq 5, with volume fractlon 'pi of carbonyl compounds for carbonyl compounds (+heptane (2) mixtures at 20 ' C : 0,methyl acetate; 0, ethyl acetate; A,propyl acetate; 0 ,

butyl acetate; A,amyl acetate; W, acetone; V, 2-butanone. cycloalkanes (cyclohexane in the present case). AVlcp,cp, increases sharply in the region of lower concentration of the carbonyl compound. For ketones this increase is sharper than for alkyl acetates, as is apparent from Figure 5 and from the larger negative value of the fitting parameter c (Table 11). This phenomenon reflects the nonregular nature of mixtures of carbonyl compounds with alkanes. The increase of volume is caused by alkane molecules disrupting the interactions of the highly dipolar molecules of the carbonyl compounds. When only a small amount of alkane is added, the carbonyl molecules rearrange themselves to preserve a larger proportion of paired dipoles than would be allowed by regular mixing. With the progressing amount of alkane being added, these "excess" dipolar pairs are disrupted as well, increasing the value of the excess volume in this concentration range.

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interactions among molecules. In the present study, it was found that mixtures of carbonyl compounds with alkanes exhibit a distinct nonregulartty. Due to the strong interaction among the polar molecules, the number of interacting dipolar pairs disrupted by added nonpolar alkane molecules is less than would be expected for regular (random) mixing. RegMry No. Hexane, 110-54-3; heptane, 142-82-5; octane, 1 1 1-65-9; cyclohexane, 110-82-7; methyl acetate, 79-20-9; ethyl acetate, 141-78-6; propyl acetate, 109-60-4; butyl acetate, 123-86-4; amyl acetate, 628-63-7; acetone, 67-64-1; 2-butanone, 78-93-3. Llterature Clted Munk, P.; Hattam, P.; Du, Q. J. Appl. folym. Sci., Appl. Porn.

.

Svmn. _, .... ~10BO. ..-. , 43. .- 373. .. ..

Cheng, W.; AbdeCAzim, A.-A. A.; El-Hlbri, M. J.; Du, Q.; Munk, P. J . Phvs. Chem. 1989. 93. 8248. TRC-Thermodynamic Tables-Non-hydrocarbons. Thermodynamics Research Center, The Texas A8M University System: College Station, TX, 1969; p. d-5550. RkMick, J. A.; Bunger, W. E.; Sakano, T. K. I n Organic Solvents, 4th ed.; Weissberger, A., Ed.; Techniques of Chemistry, Voi. 11; John Wlley 8 Sons: New York, 1986. TRC-Thermodynamic Tables-Nonhydrocarbons. Thermodynamics Research Center. The Texas A8M University System: College Station, TX, 1952; p. d-1440 (loose-leaf data sheets). TRC-Thermodynamic Tables-Non-hydrocarbns. Thermodynamics Research Center, The Texas A8M University System: College Station, TX, 1952; p. 61460 (loose-leaf data sheets). TRC-Thermodynamic Tables-Non-hydrocarbons. Thermodynamics Research Center, The Texas A8M University System: College Station, TX, 1952; p. d-1490 (loose-leaf data sheets). TRC-Thermodynamlc Tables-Non-hydrocarbons. Thermodynamics Research Center, The Texas ABM University System: College Station, TX, 1952; p. d-2050 (loose-leaf data sheets). Grolk, J.-P. E.; Ballet, D.; Viallard, A. J . Chem. Thennodyn. 1974, 6 ,

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Patel, N. C.; Sandler, S . I. J . Chem. Eng. Data 1985, 30, 218. Dusart, 0.;Groller, J.-P. E.; Viallard, A. Bull. SOC. Chim. Fr. 1977, 7-8 (Part l), 587. Jimenez, E.; Romani, L.; Paz Andrade, M. I.; Roux-Desgranges, G.; Groller, J.-P. E. J . Solution Chem. 1988, 75, 879. Crespo Colin, A.; Compostizo, A.; Dlaz Pena. M. J. Chem. Thermodyn. 1984, 16, 497.

Groller, J.-P. E.; Benson, G. C. Can. J. Chem. 1984, 62, 949.

Conclusions Systematic measurement of compositional dependences of the excess volume of mixing on the composition for families of related pairs of compounds may reveal basic effects governing

Received for review December 20, 1990. Revised June 7, 1991. Accepted September 17, 1991. This research was supported by The Robert A. Welch Foundation (Grant F-1072) and by the National Science Foundation (Grant

DMR-88 15784).

Excess Volume of Mixtures of Alkanes with Aromatic Hydrocarbons Anwel Qin, Dolly E. Hoffman, and Petr Munk" Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Polymer Research, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712

The excess volumes of 22 binary mlxtures of aromatlc hydrocarbons and alkanes are reported. The excess volume of systems wlth the same alkane decreases wlth Increasing 'Ize and number Of substituents On the benzene For systems the same hydrocarbon It Increases wlth the length of the alkanes. Systems with benzene or cyclohexane as one of the components show larger excess volumes than the other systems, and the dependence of thelr AV/cp,cp, values on composltlon Is noticeably asymmetrlc. During recent years we have been using various methods such as light scattering, inverse gas chromatography, densito-

metry, and calorimetry to accumulate extensive thermodynamic data concerning binary mixtures in order to develop a comprehensive theory which could interpret all the Important aspects of liquid mixtures ( 1 , 2). As part of this work, we are reporting in the present paper the measurements of excess volume of mixing of alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons. The alkanes used were three linear alkanes (hexane, heptane, and octane) and cyclohexane. The aromatic hydrocarbons included benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p -xylene, o-xylene, and m xylene. Attogether 22 systems were prepared, and, for each system, the dependence of the excess volume on concentration was studied. The molar excess volume of mixing V Eis defined as

VE = 'To whom correspondence should be addressed at the Department of Chemistry.

0021-9568/92/ 1737-0061$03.00/0

v-

xlvo,

- x*vo2

(1)

where V is the volume of 1 mol of the mixture and x, and V o ,

0 1992 American Chemical Society

62 Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, Vol. 37, No. 1, 1992

Table I. Excess Volumes of Mixing for Aromatic Hydrocarbon and Alkane Mixtures at 20 OC 91 Xl p / ( g ~ m - ~ )p / ( c m 3 mol-') AV/W2 91 Xl p / ( g ~ m - ~ )p / ( c m 3 mol-') Benzene (1) + Hexane (2) 0.402 0.497 0.879 28 0.745 35 0.403 1.Oo0 LOO0 0.908 0.801 0.700 0.599 0.502

0.936 0.856 0.775 0.687 0.597

0.858 34 0.833 86 0.811 11 0.788 40 0.767 18

1.000 0.907 0.695 0.601 0.503

1.000 0.941 0.790 0.713 0.626

0.879 31 0.859 67 0.816 21 0.797 50 0.778 25

1.000 0.906 0.798 0.703 0.602 0.497

1.000 0.946 0.879 0.812 0.734 0.644

0.879 30 0.860 91 0.840 44 0.822 72 0.804 39 0.785 79

1.000 0.916 0.809 0.714 0.613 0.499

1.OO0

0.879 32 0.869 29 0.856 91 0.846 36 0.835 36 0.823 58

0.087 0.204 0.291 0.360 0.400

0.095 0.215 0.296 0.353 0.379

AV/lO-*

0.385 0.268 0.150 0.000

0.723 03 0.701 68 0.682 25 0.659 84

0.374 0.319 0.211

0.367 0.327 0.267 0.170

0.523 0.417 0.304 0.159 o.Oo0

0.758 15 0.739 67 0.722 24 0.702 65 0.684 14

0.591 0.570 0.486 0.297

0.508 0.465 0.377 0.216

0.541 0.436 0.320 0.189 0.000

0.767 48 0.751 27 0.735 79 0.720 85 0.702 78

0.716 0.690 0.576 0.388

0.584 0.529 0.414 0.261

0.449 0.344 0.236 0.128 o.Oo0

0.813 89 0.804 44 0.795 55 0.787 45 0.778 87

0.644 0.593 0.479 0.297

0.648 0.585 0.463 0.281

0.451 0.346 0.237 0.114 0.000

0.743 22 0.722 50 0.701 77 0.679 45 0.659 83

-0.054 -0.041 -0.028 -0.009

-0.045 -0.034 -0.023 -0.007

0.405 0.304 0.208 0.107

0.484 0.376 0.266 0.142

0.151 0.140 0.123 0.084

0.119 0.106 0.091 0.059

o.Oo0

o.Oo0

0.757 30 0.739 06 0.721 62 0.703 30 0.684 13

0.508 0.401 0.278 0.148 0.000

0.767 62 0.751 54 0.734 84 0.71900 0.702 85

0.261 0.242 0.201 0.121

0.195 0.173 0.137 0.078

0.410 0.306 0.202 0.098 0.000

0.810 35 0.801 63 0.793 39 0.785 65 0.778 86

0.571 0.525 0.417 0.235

0.532 0.488 0.387 0.218

0.416 0.318 0.208 0.102 0.000

0.743 94 0.723 78 0.701 48 0.680 07 0.659 89

-0.161 -0.126 -0.095 -0.056

-0.127 -0.099 -0.074 -0.043

0.449 0.341 0.229 0.122 o.Oo0

0.757 84 0.739 10 0.720 29 0.703 01 0.684 14

0.063 0.060 0.045 0.027

0.046 0.043 0.032 0.019

0.299 0.199 0.107 0.000

Benzene (1) + Heptane (2) 0.157 0.444 0.532 0.584

0.170 0.440 0.505 0.529

0.399 0.302 0.209 0.103 o.Oo0

Benzene (1) + Octane (2) 0.191 0.376 0.520 0.624 0.701

0.205 0.385 0.507 0.576 0.609

0.392 0.297 0.204 0.113

o.Oo0

Benzene (1) + Cyclohexane (2) 0.930 0.837 0.753 0.658 0.548

0.164 0.343 0.472 0.580 0.640

0.182 0.372 0.504 0.608 0.656

0.401 0.301 0.203 0.108 o.Oo0

Toluene (1)+ Hexane (2) 1.000 0.899 0.809 0.708 0.603 0.495

LOO0 0.916 0.839 0.748 0.651 0.547

0.867 12 0.846 55 0.827 49 0.806 94 0.785 35 0.762 89

-0.040 -0,044 -0.056 -0.086 -0.061

-0.037 -0.040 -0.049 -0.075 -0.052

0.401 0.301 0.202 0.094 0.000

Toluene (1) + Heptane (2) 1.000 0.899 0.799 0.699 0.592

LOO0 0.924 0.845 0.762 0.667

0.867 18 0.848 30 0.829 81 0.811 38 0.791 63

0.039 0.072 0.106 0.134

0.036 0.064 0.092 0.112

Toluene (1)+ Octane (2) 1.000 0.901 0.801 0.700 0.606 0.513

1.000 0.933 0.860 0.781 0.702 0.617

0.867 15 0.850 26 0.833 39 0.816 48 0.800 97 0.785 62

1.000 0.907 0.804 0.706 0.606 0.502

1.000 0.908 0.807 0.709 0.610 0.507

0.867 14 0.857 62 0.847 34 0.837 76 0.828 33 0.818 87

1.Oo0 0.795 0.696 0.596 0.501

1.000 0.806 0.710 0.612 0.518

0.867 39 0.825 51 0.805 121 0.784 50 0.764 80

1.000 0.896 0.797 0.700 0.594 0.500

LOO0 0.911 0.825 0.736 0.637 0.544

0.867 12 0.847 89 0.829 80 0.811 86 0.792 50 0.775 22

0.084 0.138 0.189 0.225 0.254

0.076 0.121 0.160 0.183 0.199

0.403 0.304 0.201 0.102 o.OO0

Toluene (1) + Cyclohexane (2) 0.163 0.316 0.433 0.519 0.568

0.153 0.297 0.406 0.485 0.530

0.406 0.302 0.199 0.096 0.000

Ethylbenzene (1) + Hexane (2) -0.091 -0.120 -0.145 -0.146

-0.073 -0.096 -0.115 -0.116

0.400 0.304 0.198 0.096 0.000

Ethylbenzene (1)+ Heptane (2) 0.016 0.031 0.051 0.060 0.062

0.013 0.025 0.040 0.046 0.046

0.405 0.302 0.199 0.104 o.Oo0

Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, Vol. 37, No. 1, 1992

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Table I (Continued) (01

x1

1.OOO 0.900 0.798 0.696 0.600 0.497

LOO0 0.923 0.840 0.752 0.666 0.568

0.867 39 0.850 54 0.833 43 0.816 36 0.800 47 0.783 54

1.OOO

1.000 0.886 0.772 0.672 0.570

0.867 39 0.857 17 0.846 84 0.837 78 0.828 58

1.OOO 0.908 0.808 0.713 0.620 0.522

0.879 77 0.858 96 0.836 12 0.814 89 0.794 17 0.772 54

0.901 0.800 0.695 0.596

1.000 0.917 0.830 0.735 0.641

0.879 87 0.860 76 0.841 41 0.821 02 0.801 58

1.OOO 0.898 0.803 0.698 0.596 0.498

1.OOO 0.887 0.785 0.674 0.569 0.471

0.879 75 0.868 04 0.857 44 0.845 81 0.834 88 0.82472

1.OOO 0.896 0.801 0.703 0.601 0.503

1.OOO 0.901 0.811 0.715 0.615 0.518

0.86445 0.84366 0.82468 0.804 71 0.78399 0.763 99

1.000 0.901 0.798 0.702 0.600 0.498

1.000 0.915 0.825 0.737 0.641 0.542

0.864 46 0.846 65 0.828 27 0.81092 0.792 51 0.774 21

1.000 0.905 0.793 0.698 0.597 0.495

1.000 0.894 0.771 0.670 0.566 0.463

0.864 44 0.854 96 0.84394 0.834 84 0.825 54 0.816 38

1.OOO 0.905 0.798 0.700 0.601 0.508

1.000 0.910 0.808 0.712 0.615 0.522

0.86144 0.842 80 0.82185 0.802 32 0.782 57 0.763 79

LOO0 0.894 0.690 0.595 0.503

1.000 0.910 0.726 0.635 0.546

0.861 56 0.843 02 0.807 06 0.790 10 0.773 76

0.898 0.793 0.699 0.600 1.000 0.902 0.795 0.697 0.601 0.503

1.OOO

p / ( g ~ m - ~ )P / ( c m 3 mol-')

AV/lO-* cp1 Ethylbenzene (1)+ Octane (2) 0.396 0.051 0.298 0.088 0.204 0.115 0.107 0.132 0.000 0.140

X1

p / ( g ~ m - ~ )P / ( c m 3 mol-')

AV/10-*

0.466 0.360 0.254 0.137 0.000

0.766 95 0.750 98 0.735 64 0.720 02 0.702 78

0.197 0.154 0.147 0.082

0.137 0.104 0.096 0.052

Ethylbenzene (1) + Cyclohexane (2) 0.498 0.467 0.142 0.398 0.369 0.262 0.195 0.177 0.351 0.097 0.087 0.OOO 0.000 0.412

0.819 24 0.810 43 0.793 57 0.785 86 0.778 85

0.518 0.513 0.361 0.219

0.452 0.453 0.326 0.200

0.416 0.320 0.210 0.097 0.000

0.74902 0.72821 0.704 36 0.680 28 0.659 90

-0,324 -0.297 -0.211 -0,099

-0.256 -0.233 -0,164 -0.076

0.544 0.344 0.224 0.108 0.000

0.782 07 0.743 87 0.722 17 0.702 10 0.684 11

-0,159 -0.121 -0.090 -0.049

-0.120 -0.088 -0.064 -0.034

0.194 0.340 0.474 0.564 0.605

o-Xylene (1) + Cyclohexane (2) 0.397 0.162 0.302 0.288 0.198 0.407 0.102 0.489 0.000 0.531

0.371 0.279 0.181 0.092 0.000

0.814 61 0.805 36 0.795 76 0.787 29 0.778 83

0.597 0.542 0.425 0.255

0.530 0.486 0.385 0.234

-0.071 -0.124 -0.166 -0.186 -0.196

m-Xylene (1) + Hexane (2) 0.397 -0.058 0.291 -0.099 0.198 -0.133 0.100 -0.148 0.000 -0.155

0.411 0.304 0.208 0.106

0.742 12 0.720 30 0.701 11 0.680 82 0.659 95

-0.184 -0,156 -0.116 -0.059

-0,145 -0.121 -0.090 -0,046

-0.016 -0.030 -0.042 -0.040 -0,046

m-Xylene (1) + Heptane (2) 0.402 -0.013 0.294 -0.024 0.198 -0,033 0.097 -0.031 0.000 -0.034

-0,031 -0.019 -0.013 -0.004

-0.023 -0.014 -0,009 -0.003

0.OOO

0.756 75 0.737 15 0.71988 0.701 51 0.684 05

0.195 0.391 0.527 0.617 0.678

m-Xylene (1) + Cyclohexane (2) 0.397 0.161 0.298 0.327 0.199 0.447 0.102 0.000 0.530 0.590

0.367 0.272 0.180 0.091 0.000

0.807 95 0.799 93 0.792 34 0.785 39 0.778 83

0.685 0.625 0.498 0.305

0.604 0.557 0.450 0.279

-0.082 -0.154 -0.202 -0,231 -0.254

p-Xylene (1) + Hexane (2) 0.398 -0,066 0.304 -0.123 0.210 -0.161 0.110 0.OOO -0,183 -0.200

0.412 0.316 0.220 0.116

-0,236 -0.199 -0.164 -0.095

-0.185 -0.155 -0,127 -0,073

0.OOO

0.741 55 0.722 27 0.703 24 0.682 60 0.659 95

-0.032 -0.074 -0.078 -0.077

p-Xylene (1) + Heptane (2) 0.406 -0.025 0.303 -0.057 0.195 -0.059 0.091 0.OOO -0.057

0.449 0.340 0.224 0.106 0.000

0.756 67 0.738 17 0.71900 0.700 36 0.684 14

-0.076 -0.058 -0.041 -0.025

-0.056 -0.042 -0,029 -0.018

0.064 0.114 0.153 0.180 0.196

0.172 0.312 0.413 0.479

-0.120 -0.208 -0.270 -0.322 -0.340

o-Xylene (1) + Hexane (2) 0.397 -0.099 0.303 -0.170 0.197 -0.218 0.090 0.OOO -0.259 -0.271

-0.044 -0.092 -0.126 -0.144

o-Xylene (1)+ Heptane (2) 0.496 -0.036 0.302 -0.074 0.192 -0.099 0.091 -0.111 0.000

0.OOO

0.445 0.332 0.228 0.113

64 Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, Vol. 37, No. 1, 1992

Table I (Continued) p/(g

~ m - ~ )p / ( c m 3 mol-')

PI

Xl

1.000 0.891 0.788 0.683 0.590 0.495

1.000 0.915 0.830 0.740 0.655 0.564

0.861 41 0.844 09 0.827 72 0.811 09 0.796 30 0.781 17

1.000 0.899 0.802 0.702 0.602 0.504

1.oO0 0.887 0.781 0.674 0.570 0.471

0.861 44 0.851 81 0.842 63 0.833 42 0.824 46 0.816 02

-0.001 0.005 0.025 0.025 0.032

AV/10-2 P1 p-Xylene (1) + Octane (2) 0.393 -0.001 0.294 0.004 0.192 0.019 0.093 0.019 o.oO0 0.023

0.189 0.352 0.485 0.579 0.631

p-Xylene (1) + Cyclohexane (2) 0.405 0.156 0.304 0.294 0.203 0.410 0.100 o.oO0 0.496 0.548

XI

p/(g ~ m - ~ p ) / ( c m 3 mol-')

AV/10-2

0.461 0.354 0.239 0.119 0.000

0.765 04 0.749 30 0.733 28 0.717 52 0.702 89

0.030 0.036 0.027 0.019

0.021 0.024 0.018 0.012

0.374 0.277 0.182 0.089 0.000

0.807 80 0.799 81 0.792 25 0.785 15 0.77885

0.635 0.583 0.468 0.272

0.558 0.520 0.422 0.248

Table 11. Parameters of Equations 2 and 3 and Standard Deviations U P / X , X Z ) /

system' BE-HX BE-HP BE-OC BE-CH TO-HX TO-HP TO-OC TO-CH EB-HX EB-HP EB-OC EB-CH PX-HX PX-HP PX-oc PX-CH OX-HX OX-HP OX-CH MX-HX MX-HP MX-CH

a0

a1

a2

1.658 2.393 2.840 2.596 -0.237 0.601 1.015 2.282 -0.607 0.262 0.769 2.030 -0,980 -0.304 0.141 2.483 -1.354 -0.612 2.378 -0.783 -0.152 2.654

0.018 -0.363 -0.678 0.104 0.212 0.073 -0.150 0.449 -0.019 0.023 -0.111 0.615 0.044 0.095 0.087 0.899 0.120 0.087 0.686 0.102 0.121 0.981

-0.133 0.185 0.343 -0.007 -0.056 0.033 0.162 0.061 0.051 -0.057 0.029 0.270 0.040 -0.026 -0.083 0.196 0.115 0.101 0.143 0.101 0.049 0.303

(cm3 mol-') 0.072 0.023 0.030 0.009 0.060 0.021 0.051 0.010 0.033 0.013 0.040 0.035 0.022 0.021 0.027 0.013 0.057 0.031 0.013 0.012 0.016 0.022

bo/10-2 1.509 2.117 2.436 2.626 -0.218 0.468 0.780 2.126 -0.480 0.194 0.551 1.794 -0.773 -0.232 0.091 2.199 -1.081 -0.464 2.112 -0.621 -0.121 2.354

b2/ lo-' -0.064 0.111 0.117 0.039 -0.015 0.052 0.105 0.064 0.041 -0.038 0.009 0.175 0.033 -0.007 -0.041 0.076 0.095 0.085 0.065 0.083 0.052 0.163

b,/10-2 0.322 0.194 0.131 0.364 0.160 0.131 0.038 0.436 -0.032 0.037 -0.002 0.431 0.012 0.051 0.079 0.641 0.051 0.017 0.488 0.060 0.077 0.711

~(AV/pplpJ/lo-' 0.057 0.025 0.018 0.009 0.048 0.019 0.029 0.009 0.026 0.009 0.030 0.027 0.017 0.016 0.017 0.010 0.047 0.021 0.010 0.011 0.011 0.017

Abbreviations: BE. benzene:, TO.. toluene:. EB.. ethvlbenzene: OX, o-xylene; MX, m-xylene; PX, p-xylene; HX, hexane; HP, heptane; OC, " octane; CH, cyclohexane.

are mole fraction and molar volume of pure component i,respectively. Experimentally, by measuring the densities of pure components and their mixtures, the molar excess volume of mixing can be calculated. We have found it convenient to express the volume changes also as fractional changes of volume upon mixing A V = VE/(xlVol x 2 V 0 2 ) . The experimental data are listed in Table I for all systems. A polynomial function is often used to correlate the experimental data of V E I x1x2

+

Similarly, A V/cp,cp2 is expressed by the following power series

Table 111. VE at x 1 = 0.5" svstemb P(1it.) BE-HP 0.591 (20 "C) BE-HP 0.590 0.651 (20 "C) BE-CH BE-CH 0.654 BE-CH 0.650 0.638 BE-CH 0.651 BE-CH 0.551 TO-CH EB-HX -0.147 EB-OC 0.195 PX-CH 0.588

VYexDt) 0.598 0.598 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.571 -0.152 0.192 0.621

W i t . )/ p(exDt)' 0.9880.987 ( 4 ) 1.003 (5) 1.008 (5) 1.001 (6) 0.982 (7) 1.004 (8) 0.966 (7) 0.967 (9) 1.014 (9) 0.945 (7)

"Literature values were measured at 25 "C except where indicated. bSee guide for abbreviations in footnote a of Table 11. Literature references are given in parentheses.

The correlation coefficients in eqs 2 and 3 obtained by leastsquares fitting to the second order are collected in Table 11, together with the standard deviations of the f i , u(VEIx1x2)and a(AV/cp,cp,), which have the forms as follows

Experlmental Part and Results All aromatic hydrocarbons and alkanes obtained from Aldrich Chemical Co. were of purity higher than 99% and were used as supplied. The measurement of densities was described in another paper (3).All experiments were done at 20 O C .

Dlscusslon and Concluslons There, N is the number of values measured, and n is the number of adjusted parameters.

We were able to compare some resutts of our systems with literature data (4-9) for the compositional dependence of VE. Most of the literature data were measured at 25 OC. Our ex-

Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, Vol. 37, No. 1, 1992 05

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+I

Flgwe 1. Variation of AVlcp,cpz with volume fraction 'pi of the aromatic hydrocarbon for aromatic hydrocarbon (1)-octane (2) mixtures at 2 0 O C : 0, benzene: 0, toluene; A, ethylbenzene; B, p-xylene.

Figure 3. Variatlon of AVlcp,qZ with volume fraction cp, of benzene for benzene (l)-alkane(2) mixtures at 20 O C : 0, hexane; 0, heptane; A, octane; W, cyclohexane.

3.00) 1,

N

2.50

P

*a, 2 .oo

X

1.50 - I .oo

0.00 0.20

0.40

0.60

0.80

1.00

t

1.00

0.00

Flgure 2. Variation of AVIcprcpzwith volume fraction cp, of toluene for toluene (Italkane (2) mixtures at 20 ' C : 0, hexane; 0, heptane; A, octane; M, cyclohexane. perimental values and literature values of V E interpolated to molar fraction 0.5 are listed in Table 111. For all these systems, the values calculated from our interpolation formula (eq 2 and Table 11) were very close to the values obtained from the literature formula. For the majority of the systems, the discrepancy between literature values and our data is less than 3%; this may be partially due to the different temperature used. The overall agreement assures us about the reliability of our data. The dependences of excess volumes on composition are very clearly demonstrated by the plots of AV/cp1cp2 versus composition. From Figure 1 it can be seen that for systems with octane as one component the excess volume decreases with the increase of the size and the number of the substituents on the benzene ring. This is also true for other linear alkanes. When a given aromatic hydrocarbon is mixed with a series of alkanes, the excess volume increases regularly with the increasing length of the alkane (Figure 2). The behavior of mixtures with benzene or cyclohexane as one component is strikingly different from the other systems. First, in comparison with the other members of their family, these systems have distinctly higher excess volumes (Figures 1 and 2). Second, AV/cplcp, values of all these systems are remarkably composition dependent (Figures 3 and 4), while the other systems are almost independent of composition. The A V/(ol (o, values in benzenecontaining mixtures increase with the decreasing amount of benzene. However, in cyclo-

0.20

0.40

0.60

0.80

1.00

4

+I

Flgure 4. Variation of AV/cp,cpz wlth volume fraction cp, of aromatic hydrocarbon for aromatic hydrocarbon (1)-cyclohexane (2) mixtures at 2 0 O C : 0, benzene; 0, toluene; A, ethylbenzene; B, p-xylene. hexane-containing mixtures, they increase with the increasing amount of cyclohexane. We believe that this behavior is related to the geometry of the molecules involved and to the peculiarities of their packing in pure liquids and in mixtures. R~ggktwNo. BE, 71-43-2; TO, 108-88-3; EB, 100-41-4; OX, 95-47-6; MX, 108-38-3; PX, 10642-3; HX, 110-54-3: HP, 142-82-5; OC, 11 1-65-9; CH, 292-64-8.

Literature CHed (1) Munk, P.; Hattam, P.; Du. Q. J . Appl. Powm. Scl.: Appl. Powm. Symp. 1989, 43, 373. Munk. P.; Hattam, P.; Du, Q.; AWeCAzim, A. A. IbM. 1990, 45, 289. (2) Cheng, W.; AWeCAzim, A.-A. A.; El-Hibri, M. J.; Du, Q.; Munk, P. J . Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 8248. (3) Qin, A,; Hoffman, D. E.; Munk, P. J . Chem. Eng. Data, first of three papers in this issue. (4) Takenaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Murakami, 5. J . Chem. T k n w d y n . 1982, 14, 399. (5) Takenaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Murakami, 5. J . Chem. Thennodyn. 1980, 12, 849. (6) Stokes, R. H.; Levien, 9. J.; Marsh, K. N. J . Chem. Thermodyn. 1970, 2 , 43. (7) Acree, W. E., Jr.; Ghoiami. K.; McHan, D. R.; Rytting, J. H. J . Chem. Eng. Data 1985. 30, 182. ( 8 ) Grolier, J.-P. E.; Wilhelm. E.; Hamedi, M. H. 8er. Bunsen-Ges, Phys. Chem. 1978. 82. 1282. (9) Caceres Aionso, .M.; Poveda Vliches, J. L.; Sanchez-PaJares, R. G.; Nunez Deigado, J. FIuM phese Equilib. 1985, 20, 81. Received for review February 20, 1991. Accepted August 20, 1991. This research was supported by The Robert A. Welch Foundation (Grant F-1072) and by National Science Foundation (Grant DMR-8815784).