General Chemistry (McQuarrie, Donald A.; Rock, Peter A.) - Journal of


General Chemistry (McQuarrie, Donald A.; Rock, Peter A.) Richard M. Sheeley. J. Chem. Educ. , 1985, 62 (10), p A270. DOI: 10.1021/ed062pA270.2. Public...
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speak to the student comfortably, with the ability and expertise that come only with experience. They rightly treat molecules as real entities with tangible qualities, shapes, and sizes, which should aid the student ereatlv in understandine their eeometrv. The introduction m i t r e a t m e n t of ;me of the simpler organic moleeulea in the discussiun of bonding, shout half way through the book, should make the survey chapters on organic and hiochemistryat theend more comprehensible to the student. Frequent and extensive use of Lewis structures and VSEPR theory effectively underwrite this emphasis on molecular structure and shape, especially with inorganic compounds. Molecular orbital theory is presented and aplied efficiently in the chapter that follows and is utilized well in discussions of bonding in organic molecules. The progression of topics is pedagogically lagiesl and builds nicely throughout. The introduction of new concepts is timed well, and they are explained both qualitatively and quantitatively through many pertinent examples. At the end of eaeh chapter there is a list of new equations and terms that the student should learn, as well as a chapter summary. The authors take an academically honest approach to chemistry by presenting experimental data first and then using it in their development of theoretical concepts. S I units are used throughout the text. The authors have attacked the proverhially intractable problem of integrating descriptive chemistry with principles by taking Mary Poppins' advice-a little bit of sugar makes the medicine go down. Fourteen short essays of five to ten pages ("interchapters") discuss the chemistry and industrial importance of specific elements or groups and other special topics. In these as well as the formal chapters excellent use has been made of over a hundred and ten fullcolor photographs along with many more black and white photos and two-color figures to stimulate interest and present material that otherwise would be difficult to treat effectively. Unlike the past texts we have seen that have used color plates simply to dress up the hook, these are certainly worth whatever cost they might add since they serve well to help connect theory with the practice of chemistry and reinforce upon the students that they are studying a laboratory science. This first-year text is of necessity large (about 1160 pages). The paper quality and print are good, as well as the overall design and art work. The binding appears to be adequate, but it seems inevitable that today's publishers use cover material that seems to be the most slippery substance available, with little regard for the students who must carry several of these eel-like monsters around with them. This one is no exception. The index is carefully done, but like most textbooks is not as detailed as one would prefer. The approximately 3600 entries are minimal for a two-semester science textbook, although they are well chosen and specifie. More than 1600 problems are provided in the main chapters, with the answers to the odd-numbered ones given in the 62 pages of appendices, which also include a mathematics review with data plotting and graphing helps, SI units and conversion factors, log tables, and atomic mass tables. About a dozen discussion questions are in-

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lnlmductlon to Chemlslry E. Russeii Hardwick, Burgess Publishing Go., Minneapolis, MN. 1984. Tables. 19 X 24 cm. This general chemistry text is intended for use in an introductory couise suited to nrenare students for a more rieorous. comprehensive, first-year collegr chemistry courre; or ta be used a s a terminal course for health science or nonscienre majors. Supplementary materials include a Study Guide, an Instructor's Guide, a set of Transparency Masters, a Test Bank, and a Laboratory Manual organized to correlate to the textbook. The twenty-one chaptera are organized in a traditional fashion beginning with wientific measurements and atomic theory, and progressing through formulas, mass calculstions, and electron shell and quantum theory. Later chapters are devoted to solution chemistry, kinetics and equilibrium, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Descriptive chemistry is cursory in treatment of the entire periodic chart in one chapter, although at least same information is mentioned for each familv. The chemistrv of water. carbon compounds, and lking organisms each are treated m separate chapters. The Appendixrmtninsa mathematics review and aectimn on precision, temperature scales, nomenclature, and the Valence Shell Electron Pair Revulsion Theory. A wide range of problems is available far eaeh chapter and answers to selected problems are given in the back of the book. It appears that the book does what it purports to do and at the same time has enough descriptive chemistry and quantitative rigor to prepare a student for a science and engineering majors course.

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Carl J. Popp Mexico Institute of Mlnlng and ~echnology Socorm. NM 87801

General Chemlslry Donald A. McQuarrle and Peter A. Rock, W. H. Freeman and Company, New York, NY. 1984. xviii 1144 pp. Figs. and tables. 20.5 X 26 cm.

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The authors have done a remarkably thorough and professional job to produce a textbook that should serve most students well.. both during the course and as a referrncr in ~ubsequrntyears. The arknowlrdgrnrnts listed in this trxt indicate the a s i s Lance and wntrihutimr of furty-air chemiatry teachers, a hearteningly welcome array of those currently sewing "in the trenches," who have helped debug the manuscript. They have been effective. The book reads smoothly throughout and is written in a lexicon and style nicely suited to the beginning but serious student. McQuarrie and Rock ~~

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cluded with eachof the fourteen "interchapters." The total package available from the publisher includes an instructor's laboratory manual of 40 experiments (keyed to the textbook) which has been derived from the Frantz and Malm series. Richard M. Sheeley DlcklnsonCollege Carllsle. PA 17013

Mammallan Semlochemlstry: The lnvestlgallon of Chemical Signals Between Mammals Eric S. Aibone, John Wiley & Sons Ltd.. Chichester. UK. 1984. xii 360 pp. Figs. and tables. $57.00 HE.

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Semiochemistry, sometimes referred to as "chemical ecology," has been a neglected area, lying as it does between the two disciplines, chemistry and biology. While there has been considerable recent interest in the so-called pheromones of insects, the study of the chemistry of substances that mediate interactions between mammals-i.e., mammalian semioehemistry-is still in its infancy. In his new book, Eric Alhone carefully reviews what is known of mammalian semiochemistry and points out the many gaps in our knowledge of this subject, providing suggestions for further investigations. In the first chapter Albone clarifies the tangled terminology of semiochemistry (e.g., "pheromone," etc.) and discusses the problems of interdisciplinary investigations. The second chapter poses the challenge to chemists, most of our knowledge in this area having come from biologists, and discusses the chemical methods used in mammalian semiochemical research. The next six chapters survey our knowledge of the chemical signals employed by mammals; the information is arranged systematically according to the semiochemical source: skin secretions, products of specialized scent glands, microbial scents, urine, secretions of the reproductive tract, and breath and saliva. Chapter 9, "Mammalian Chemoreception," a contribution by Stephen Shirley, discusses the physiology of mammalian olfaction and taste "from the standpoint of a molecular scientist concerned with mammalian chemoreception." The five-part Appendix outlines chemical techniques as applied in the study of mammalian semiochemistry. These include chromatographic techniques (especially gas chromatography), spectroscopic techniques (especially mass spectroscopy), and radioimmunoassay. The book contains 48 pages of references, most of them from the 1970's and extending into 1982, and many illustrations, all but a few being of high quality. Indirectlv. .. "Mammalian Semiochemistry" has murh to trnrh is at,out uursel\,es. After all, wr arc mammals, and our aemiochemistry has the addeddimension ofnrtifr. cia1 and synthetic, economic applications as exemplified by perfumes, mauthwashes, antiperspirants, deodorants, etc. GVO