HOUSTON 179th ACS National Meeting March 23-28 - C&EN Global


Feb 18, 1980 - Hear the Buzz About a New Class of Mosquito Repellents. Each year, almost 700 million people suffer from mosquito-borne diseases, such ...
0 downloads 0 Views 15MB Size

Final Program

HOUSTON 179th ACS National Meeting March 23-28

The American Chemical Society's 179th national meeting in Houston will feature a diverse technical program covering a broad range of timely topics. Just under 2150 papers, poster sessions, and panel discussions will be presented by seven ACS committees and 29 ACS divisions. A sampling of major symposia being presented includes the week-long international symposium on anionic polymerization sponsored by the Division of Polymer Chemistry, and symposia on chemistry and chemical analysis of wastewater intended for re-use by the Division of Environmental Chemistry, structure of large drugs and macromolecules by the Division of Physical Chemistry, environmental control of synfuels process by the Division of Fuels Chemistry, and applications of Môssbauer spectroscopy by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology. A complete listing of all symposia is on the following pages.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

47

TOURS AND PLANT TRIPS

REGISTRATION

84

CHEMICAL EXPOSITION

100

LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS

85

SPECIAL EVENTS

103

SOCIAL EVENTS

87

PREPRINTS

104

AWARDS

90

EMPLOYMENT

104

COMMITTEE AGENDA

92

ACS OFFICERS

105

42

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

99

Diverse technical program offers broad range of topics Council Committee on Chemical Education Two-day student affiliate research symposium (joint) provides opportunity for undergraduate students to present papers on their research to national audience. Topics include organic, inorganic, physical, biochemistry, and medicinal chemistry. Committee on Chemistry & Public Affairs In symposium entitled Federal R&D Funding in Chemistry—FY 1981, speakers from six federal agencies that fund a large amount of research related to chemistry and engineering discuss funding of chemistry research programs at their agencies for 1981. Speaker from the Office of Management & Budget describes OMB's role in the development of the federal budget as a whole. Committee for Younger Chemists Symposium on some of the aspects of a professional career as a chemist in the chemical industry is directed primarily toward students, both graduate and undergraduate, who expect to become professional chemists in the near future. Topics include the importance of versatility and communication skills to success as a professional chemist. Agricultural & Food Chemistry Symposium on chemistry of food components and its relation to diseases incurred by animals, primarily the meatproducing animals, may be of particular interest to biochemists and those engaged in animal husbandry, veterinary medicine, research on animal feeds, and animal toxicology. Symposium on dietary fiber (joint) covers fiber from cereal grains, corn, fruits, and vegetables; analysis of the different forms of fibers; and some of fibers' effects on gastrointestinal tract. Analytical Chemistry Four award symposia featured, with keynote addresses by recipients J. E. Lovelock, J. Calvin Giddings, Helen M. Free, and Donald E. Smith. Symposia honoring Lovelock and Giddings, both outstanding contributors to the field of chromatography, focus on the electron capture detector in environmental studies and on field-flow fractionation. Innovative approaches to clinical analytical chemistry is the theme of Free's symposium; Smith and his former students describe accomplishments

growing out of a background in electroanalytical instrumentation. Two-day symposium details previously undisclosed solutions to industrial problems involving a multitude of analytical techniques. Chemical Education Programing firsts for the division include first Perspectives Lecture, by C. S. Marvel, Polymer Chemistry in America. The Early Years; initial lecture in the Breakthrough series, Laser Isotope Separation; and first of the State of the Art Symposia for Chemical Educators (joint), featuring solid-state chemistry in the undergraduate curriculum. Symposium honoring Louis Fieser (joint) focuses on teaching lab techniques for organic chemistry. Chemical Information Day-long symposium on record keeping responsibilities under federal environmental laws features luncheon talk by Adlene Harrison, administrator of Region VI of Environmental Protection Agency, on current issues in federal environmental protection. Other sessions are on development and use of quality data bases for quantitative structure-activity correlation, patents as an information source in image technology, and structure and use of the engineering index data base. Colloid & Surface Chemistry Several symposia focus on surface phenomena, which play a significant role in many areas of technological importance, such as heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry, geochemistry, wetting phenomena, and many energyrelated technologies. These symposia include Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces, Surface Science of Catalysis, Photoeffects at Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interfaces, Colloid and Interfacial Problems in Coal Utilization, and Surface Chemistry in Biology and Medicine. Environmental Chemistry Award symposium for creative advances in environmental science, honoring James J. Morgan, covers wideranging aspects of aquatic chemistry, including chemical models, trace metal catalysis, aquatic surface chemistry, and aquasols. Symposium on chemistry of water/wastewater intended for re-use discusses monitoring and control, quality assurance, concentrating organics for toxicity testing, removal of trace organics by carbon, removal of toxic

chemicals by membrane processes, treatment techniques, and disinfection. Geochemistry (Probationary) Symposium gives recent developments of the chemical tools for petroleum and gas exploration, includes papers by leading authorities from West Germany and Italy. General sessions examine compounds useful as geological markers and the incorporation of various chlorophylls into marine sediments and porphyrins in humic coals. History of Chemistry All-day symposium and panel discussion is aimed at exploring the question of whether ACS should establish a center for the history of chemistry. The division is particularly interested in the opinions of ACS members concerning the need and uses for such a center. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Murphree award symposium (joint), honoring Milton Orchin, covers homogeneous catalysis of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Symposium on monohydric alcohols (joint) ends with session dealing with ethanol and methanol—this session concludes with a roundtable discussion on lower alcohols as fuels. Nuclear Chemistry & Technology Symposium presents results of studies of nuclear reactions made possible by new accelerator developments. Joint symposium on dating significant events in the history of Earth brings together many world experts on dating techniques. Joint symposium dealing with recent advances in the use of Mossbauer spectroscopy for studying chemical systems covers fundamental inorganic chemistry, theoretical chemistry, analytical and environmental applications, and new experimental techniques. Professional Relations Symposium entitled Education for a Professional Life (joint) examines career development, performance appraisals, and professional employment agreements. Symposium on employment reentry options (joint) deals primarily with the problems of and proposed solutions for re-employment of women who have interrupted careers. Note: These highlights are based on information provided by chairmen about their programs to the ACS Meetings & Divisional Activities Department.

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

43

TECHNICAL MEETING SUMMARY COMMITTEES

MONDAY |

AM

PM

[

AM

TUESDAY | PM

TUI IDCRAV

WEDNESDAY AM PM

|

AM

FRIDAY AM

PM

Chemical Education

EF^S

Clinical chemistry* 47

Chemistry & Public Affairs

Federal R&D funding in chemistry 47

Membership Affairs

Retirement, a new challenge 47

Professional Relations

Education for professional life 47

Technician Activities

Chemical technicians 47

48

Women Chemists

Employment re-entry 48

Younger Chemists

Professional chemists in industry 48

DIVISIONS Agricultural & Food Chemistry

I I

Dietary fiber* 48

m

Award in chromatography 49

Analytical Chemistry ANAL

General (chromatography) 50

49

49

General

Ultrahigh-sensitivity analytical chemistry 49 50

Garvan Medal 49

General 49

49

48

Industrial problem solving

General (atomic absorption)

48

Nutrition & quality of citrus fruit

Proteins in food applications 48

General 50

General {electrochemistry) 5 0

Chemical instrumentation award

Genera! (spectroscopy)

50

50

Advanced instrumentation for combustion products analysis 50

Computer networks in analytical I; 49

Analytical chemistry award 50

Solution properties of polysaccharides 51

Carbohydrate Chemistry CARB

General 51

General

Proteins in various organisms

Problems in diet, resistance to disease 48

General 51

Blocking groups 51

Dietary fiber 51

Cellulose, Paper & Textile CELL

Liquid crystal formation in cellulose derivatives 51 52

Influence of pollution energy on textile finishing 52

Liquid sorption in cellulose materials 52 Role of wood/paper in material science 52

Chemical Education CHED

Textile comfort 52

53

52

53 General 53

53

Clinical chemistry

High school chemistry

52

Chemical Information | CINF

Public perception of chemical industries 53

Chemical Marketing & Economics CMEC

Data bases for quantitative structure activity relationships 54

m

53 Underground storage of | liquefied gases |

General 53

1

53

54

g

Record keeping under environmental laws

Handling patent data in image technology

Engineering indexing workshop

54

54

54 Chemicals for enhanced oil recovery 54

Monohydric alcohols 54 Synthetic lubricants 54

44

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

53 Chemical industry & chemical education 53

Student affiliate research 52

General

53

Goals of general chemistry

Poster session 52

General 53

| Teaching lab techniques! for organic chemistry \

Teaching lab techniques y | for organic chemistry 53

State of the art for chemical educators 52

General 52

Underlined symposia titles have joint sponsorship; * after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue ofC&EN.

AM Colloid & Surface Chemistry COLL

Effects atrne^i-semiconductor interface 54 55

54

55

Surface chemistry in biology & medicine 55

Computers in Chemistry COMP

Environmental Chemistry ENVT

Surface studies—petroleum chemistry 56

Gèfïeia!

Genera!

Computer networks in analytical lab

56

56 Chemical analysis of water/wastewater intended for reuse 61

General;

•ïïïtS

62

Award for advances in environmental sciences

General

Virus removal in wastewater treatment

61

61

61

Liquid fuels from coal 62

Fuel Chemistry FUEL

Catalytic reactions—synthesis gas" 63

Utilization of peat& lignite 62

Coal liquids upgrading^ 62

Novel methods of metal & heteroatom removal 62

Geochemistry GEOC

Colloid problems in coal utilization 56

Photochemical & electrochemical surface science 55 56

Clay-organic-metal ion interactions" 54

Adsorption from aqueous solutions 56

Surface science of catalysis 55 56

General (catalysis) 55

55

FRIDAY AM

Physicochemical properties of colloidal particles 56

Kendall award 55

Molecular processes at solid surfaces

THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY PM

General 63

Environmental control in synfuels processes 62

Clay-organic-metal ion interactions 63

Genera}

63

General 63

Stable isotopes in gas & petroleum 63

Nuclear & chemical dating techniques 63

History of Chemistry HIST

Center for history of chemistry 63

Industrial & Engineering Chemistry INDE

New applications for plastics 64

Inorganic Chemistry INOR

History of polymer science & technology

General 63

63

Nuclear & chemical dating techniques 63 64 Monohydric alcohols—manufacture, applications & chemistry

Homogeneous catalysis

General (silicon chemistry)

Homogeneous catalysis

64

65

66

General (solid-state chemistry)

66

65

65

Quantum methods 66

66 General (sulfur-containing compounds) 66

Sulfur complexes

Poster

Synthesis in solid-state chemistry 66 67 68

66

Solid-state chemistry in undergraduate curriculum 65

Controlled release membranes 64

Murphree award 64

64 Awards

Chemicals from cellulosic materials 64

General (photochemistry)

66 General (main group compounds)

65

General (theoretical calculations) 66

General {main-group metal complexes) 67

67

68

General

General (organometaliic)

(organometaliic clusters)

67

67

Genera} (kinetics & mechanisms)

General (bio inorganic}

67

Chemical applications of Mossbauer spectroscopy 65

66

67

Heteiophase attached homogeneous catalysis* 65 66 General (organometaliic)

65

General (macrocycles) 67

General I (ianthanides & actinides)

65

I Metalations in synthesis 65 67

Medicinal Chemistry MEDI

Nuclear Chemistry & Technology NUCL

Novel approaches to fertility control 68

General

Drugs for treatment of hypertension 68

Mechanism of antitumor agents 68

Burger award 68

Short-lived and exotic nuclei 70

Nuclear & chemical dating techniques 69 Reactions in intermediate energy region with nuclear & mesonic projectiles

General 68

High-energy reactions & nuclei far from stability 69 70

General 70

Chemical applications of Mossbauer spectroscopy

m το

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

45

TECHNICAL MEETING SUMMARY

Underlined symposia titles have joint sponsorship; * after the title indicates the primary sponsor. Note: Numbers represent page numbers in this issue of C&EN.

NIÔNDÂ^^^^^^^^^^TUËSDÂ^^^^^^^^^WÊDNÊSD^ AM Organic Chemistry

I

PM

General (peptides, nucleosides) 71

I

PM

I

General (terpenes) 71

71

71

I

72

73 Borden award

I

AM

General (physical organic)

I

i General J (synthetic methodology

General (physical organic)

PM

General (organometallics) 72 General (radicals) 72

I

AM

General

General

(photochemistry) 72

(excited states) 73

General (organometallics)

I I

72

I

Genera! benzenoid aromatic

I Teaching lab technique; 72

72

Interfacial synthesis

Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry

PM General (heterocycies) 72

Metalation in synthesis* 71 79

71 General (reaction mechanics 71

AM Guenther award

I

Phase-transfer catalysis

uenerai (stereochemistry}

ORPL

AM Award for synthetic organic chemistry

(alkaloids) 71

70

ORGN

I

General

Norris award

Photodegradation, photooxidation, photostabilization of organic coatings 74 75

74 Film formation from powders, melts, solutions

73

73

New concepts in coatings & plastics chemistry 74

74

Biomedical and dental applications 73

74

New applications for plastic:

Molecular structure of polymers

73

74

75

History of polymer science & technology 74 Novel methods of metal & heteroatom removal* 75

Petroleum Chemistry PETR

Lubrizol award 75

Chemistry for octane improvement

Homogeneous catalysis* 75

Surface studies—petroleum chemistry*

75

75

Advanced instrumentation for combustion Droducts analvsis 75

Catalytic reactions—synthesis gas 75

76

Heterophase attached homogeneous catalysis 75 Coal liquids upgrading 75 Physical Chemistry

Murphree award 75

Structure of large drugs and biomolecules 76 77

PHYS

Developments in spectroscopy 76 77 Electrostatic potential in chemistry 77 78 Solid-state chemistry 76 77 Nonionizing radiation 76 77 78 Poster session (general) 76 77 78

Polymer Chemistry

Anionic polymerization 78 79 80

POLY

Characterization of polymers by proton, electron & ion probe 78 79 80 Polymers for unusual service 78

Education for professionals' 80

Professional Relations PRFR

Poster session (special topics) 79

Award for creative invention 78

Polymeric controlled-release formulations 70

Employment re-entry* 80

Poster (chemists' salaries) 80

Rubber RUBB

History of polymer science & technology

Small Chemical Business

SChB

General

Innovation 80

I !

Consultants * 80

Taxation

I

True stories 80

IfPWÈ^i^ï ί ^ v î .*~'

46

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

!>

"fc^

Special topics 80

I

TECHNICAL PROGRAM 179th ACS National Meeting

HOUSTON COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON CHEMICAL EDUCATION

4:20—18. Thermolysis of N3-Methyl-N1Benzyl Amidrazone Ylides. R. R. Soelch, R. F. Smith. 4:40—19. Proton Inventory Investigation of the General Base-Catalyzed Cyclization of Ethyl 2-Hydroxymethylbenzoate. J. Hunt, J. L. Hogg.

I. D. Eubanks, Chairman Section Β MONDAY MORNING Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 101 (Lobby Level) Third National Student Affiliate Research Symposium Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Biochemistry-Medicinal Chemistry

L. Hartman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. I. D. Eu­ banks. 9:10—1. Catalysis of Peptide Bond Formation on Clay Surfaces. J. C. Erickson, D. H. White. 9:30—2. Radiolysis of Folic Acid. A. Mateo, G. A. Infante, L. Velez. 9:50—3. A Rapid Non-Destructive Assay for Gangliosides. J. L. Frame, H. C. Price. 10:10—4. The Analytical Determination of Corticosteroids on the Nanogram Level in Normal and Arthritic Serum. K. J. Ferrante, D. M. Tschaen, J. F. Belliveau, G. P. O'Leary. 10:30—5. UV Spectrophotometric Determi­ nation of DDT in Animal Tissue. M. A. Jackson, C. Harding, J. R. Harris, L. Schasel, C. L. Turner. 10:50—6. Isolation of Mucoproteins from Bovine Cornea. T. R. Prosper, B. L. Plessy. 11:10—7. Radiosensitization Studies Using Isoindole Quinones. A. Santos, C. Camacho, G. Infante. 11:30—8. The Effect of Triglycerides on the Absorption of Metal Ions in Mice. R. A. Hess, M. R. Chakrabarty. 11:50—9. Catalysis of the Disproportionation of Superoxide by Metalloporphyrins. W. R. Skowronek, Jr. R. F. Pasternack. 12:10—10. Enzymatic Halogenation and Oxidation of Phenolic Substrates. D. P. Rotella, J. F. Siuda, C. F. Wannstedt. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 101 (Lobby Level) Third National Student Affiliate Research Symposium Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Biochemistry-Medicinal ChemistryOrganic

L. Sheldon, Presiding 2:00—11. The Synthesis and Characterization of Two Arsenate Triesters. D. L. Ostrow, S. K. Gilbert. 2:20—12. The Structure of Water Absorbed in Collagen. E. V. Pons, G. R. Choppin. 2:40—13. Methylthiomethyl Esters as Carboxylic Acid Protecting Groups. R. Wood, D. R. Near, L. G. Wade, Jr. 3:00—14. A Mild and Efficient Route to Schiff Base Derivatives of Amino Acids. R. Polt, M. J. O'Donnell. 3:20-15. Preparation and Properties of Methoxy Substituted Tetraphenylporphins. L. Gadsden, A. Garvin, D. Malakar, A. McLellan, C. Sanders. 3:40—16. New Approaches to Substituted Pyrimidines Via Cycloadditions to 1,3Diazadienes. J. T. Drummond, M. H. Delton. 4:00—17. Functionalization of a Steroidal Angular Methyl Group Revisited. L. H. Yelle, Β. Η. Jennings.

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 112 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Clinical Chemistry Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc.

J. A. Bee I, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—20. Education in Clinical Chemistry. H. D. Gruemer. 2:40—21. Graduate Education and Training of Clinical Chemists. J. Kerkay. 3:10—Intermission. 3:20—22. Career and Continuing Education Programs in Clinical Chemistry. H. A. Fritsche. 3:50—23. A Systematic Approach to Teaching Analytical Aspects of Clinical Chemistry. H. L. Pardue. 4:20—Concluding Remarks.

TUESDAY MORNING Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 101 (Lobby Level) Third National Student Affiliate Research Symposium Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Organic-Inorganic-Physical Chemistry

2:20—35. Development of Chelating Ligands for Iron(lll). L. Templeton, A. E. Martell, R. J. Motekaitis. 2:40—36. Mixed Metal Carbonyl Complexes Containing Bridging Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2. S. Kaiser, J. Brodack, L. W. Cary, N. Hansen, R. Keiter. 3:00—37. Intramolecular Energy Transfer in the Transition Metal Dimers (NCfeCo111CN-Co'^NHak and (NOlCo^-CN-Cr'^NHg)!. J. S. Hallock, N. A. P. Kane-Maguire. 3:20—38. Organotin Derivatives of Phenylphosphonic Acid O-Phenyl Ester, PhP(O)(OPh)OH. L. A. Kelly, D. Cunningham, J. J. Zuckerman. 3:40—39. A Novel Variable Power Microwave Electrodeless Discharge for Production of Atomic Species. R. B. Barat, J. W. Bozzelli. 4:00—40. A New Technique for Reducing Impedance of Silver-Silver Chloride Elec­ trodes. D. S. Grubbs, D. S. Worley. 4:20—41. On the Description of Steady-State Diffusion and Reaction in Terms of Weierstrassian Elliptic Functions. D. Altshuller.

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON CHEMISTRY AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS H. L. Finkbeiner, Chairman

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. Retirement and Residential Relo­ cation. C. F. Longino, Jr. 10:00—2. Personal Strategies for a Finan­ cially Secure Retirement. E. D. Kanaly. 10:50—3. Ports of Call Before Retirement. O. Gruber. 11:40—Concluding Remarks.

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS P. S. Landis, Chairman

MONDAY AFTERNOON 2:00—Symposium on Education for a Pro­ fessional Life Joint with Division of Pro­ fessional Relations (see page 80) 4:30—Open Meeting, Sheraton-Houston, Mesa Room.

TUESDAY EVENING 7:00—Social Hour (Joint with Division of Professional Relations), Stouffer's Greenway Plaza, 6 Greenway Plaza East. 7:30—Dinner (Joint with Division of Profes­ sional Relations), Stouffer's Greenway Plaza, 6 Greenway Plaza East.

J. Spraggins, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. L. N. Fer­ guson. 9:10—24. The Effect of Urea and Acetonitrile on the Hydrolysis of Acetylimidazolium Ion. W. P. Huskey, J. L. Hogg. 9:30—25. Elucidation of Structure and Mechanism of 2,5-Di-ferf-Butyl-1,4-Benzoquinone Epoxides. V. A. Stepp, Ε. Μ. Hairfield. 9:50—26. Sample Collection and Recovery Efficiencies of Organic Vapors Using Ad­ sorbent Traps. J. E. La Regina, J. W. Bozzelli, B. Kebbekus. 10:10—27. Electrostatic Ring Strain in Crown Ethers. D. J. Moses, J. W. Larson. 10:30—28. Mesomeric Stabilization of Carbonium Ions by α-Cyano Groups. A Theo­ retical Evaluation of Inductive Versus Resonance Effects of the Cyano Moiety. P. A. Charlier, D. A. Dixon, P. G. Gassman. 10:50—29. Rare Gas Matrix Isolation ESR Studies of BeBr, MgBr and ZnBr Radicals Generated by Codeposition Reactions. T. A. Fisher, L. B. Knight, Jr. 11:10—30. Reaction of the Arsenic Cage Compound As4(NMe)6. W. S. Rees, J. L. Mills. 11:30—31. Thermal Analysis of 5,7,7,12,14,14-Hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-Tetraazacyclotetradeca-4,11-Dienatonickel (II) Iodide. J. D. Madura, E. F. Heald. 11:50—32. Thermal Degradation of EDTA. X. B. Cox III, A. E. Martell, R. J. Motekaitis. 12:10—33. Sorption of Sulfur Dioxide on Solid Surfaces. G. Welch, G. Nolan.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Sheraton-Houston, Abilene Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Federal R&D Funding in Chemistry—FY 1981 4:00—Introductory Remarks. 4:05—1. The Role of the Office of Manage­ ment and the Budget in Development of the Federal R&D Budget. G. Pesyna. 4:20—2. R&D Funding in Chemistry at the National Science Foundation. R. S. Ni­ cholson. 4:35—3. Chemistry Research at the Depart­ ment of Energy. E. Pierce. 4:50—4. Funding in Chemical R&D at the Department of Defense. W. B. Fox. 5:05—5. The Environmental Protection Agency's Chemical Research Programs. C. Riordan. 5:20—6. Chemical Research Programs at the National Institutes of Health. M. S. Fish. 5:35—7. Chemical R&D Funding at the De­ partment of Agriculture. M. J. Pallansch. 5:50—Discussion.

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AFFAIRS W. M. Tuddenham, Chairman

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 101 (Lobby Level) Third National Student Affiliate Research Symposium Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Inorganic-Physical Chemistry

TUESDAY MORNING

2:00—34. The Diffusion of Chromium into Molybdenum. M. M. Loos.

M. Campbell, Chairman

J. D. D'lanni, Presiding

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

E. Kennedy, Presiding

COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 106 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Retirement, A New Chal­ lenge L. V. Sorg, Presiding

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Sheraton-Houston, El Paso Room Symposium for Chemical Technicians W. S. Harris, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. M. Camp­ bell. 9:10—1. Mechanically Frothed Polyurethane Foam. D. L. Lee. 9:30—2. Measurement of the Odor Recog­ nition Threshold in the Laboratory. J. R. Loy. 9:50—3. Preparation of Ceramic Grade Plu­ tonium Dioxide for the Fast Flux Test Fa­ cility. L. W. Reese. G. L. Taylor, M. Haas. 10:10—Intermission. 10:30—4. The Effect of Soluble Zirconium on the Dissolution Rates of Th0 2 and Th0 2 U0 2 . L. M. Gray. 10:50—5. High Performance Liquid Chro­ matographic Analysis of Polymerization Inhibitors in Acrylic Monomers. T. J. Mann. 11:10—6. Experiments with a High Anti­ coincidence Ge(Li) Detector System. C. P. McLaughlin. 1:30—7. High-Level Defense Waste Solidifi­ cation at the Savannah River Plant. H. D. Rhoad. 1:50—8. Computer-Controlled on-Line Analysis for Krypton 85. R. P. Canuette. 2:10—Intermission. 2:30—9. Kinetic Studies Using a Batch Micro-Reactor System. J. Henegar. 2:50—10. Nonhydrolyzable Silicone Surfac­ tants as Polyurethane Foam Stabilizers. W. N. Matulewicz.

Feb. 18. 1980 C&EN

47

1 I -I

s Ζ' ζ

I •Ë

TUESDAY MORNING

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Sheraton-Houston, El Paso Room Symposium for Chemical Technicians W. S. Harris, Presiding 9:00—11. Use of Radioisotopes in Refinery Operations. H. G. Myers. 9:20—12. Determination of Titanium, on Sil­ ica Supported Catalysts by Atomic Ab­ sorption Spectroscopy. R. C. Singer. 9:40—13. Plutonium Scrap Processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. A. E. Nixon. B. J. McKerley, E. L. Christensen. 10:00—Intermission. 10:20—14. Contact Angle, Surface Energy, and Urethane Mold Release. C. B. Ni­ chols. 10:40—15. Chemical Research Studies for the Recovery of Americium at Rocky Flats. P. G. Hagan. 11:00—Keynote Address. G. Stacy, Past President, American Chemical Society. 1:30—16. Use of Differential Scanning Calorimetry for Prediction of Polyethylene Density. J. E. Janak. 1:50—17. Trace Metals Analysis by Atomic Absorption with Carbon Rod Atomizer. G. M. Blessing. 2:10—Concluding Remarks. 2:15—Intermission. 2:30—Open Meeting—Committee on Tech­ nician Activities. 3:30—Open Meeting—National Council of Chemical Technician Affiliates.

WOMEN CHEMISTS COMMITTEE W. L. Brown, Chairman

TUESDAY MORNING Symposium on Employment Re-entry, Issues and Options Joint with Division of Profes­ sional Relations (see page 80) 11:30—Social Hour, Hyatt Regency, Regency Room (2nd Floor) 12:00—Luncheon, Hyatt Regency, Regency Room (2nd Floor)

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Symposium on Employment Re-entry, Issues and Options. Joint with Division of Profes­ sional Relations (see page 80)

JOINT BOARD-COUNCIL COMMITTEE FOR YOUNGER CHEMISTS R. A. Pribush, Chairman A. W. Verstuyft, Secretary

The Whitehall, Concourse A (2nd Level) Symposium on Functional Properties Gov­ erning Roles of Proteins in Food Applications. II. J. P. Cherry, Presiding

AGFD DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY R. L. Ory, Chairman C. J. Mussinan, Secretary/ Treasurer

TUESDAY

MONDAY MORNING The Whitehall, Concourse A (2nd Level) Symposium on Dietary Fiber: Sources and Physiological Effects. I. Joint with Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry

R. L. Ory, R. R. Mod, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Dietary Fiber in Cereals: Chemical, Enzymatic and In Vivo Observations. R. M. Saunders, E. Hautala, E. A. Elliston. 9:35—2. Chemical Properties and Interac­ tions of Rice Hemicelluloses with Trace Minerals In Vitro. R. R. Mod, R. L. Ory, N. M. Morris, F. L. Normand. 10:05—3. Cereal Brans as Dietary Fiber Sources and Their Physiological Effects in Humans. G. E. Inglett. 10:35—4. Changes in Dietary Fiber of Cereals During Processing. S. K. Skarsaune, D. R. Schaller. 11:05—5. Molecular Interactions of Dietary Fiber Components. P. E. Pfeffer, P. D. Hoagland, L. W. Doner, K. M. Valentine, R. A. Barford, G. G. McDonald. 11:35—6. A Systems View of the Structure and Function of Dietary Fiber. I. Falkehag. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

The Whitehall, Concourse A (2nd Level) Symposium on Dietary Fiber: Sources and Physiological Effects. II. Joint with Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry R. R. Mod, R. L. Ory, Presiding 2:00—7. Nutrient Utilization by Human Subjects Consuming Fruits and Vegetables as Sources of Fiber. J. L. Kelsay, W. M. Clark, B. J. Herbst, E. S. Prather. 2:30—8. Nutritional Significance of Dietary Fiber in Relation to Health With Special Reference to Some of its Gastrointestinal Effects. R. Ali, H. Staub, L. Schanbacher. 3:00—9. Effects of Lignin on Gallbladder (GB) Bile Composition and Fecal Steroid Ex­ cretion in the Hamster. R. M. Kay, M. Wayman, O. Rotstein, S. M. Strasberg. 3:30—10. The Physico-Chemical Properties of Lignins and Their Potential Roles in Di­ etary Fiber. B. A. Pethica, P. Zuman. 4:00—11. Breakdown of Polysaccharides by Human Colonic Bacteria. A. A. Salyers. 4:30—12. The Enzymatic Degradation of Plant Cell Wall by a Bacteroides of Human Fecal Origin. J. Dekker, J. K. Palmer. 5:15—Nutrition Subdivision Business Meeting. Section Β

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 214 (2nd Level) Forum on Some Aspects of a Career as a Professional Chemist in Industry J. D. Richardson, Presiding 2:05—Forum on Some Aspects of a Career as a Professional Chemist in Industry. J. D. Richardson.

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

48

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

9:00—18. Whippability and Aeration. J. P. Cherry. 9:30—19. Water and Fat Absorption. C. W. Hutton, A. M. Campbell. 10:00—20. Emulsification—Milk Proteins. C. V. Morr. 10:30—21. Emulsification—Vegetable Pro­ teins. K. H. McWatters, J. P. Cherry. 11:00—22. Multiple Regression Modelling of Functional Properties of Plant Proteins. M. R. Holmes.

The Whitehall, Concourse Β (2nd Level) Symposium on Functional Properties Gov­ erning Roles of Proteins in Food Applications. I. J. P. Cherry, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—13. Functionality-Terminology, Clas­ sification and Methodology. A. Pour-El. 2:35—14. Solubility and Viscosity: Funda­ mental Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Isolated Soy Proteins. J. L. Shen. 3:05—15. Adhesion and Cohesion, Wheat and Other Proteins. J. S. Wall, F. R. Huebner. 3:35—16. Gelation and Coagulation. R. H. Schmidt. 4:05—17. Texturization. K. C. Rhee, C.-K. Kuo, E. W. Lusas. 5:15—Nutrition Subdivision Business Meeting. (see Section A for location.)

AFTERNOON

The Whitehall, Concourse A (2nd Level) Symposium on Functional Properties Gov­ erning Roles of Proteins in Food Applications. III.

J. P. Cherry, Presiding 2:00—23. Enzyme Modification of Protein Functionality. G. Puski. 2:30—24. Color—A Functional Property Governing the Role of Plant Proteins in Food Application. F. A. Blouin, Z. M. Zarins, J. P. Cherry. 3:00—25. Flavor Volatiles—Measurement by Rapid Instrumental Techniques. M. G. Legendre, H. P. Dupuy. 3:30—26. Nutrient Bioavailability. J. W. Erdman, Jr., D. B. Thompson. 4:00—Discussion. 5:15—Protein Subdivision Business Meeting. WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A The Whitehall, Concourse A (2nd Level) Symposium on Proteins in Diet and Resis­ tance to Disease. I.

M. Phillips, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—27. The Role of Copper in Metabolic Disorders. G. W.^Evans. 9:40—28. Antimicrobial Properties of IronBinding Proteins. A. Bezkorovainy. 10:15—29. Iron Status, Humoral and Cellular Immunity, and Host Defense. S. A. Broitman, J. J. Vitale. 10:50—30. The Effect of Dietary Zinc Defi­ ciency on Immunity in the Inbred Mouse. P. J. Fraker, R. W. Luecke. 11:25—31. Anti-Inflammatory, Immunologic and Carcinostatic Attributes of Selenium in Experimental Animals. J. E. Spallholz. Section Β The Whitehall, Concourse Β (2nd Level) Symposium on Nutrition and Quality of Citrus Fruit and Their Products. I.

S. Nagy, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—32. Limonin and Limonoids: Chemistry, Biochemistry and Juice Bitterness. V. P. Maier, S. Hasegawa, R. D. Bennett, L. C. Brewster. 9:35—33. Citrus Flavonoids and Related Compounds. R. L. Rouseff. 10:00—34. Color as Related to Quality in Citrus. I. Stewart. 10:30—35. Immunological Tests for the Evaluation of Citrus Quality. R. L. Mansell, E. W. Weiler. 11:00—36. Importance of Selected Volatile Components to Natural Orange, Grapefruit, Tangerine and Mandarin Flavors. C. W. Wilson, III, P. E. Shaw. 11:30—37. Analysis of Trace Metals in Or­ ange Juice. J. A. McHard, S. J. Foulk, J. L. Jorgensen, J. D. Winefordner. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON A

Section

The Whitehall, Concourse A (2nd Level) Symposium on Proteins in Diet and Resis­ tance to Disease. II.

A. L. Baetz, Presiding 1:45—38. Effect of Vitamin Ε on Disease Resistance and Immune Responses. R. P. Tengerdy, D. F. Nockels, Μ. Μ. Mathias. 2:20—39. Host Defense Mechanisms in Protein Calorie Malnutrition. G. T. Keusch, J. J. Urrutia. 2:55—40. Effects of Dietary Folate, Vitamin B-I2 and Methionine/Choline Deficiency on Immune Function. K. M. Nauss, P. M. ' Newberne.

3:30—41. Role of the Β Vitamins in the Im­ mune Response. A. E. Axelrod. 4:05—42. Vitamin C and the Immune Re­ sponse. B. Leibovitz, B. V. Siegel. 4:40—Concluding Remarks. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting, (see Section Β for location)

Section Β The Whitehall, Concourse Β (2nd Level) Symposium on Nutrition and Quality of Citrus Fruit and Their Products. II.

J. A. Attaway, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—43. Pectin-Lipoprotein Interaction. M. Mansoor Baig, J. J. Cerda. 2:35—44. Nutrients and Nutrition of Citrus Fruits. S. V. Ting. 3:05—45. The Role of Pectin in Citrus Quality and Nutrition. R. A. Baker. 3:35—46. Relationship Between Enzymes and Quality of Citrus Fruit and Their Prod­ ucts. J. H. Bruemmer. 4:05—47. Problems in Organoleptic Evalua­ tion of Citrus Products. P. Fellers. 4:35—48. Effects of Processing on Quality and Nutrition of Citrus Juices. C. Varsel, K. Assar. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

The Whitehall, Concourse A (2nd Level) Symposium on Protein Turnover, Biosyn­ thesis, and Degradation in Various Organ­ isms. I. T. Richardson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—49. Milk Protein Gene Expression in Rat Mammary Gland. P. K. Qasba. 9:50—50. Mechanism and Regulation of Protein Turnover in Higher Organisms. J. R. Winkler, H. L. Segal. 10:35—51. Growth and Protein Turnover in Animals. R. W. Swick. 11:20—52. Protein Synthesis and Degrada­ tion During Development. R. J. Mayer.

Section Β The Whitehall, Concourse Β (2nd Level) General R. L. Ory, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—53. Acetylenic and Wittig Synthesis of Hexadeuterio-11-octadecenoates. W. J. DeJarlais, E. A. Emken, H. J. Dutton. 9:25—54. Reproducibility in Stopped-flow Cholinesterase Inhibition Studies. C. N. Lieske, J. H. Clark, J. R. Lowe, H. G. Meyer, C. R. Tremper, A. R. Main. 9:45—55. Mycotoxin Production by Alternaria Species Grown on Apples, Tomatoes, and Blueberries. E. E. Stinson, D. D. Bills, S. F. Osman, J. Siciliano, M. J. Ceponis, E. G. Heisler. 10:05—56. Excretion and Distribution of Ra­ dioactivity from Tritium-labeled Zearalenone in Tissue of Broiler Chicks. T. S. Robison, C. J. Mirocha, P. C. Smith, S. P. Swanson, S. V. Pathre, J. C. Behrens, G. A. Weaver. 10:25—57. Partial Inhibition of Radiation and Radiomimetic-induced Disease by Sup­ plemental Vitamin A. E. Seifler, G. Rettura, S. M. Levenson. 10:45—58. Comparative Utilization of Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins by Adult Hu­ mans Fed Liquid Formula Diets. C. Kies, H. M. Fox. 11:05—59. Role of the Lactone Ring of Aflatoxin Bi in Toxicity and Mutagenicity. L. S. Lee, J. J. Dunn II, A. J. DeLucca, A. Ciegler. THURSDAY

AFTERNOON

The Whitehall, Concourse A (2nd Level) Symposium on Protein Turnover, Biosyn­ thesis, and Degradation in Various Organ­ isms. II. T. Richardson, Presiding 2:00—60. Molecular Aspects of Seed Storage Protein Biosynthesis. R. N. Beachy. 2:45—61. Factors Contributing to Enhanced Storage Protein Synthesis in Maize Endo­ sperm. B. A. Larkins.

Γ­ 3:35—62. Microbial Factories for the Pro­ duction of Animal Proteins. T. H. Fraser. 4:20—63. Genetic Engineering of Yeast for Production of Specific Proteins. R. W. Davis. FRIDAY MORNING The Whitehall, Concourse A (2nd Level) General—GC, GC/MS, and HPLC S. Nagy, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—64. Composition of Rough Lemon, Key Lime and Meyer Lemon Leaf Oils. E. D. Lund, P. E. Shaw, C. L. Kirkland. 9:25—65. Determination of Thiamin and Ri­ boflavin in Meat and Meat Products by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography. C. Y. W. Ang, F. A. Moseley. 9:45—66. Separation of Organic Acids in Beverages by Reverse Phase HPLC. M. Nelson. 10:05—67. Determination of Total Bound Inositol and Phytic Acid by Gas-Liquid Chromatography of Inositol Acetates. J. S. Wall, J. E. Sanderson, G. L. Donaldson, J. H. Sloneker. 10:25—68. The Characterization of Pesticide Degradation Products and Their Interactions with Copper. W. E. Rudzinski. 10:45—69. Quantitation of Manganese, Iron, Copper, and Zinc in Grass Tissue by X-ray Fluorescence. T. A. Kling, R. L. R. Towns. 11:05—70. Phenylpropanoids in Hot Water Extracts of Cultured Tobacco Callus Tissue. R. A. Anderson, T. R. Kemp.

/miV/\L

DIVISION OF ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) General: Atomic Absorption T. M. Vickrey, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—12. Characterization of Plate Elec­ trodes for LEI Spectrometry. G. J. Havrilla, R. B. Green. 9:20—13. Surface Studies of Electrodes for LEI Spectrometry. T. O. Trask, R. B. Green. 9:40—14. Post Column Digestion Methods for LCGFAA Speciation Qf Organolead and Organotin Compounds. T. M. Vickrey, Η. Ε. Howell, G. V. Harrison, G. J. Ramelow. 9:55—15. GFAA Analysis of Organometallics Using Metal Carbide Coated Graphite Cu­ vettes. T. M. Vickrey, G. V. Harrison, G. J. Ramelow. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—16. Investigation of Alternate Ana­ lytical Lines in Continuum-Source Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. J. D. Messman, M. S. Epstein, T. C. Rains, T. C. O'Haver. 10:40—17. Analytical Utility of Liquid Chro­ matography—Atomic Absorption Spec­ trometry for Metal Speciation Studies. J. D. Messman, T. C. Rains. 11:00—18. APDC-MIBK Extraction for the Determination of Trace Amounts of Auto­ genic Silver in Marine Sediments by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. J. J. Dillon. 11:15—19. Chemical Behavior of the OH Radical in an Air-Acetylene Flame. G. J. Bastiaans, G. J. Keefe. 11:35—20. An Improved Method for Quanti­ tation of Sulfur Forms in Natural Fuel Ma­ terials. T. J. Hocking, W. M. Gulick, Jr. MONDAY AFTERNOON

F. A. Guthrie, Chairman R. F. Hirsch, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

10:10—8. A Geochemical Laboratory for Analysis of Large Numbers of Samples Using a Multitechnique Approach. R. W. Morrow, G. F. Larson, L. E. White, T. L. Futrell. 10:40—9. Spectral Investigations in Support of Coal Liquefaction Technologies. H. L. Retcofsky, F. R. Brown, R. G. Lett. 11:10—10. Characterization of Mixed Metal Cobalt Spinels. H. L. Spell, C. P. Christenson, R. E. Guerra, W. W. Henslee. 11:40—11. Multi-Technique Approach in Research and Development. A. Davis, S. Sojka.

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 210 (2nd Level) ACS Award in Chromatography Symposium: The Electron Capture Detector in Environ­ mental and Biological Studies A. Zlatkis, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Award Address. (ACS Award in Chromatography sponsored by SUPELCO, Inc.) The electron Capture Detector: An Odyssey. J. E. Lovelock. 10:00—2. SECS and the Lovelock EC De­ tector: The Odyssey to Effortless Sensiti­ zation. R. E. Sievers, M. P. Phillips, M. A. Wizner, F. C. Fehsenfeld, P. D. Goldan 10:30—3. The E. C. Detector Revisited: A Pathway to Greatly Broadened Applicability. P. D. GokJan, F. C. Fehsenfeld, W. C. Kuster, R. E. Sievers, M. Phillips. 10:50—Intermission. 11:00—4. Biomedical Applications of Elec­ tron Capture Gas Chromatography. D. C. Fenimore, C. M. Davis. 11:30—5. Derivitization Techniques for Use with the Electron-Capture Detector. C. F. Poole, A. Zlatkis. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 211 (2nd Level) Symposium on Industrial Problem Solv­ ing—a Multi-technique Approach J. G. Grasselli, Presiding 9:00—6. Analytical Problems in Industrial Research with Hydrogen Cyanide Chem­ istry. E. C. Dunlop, O. W. Webster. 9:30—7. Chemical Characterization of Ref­ use Fueled Processes. G. M. Trischan. 10:00—Intermission.

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 210 (2nd Level) ACS Award in Chromatography Symposium: The Electron Capture Detector in Environ­ mental and Biological Studies L. S. Ettre, Presiding 2:00—21. Comparative Investigation of 63 Ni and 3H Sources for the ECD. J. A. Ayala, W. E. Wentworth, E. C. M. Chen. 2:30—22. Physical Detail of the Pulsed Electron Capture Detector Provided by the Simultaneous Measurement of its Electrons and Ions. E. P. Grimsrud, P. L. Gobby, S. W. Warden. 3:00—23. Negative Ion Mass Spectrometry. E. C. Horning, D. I. Carroll, I. Dzidic, R. N. Stillwell. 3:30—24. Further Observations on the Use of Fused Silica Glass in Capillary Column Gas Chromatography. S. R. Lipsky, W. J. McMurray, M. Hernandez. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 211 (2nd Level) Symposium on Industrial Problem Solv­ ing—A Multi-Technique Approach J. G. Grasselli, Presiding 1:45—25. Analytical Approach to the Case of the Great Yellow Cake Caper. P. A. Budinger, T. L. Drenski, A. W. Varnes, J. R. Mooney. 2:15—26. Repair, Replace, Sue or Be Sued, Which? R. L. Campbell, R. Zuback. 2:45—Intermission. 3:00—27. The Role of Structural Chemists in Consumer Products Safety Research. R. P. Oertel. 3:30—28. An Integrated Analytical Approach to Surface Problems of Polyethylene. R. E. Guerra, H. L. Spell.

4:00—29. Organic Coatings Complaint Analysis. R. M. Holsworth. 4:30—30. 1H and 13C NMR Characterization of Cellulose Ethers. F. F.-L. Ho. Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) General

C. H. Lochmuller, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—31. Activation Analysis with Low En­ ergy Heavy Ion Beams. B. D. Lass, J. F. Ojo, C. Friedli, E. A. Schweikert. 2:20—32. Mass Analysis Via Heavy Ion Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. R. T. Sullins, III, C. V. Barros Leite, E. A. Schweikert. 2:40—33. Microscopic Characterization of Objects with a Radioactive Ion Beam. S. A. Johnson, E. A. Schweikert. 2:55—34. Applications of Photoacoustic Spectrometry in the Synthesis of Chemi­ cally-Modified Silica. C. H. Lochmuller, S. F. Marshall, J. D. Fisk, D. Wilder. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—35. Comparison of Continuous and Discrete Nebulization in a Three-Electrode Direct Current Argon Plasma. J. M. Malloy, J. Farino, W. Boyko, P. N. Keliher. 3:45—36. Inductively Coupled Plasma Sam­ ple Introduction of Volatile Metal Chelates. M. S. Black, R. F. Browner. 4:00—37. New Binuclear NMR Shift Reagents Effective for Altering Spectra of Aromatic, Olefinic and Phosphine Compounds. T. J. Wenzel, T. C. Bettes, J. E. Sadlowski, R. E. Sievers. 4:20—38. Determination of Resin & Fatty Acids in Papermill Effluents by GC/MS. V. E. Turoski, M. E. Kuehnl, B. F. Vincent. 4:40—39. Multitechnique Multielement Analysis of Coal and Fly Ash. R. A. Nadkarni. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 210 (2nd Level) Garvan Medal Symposium: Innovative Ap­ proaches to Clinical Analytical Chemistry R. S. Melville, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:35—40. Innovative Approaches to Clinical Analytical Chemistry. R. S. Melville. 9:00—41. Contributions and Challenges of Global Clinical Analytical Chemistry. A. H. Free. 9:45—42. Award Address. (Garvan Medal sponsored by W. R. Grace & Co.) Contri­ butions of Clinical Analytical Chemistry to the Quality of Life. H. M. Free. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—43. Opportunities of Clinical Chem­ istry in the Advancement of Medicine. F. W. Sunderman. 11:15—44. Immobilized Biochemicals at Membrane Electrodes. G. A. Rechnitz. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 211 (2nd Level) Symposium on Industrial Problem Solv­ ing—A Multi-Technique Approach E. C. Dunlop, Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 8:50—45. Analytical—Process Team Solu­ tion to Cosorb Fouling. C. P. Christenson, G. McNamee, G. Turnbo. 9:20—46. Materials Engineering for Elec­ tronics. G. L. Fix. 9:50—47. Problem Solving with Modernized Quality Control Methods and Instruments. J. C-A Hu. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—48. A Multi-technique and Multi-dis­ ciplinary Approach to Trace Metal Analyses and Chemical Cleaning Problems. J. C. Cooper, Rm. Panayappan, D. L. Venezky. 11:00—49. Instrumental Analysis of Ambient Air Samples: One Laboratory's Experi­ ences and Approaches. J. L. Lindgren, H. J. Krauss, J. S. Mgebroff. 11:30—50. Quality Assurance—A Way to Acceptable Analytical Data. W. F. Gutknecht, A. Gaskill, Jr., R. Κ. Μ. Jayanty.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 210 (2nd Level) Garvan Medal Symposium: Innovative Ap­ proaches to Clinical Analytical Chemistry R. S. Melville, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—51. Colorimetric Immunoassays with Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide as the Label. D. L. Morris, R. J. Carrico, P. B. Ellis, W. Hornby, H. R. Schroeder, T. T. Ngo, R. C. Boguslaski. 2:20—52. New Approaches to Fluorescence Measurements. G. D. Christian. 3:05—Intermission. 3:20—53. Measurement of Drugs and Meta­ bolites in Body Fluids and Tissue Homogenates Using Liquid Chromatography with Electrochemical Detection. P. T. Kissinger. 4:05—54. Localized Elemental Analysis by Coupled Back Scatter Electron Microscopy and X Irradiation Analysis. M. Rubin, G. Davidson, W. S. Andrus. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour. (Joint with Di­ vision of Computers in Chemistry) San Ja­ cinto Inn, Battleground Road—off the LaPorte Freeway 7:30—Divisional Dinner. (Joint with Division of Computers in Chemistry) San Jacinto Inn, Battleground Road—off the LaPorte Freeway Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 211 (2nd Level) Symposium on Industrial Problem Solv­ ing—A Multi-Technique Approach E. C. Dunlop, Presiding 1:45—Introductory Remarks. 1:50—55. Analysis of Multi-Component Liquid Crystal Mixtures Using LC-MS-DS Tech­ niques. T.'l. Martin, W. E. Haas. 2:20—56. Detection of Water-Soluble Flux Residues on Epoxy-Glass Printed Circuit Boards by ESCA, ISS/SIMS and EDXRF. R. F. Roberts. 2:50—Intermission. 3:05—57. A Manifold to Prepare Dynamic Vapor Calibration Standards for Chemical and Instrumental Methods. L. T. Freeland. 3:35—58. Analytical-Problem Solving in the Pharmaceutical Industry. S. Fusari. 4:05—59. The Use of High Performance Li­ quid Chromatography for the Solution of Pharmaceutical Separation Problems. M. A. CarroH, E. R. White, J.E. Zarembo. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location.) 7:30—Divisional Dinner, (see Section A for location.) Section C Symposium on Computer Networks in the Analytical Laboratory Joint with Division of Computers in Chemistry (see page 56) 6:30—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location). 7:30—Divisional Dinner, (see Section A for location). WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 210 (2nd Level) Symposium on Ultra High Sensitivity Ana­ lytical Chemistry T. Hirschfeld, Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 8:50—60. Resonance Ionization Spectros­ copy for Ultralow Quantity and Concentra­ tion Analysis. G. S. Hurst. 9:35—61. Transuranics Analysis by Reso­ nance Ionization of Noble Gases. M. R. Cates, L. A. Franks, C. H. Chen. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—62. Solar Neutrino Search Via Atom Counting Analysis at 10 28 Molar Concen­ tration. R. Davis, Jr. 11:15—63. Physiochemical Measurements on Single Atoms in Gases Via Fluores­ cence Correlation. C. Y. She, J. V. Prodan, C. L. Pan, W. M. Fairbank, Jr.

Section C Symposium on Computer Networks in the Analytical Laboratory Joint with Division of Computers in Chemistry (see page 56)

Feb. 18, 1980C&EN

49

Ι*

\

u «PI

ΊΓ m &m ΊΈ

lip

%m m,

W 'S* Ρ»

"Se

Section B Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 211 (2nd Level) General: Chromatography I. E. Treble, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—64. The Many Reversed Phases for HPLC--Which Does What. F. M. Rabel, C. J. Lancaster, J. R. Bickier. 9:20—65. The Determination of Colchicine and its Metabolites by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. A. E. Klein, P. J. Davis. 9:40—66. Determination of 4,4'-Dichlorodiphenyl Sulfone Impurities by Liquid Chro­ matography. I. E. Treble. 9:55—67. An HPLC Method for Measurement of the Corticosteroid Levels in Human and Animal Blood. J. F. Belliveau, G. P. O'Leary, Jr., Β. Ν. Nguyen. 10:10—68. Copolymer Analysis by Combined GPC/GPC and GPC/HPLC. S. T. Balke, R. D. Patel. 10:30—Intermission. 10:40—69. Analysis of Water-Soluble Vita­ mins in Ready to Eat Cereal by HPLC. D. I. Johnson, S. B. Dave. 11:Q0—70. High Pressure Liquid Chromato­ graphic Analysis of Amino Acids in Protein Hydrolysate of Biological Excreta. G. W. C. Hung. 11:15—71. A New High Performance Packed GLC Column and its Use. T. G. Filipi, H. Kessler, Jr., F. M. Rabel. 11:30—72. Sensitive Gas Chromatographic Technique for the Detection of Quaternary Ammonium Salts. S. L. Abidi. 11:45—73. Evaluation of High Temperature Nematic Liquid Crystal GLC Capillary Col­ umns. G. M. Muschik, M. Miller. Section C Symposium on Advanced Instrumentation for Analysis of Combustion Products Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75) WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 210 (2nd Level) Symposium on Ultra High Sensitivity Ana­ lytical Chemistry T. Hirschfeld, Presiding 1:45—Introductory Remarks. 1:50—74. Laser Fluorescence Immunoassay. S. D. Lidofsky. 2:35—75. Flow Photometry Techniques in the Detection of Subfemtogram Particulates at 10~ 18 Molar Concentration. T. Hirsch­ feld. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—76. Photon Counting Chemiluminescence and Fluorescence Applied to Im­ munoassay. R. E. Curry, H. Heitzmann, M. G. Simonsen. 4:15—77. Ultra-Sensitive Characterization of Fluorophores in Solution Utilizing Pulse Laser Excitation and Time-Filter Detection. G. R. Haugen, F. E. Lytle. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 211 (2nd Level) General T. A. Nieman, Presiding 1:45—Introductory Remarks. 1:50—78. A Simple Chromatographic Pro­ cedure for the Separation of Η-Coal Liquid into Polar and Nonpolar Fractions. A. W. Fort, C. T. Magura, Τ. Τ. Coburn. 2:05—79. A New Procedure for the Prepa­ ration of a Cosmetic Item and/or its Ingre­ dients to be Analyzed for N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA). Y. Fukuda, Y. Morikawa, I. Matsumoto. 2:20—80. Evaluation of Ambersorb as an Adsorbent for Sampling Atmospheric Pol­ lutants. C. S. Giam, E. L. Atlas, J. B. Coley. 2:40—81. The Use of Cyclodextrins in the TLC Separation of Aromatic Compounds. W. L. Hinze, D. W. Armstrong. 2:55—82. TLC Separation of Conjugated Cheno- and Ursodeoxycholic Acids. A. K. Batta, G. Salen, S. Shefer.

50

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

3:10—83. Analytical Implications of Bipolar Pulse Conductance Measurements on Ion Selective Electrodes. T. A. Nieman, C. R. Powley, R. F. Geiger, Jr. 3:25—Intermission. 3:35—84. Retention of Metal Ions in Gas-Solid Chromatography: Topological Analysis. J. R. Chretien, J.-E. Dubois, R. J. Gaydosh, R. F. Hirsch. 3:55—85. Determination of Chromium Speciation in Aquatic and Marine Environments. C. A. Chang, H. H. Patterson, D. E. Bause, L. M. Mayer. 4:10—86. Simplified Analytical Monitoring Method for Organic Pollutants in a Contin­ uous Exposure Aquatic System. C. S. Giam, D. Trujillo, Y. Hrung, S. Kira. 4:30—87. Bioaccumulation of Hexachlorobenzene in Killifish. C. S. Giam, H. E. Murray, L. Ray, S. Kira. 4:45—88. Analysis of Vapor Phase Organic Air Pollutants Using Several Simultaneous GC Detectors. J. W. Bozzelli, B. Kebbekus, J. Kemp.

Section C Symposium on Advanced Instrumentation for Analysis of Combustion Products Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 210 (2nd Level) Symposium on Ultra High Sensitivity Ana­ lytical Chemistry T. Hirschfeld, Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 8:50—89. The Study of Metallic Molecules in a Supersonic Molecular Beam. A. Herman. 9:35—90. CW Laser Saturated Fluorescence Spectrometry for Ultrasensitive Analysis. J. A. Gelbwachs. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—91. Gravimetric Methods for UltraTrace Detection by Laser Excited Fluo­ rescence. J. C. Wright, M. V. Johnston. 11:15—92. Ultra High Sensitivity Method for Physical and Analytical Measurements. M. H. Nayfeh.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 211 (2nd Level) Analytical Division Chemical Instrumentation Award Symposium K. R. Bullock, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks and Award Presentation. 9:15—93. Award Address. (Analytical Divi­ sion Chemical Instrumentation Award, co-sponsored by The Hamilton Company.) Two Decades of Progress in Electroanalytical Instrumentation. D. E. Smith. 10:00—94. A. C. Polarographic Analysis of Organic Pharmaceuticals Using Aprotic Organic Solvents: The Steroids Methyltestosterone, Progesterone, Hydrocorti­ sone, and Prednisolone. J. C. Schaar, D. E. Smith. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—95. Development and Evaluation of a Third-Generation Total Organic Carbon Analyzer. S. C. Creason, T. J. Kehoe. 11:15—96. A Comprehensive Critical Col­ lection of Electrochemical Data. Ε. Β. Rupp, P. Zuman, L. Meites. Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry Sym­ posium R. A. Keller, Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 9i00—97. Award Address. (ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry sponsored by Fisher Scientific Company). Field-Flow Fraction­ ation: A Versatile Approach to the Macromolecular-Supramolecular Separation Problem. J. C. Giddings. 9:45—98. Theoretical and Practical Range of Separation by Field-Flow Fractionation. M. N. Myers, K. D. Caldwell, J. C. Giddings. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—99. High-Speed Particle Size Distri­ bution by Programmed Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation. W. W. Yau, J. J. Kirkland.

11:00—100. Particle Size Distribution of Latices and Emulsions by Sedimentation Field-Flow Fractionation. F. F. S. Yang, K. D. Caldwell, M. N. Myers, J. C. Giddings. 11:20—101. Characterization of Polymers by Thermal Field-Flow Fractionation. S. L. Brimhall, M. N. Myers, J. C. Giddings. 11:40—102. Steric Field-Flow Fractionation: Application to Fine Particles Associated with Energy Production. K. A. Graff, M. N. Myers, K. D. Caldwell, J. C. Giddings. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 210 (2nd Level) Symposium on Ultra High Sensitivity Ana­ lytical Chemistry T. Hirschfeld, Presiding 1:45—Introductory Remarks. 1:50—103- Microscopic Volume Analysis. G. B. Larrabee. 2:25—104. The Molecular Microprobe: Micro-Raman Spectroscopy. E. S. Etz. 3:05—105. Resonance Enhanced Two-Pho­ ton Photoionization Spectroscopy Applied to Molecular Detection. R. Frueholz, C. Klimcak, J. Wessel. 3:35—intermission. 3:45—106. Ultratrace High Performance Li­ quid Chromatographic Determination of Selected Carbamate Pesticides in Water with Electrochemical Detection. D. J. Chesney, J. L. Anderson. 4:25—107. Parts Per Trillion Analysis of Volatile Pollutants Using a Purge and Trap—Capillary Column Chromatographic System. R. R. Freeman. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 211 (2nd Level) Analytical Division Chemical Instrumentation Award Symposium T. G. McCord, Presiding 1:45—Introductory Remarks. 1:50—108. Effect of E 1/2 of Reducing Agents on Their Rates of Reduction of 2,6-Dichlorophenolindophenol Dye. E. R. Brown. 2:15—109. Electron-Transfer Reactions of Metallocarborane Triple-Decker Sandwich Compounds. W. E. Geiger, Jr., D. E. Brennan. 2:45—110. The Effect of H3PO4 on the Elec­ trochemistry of Pb0 2 Electrodes in H 2 S0 4 . K. R. Bullock. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—111. Design and Performance of a System to Control Concentrations of Common Gaseous Air Pollutants Within Environmental Chambers Used for Human Exposure Studies. D. E. Glover, J. H. Bemtsen, W. C. Crider, A. A. Strong. 4:00—112. Systematic and Random Errors in Visibility Measurements. R. 4. Schwall, C. McDade. 4:30—113. A Comparison of Substrates for the Collection of Atmospheric HNO3 Vapor on Filters. B. J. Huebert.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry Sym­ posium J. J. Kirkland, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:15—114. Applications of Thermal FieldFlow Fractionation to Polymer Analysis. M. Martin, R. Reynaud. 2:45—115. Field-Flow Fractionation for the Purification and Analysis of Biological Ma­ terials. K. D. Caldwell, M. N. Myers, J. C. Giddings. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—116. Comparison of the Theoretical Limits of Separating Speed in Liquid and Gas Chromatography. G. Guiochon. 4:00—117. The Tubular Pinched Effect: A Possible Method for Separating Large Particles. E. Grushka. 4:30—118. A Framework for Separation Science. G. H. Stewart.

FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 210 (2nd Level) General: Electrochemistry C. O. Huber, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—119. Determination of Chlorite Ion by Differential Pulse Polarography. J. Benga, G. Gordon. 9:25—120. A Spectroelectrochemical Method for Studying Redox Properties of Flavoenzymes. M. T. Stankovich. 9:45—121. Nickel Oxide Electrode Amperometric Determination of Amines and Amino Acids. C. O. Huber, B. S. Hui. 10:05—122. Improved Enzyme Sensor with an Ultrafiltration Membrane. M. Koyama, Y. Sato, M. Aizawa, S. Suzuki. 10:25—Intermission. 10:35—123. Potentiometric Determination of Electrolytes in Protein-Containing Solutions. J. H. Hiller. 10:55—124. Non-Linear Model Discrimination Applied to Potentiometric Response. B. Sachok, S. N. Deming. 11:15—125. Development of a Computer Controlled Coulometric Titrator. G. D. Howard, S. Henzel. 11:35—126. The Electrochemical Reduction of Some 3-Substituted-N-methylpyridinium Chlorides. J. G. Gaudiello, D. Larkin, J. D. Rawn, J. J. Sosnowski.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 211 (2nd Level) General: Spectroscopy R. T. Pflaum, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—127. Micellar Systems in Analytical Chemistry—Application to Spectrofluorimetric Methods of Analysis. W. L. Hinze, S. R. Spurlin, V. Prelevic. 9:20—128. Analytical Factors Related to the Fluorescence Fingerprinting of Pseudomonads. D. C. Shelly, I. M. Warner, J. M. Quarles. 9:40—129. Substituted Hydrazones as Chromogenic Reagents in Spectrophotometric and Spectrophotofluorometric Analysis. R. T. Pflaum, C. A. Haustein, W. D. Savage. 9:55—130. Spectrophotometric Determina­ tion of Manganese Porphyrin Formation Constants Using SQUAD. K. M. Kadish, S. L. Kelly, D. J. Leggett. 10:15—Intermission. 10:25—131. Use of Ultraviolet Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy in the Analytical Distinction of Structurally Similar Molec­ ules. J. M. Bowen, T. A. Crone, V. L. Head, N. Purdie. 10:40—132. Asbestos Analysis by Polarized Light Microscopy. M. M. Reddy, J. Webber, D. Taylor, D. Lubiner. 11:00—133. Ultratrace Quantitative Ele­ mental Analysis: Enhancements and/or Limitations Resulting from Chemical Pro­ cessing of Samples. J. W. Mitchell. 11:20—134. Remote Spectrophotometric Techniques Based on Long Distance Fiber Optics. T. Hirschfeld, D. Johnson, G. Hau­ gen, L. Hrubesh. 11:40—135. Optimization of Rapid Scanning Data Processing Through a Dedicated Minicomputer. M. P. Fogarty, I. M. Warner.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry Sym­ posium M. F. Burke, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—136. Studies on the Molecular Basis for Selectivity in Chromatographic Systems. C. H. Lochmuller. 9:45—137. Theory of GLC Retention and Separation. D. E. Martire. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—138. Molecular Interactions on the Surface of Silica Gel and Their Contribution to Solute Retention in Liquid Chromatog­ raphy. R. P. W. Scott. 11:00—139. Structure-Retention Relation­ ships in the Reversed-Phase High Perfor­ mance Liquid Chromatography of Purine and Pyrimidine Compounds. P. R. Brown, E. Grushka. 11:30—140. Chemical and Physical Char­ acterization of Bonded Stationary Phases in Liquid Chromatography. M. F. Burke, K. Stetzenbach.

CARB DIVISION OF CARBOHYDRATE CHEMISTRY R. W. Binkley, Chairman J. R. Vercelloti, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

2:30—17. Cellulose Viscosity-Molecular Weight Relationships by Gel Permeation Chromatography/Low Angle Laser Light Scattering. J. J. Cael, R. E. Cannon, A. O. Diggs. 2:55—18. Light Scattering, Refractometry and Viscometry in Dilute Solutions Cellulose Triacetate. G. C. Berry, M. A. Leech. 3:20—19. The Configurational Statistics of Pullulan. D. A. Brandt, B. A. Burton. 3:45—20. Solution Properties of S. Salivarius Levan Hydrolysates. S. S. Stivala, J. E. Zweig. 4:10—21. Conformation, Dynamics and Gelatin Mechanisms of Gel-State (1 -* 3)-/3-D-Glucans as Revealed by Carbon-13 NMR. H. Saitô. 4:35—22. PS-60: A New Gel-Forming Polysaccharide. R. Moorhouse, C. T. Colgrove, P. A. Sanford, J. Baird, K. S. Kang. Section Β

Section A

The Whitehall, State Room (2nd Level) Symposium on Solution Properties of Poly­ saccharides D. A. Brandt, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Shapes and Interactions of Carbo­ hydrate Chains. D. A. Rees. 9:50—2. Investigation of Conformational Properties o f Xanthan in Aqueous Solu­ tions. M. Milas, M. Rinaudo. 10:15—3. Quasi-Elastic Light Scattering Studies of Xanthan in Solution. J. Blackwell, J. S. Southwick, A. M. Jamieson. 10:40—4. Xanthan: A Molecular Model for Its Non-Newtonian Viscosity: G. Holzwarth. 11:05—5. Xanthan Gum with Improved Dispersibility. P. A. Sanford, J. Baird,, I. W. Cottrell. 11:30—6. Conformational Order in Carrageenan Solutions. E. R. Morris. Section Β The Whitehall, President's Room (2nd Level) General

R. W. Binkley, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—7. Reactions of Glycals with Xenon Flouride: An Improved Synthesis of 2Dexoy-2-Fluorosaccharides. W. Korytnyk, S. Valentecovic, C. Pétrie. 9:30—8. A Synthesis of 5-Keto Mannose. R. H. O'Kuru, E. Kiely. 9:50—9. Synthesis of Oligosaccharides Containing A β-Linked D-Galacto-Pyranose Unit that can be Selectively Deblocked for Chain-Extension at Position 3. M. S. Chowdhary, M. A. Nashed, L. Anderson. 10:10—10. The Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of D-Glycero-D-Gulo-Hepturonic Acid. C. Cottet, M. S. Feather. 10:30—11. Preparation of Lactulose from Lactose with Tertiary Amine/Boric Acid Reagents. K. B. Hicks, F. W. Parrish, P. E. Pfeffer. 10:50—12. Oligosaccharide Glyosides of Anthracyclinones. R. C. Cermak, H. S. El Khadem, D. Marsuura, D. L. Swartz. 11:10—13. Synthesis of 2'-Thio-2'-Deoxycytidine, A New Cytotoxic Agent. A. D. Patel, W. H. Schrier, J. J. Nagyvary. 11:30—14. 1,3-Diazepin-2-Ones. Synthesis and Reactions of Novel 1,3-Diazepin-2Ones and Their Nucleosides. P. S. Liu, V. E. Marquez, J. A. Kelley, J. S. Driscoll. 11:50—15. Preparation of some Volatile Derivatives of Sialic Acids. T. P. Mawhinney, M. A. Madison, M. S. Feather, G. J. Barbero.

Section C Symposium on Dietary Fiber: Sources and Physiological Effects. I. Joint with Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 48) MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A The Whitehall, State Room (2nd Level) Symposium on Solution Properties of Poly­ saccharides G. M. Holzwarth, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—16. Conformation-Dependent Inter­ actions in Ionic Polysaccharide Solutions. V. Crescenzi, R. Rizzo, M. Dentini.

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

The Whitehall, President's Room (2nd Level) General G. McGinnis, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—23. Synthesis and Chemistry of (fî)and (S)-2-Benzyloxypropanal. D. C. Baker, L. D. Hawksin, B. Jarrell, R. Pajres III. 2:30—24. A Photochemically-Based Aminodeoxy Sugar Synthesis. T. W. Flechtner, H. D. Pohlid. 2:50—25. Synthesis of Oligosaccharides of the Blood Group Series Containing A β-Linked D-Galactopyranose Unite Substi­ tuted at Positions 4 and/or 2. L. Anderson, M. A. Nashed, C. W. Slife. 3:10—26. Solution Differential Isotope Shift and Solid State Cross Polarization 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Lactulose. P. E. Pfeffer, Κ. Β. Hicks. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—27. Use of the TBDMS Group in the Synthesis of 1,6-Diamino-1,6-DideoxyGalactitol. J. L. Navia, D. E. Kiely. 4:00—28. HPLC Separation of Enantiomeric Sugars as Diastereomeric Cyclic Dithioacetal. M. R. Little, K. A. Reynolds, C. R. Rauck, G. A. Barber, E. J. Behrman. 4:20—29. Comparison of Systematic Changes in Molecular Parameters of Sac­ charides as Petermined by Molecular Mechanics and by Single Crystal Studies. A. D. French. 4:40—30. Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopy of Pyruvate Dimers. B. Coxon, S. A. Margolis.

Section C Symposium on Dietary Fiber: Sources and Physiological Effects. II. Joint with Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (see page 48) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

The Whitehall, State Room (2nd Level) Symposium on Solution Properties of Poly­ saccharides

A. M; Jamieson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—31. Recent Developments in the Characterization and Elucidation of the Biologic Functions of Dermatan Sulfate, Heparin Sulfate-, and Heparin-Containing Classes of Proteoglycans. L. Rosenberg. 9:55—32. Solution Properties of Hyaluronic Acid. T. W. Barrett. 10:20—33. The Role of Hydrogen Bonding in Hyaluronate Conformation. R. L. Cleland. 10:45—34. Anticoagulant Activity, Charge Density, and the Conformation of Heparin. R. E. Hurst, S. S. West, J. M. Menter. 11:10—35. Rheological Studies of Cartilage Proteoglycan and Related Compounds. G. Matsumura. 11:35—36. Change in the Chemical and Physical Properties of Proteoglycan Ag­ gregates during Enchondral Ossification in Bovine Fetal EpiphyseaL Cartilage Growth Plate. L. Rosenberg, J. Buckwalter.

Section Β The Whitehall, President's Room (2nd Level) Symposium on Blocking Groups W. A. Szarek, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—37. Blocking Groups of Interest in Carbohydrate Chemistry. R. A. Whitney, W. A. Szarek. 9:50—38. The Alkylsilyl Protecting Groups in Oligonucleotide Synthesis. K. K. Ogilvie.

10:35—Intermission. 10:45—39. Some Recent Developments in the Protection of Alcoholic Hydroxy Groups. C. B. Reese. 11:30—40. Allyl Ethers as Protecting Groups. R. Gigg. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

The Whitehall, State Room (2nd Level) Symposium on Solution Properties of Poly­ saccharides T. E. Barrett, Presiding 2:00—41. Potentiometric Titration Behavior of Hyaluronic Acid. R. L. Cleland, J. L. Wang, D. M. Detweiler. 2:25—42. Configurational Entropy of Tethered Polymers and the Swelling Properties of Connective Tissue. P. Geissler. 2:50—43. Carboxyl and Amide Transitions in Circular Dichroism of Glycosaminoglycans. B. Chakrabarti. 3:15—44. Vacuum Ultraviolet Circular Di­ chroism Spectroscopy of Acetamido Sug­ ars. C. A. Bush. 3:40—45. Vacuum Ultraviolet Circular Di­ chroism of Glucans. A. J. Stipanovic, E. S. Stevens. 4:0'5—46. The Structure and Conformation of the Capsular Polysaccharides of Group Β Streptococcus. H. J. Jennings, D. L. Kasper. 4:30—47. Determination of Galactose to Galactose and Galactose to Mannose Structures in jS-D-Galactofurano-a-DMannopyranans by C 13 -NMR Spectrosco­ py. E. Barreto-Bergter, P. A. J. Gorin.

Section Β The Whitehall, President's Room (2nd Level) Symposium on Blocking Groups W. A. Szarek, Presiding 2:00—48. Blocked Sugars and the Systematic Chemical Synthesis of Oligosaccharides. L. Anderson. 2:45—49. /V-Protecting Techniques in Aminoglycoside-Aminocyclitol Antibiotics. T. L. Nagabhushan. 3:30—Intermission. 3:40—50. Photochemically Reactive Pro­ tective Groups. R. W. Binkley. 4:25—51. Synthesis and Applications of Polymeric Protecting Groups. J. M. J. Frechet, L J . Nuyens, C. Brazeau. WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON The Whitehall, State Room (2nd Level) Symposium on Solution Properties of Poly­ saccharides R. L. Cleland, Presiding 9:00—52. Interactions of Group II Cations and Borate Anions with Nonionic Saccharides: Studies on Model Polyols. R. H. Atalla, R. M. Williams. 9:25—53. Investigation of Aqueous Solution Properties of K-Carrageenans. M. Rinaudo, C. Rochas. 9:50—54. lon-Polyion Interactions in Chrondroitin Sulfate Solutions. H. Magdelenat, P. Turq, P. Tivant. 10:15—55. Solution Properties of Dextran and its Ionic Derivatives. K. Gekko. 10:40—56. Interactions of Small Ions with Ionic Polysaccharides. P. Anders, W. Lubas. 11:05—57. Thermodynamics of Dissociation of Alginic Acid in Aqueous Solution. S. Paoletti, A. Ciana, F. Delben, G. Manzini. 11:25—58. Interaction Between Metal Cat­ ions and Anionic Polysaccharides. P. W. Hales, G. Pass. P. Ander, Presiding 2:00—59. Specificity of the Interactions be­ tween Polysaccharide Double Helices and /3-(1,4)-Linked Polysaccharides. I. C. M. Dea. 2:25—60. Bluing Mechanism of Triiodide Ions in Amylose Being Associated with Its Conformation in Aqueous Solution. T. Handa, H. Yajima, T. Ishii. 2:50—61. A Model for Amylose-lodine Bind­ ing. A. Cesaro, W. Konic, G. Manzini, D. A. Brandt. 3:15—62. Solvent Effects on the Spectro­ photometry and Hydrodynamic Behaviors of Amylose and its Iodine Complex. S. Gupta, S. P. Moulik. 3:40—63. The Interaction of Ligands with Iodine Complexes of Amylose and Amylo-

pectin. S. V. Bhide, M. S. Karve, N. R. Kale. 4:05—64. Interaction of Mycobacterial Polymethylpolysaccharides with Palmitoyl-Coenzyme A. C. E. Ballou, R. E. Cohen. 4:30—65. Complexing Properties of Substi­ tuted Cyclodextrins and Cyclodextrin Polymers in Aqueous Solutions. J. Szejtli. THURSDAY

MORNING

The Whitehall, State Room (2nd Level) Symposium on Solution Properties of Poly­ saccharides D. A. Brandt, Presiding 9:00—66. Quasielastic Light Scattering from Proteoglycan Solutions. A. M. Jamieson, H. Reihanian, J. Blackwell, L. H. Tang, L. Rosenberg. 9:25—67. Light Scattering Spectroscopy of Meningococcal Polysaccharides. B. Chu, A. DiNapoli, T. Y. Liu. 9:50—68. Characterization by Quasi-Elastic Light-Scattering and GPC of Oligomers Obtained from Glycogen and Amylose by α-Amylolytic Degradation. A. Reiner, W. Burchard. 10:15—69. Monte Carlo Calculations of the Debye Scattering Function for Amylose Chains. A. Cesaro, D. A. Brandt. 10:40—70. Chain Length Dependence of Aqueous Amylose Solution Properties. B. Pfannemuller, B. Ziegast. 11:05—71. Initial Rapid Process(es) in Rétrogradation of Amylose Observed by Light Scattering Stopped-Flow Method. M. Ohnishi, K. Hiromi. 11:30—72. Separation of Starch Components by Affinity Chromatography. M. S. Karve, S. V. Bhide, N. R. Kale. 11:50—73. Amylose Conformation Aqueous Solution. M. Kodama, K. Tsuda.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON The Whitehall, State Room (2nd Level) General

R. E. Harmon, Presiding 2:00—74. Age Related Changes in the Structure of Bovine Articular Cartilage High Density Proteoglycans. H. G. Garg, D. A. Swann. 2:20—75. Serum Glycosaminoglycans Levels in Psychiatric Disorders. R. S. Varma, R. Varma, A. Y. Hoshino. 2:40—76. Catalytic Mechanism of Glucoamylase and Glucodextranase: Complementary Hydrolytic and D-Glucosyl Transfer Reactions Catalyzed with a- and /3-D-Glycosyl Fluoride. S. Kitahata, C. F. Brewer, D. S. Genghof, T. Sawai, E. J. Hehre. 3:00—77. Actions of a- or β-Glucosidases and of an Inverting α-Glucanase on a Glycosyl Donor(2,6-Anhydro-1-DeoxyD-//uco-Hept-1-Enitol) Lacking a- or β-Anomeric Configuration. E. J. Hehre, C. F. Brewer, T. Uchiyama, P. Schlesselmann, and J. Lehmann. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—78. L-Fucose Metabolism in Rabbit Liver. M. Endo, H. Hiyama, K. Schmidt. 4:00—79. Synthesis of the /^-Glycoprotein "CORE" Trisaccharide. C. D. Warren, C. Auge, R. W. Jeanloz. M. Kiso, L. An­ derson.

CELL CELLULOSE, PAPER AND TEXTILE DIVISION R. M. Rowel I, Chairman T. L. Vigo, Secretary-Treasurer

MONDAY

MORNING

Hyatt Regency, Mesquite Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Liquid Crystal Formation in Cellulose Derivatives—Session I R. D. Gilbert, Presiding

Feb. 18. 1980 C&EN

51

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Theory of Nematic Phases in Systems of Rigid Chain Molecules. P. J. Flory 9:40—2. Optical Properties of Hydroxypropyl Cellulose Lyomesophases. R. S. Werbowyj, D. G. Gray. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—3. Flow Mechanism of Liquid-Crystalline Solutions of Cellulose Derivatives. M. Horio, T. Asada, S. Onogi. 11:05—4. A Case of Changed Liquid Crystalline Structure During Polymerization. S. E. Friberg.

MONDAY AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Mesquite Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Liquid Crystal Formation in Cellulose Derivatives—Session II

D. E. Gray, Presiding 1:30—5. Nematic Crystalline Structures in Chemically Modified Native Cellulose Fibres and Microfibril Systems. R. H. Marchessault, M. Dube. 2:05—6. Dissolution and Recrystallization of Cellulose in Cyclic Amine Oxide Systems. H. Chanzy, A. Péguy, S. Chaunis, P. Monzie. 2:40—7. Phase Transitions and Structure of Liquid Crystalline Solutions of Cellulose Derivatives. J. Bheda, J. F. Fellers, J. L. White. 3:15—8. The Structure of Cellulose Crystallized from Hydrazine Solution. J. Blackwell, D. M. Lee. 3:50—9. Rigid Backbone Polymers, XIII: Effects of the Nature of the Solvent on the Lyotropic Mesomophicity of Cellulose Acetate. S. M. Aharoni. 4:25-10. Anisotropic Cellulose Derivative Solutions. A. B. Auerbach, J. Dyer, R. T. Virgin. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Mesquite Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Liquid Sorption in Cellulose and Modified Cellulose Materials—Session I

P. K. Chatterjee, Presiding

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Forum Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Roles of Wood/Paper in Material Science Program—Session II

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Forum Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Role of Wood/Paper in Ma­ terial Science Program—Session I D. F. Caulfield, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—15. Wood as an Engineering Material. J. F. Saeman. 9:40—16. Formation and Structure of Wood. R. L. Gray, R. A. Parham. 10:10—Intermission. 10:25—17. Wood-Polymer Research in Uni­ versity Materials Science Programs. R. V. Subramanian. 11:00—18. Improvement of Wood Properties Through Chemical Modification. R. M. Rowell. 11:30—19. Wood Surface Characteristics and Adhesive Bond Strength. R. O. Ebewele, B. River, J. A. Koutsky. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Mesquite Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Liquid Sorption in Cellulose and Modified Cellulose Materials—Session II

P. K. Chatterjee, Presiding 2:00—20. The Dehydration of Aqueous Adhesives on Paper. P. Lepoutre, K. Huynh, A. A. Robertson. 2:30—21. Absorbent Regenerated Cellulose Fibers. F. R. Smith. 3:00—Intermission. 3:10—22. Radiation Grafting of Acrylic and Methacrylic Acid to Cellulose for Imparting High Water Sorption. J.'L Williams, A. H. Zahran, V. T. Stannett. 3:40—23. Superabsorbents: What are They/How Useful? D. F. Durso, E. V. v Painter.

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

2:00—43. Evaluation of an Engineering Ap­ proach to Assessment of Fabric Hand. H. M. Behery, J. A. Monson. 2:30—44. Clothing as a Key to Energy Con­ servation. F. H. Rohles, E. McCullough. 3:00—45. Some Factors Affecting the Comfort Assessment of Knit T-Shirts. J. F. Fuzek.

D. F. Caulfield, Presiding

THURSDAY MORNING

2:00—25. Wood Fiber Variability: A Material Concern. R. A. Parham, R. L. Gray. 2:30—26. Polymorphic Transformations in Cellulose, R. H. Atalla. 3:00—Intermission 3:15—27. Structure and the Elastic Modulus of Paper. D. H. Page, R. S. Seth. 3:45—28. Friction Characteristics of Paper—Effects of Sliding Surface and Paper Nature. J. Borch.

Hyatt Regency, Mesquite Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Influence of Pollution, Energy and Other Restrictive Factors on New Di­ rections in Textile Finishing—Session III

WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Hyatt Regency, Mesquite Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Influence of Pollution, Energy and Other Restrictive Factors on New Di­ rections in Textile-Finishing—Session I

R. J. Harper, Jr., Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—29. The Influence of Restrictive Factors on New Directions in Textile Finishing. R. M. Reinhardt, R. J. Harper, Jr. 9:40—30. Use of Formaldehyde Acceptors to Reduce Formaldehyde Levels on Cellu­ losic Fabrics. R. S. Perry, Y. Park. 10:10—Intermission. 10:25—31. Consumers Challenge Textile Finishes for Energy Conservation Proper­ ties in Fabrics. J. A. Warden. 10:55—32. New Developments in Textile Chemical Analysis: Aqueous Liquid Chro­ matographic Analysis of Durable Press Agents. K. R. Beck, M. R. Ladisch. 11:25—33. Energy Use in the Production of Tufted Carpet. S. V. Connor. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Redbud Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Textile Comfort—Session I

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—11. Water Retention Values of Wood Pulp. D. Abson, R. D. Gilbert. 9:40—12. Spreading and Penetration of Aqueous Reagent Solutions in Cotton Fabric. N. R. Bertoniere, S. P. Rowland. 10:10—Intermission. 10:25—13. Solvent Extraction of Water from Cellulosic Materials. C. J. Green. 10:55—14. Developments and Problems in Capillarity. A. M. Schwartz.

52

4:10—24. The Solubility of Cellulose in Liquid Ammonia/Salt Solutions. S. M. Hudson, J. A. Cuculo.

K. Yeh,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—34. A Review of Screening Methods for Clothing Comfort. N. R. S. Hollies. 10:00—35. An Apparatus for Measuring the Effect of Moisture Transport on Heat Flow Through Textiles. C. B. Hassenboehier, T. L. Vigo, M. J. Donoghue. 10:30—36. Laboratory Measurement and Evaluation of Thermal and Selected Com­ fort and Durability Properties of Twelve Textile Fabrics Intended for Indoor Winter Wear with Lowered Temperatures. B. J. Scruggs. 11:00—37. Applications of the Trace Gas Technique in Clothing Comfort. K. Harter, S. M. Spivak, K. Yeh, T. L. Vigo.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Hyatt Regency, Mesquite Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Influence of Pollution, Energy and Other Restrictive Factors in New Di­ rections in Textile Finishing—Session II R. J. Harper, Jr., Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—38. An Effective Fungicide with Mini­ mum Environmental Pollution. S. A. Sherif. 2:35—39. Ignition and Burning Rates of Tex­ tiles with Low Add-Ons of Fire Retardant. W. A. Reeves, M. A. Hammons. 3:05—Intermission 3:20—40. Textiles in Fires. H. Tovey. 3:50—41. Experiments Using Microprobe Technique to Study Textile Performance. S. K. Obendorf, D. Durnam. 4:20—42. The Simultaneous Dyeing and Finishing of Cotton/Polyester/Cordelan Blend Fabrics with Dispersol/Procion Τ Dyes and Flame Retardant Finish. R. D. Mehta.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Redbud Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Textile Comfort—Session II K. Yeh, Presiding

R. M. Reinhardt, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—46. Low Wet Pick-Up Processes for the Finishing, Dyeing and Printing of Textiles. R. S. Gregorian, C. G. Namboodri, R. A. Bafford. 9:35—47. Effective Utilization of Thermal Energy in Continuous Textile Finishing Processes. E. Kattermann, I. E. Pensa, S. Β. Sello, J. M. Smart. 10:05—Intermission. 10:20—48. The Impact of Conservation and Regulatory Actions on Textile Finishing. M. C. Hindle. 10:50—49. Processing of Cellulosic Fibers by Ionizing Radiations as Related to Pollu­ tion and Energy Use. J. C. Arthur, Jr. 11:20—50. Abrasion-Resistant Durable Press Cotton—An Update. R. J. Harper, Jr.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Hyatt Regency, Mesquite Room (3rd Floor) General

E. J. Soltes, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—51. Polysaccharides: Crystallization, Morphology and Structure. H. D. Chanzy, M. Dube, A. Grosrenaud, R. H. Marchessault. 2:35—52. Mechanism and Kinetics of Enzy­ matic Hydrolysis of Native and Solvent Treated Cellulose. T. Y. Chou, G. T. Tsao. 3:05—53. The Effect of Oxygen and Anthraquinone on the Alkaline Degradation of Amylose. F. L. A. Arbin, L. R. Schroeder, N. S. Thompson, E. W. Malcolm. 3:35—54. Photolysis of 2-Methoxy-6-Methyltetrahydropyran, A Carbohydrate Model. B. W. Bobcock, D. R. Dimmel, R. D. McKelvey. 4:05—55. Extraction Studies of DMDHEUTreated Cotton Fabrics M. Finekl, I. Block, K. Yeh, B. F. Smith. 4:35—56. Binding of Organic Antimicrobial Agents to Cotton Fabric as Zirconium Complexes. C. E. Morris, T. L. Vigo, C. M. Welch.

CHED DIVISION OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION INC. L. N. Ferguson, Chairman J. A. Bell, Secretary

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 104 (Lobby Level) Break Through Lecture W. F. Coleman, Presiding 1:30—3. Laser Isotope Separation. J. H. Bireley. State of the Art Symposia for Chemical Ed­ ucators. I. Solid State Chemistry in the Un­ dergraduate Curriculum. Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry E. Kostiner, Presiding 2:30—4. Chemistry and Diffusion in Solids. M. S. Whittingham. 3:30—5. Solid State Chemistry and Optical Fibers. C. M. Melliar-Smith. 4:30—6. On the Chemistry of Solar Cells. A. Heller. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 102 (Lobby Level) Poster A. Benham, Presiding 2:30—7. Model for Demonstration of Organic Reaction Mechanisms. P. M. Nave. 2:30—8. A General Chemistry Experiment for Determining the Oxygen Content of Air. S. K. Gunter, J. P. Birk, L. McGrath. 2:30—9. Computer Assisted Scheduling of Teaching Assistants. J. P. Birk. 2:30—10. Developing Goals for General Chemistry, K. A. Eisenhardt, G. F. Palladino. 2:30—11. Applied, Industrially Oriented Ex­ periments in Organic Chemistry. D. A. Nelson.

Section C Third National Student Affiliate Research Symposium Joint with Council Committee on Chemical Education (see page 47) Section D Symposium on Clinical Chemistry Joint with Council Committee on Chemical Education (see page 47) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 104 (Lobby Level) State of the Art Symposia for Chemical Ed­ ucators. I. Solid State Chemistry in the Un­ dergraduate Curriculum. Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry G. McCarthy, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—12. Introduction to Luminescence in Inorganic Solids. J. A. DeLuca. 10:05—13. Metallic and Semiconducting Covalent Polymers, (SN)X and (CH)X: Their Basic Chemistry and Physics. A. G. MacDiarmid. A. J. Heeger. 11:05—14. Growing the Crystals We Need. S. Mroczkski. 12:05—Discussion—Introducing Solid State Chemistry into the Undergraduate Curric­ ulum.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 103 (Lobby Level) Symposium on the Goals of General Chem­ istry, Part I: The High School-College Inter­ face

J. P. Rouse, Presiding MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 104 (Lobby Level) State of the Art Symposia for Chemical Ed­ ucators. I. Solid State Chemistry in the Un­ dergraduate Curriculum. Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

S. L. Holt, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Preparation and Characterization of Inorganic Solids. A. Wold. 10:25—2. Structure and Bonding in Solids. E. Kostiner. Section Β Third National Student Affiliate Research Symposium Joint with Council Committee on Chemical Education (see page 47)

9:00—15. High School Chemistry to College Chemistry: Transition or Trauma? J. P. Rouse. 9:30—16. Special Secondary School-CoNege interface Programs through the Journal of Chemical Education. M. Sarquis. 10:00—17. Award Address. (James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching sponsored by Ethyl Corp.) Inte­ grating Descriptive Chemistry into the High School Program. E. R. Bank.

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

10:30—18. The Leveling Effect of Historical Studies in Teaching Chemistry: A Broad Perspective for Science Education in the Eighties. L. Fine. 11:15—Discussion.

Section C Third National Student Affiliate Research Symposium Joint with Council Committee on Chemical Education (see page 47) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 203 (2nd Level) State of the Art Symposia for Chemical Ed­ ucators. I. Solid State Chemistry in the Un­ dergraduate Curriculum Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

S. L. Holt, Presiding 2:00—19. t h e Introduction of Crystallographic Concepts using Lap-Dissolve Slide Techniques. G. M. Bodner, T. J. Greenbone, W. R. Robinson.

Poster Session 3:00—20. Electron Spin Resonance in Solid State Chemistry. M. Greenblatt. 3:00—21. Common Misconceptions about Crystal Lattices and Crystal Symmetry. C. P. Brock, E. C. Lingafelter, W. B. Gleason. 3:00—22. Solid State Chemistry in the Un­ dergraduate Curriculum: X-Ray Powder Diffraction. G. J. McCarthy. 3:00—23. Chemistry and" Physics of Amor­ phous Semiconductors. D. Adler. 3:00—24. The Application of High-Resolution Electron Microscopy to Problems in Solid State Chemistry: Exploits of a Peeping TEM. L. Eyring. 4:00—25. Preparation and Physical Properties of One-Dimensional Structures: Bap(Fe2S4)q. J. S. Swinnea, H. Steinfink. 4:00—26. Synthesis and Property Studies of Graphite-MF5(M = As.Sb) Intercalation Compounds. L. V. Interrante, R. S. Markiewicz, H. R. Hart, Jr., D. W. McKee. 4:00—27. Use of Order-Disorder Theory in the Characterization of Lattice Properties. J. M. Honig. 4:00—28. Magnetic and Structural Properties of the Nickel(ll) and Cobalt(ll) Hippurate Deuterates—Effects of Deuterium Substi­ tution on the Water Mediated Superexchange in these Linear Chain Insulators. M. M. Morelock, M. L. Good, R. Seidler, D. Karraker. 4:00—29. Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and their Composition De­ pendence of Some First Transition Metal Mixed Valence Fluorides. R. F. Williamson, W. O. J. Boo. 4:00—30. Chemical Reactions Associated with the Solidification of Garnet Melts. M. A. DiGiuseppe. 4:00—31. On the Structural and Luminescent Properties of the ScTa 1 _ x Nb x 0 4 System. L. H. Brixner. 7:00—Divisional Social Hour. SheratonHouston, The Summit. 8:00—Divisional Dinner. Sheraton-Houston, The Summit. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 103 (Lobby Level) Symposium on the Goals of General Chem­ istry, Part II: Career-Oriented Goals A. J . Banks, Presiding 1:30—32. Evaluating the Need for Chemical Knowledge as Careers Progress. J. D. Hopkins, G. F. Palladino. 2:00—33. General Chemistry as a Liberal Art. J. W. Hill. 2:30—Intermission. 3:00—34. General Chemistry for Engineers, Β. Κ. Kybett. 3:30—35. Chemistry for the Unwashed Masses. A. J. Banks. 4:00—Discussion. 7:00—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location.) 8:00—Divisional Dinner, (see Section A for location.)

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 104 (Lobby Level) Symposium on High School Chemistry: What Should the High School Graduate Know About Chemical Bonding and the Shapes of Molecules

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—36. Chemical Bonding and the Shapes of Molecules. W. T. Lippincott. Teaching Chemical Bonding and the Shapes of Molecules in Local High Schools 3:00—37. What I Teach Now. K. Mays. 3:10—38. Demonstration I Use. D. S. Rae. 3:20—39. Experiments Students Do. J. Reed. 3:30—40. What Students Learn. A. C. Johnsen. 3:40—Discussion. 4:20—41. Overview and Summary of the Symposium on High School Chemistry: What Should the High School Graduate Know About Chemical Bonding and the Shapes of Molecules. P. J. Smith. 7:00—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location.) 8:00—Divisional Dinner, (see Section A for location.) Section D Third National Student Affiliate Research Symposium Joint with Council Committee on Chemical Education (see page 47)

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 103 (Lobby Level) General

J. Fitzgerald, Presiding 2:30—56. Computer Assisted Determination of Amino Acid pK by NMR Spectroscopy. I. S. Hartman, L. J. Soltzberg. 2:50—57. Volumes vs. Energies of Activation. J. F. O'Brien. 3:10—58. Undergraduate Research in a Lib­ eral Arts College—Evaluation and Impact. G. R. Francois, L. Harris. 3:30—59. A New Undergraduate Course: "Toxicology for Scientists and Engineers." J. J. Fitzgerald. 3:50—60. A New Course Integrating Analog Electronics, Digital Electronics and Com­ puter Interfacing. L. G. Hargis, R. F. Evilia. 4:10—61. Effects of Molecular Structural Changes on the Activity of a Citrus Bioregulator. J. J. Flynn. 4:30—62. Computer Assisted Data Analysis of Enzyme Kinetics. M. Bishop, Edgardo Zamora.

THURSDAY MORNING WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 103 (Lobby Level) Symposium on the Goals of General Chem­ istry Part III: Philosophical Goals T. E. Taylor, Presiding 9:00—42. Toward an Awareness of Labora­ tory Safety. R. Gerlach. 9:30—43. The Chemistry-Mathematics In­ terface: Equation Balancing by the Matrix Method, with Applications to Macromolecules. G. R. Blakley. 10:00—44. How Do I Get the Answer? (Problem Solving in Chemistry). G. L. Gil­ bert. 10:30—45. Using General Chemistry to Pro­ mote the Higher Level Thinking Abilities. M. J. Pavelich. 11:00—46. Whetting the Keen Edge of Curi­ osity. T. E. Taylor. 11:30—Discussion.

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 103 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Teaching Laboratory Tech­ niques for Organic Chemistry in Honor of Louis Fieser Joint with Division of Organic Chemistry

P. Schatz, Presiding 9:00—63. Economics of Undergraduate La­ boratory Instruction. D. C. Neckers. 9:35—64. Organic Chemistry and the Unified Laboratory at Ithaca College: Ten Years' Experience. W. R. Bergmark. 10:10—65. Project Laboratory at Cal Tech. J. Raymond. 10:45—66. The Role of the Organic Labora­ tory in Closing the Academic-Industrial Gap. D. A. Nelson. 11:20—67. Three More Open-Ended Experi­ ments. K. E. Kolb, B. J. Helmer, K. W. Field.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 104 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Teaching Laboratory Tech­ niques for Organic Chemistry in Honor of Louis Fieser Joint with Division of Organic Chemistry

P. Schatz, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—47. Philosophy of Laboratory Teaching. M. S. Newman. 10:00—48. Louis Fieser, From an Under­ graduate's Perspective. K. L. Wil­ liamson. 10:45—49. Safety in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory—Strategies for the 80's. J. R. Mohrig. 11:25—50. Recrystallization for the Masses (The Large Organic Chemistry Laboratory Course). L. Mohrmann, J. E. Leonard.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 102 (Lobby Level) Perspectives Lecture

W. T. Lippincott, Presiding 1:30—51. The Development of Polymer Chemistry in America—The Early Years. C. S. Marvel. Symposium on the Goals of General Chem­ istry Part IV: Achieving Goals

L. Peck, Presiding 2:30—52. Effective Instruction for n-Kilostudents with A-Z Majors. G. P. Haight, Jr. 3:00—53. Logistics and Pedagogy in the General Chemistry Laboratory. L. Peck, J : Marcello. 3:30—54. Alternatives to "Traditional In­ struction": The Learning Resources Center. C. A. Hassell. 4:00—55. From Where We Are to Where We Want to Be: A Long, But Not Lonesome, Road. R. O'Connor, T. Taylor. 4:30—Discussion.

CHSA

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 103 (Lobby Level) Symposium on the Contemporary Chemical Industry and Chemical Education

J. A. Young, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—68. Bridges Between Industry and Academe. A. Weissberger. 2:40—69. The Industry-Oriented Chemistry Curriculum at the University of Detroit. H. H. Szmant. 3:10—70. Education for Chemical Information Science. H. Skolnik. 3:40—71. Up-to-Date Industrial Processes. J. C. Bailar, Jr. 4:10—Panel Discussion.

FRIDAY MORNING Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 103 (Lobby Level) General T. Cassen, Presiding 9:00—72. A Laboratory Course for Freshman Science Majors with Emphasis on Instru­ mentation and Computer Applications. G. D. Howard, T. D. DuBois. 9:20—73. A Unified Approach to the Study of Chemical Reactions in Freshman Chem­ istry. T. Cassen, T. D. DuBois. 9:40—74. The Use of a Comprehensive Lecture Outline in General Chemistry. K. D. Gailey, K. W. Whitten. 10:00—75. Cognitive Process Instruction, Heuristics, Chemistry Problems, and Computers—Are They Compatible? R. W. Collins. 10:20—76. The Impact of a Community Col­ lege Education on the Cognitive Develop­ ment of Laboratory Technology Students. A. Sherman, S. Sherman. 10:40—77. Some Characteristics of Chemi­ cal Education at Urban Colleges and Uni­ versities. W. K. Fife. 11:00—78. Standards with Sympathy: Gen­ eral Chemistry for the Educationally-Disadvantaged. D. K. Robinson, M. A. Ryan, J. W. Carmichael, Jr. 11:20—79. Guided Design: An Alternative Way of Teaching Freshman Chemistry. P. Hoggard.

DIVISION OF CHEMICAL HEALTH AND SAFETY J. A. Young, Chairman D. B. Walters, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 216 (2nd Level) General H. H. Fawcett, Presiding, 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. The Safe Use Of Chemicals in the Home: A Hard Message To Sell. J. J. Bonin. 9:30—2. Socio-behavioral Patterns of Re­ sponse to Acute Chemical Emergencies. J. Gray, E. L. Quarantelli. 9:55—Intermission. 10:10—3. Reduction of Toxicities by Nutri­ tional Means. G. Rettura, F. Stratford, E. Seifter. 10:30—4. Special Work Risks of Marginal Workers. E. Seifter. 10:45—5. Preparation for a University Course in Laboratory Safety. L. J. Nicholls. 11:10—6. Storage of Chemicals in Aca­ demic Institutions-Problems and Solutions. R. Bayer. 11:30—Concluding Remarks.

MONDAY AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 216 (2nd Level) Symposium on Public Perception of Chemi­ cal and Petrochemical Industries R. D. Zentner, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—7. Neighbors' Perceptions of the Chemical Industry. R. D. Zentner. 2:30—8. Public Attitudes Toward Waste Disposal in the Chemical Industry. A. S. Hart. 2:55—Intermission. 3:15—9. Public Attitudes Toward the Chemical Industry. J. H. Hamilton. 3:40—10. Using Survey Research To Define Communications Goals. J. M. Costello. 4:00—Discussion. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting.

TUESDAY MORNING Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 216 (2nd Level) General

R. W. Weeks, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—11. The Growing Applications of the NIH/EPA Chemical Information System to Problems of Chemical Health and Safety. A. E. Fein, G. W. A. Milne, A. L. Âlford, J. Wright. 9:30—12. Permeation of Protective Garment Material by Liquid Benzene. R. W. Weeks, Jr., M. J. McLeod. 9:55-lntermission. 10:15—13. Replacements for Asbestos in the Laboratory. J. Jensen, D. D. Hedberg. 10:40—14. Sampling Methods for Airborne Pesticides. E. C. Gunderson. 11:00—Discussion. 11:30—Divisional Luncheon. Holiday Inn Downtown, Big Annie's Restaurant, Longhorn Room.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 216 (2nd Level) Symposium on Underground Storage of Liquefied Gases (Propane, Butane, etc.)

R. Barbaro, D. Lewis, Presiding

P. J. Smith, Presiding Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

53

ht"



h

2:00—15. Underground Storage of Liquefied Petroleum Products, Introduction and Pur­ pose of Symposium. R. D. Barbaro. 2:25—16. Design, Construction, and Safe Operation of Solution Mined Caverns for LPG Storage. C. W. Querio. 2:50—17. Design, Construction and Safe Operation of Mined Caverns For LPG Storage. J. E. Wyrick. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—18. Release of LPG From a Mined Underground Cavern. W. S. Wood. 4:00—19. Storage Safety. T. J. Minihan. 4:25-20. OSHA and Underground Cavern Storage of LPG. W. Thomas. 4:45—Discussion.

a i

CINF

η Ν

I

11

DIVISION OF CHEMICAL INFORMATION C. O'Donohue, Chairman B. Prewitt, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 221 (2nd Level) Symposium on Development and Use of Reliable Data Bases for Quantitative Struc­ ture Activity Relationships

A. Rispin, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. A Computerized Structure Activity Program for Relating Bacterial Mutagenesis Activity to Chemical Structure. J. F. Tinker. 9:30—2. Computer Assisted Studies of Structure-Activity Relationships Using Pattern Recognition. P. C. Jurs, G. W. Small, E. K. Whalen-Pedersen, K. Yuta. 9:55—3. The Carcinogenicity of N-Nitroso Compounds: A SIMCA Pattern Recognition Study. W. J. Dunn, III, S. Wold. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—4. The BC(DEF) Parameters: Potential Correlates of Biological Properties. R. D. Cramer, III. 10:55—5. Development of a Format for Ab­ stracting Dose-Response Information from Published Studies for Use in Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs). B. R. Weir, W. S. Simmons, A. M. Fan, D. L. Livingston, N. S. Tesche, A. H. Walton. 11:20—6. The Development and Validation of Rapid Procedures for Predicting Partition Coefficients. R. Purdy, R. Potenzone. 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—7. The EPA Health Effects and Envi­ ronmental Data Analysis System (HEEDA). D. Lefkovitz, A. Rispin. 2:30—8. Evaluation of an Information Re­ trieval System for Assessment of Toxicological Effects of Chemicals on Fish, Wildlife and Ecosystem Components. C. R. Walker C. M. Menzie, W. A. Bowles. 2:55—9. The EPA GENE-TOX Program. M. D. Waters, A. Auletta. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—10. Panel Discussion: Issues Con­ cerning the Development and Use of Reli­ able Data Bases for QSAR Correlation of Health and Eco-toxicological Effects. S. Siegel, Moderator.

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 221 (2nd Level) Symposium on Record Keeping and Duties to Report Under the U.S. Environmental Laws H. M. Peters, Presiding

54

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—11. Current Status of Record Keeping Responsibilities Under the Clean Water Act and the Clean Air Act. J. L. Collins. 9:40—Discussion. 9:45—12. One Company's Response to the Information Requirements of the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts. S. Arnold. 10:10—Discussion. 10:15—13. Reporting and Record Keeping Under the Toxic Substances Control Act. N. E. Dyer. 10:40—Discussion. 10:45—14. TSCA Reporting and Record Keeping—Industry Bane or Boon. C. Elmer. 11:10—Discussion. 11:15—Panel Discussion. 12:00—Divisional Luncheon, Room 209. Speaker: Ms. A. Harrison, Subject: Current Issues in Federal Environmental Protec­ tion.

C. O'Donohue, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:15—15. Resource Conservation and Re­ covery Act. R. L. Hill. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—16. Resource Conservation and Re­ covery Act—Industry Response. A. W. Nosil, J. Markley. 3:10—Discussion. 3:15—17. Status of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. Ν. Ε. Dyer. 3:40—Discussion. 3:45—18. The Federal Pesticide Act of 1978: Its Impact on Industry. J. W. Behan. 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—Panel Discussion. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour. Room #218.

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 221 (2nd Level) Symposium on Handling of Patent Informa­ tion in Image Technology

DIVISION OF CHEMICAL MARKETING AND ECONOMICS

DIVISION OF COLLOID AND SURFACE CHEMISTRY

P. J. Manno, Chairman F. Y. Chan, Secretary

J. T. Yates, Jr., Chairman E. L. Fuller, Jr., Secretary M. E. Schrader, Meeting Secretary

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Symposium on Monohydric Alcohols— Manufacture, Applications, and Chemistry Joint with Division of Industrial and Engi­ neering Chemistry (see page 64)

WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Sheraton-Houston, El Paso Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Synthetic Lubricants

E. C. Leonard, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. A Brief History of the Technology and Development of the Synthetic Lubricant Industry. E. C. Leonard. 9:35—2. Why Synthetics. G. Willette. 10:15—3. Use Specifications and Economics of Synthetic Lubricants—an Update. M. Campen. 10:45—Intermission. 11:00—4. Are Synthetic Oils in Your Future? D. L. Surbey.

G. Szonyi, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—19. Image Technology Patent Infor­ mation System (ITPAIS). R. W. Graham. 9:35—20. Use of ITPAIS for Storage and Retrieval of Published Literature as Well as In-House Information. K. Keller. 10:00—21. Problems of Generating New Descriptors and the Hierarchical Thesaurus. T. Tabuchi. 10:25—22. An Online System for Searching the ITPAIS Data Base for Patents on Pho­ tographic Chemistry. J. M. Vnenchak. 10:50—23. Search Strategies Used in the Information Technology Patent Information System (ITPAIS). H. E. Roberts. 11:15—24. Award Address. (Herman J. Skolnik Award sponsored by the Division of Chemical Information.) W. J. Wiswesser. Panel Discussion: 'How Secondary Services Handle Photographic Patents.' 1:30—25. ITPAIS, The Image Technology Patent Information System. H. B. Archer. 1:55—26. Photographic Patent Coverage in Chemical Abstracts. R. J. Rowlett, G. B. Shoop. 2:20—27. Photographic Patent Coverage in the IFI Comprehensive Data Base. H. M. Allcock, M. Baient. 2:45—28. Retrieval of Patents in Photo­ graphic Chemistry: A Comparative Study. N. Lambert. 3:15—Discussion.

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 221 (2nd Level) Workshop on Engineering Indexing 9:00—Introductory Remarks. N. Hardy. Demonstration of the Structure and Searching of Engineering Index Data Base.

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

COLL

CMEC

Section Β Symposium on Monohydric Alcohols— Manufacture, Applications, and Chemistry Joint with Division of Industrial and Engi­ neering Chemistry (see page 64) WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

Sheraton-Houston, El Paso Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Synthetic Lubricants

L. G. Parkinson, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—5. Aerospace Applications of Synthetic Based Hydraulic Fluids and Lubricants. C. E. Snyder. 2:45—6. The Future of Synthetic Lubricants in the On-Highway Market. J. F. Waggener. 3:25—Intermission. 4:00—Discussion. THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Sheraton-Houston, El Paso Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemicals for Enhanced Oil Recovery C. A. Houston, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:20—7. An Overview on Micellar/Polymer Flooding. D. N. Burdge. 9:45—8. Petroleum Sulfonates: A Key Pro­ cess Chemical in Micellar/Polymer Re­ covery. E. Knaggs. 10:20—9. Lignin Utilization in Enhanced Oil Recovery. G. A. Rasmussen, W. Detroit. 11:10—Discussion. 11:15—10. Polymers for Mobility Control in Enhanced Oil Recovery. G. F. Schurz. 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:15—11. An Overview of Alkaline Flooding: Current Applications and Future Potential. R. M. Weinbrandt. 2:45—Discussion. 2:50—12. Nitrogen for the Enhanced Re­ covery of Oil and Gas. J. P. Clancy, R. E. Gilchrist, D. E. Kroll. 3:20—Discussion. 3:30—13. SACROC Unit C 0 2 Project. S. Walker. 4:10—14. Treating Emulsions from Enhanced Oil Recovery Projects. D. U. Bessler. 4:40—Concluding Remarks.

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Ballroom East (3rd Floor) Symposium on Surface Chemical Effects at the Metal—Semiconductor Interface J. A. Schwarz, Presiding 9:05—1. Role of Wetting in the Sintering and Redispersion of Supported Metals. E. Ruckenstein. 9:40—2. Electronic Structure of Metal Clusters. R. Baetzold. 10:15—3. The Chemical Interaction Between Metals and Ultrathin Si0 2 Layers. C. W. Wilmsen, D. L. Ellsworth, S. M. Goodnick. 10:50—4. Metal—Semiconductor Surfaces in MBE. J. R. Arthur. 11:25—5. Chemistry and Morphology of the Si-Si0 2 Interface. C. R. Helms.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Ballroom Center (3rd Floor) Symposium on Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Chemistry of Metal Clusters J. W. Rogers, Presiding 9:00—6. Correlations between Catalytic Activity and Electronic Structure of Metal Clusters. J. F. Hamilton. 9:30—7. Wrapping Polymers Around Metal Atoms and Very Small Metal Clusters at Room Temperature. G. A. Ozin. 10:00—8. Aspects of the Hydrogénation of Carbon Disulfide by Triosmium Hydride Cluster Compounds. R. D. Adams, J. P. Selegue. 10:30—9. Electronic Structure and Chemical Bonding at Metal Clusters. Κ. Η. Johnson, R. P. Messmer, C. Y. Yang. 11:00—10. Auger Spectroscopy of Metal Carbonyls. G. D. Stucky, R. R. Rye. 11:30—11. Comparative Reactivity of Sup­ ported Cluster Complexes. T. J. Thomas, G. Mistalski, D. A. Hucul, A. Brenner.

Section C Hyatt Regency, Ballroom West (3rd Floor) Symposium on the Chemistry of Clay-Or­ ganic-Metal Ion Interactions Joint with Divi­ sion of Geochemistry {Probationary)

Ε. Η. Edelson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—12. Properties of Transition Ion— Organic Complexes in Swelling Clays. M. M. Mortland. 9:30—13. The η-Power Exchange Function: A General Model for Metal Absorption onto Geological Materials. D. Langmuir, D. Ozsvath. 9:55—14. Interlayer Complexes of Phyllosilicates with Macrocyclic Ligands. E. Puiz-Hitzky, B. Casai, J. M. Serratosa. 10:20—15. Influence of Adsorbed Natural Organic Matter on the Uptake of Cu and Cd by Aluminum Oxide. J. A. Davis. 10:45—16. Surface Properties of Clay Min­ erals and their Contributions to Radioactive Waste Repository Siting. R. L. Bassett. 11:10—17. Influence of Montmorillonite During the Irradiation of Aqueous Acetic Acid. A. Negron-Mendoza, C. Ponnamperuma. 11:35—18. The Surface Chemistry of Kaolinite Compared to the Surface Chemistries of Alumina and Silica. J. C. Westall, P. Liechti, P. Schindler.

Section D Hyatt Regency, Regency Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on Surface Chemistry in Biology and Medicine: Transport Through Biomem­ branes Ε. R. Cooper, Presiding 9:00—19. Rate Limiting Factors in Intestinal Drug Absorption. N. F. H. Ho. 9:30—20. Physico-Chemical Investigations of Bile Salt Systems—Drug Solubilization and Interactions. E. J. Fendler, E. P. Mozzola, S. N. Rosenthal. 9:55—21. Effect of Decylmethyl Sulfoxide on Skin Penetration. E. R. Cooper. 10:20—22. Interactions of Alkyldimethylammoniohexanoates with Lipid Model Membrane. Y. C. Fu, R. G. Laughlin. 10:45—23. Fluorescence Stopped-Flow and Temperature-Jump Studies on Anion Transport in the Red Blood Cell Membrane. J. A. Dix, L. C. Cantley, A. K. Solomon, A. S. Verkman. 11:10—24. Control of Lipid Transfer. L. C. Smith, M. C. Doody, S. C. Charlton. 11:35—25. Drug Transport Across the Cor­ neal Membrane. T. J. Mikkelson. MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Hyatt Regency, Ballroom East (3rd Floor) Symposium on Surface Chemical Effects at the Metal—Semiconductor Interface C. Wronski,

Presiding

2:00—26. Electronic and Structural Proper­ ties of Semiconductor Interfaces. T. C. McGill. 2:35—27. Metal—Semiconductor Interface Problems in Polycrystalline Solar Cells. L. L. Kazmerski. 3:10—28. Sn0 2 /n-Si and ITO/n-Si. Α. Κ. Ghosh, T. Feng, H. P. Maruska. 3:45—29. Carrier Transport Across Metal—Semiconductor and Metal—Insu­ lator—Semiconductor Interfaces. H. C. Card. 4:20—30. Metal and Metal—Insulator Junctions on Amorphous Silicon. C. R. Wronski. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Ballroom Center (3rd Floor) Symposium on Molecular Processes at Solid Surfaces: Chemistry of Metal Clusters J. W. Rogers, Presiding 1:30—31. Metal Surface Coordination Chemistry. J. Stein, C. Friend, M-C. Tsai, E. L. Muetterties. 2:00—32. Low Temperature Cleavage of Alkanes and Arènes by Small Nickel Particles. Clustering of Metal Atoms in Organic Media. S. C. Davis, D. Ralston, K. J. Klabunde. 2:30—33. A Combined NMR/lnfrared Study of the Absorbed States of CO on Rh Dispersed on Al 2 0 3 . T. M. Duncan, J. T. Yates, Jr., R. W. Vaughan. 3:00—34. Theoretical Investigations of the Electronic Structure of Clean and Adsorbate Covered Surfaces. I. P. Batra. 3:30—35. Investigation of the d-Electron Concentration in Supported Catalysts by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. F. W. Lytle, R. B. Greegor, P. S. P. Wei, G. H. Via, J. H. Sinfelt. 4:00—36. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Over Alumina-Supported Ru Clusters. K. C. Kellner, A. T. Bell, V. L. Kuznetsov. 4:30—37. Recent Aspects of Organometal Cluster Chemistry. J. R. Shapley. Section C Hyatt Regency, Ballroom West (3rd Floor) Symposium on the Chemistry of Clay-Organic-Metal Ion Interactions Joint with Division of Geochemistry {Probationary) Ε. Η. Edelson, Presiding 1:30—38. The Role of Clay in Chemical Ev­ olution. C. Ponnamperuma. 2:00—39. The Use of Reduced Clays in Primitive Earth Simulation Experiments. J. P. Ferris, K. W. Alwis, E. H. Edelson, N. Mount. 2:30—40. Recent Studies of the Interaction of Nucleotides with Cation-Exchanged Bentonites. M. Tunzi, F. Church, J. Mazzur'co, K. O'brien, J. G. Lawless. 3:00—41. The Interaction of Metal Ions and Nucleotides: Possible Mechanisms for Absorption of Nucleotides on Homoionic Bentonite Clays. P. Liebman, G. H. Loew. 3:30—42. Prebiotic Peptide Formation by Thermal Condensation of Glycine in Fluc­ tuating Clay Environments. N. Lahav, D. H. White, D. P. Sheehan, S. Chang.

4:00—43. Effects of Histidyl-Histidine and Polyribonucleotides on Glycine Conden. sation in Fluctuating Clay Environments. J. C. Erickson, R. M. Kennedy, D. H. White. 4:30—44. Clays as Delayed Luminescent Materials: Relevance to Prebiotic Poly­ merizations. L. M. Coyne, J. G. Lawless. Section D Hyatt Regency, Regency Room (2nd Floor) General J. A. Mann, Presiding 2:00—45. Electrodynamic Studies of Brownian Particles. H. M. Cheung, R. V. Ed­ wards, J. A. Mann. 2:15—46. Characterization of Calcined Silica Aerogel. J. E. Bundschuh, E. M. Pe­ terson. 2:30—47. Improved Kirkwood-Buff-Fowler Approximation for Computing Interfacial Thermodynamic Quantities. D. Weyburne, J. Parsons, J. A. Mann. 2:45—48. Photochemistry of Pigment Dis­ persions: ZnO in Heptane. J. R. Harbour, S. L. Issler, J. Tromp, M. L. Hair. 3:00—49. The Limitations of Theoretical Expressions for Surface Potentials of Or­ ganic Monolayers on Metallic Substrates. B. J. Kinzig, J. A. Mann. 3 : 1 5 ^ 5 0 . Interaction of Cobalt Amino Acid Complexes with Sedimentary Materials. D. L. Crowther, J. G. Dillard. 3:30—51. Adsorption of Cobalt Coordination Compounds on Minerals. C. V. Schenck, J. G. Dillard. 3:45—52. Surface Characterization of Sul­ fonated Polysulfone Membranes. J. P. Wightman, M. Iqbal, Y. Kang, D. R. Lloyd, J. E. McGrath, C. Sunderland. 4:00—53. Surface Characterization of Sul­ fonated Polysulfone Membranes. Y. Kang, J. P. Wightman. 4:15—54. The Formation of 7-Xylan-Polyethyleneimine Complexes and Its Influence on Colloidal Stability of Fiber Suspensions. G. Strom, P. Barla, P. Stenius. 4:30—55. Electrosorption of Iso-pentanol from Tenth Normal Perchloric Acid and Sulfuric Acid Solutions. K. G. Baikerikar, R. S. Hansen. 4:45—56. The Structure of W/O Microemulsions by Means of Carbon 13 NMR. E. Sjoblom. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Ballroom East (3rd Floor) Kendall Award Symposium on Phases & In­ terfaces in Inhomogeneous Systems: Modern Thermodynamics, Kinetics & Applications in Honor of Howard Reiss K. Jackson, Presiding 9:00—57. Kinetics of First Order Phase Transitions. J. L. Lebowitz. 9:40—58. Homogeneous Nucleation Near the Critical Point. C. M. Knobler. 10:20—59. A Kinetic Approach to Nuclea­ tion. J. L. Katz. 11:00—Introduction of the ACS Kendall Award Winner. F. H. Stillinger. 11:10—60. A ward Address. (ACS Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry sponsored by The Kendall Co.) Improvement of Nuclea­ tion Theory: The Demands of Experiment and Application. H. Reiss. 12:00—Divisional Reception. The Petroleum Club, 800 Bell St. 12:30—Divisional Luncheon. The Petroleum Club, 800 Bell St. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Ballroom Center (3rd Floor) General—Catalysis and Related Topics J. L. Gland, J . A. Dumesic, Presiding 8:55—61. Oxygen Interactions with the Pt (111) Surface. J. L. Gland, B. A. Sexton, G. B. Fisher. 9:20—62. Identification of Adsorbed Hydroxyl Species on the Pt (111) Surface. G. B. Fisher, B. A. Sexton. 9:45—63. Reaction of Hydrogen with Oxygen Chemisorbed on Ru (001). S.-K. Shi, J. M. White. 10:10—64. The Rate of Isotopic Mixing Be­ tween CO Molecules on Ni(100). D. W. Goodman, J. T. Yates, Jr. 10:35—65. Spectroscopic Comparison of CO and Isocyanide Chemisorption on Supported Metal Catalysts. R. R. Cavanagh, J. T. Yates, Jr. 12:00—Divisional Reception. (See Section A for location.) 12:30—Divisional Luncheon. (See Section A for location.)

Section C Hyatt Regency, Ballroom West (3rd Floor) Symposium on Photochemical and Electro­ chemical Surface Science: Photoeffects at Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interfaces A. J . Nozik, Presiding 8:30—66. The Influence on Surface Orien­ tation and Crystal Imperfections on Photoreactions at Semiconductor Electrodes. H. Gerischer. 9:00—67. Heterogeneous Electron Transfer Rates at Chemically Derivatized Semi­ conductor Photoelectrodes. M. S. Wrighton, N. S. Lewis, A. B. Bocarsly. 9:30—68. Behavior and Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on p-Type GaAs. A. J. Bard, F. F. Fan. 10:00—69. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Pro­ duction and Surface Studies on Strontium Titanate. R. Carr, S. Ferrer, F. T. Wagner, G. A. Somorjai. 10:30—70. Photoelectrochemical Behavior of Oxide Semiconductors Coated with Chlorophyll. K. Honda. 12:00—Divisional Reception. (See Section A for location.) 12:30—Divisional Luncheon. (See Section A for location.) TUESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Hyatt Regency, Ballroom East (3rd Floor) Kendall Award Symposium on Phases & In­ terfaces in Inhomogeneous Systems: Modern Thermodynamics, Kinetics & Applications in Honor of Howard Reiss J. L. Lebowitz, Presiding 2:00—71. Homogeneous Nucleation as a Hydrodynamic Fluctuation Phenomenon. R. Lovett. 2:45—72. Interface Structure and Crystal Growth Kinetics. K. A. Jackson. 3:30—73. A Computer Simulation of an Amorphous Thin Film on a Crystalline Substrate. G. M. Pound, F. F. Abraham, N-H. Tsai. 4:15—74. Statistical Mechanics of Thick Films Physisorbed on Uniform Solids. W. Steele. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Ballroom Center (3rd Floor) General—Catalysis and Related Topics

J. L. Gland, J. A. Dumesic, Presiding 2:00—75. Photoassisted Reaction of C0 2 with H 2 0 on Pt/Ti0 2 . S. Sato, J. M. White. 2:30—76. Vanadium-Titanium Oxide Cata­ lysts for Oxidation of Butène. W. E. Slinkard, P. B. DeGroot. 3:00—77. Characterization of the Co-Mo/ 7-AI2O3 Hydrodesulfurization Catalyst by Pyridine Adsorption using Laser Raman Spectroscopy. C. P. Cheng, D. G. Harrell, G. L. Schrader. 3:30—78. Iron Pentacarbonyl Decomposition over Grafoil: Production of Small Metallic Iron Particles. J. Phillips, B. Clausen, J. A. Dumesic. 4:00—79. Influence of Various Poly(ethylenimine) Modifications on Microenvironment and Polymer Conformation: Decarboxylation of 6-Nitrobenzisoxazole-3Carboxylate. D. Mirejovsky, I. M. Klotz. 4:30—80. The Effect of l2(g) and S0 2 on CO Oxidation over Alumina-Supported Platinum. J. A. Del Debbio, T. R. Thomas. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting, (see Section A for location.) Section C Hyatt Regency, Ballroom West (3rd Floor) Symposium on Photochemical and Electrochemical Surface Science: Photoeffects at Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interfaces H. Gerischer, Presiding 2:00—81. Reduction of Grain Boundary and Surface Recombination by Chemisorbed Ions. A. Heller, B. Miller. 2:25—82. Ion Absorption Effects at Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interfaces. D. S. Ginley, M. A. Butler. 2:50—83. Competing Photoelectrochemical Reactions on Semiconductor Electrodes. W. P. Gomes, F. Van Overmeire, F. Vanden Kerchove, F. Cardon. 3:15—84. Supra-Band-Edge Reactions at Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interfaces. J. Turner, J. Manassen, A. J. Nozik.

3:40—85. The Role of Interface States in Electron-Transfer Processes at Photoexcited Semiconductor Electrodes. R. H. Wilson. 4:05—86. Electrode Band Structure and Interface States in Photoelectrochemical Cells. J. G. Mavroides, J. C. C. Fan, H. J. Zieger. 4:30—87. Surface Structure and Electrochemical Behavior of Some Semiconductor or Metal Electrodes. H. Tsubomura, Y. Nakato. 4:55—88. Heterogeneous Cadmium Sulfide Sensitized Photoinduced Electron Transfer Processes in Nonaqueous Solution. F. D. Saeva, G. R. Olin, J. H. Harbour. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting, (see Section A for location.) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Suite (4th Floor) Kendall Award Symposium on Phases & Interfaces in Inhomogenous Systems: Modern Thermodynamics, Kinetics & Applications in Honor of Howard Reiss W. A. Steele, Presiding 9:00—89. The Interface Between Fluid Phases. B. Widom. 9:45—90. The Structure and Dynamics of the Liquid-Solid and Liquid-Gas Interface. B. J. Berne. 10:30—91. Theory of Micelle Formation. F. H. Stillinger, A. Ben-Nairn. 11:15—92. Computer Simulation of Microclusters, Interfaces and Phase Stability. F. F. Abraham. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Ballroom East (3rd Floor) Symposium on Surface Science of Catalysis: Metal Support interactions in Catalysis G. L. Haller, R. L. Garten, Presiding. 9:00—93. Metals as Catalyst Supports and as Supported Catalysts. G.-M. Schwab. 9:45—94. Properties of Metal Catalysts Al­ tered by Strongly Interacting Oxide Sup­ ports. S. C. Fung, S. J. Tauster, R. T. K. Baker, J. A. Horsley, R. L. Garten. 10:15—95. The Influence of the Support on CO Adsorption and Hydrogénation on Palladium. M. A. Vannice, S. H. Moon, S.-Y. Wang. 10:45—96. Redox Properties of Supported Metals as a Probe of Strong Metal-Support Interactions. D. A. Hucul, H. Stepien, A. Brenner. 11:15—97. Redispersion of Supported Platinum Catalysts. G. I. Straguzzi, H. R. Aduriz, C. G. Gigola. Section C Hyatt Regency, Ballroom West (3rd Floor) Symposium on Photochemical and Electrochemical Surface Science: Photoeffects at Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interfaces M. Wrighton, Presiding 9:00—98. Factors Governing the Competition in Electrochemical Reactions at Illuminated Semiconductors. H. Tamura, H. Yoneyama, T. Kobayashi. 9:25—99. Study of the Potential Distribution at the Semiconductor Electrolyte Interface in Regenerative Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells. M. Tomkiewicz, J. Lyden. 9:50—100. Some Aspects of the Potential Distribution at the Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interface. D. L. Ullman. 10:05—101. Photoprocesses on "Clean" and Oxidized Silicon Electrodes. S. R. Morrison, M. J. Madou, K. N. Frese, Jr. 10:30—102. Conditions for Rapid Photocorrosion at Strontium Titanate Photoanodes. R. E. Schwerzel, E. W. Brooman, H. J. Byker, E. J. Drauglis, D. D. Levy, L. E. Vaaler, V. E. Wood. 10:55—103. The Relationship Between Surface Morphology and Solar Conversion Efficiency of Layered Compound Transition Metal Dichalcogenides. H. J. Lewerenz, A. Heller, F. J. DiSalvo. 11:15—104. Photoelectrochemical Effects at Semiconducting Molecular Films. L R. Faulkner, J. M. Green, J. L. Kahl, S. L. Suib. 11:30—105. Carbanion Photooxidation at Semiconductor Surfaces. R. C. Owen, T. A. Voynick, M. A. Fox. 11:45—106. Luminescent Properties of Ordered Porphyrin Assemblies on Solid Supports. J. E. Bulkowski, R. A. Bull, S. R. Sauerbrunn.

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

55

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A

5:30—Divisional Social Hour. (See Section A for location.)

Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Suite (4th Floor)

THURSDAY MORNING

Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Micellar and Microemulsion Structure

Hyatt Regency, Ballroom East (3rd Floor) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Micellar and Microemulsion Structure

S. E. Friberg, Presiding 2:00—107. Review of Recent Experimental Studies on the Forces Between Surfaces. J. N. Israelachvili. 2:45—108. Stability of Dispersions. E. Ruckenstein. 3:30—109. Percolation Phenomena in Microemulsions. J. Peyrelasse, B. Lagourette, J. Heil, C. Boned, M. Clausse. 4:00—110. Study of Micelle Formation in Polar and Apolar Solvents by Positron An­ nihilation Techniques. H. J. Ache, L. A. Fucugauchi, B. Djermouni, E. D. Handel. 4:30—111. Micellar State of Mixed Surfac­ tant Systems. S. Vijayan, A. Melnyk, C. Ramachandran. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour. Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Suite

Section A

J. K. Thomas, Presiding 9:00—129. The Association of Amphiphilic Molecules. J. N. Israelachvili. 9:45—130. Micellar Induced Changes in Ground State Conformations of Molecules as Probes of Micellar Structure. J. Emert, P. Phalon, R. Catena. 10:15—131. Bonding Energies in Premicellar Aggregates. B. Bendiksen, S. E. Friberg. 10:45—132. Molecular Spectroscopy of Hydrocarbon Solution in HydrocarbonPolyethylene Glycol Alkyl Ether-Water Systems. H. Christensen, S. E. Friberg, D. Larsen. 11:15—133. Present State of the Structural Studies of Micromulsions. C. Taupin.

Section Β Section Β Hyatt Regency, Ballroom East (3rd Floor) Symposium on Surface Science of Catalysis: Metal Support Interactions in Catalysis G. L. Haller, R. L. Garten, Presiding 2:00—112. Physical Characterization of Fe/Ti0 2 Model Supported Catalysts. B. J. Tatarchuk, J. A. Dumesic. 2:30—113. Electrocatalytic Properties of Pt Intermetallic Compounds. P. N. Ross, Jr. 3:00—114. Nickel-Support Interactions: Their Effects on Particle Morphology, Ad­ sorption and Activity/Selectivity Properties. C. H. Bartholomew, R. B. Pannell, J. L. Butler, D. G. Mustard. 3:30—115. Supported Osmium Clusters: Synthesis and Catalytic Activity. M. Deeba, M. B. Freeman, B. C. Gates. 4:00—116. Effect of Support Acidity on Platinum Clusters Encaged in Y-Type Ze­ olites. R. S. Weber, M. Boudart. 4:30—117. Studies of Pd, Pt, Rh and Ir Sup­ ported on Acidic (Zeolite) and Basic (Ti0 2 , MgO) Carriers. Evidence of Metal-Support Interactions./;. Naccache, H. Ellestad, M. Dufaux, J. Bandiera, J. Védrine. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location.) Section C Hyatt Regency, Ballroom West (3rd Floor) Symposium on Photochemical and Electrochemical Surface Science: Photoeffects at Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interfaces A. J. Bard, Presiding 2:00—118. Ternary Iron Transition Métal Oxides. K. Dwight, C. Case, J. Koenrtzer, A. Wold. 2:20—119. Fundamental Aspects of Photoeffects at the Semiconductor-Molten Salt Interphase. J. DuBow, R. Job, K. Rajeshwar, R. J. Gale, P. J. Singh. 2:40—120. A Possible Mechanism of Electron Exchange at the SemiconductorElectrolyte Interface. D. L. Ullman, J. S. Newman. 2:55—121. The Role of Ionic Product Desorption Rates in Photo-Assisted Electrochemical Reactions. H. E. Hager. 3:10—122. Luminescent Properties of Tellurium-Doped Cadmium Sulfide Photoelectrodes. A. B. Ellis, B. R. Karas, D. S. Morano. 3:25—123. Thin Film, Cd-ChalcogenideBased, Photoelectrochemical Cells. D. Cahen, G. Hodes, J. Manassen, R. Tenne. 3:50—124. A Novel Concept in Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage. H. Witzke, S. Chen, S. K. Deb, M. Russak, J. Reichman. 4:15—125. Photoeffects on Solid-State Photoelectrochemical Cells. P. G. P. Ang, A. F. Sammells. 4:30—126. The Photoassisted Electrochemical Production of Chlorine. J. Jorne. 4:45—127. Analysis of Current-Voltage Characteristics of CdSe Photoanodes. J. Reichman, M. A. Russak. 5:00—128. Influence of Doping and PostDeposition Treatments on the Photoelectrochemical Performance of Sprayed CdSe Photoanode. K. R. Ramaprasad, M. McDonough, S. N. Chen.

56

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

Hyatt Regency, Ballroom Center (3rd Floor) Symposium on Adsorption from Aqueous Solutions

P. H. Te war i, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—134. Effect of Complex Formation on the Adsorption Characteristics of Heavy Metals. Exemplified by the Absorption of [Co(lll)-EDTA]~ Complexes onto Hydrous Oxide Surfaces. C. P. Huang, Y. T. Lin. 9:30—135. Interactions Between Strongly Binding Anionic and Cationic Adsorbates on Amorphous Iron Oxyhydroxide. M. Benjamin, N. Bloom. 9:55—136. Colloid Chemical Properties of Hydrsols—Model Colloids and Colloid Models. R. O. James. 10:20—Discussion. 10:30—137. Interaction of Zinc Ions with Hydroxylapatite. D. N. Misra, R. L. Bowen. 10:55—138. Adsorption of Polyacrylamide and Sulfonated Polyacrylamide on Kaolinite. A. Hollander, C. C. Gryte, P. Somasundaran. 11:20—139. The Adsorption of AlkalineEarth Metal Ions at the Rutile-Aqueous Solution Interface. D. Manmohan, S. Raghavan, D. W. Fuerstenau. 11:45—140. The Adsorption of Oleate from Aqueous Solution onto Hematite. S. N. Yap, S. Raghavan, D. W. Fuerstenau. 12:10—Discussion. Section C Hyatt Regency, Ballroom West (3rd Floor) Symposium on Colloid and Interfacial Prob­ lems in Coal Utilization

2:00—145. Micellar Structure and Catalysis. J. Fendler. 2:45—146. Photochemical Studies in Microemulsions. J. K. Thomas. 3:15—147. Dynamic Behavior of Micellar Solutions in Relation to Oil Displacement Process in Porous Media. M. Chiang, D. O. Shah. 3:45—148. NMR and VPO Investigations of Steroidal Micellar Systems. E. J. Fendler, S. N. Rosenthal. 4:15—149. The Action of Hydrotropes. M. Cox, S. E. Friberg. 4:45—150. Structural and Transport Prop­ erties of O/W Microemulsions. R. A. Mackay, C. Hermansky, R. Agarwal.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Ballroom Center (3rd Floor) Symposium on Adsorption from Aqueous Solutions P. H. Tewari, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—151. Sorption of Actinides from Aqueous Solution Under Environmental Conditions. G. W. Beall, B. Allard. 2:30—152. Non-Ideal Sorption of Anions by Ferric Oxides: lodate and Selenite. R. A. Couture, M. G. Seitz, M. J. Steindler. 2:55—153. Sorption of Radionuclides on Sandstone in Water and in Brine. H. C. Weed, F. Barzan, J. H. Rego, J. S. Schweiger. 3:20—Discussion. 3:30—154. Sorption of Heavy Metals and Pesticides by Chitin and Chitosan. C. A. Eiden, C. J. Jewell, M. V. Kemp, J. P. Wightman. 3:55—155. Surface Chemistry of Asbestos Fibre. S. Ahmed. 4:20—156. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectro­ scopic (XPS) Studies on the Chemical Nature of Metal Ions Adsorbed on Clay and Minerals. J. G. Dillard, A. B. Emerson, M. H. Koppelman, D. L. Crowther, C. V. Schenck, J. W. Murray, L. Balistrieri. 4:45—Discussion.

Section C Hyatt Regency, Ballroom West (3rd Floor) Symposium on Colloid and Interfacial Prob­ lems in Coal Utilization

T. D. Wheelock, Presiding 2:00—157. Transformation of the Iron Sul­ fides in Coal Liquifaction. P. A. Montano, S. Reddy, B. Granoff. 2:40—158. Studies of Absorbed Molecular Species in Coal by NMR and Thermal Techniques. B. G. Silbernagel, S. C. Mraw. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—159. Adsorption and Diffusion of Se­ lected Solvents in Coals. B. C. Gerstein, M. Silva-Crawford. Section D

B. C. Gerstein, Presiding 9:00—141. An Investigation of the Hydrophilic/Hydrophobic Nature of Various Coals: Its Importance to the Stability and Rheological Properties of Coal-Oil Mixtures. G. Botsaris, Y. Glazman, M. A. Viola. 9:40—142. Problems of Beneficiating Coal by Froth Flotation and/or Oil Agglomera­ tion. T. D. Wheelock, R. Markuszewski, W. G. Leonard, C. Han. 10:20—Intermission. 10:35—143. Coal-Oil Mixtures V. Stabiliza­ tion of Coal Oil Mixtures by Surfactants. R. L Rowell, J. J. Kosman. 11:15—144. Structure and Chemistry of Coals: Devolatization and Modification of Sorption Properites. E. L. Fuller, Jr. Section D Symposium on Surface Studies Related to Petroleum Chemistry Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Symposium on Surface Studies Related to Petroleum Chemistry Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75)

COMP DIVISION OF COMPUTERS IN CHEMISTRY C. L Wilkins, Chairman D. Edelson, Secretary

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Ballroom East (3rd Floor) Symposium on Physicochemical Properties of Colloidal Particles: Micellar and Microemulsion Structure J. N. Israelachvili, Presiding

MONDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 103 (Lobby Level) General T. H. Ridgway, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:40—1. Conformational Analysis of Proteins: Algorithms and Data Structures for Array Processing. C. Pottle, M. S. Pottle, R. W. Turtle, R. J, Kinch, H. A. Scheraga.

9:05—2. Small Computer Automation of X-Ray Powder Diffraction. J. S. Lindsey, A. Cisar, W. W. Henslee. 9:25—3. Instrument Control, Data Acquisition and Signal Processing in Vacuum Ultravi­ olet Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy. C. A. Bush. 9:50—Intermission. 10:15—4. Control of High Precision Data Collection from a Spectrophotometer with an 8-Bit Microprocessor. A. T. Ansevin. 10:40—5. Mini to Micro to Mini: Analysis of a Rapid Scan Polarography Experiment Using an HP2000F Minicomputer and an 8080 Based Microcomputer. J. L. Bordley, Jr. E. P. Kirven, D. L. Laude, Jr., C. C. Ross, Jr. 11:05—6. A Networking Approach to OneOn-One Computing. R. E. Dessy. 11:30—7. Microcomputer Graphics and Dis­ plays: Implementation and Evaluation. D. J. Macero, T. M. Banks, P. V. Passalacqua, L. W. Burgess, Jr. 11:55—Concluding Remarks. 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:40—8. Talking Terminal Software for a Chemistry Laboratory Microcomputer Used to Aid Blind Students in Chemistry La­ boratories. R. C. Morrison, D. Lunney, D. Sowell, M. M. Cetera, G. Locklair. 2:05—9. A Talking Computer Terminal Based of the Zilog Z80 Board Family. D. Lunney, R. C. Morrison, G. Locklair, M. M. Cetera, D. Sowell. 2:30—Intermission. 2:55—10. Design Aids for Development of Microprocessor Based Instrumentation: A History. H. R. Pinnick, Jr. 3:10—11. Total Emulation of the Intel 8080 Instruction Set on a Mainframe Computer. D. J. Leggett. 3:35—12. Development of a Microproces­ sor-Based Data Acquisition Systems I. Saleh. 4:00—13. Personal Computers in the Labo­ ratory. II. Specific Application. G. S. Owen. 4:20—14. Automatic Control of Analytical Procedures Using Home Microcomputers. D. P. Stout, J. L. Fasching. 4:40—15. Some Applications of the MINC 11 in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory. G. F. Pollnow. 5:00—Concluding Remarks.

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTER­ NOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) Symposium on Computer Networks in the Analytical Laboratory Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry

G. C. Levey, Presiding 9:00—16. Introduction to Computer Net­ works. G. C. Levey. 9:30—17. The General Electric Laboratory Automation System (LAS). E. Lifshin, W. T. Hatfield, R. P. Goehner. 10:25—18. Hardware and Software Aspects of the Development of the Satellite Data Processing Network at the Department of Chemistry of The University of Hamburg. K. Zietlow, H. Ch Broecker, H. G. W. Muller. 11:15—19. Instrumental Design Consider­ ations in the Development of a Data Net­ work for an Analytical Laboratory. J. D. Mitchell, R. Ferguson, F. Duranza, D. Hawk, D. Mules. R. E. Dessey, Presiding 2:00—20. A Mini/Microcomputer Data Net­ work for the Multi User Laboratory Envi­ ronment. G. C. Levy, D. Terpstra, C. Du­ moulin, D. A. Wright, J. Past, G. W. Coppenger, J. Read, W. Joubert, R. Roeder. 2:45—21. A Small Laboratory Computer Network—Software Aspects. R. E. Des­ sey, M. K. Starling, D. J. Hooley. 3:30—22. General Purpose Microcomputer for Laboratory Automation. C. N. Reilley, W. S. Woodward. 4:15—23. The University of Utah NMR Labo­ ratory Minicomputer Network. D. W. Al­ derman, W. D. Hamill, Jr., C. L. Mayne, D. M. Grant. 6:30—Divisional Social Hour. (Joint with Di­ vision of Analytical Chemistry). San Jacinto Inn, Battleground Road—off the LaPorte Freeway. 7:30—Divisional Dinner. (Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry). San Jacinto Inn, Battleground Road—off the LaPorte Freeway.

m*nm

Graphical Substructure Search System INFORMATION

IS POWER

Separation of information from the people who need it is costly. Provide your chemists with convenient immediate access to chemi­ cal information via MOLEX, the molecular executive that understands chemical structur­ al diagrams. Through the chemist's natural language, the graphical molecular structure, new compounds may be entered, specific compounds recalled together with their bio­ logical or physical data, or the file searched for compounds containing any desired sub­ structures or other characteristics. Turn­ around time is seconds, and results are displayed graphically, plotted, or stored for future reference. More than just an information processing system, MOLEX employs sophisticated chemical perception techniques to determine molecular features. MOLEX recognizes the entire periodic table, so that valences, atomic charges, preferred geometries, even isotopic labels are handled correctly for all elements. MOLEX interprets stereochemistry at asym­ metric centers or about double bonds, desig­ nated by the user in any convenient graphi­ cal representation. MOLEX understands aromaticity, so that any molecule in the file is located no matter how its structure is drawn.

INPi

>rges, Isotopes stereochemistry Templates (User definable) ative Buildino * DISPLAY 'Cleaned1 and Symmetrized User Controlled Orientation Atom Numbers on/off Stereo Hash/Wedges on/off Automatic Plotting Structural Diagram Preserved * REGISTRATION AND RETRIEVAL Master or Subfiles Automatic Generation of SEMA Name - Mathematically Proven Unique Automatic Duplicate Rejection Immediate File Update Automatic Search Screen Generation User-Defined Screens User-Defined Fields (eg, company no.) * DATA Automatic Molecular Formula User Definable Data Types - Numerical and Text - Unlimited Number

Calculatior

\SEARCHING Powerful Interactive Search Methods - String or Substring (Data or Name) - Graphical Structure - Stereoisomers - Molecular Formular (exact or range) - MOLEX or Company Registry Numbei Substructure (graphical or string) - Multiple Substructures - Keys (boolean combinations) - Data (exact or range) Hit Lists - Filing and Restoring - All Logical Operations Interruptible

In most systems, updating of files can only be done as a batch process, perhaps once a month. MOLEX updates the file instant­ aneously — new information is immediate!) available to all your chemists. A data base is valuable and must be secure against unauthorized modification. MOLEX provides a complete authorization system which allows controlled access to proprieta information. You decide which users may examine, register, or delete structures and who may access each data item in each of the many master files allowed.

MOLEX is available for immediate in-house installation, with complete maintenance and upgrading guaranteed. Join the frontier of technology, arrange to see MOLEX in opera­ tion. For further information or demonstration please contact us.

Molecular •τ·;·;··· : : : :V: : Design Ltd 1122 Β Street Hayward, California 94541 415 581-1996

* STRUCTURE

See us at ACS Chem Expo/Houston Texas, Booth 240

ARCHITECTS

OF MOLECULES

FOR SOCIETY'S

NEEDS

METHANOL BETWEEN 1980 AND 1990, THE U.S. WILL NEED ENOUGH TO FILL A STORAGE TANK 20 TIMES LARGER THAN NEW YORK'S WORLD TRADE CENTER. SOME OF IT WILL COME FROM ASHLAND. In the decade ahead, it is estimated that the U.S. will use 19,000,000,000 gallons of methanol/ The estimated combined volume of the World Trade Center's twin towers is 122,518,000 cubic feet. Multi­ plying that volume by 7.481 gallons per cubic foot, you get 916,557,158 gallons. Which means that a storage tank large enough to hold the nation's predicted methanol require­ ments, o\ier the next ten years, would have to be 20.73 times larger than these two 110-story at's obviously a lot of ΊΟΙ. But in view of the ;al's importance as a

feedstock, its use as an inter­ mediate, and its end-use promise for the future, that projected volume is not too surprising. Nor is Ashland Chemical's position as both a producerand a supplier. A position that serves to further broaden Ashland's already broad base as a manufacturer and distributor of essential industrial chemicals. Ashland Chemical Company, P.O. Box 2219, Columbus, Ohio43216.

* * - «

';'•

>··^, .,ΙΛ*·

.-

Ashland, ^Ashland Chemical Company DIVISION OF ASHLAND OIL, INC.

ife siise?



^

*

*

*

^

"You know, C2H5j Methyl Chloride is becoming a very complicated subject for oui·users" THEREFORE TD SEND FDR OUR FREE BOOKLET IS ETHVLDGIDRLr

Φ

_-=

^fcife^Wl

* «„if «>,

"Now, with nearly 500 million pounds of Methyl Chloride being con­ sumed annually, a maze of regulations about its use has sprung up." "AFFIRITIATIVE. SOITIE REGULA­ TIONS ARE NECESSARY."

"Yes, but who's got the time to go wading through volumes of literature to find out what they are? Our new Methyl Chloride booklet contains a wealth of necessary information."

"Sure they are. Methyl Chloride has to be carefully handled, loaded and stored."

"THERE IS ALSO UÏ1PORTANT DATA ON PHYSICAL AND CHEKMCAL PROPERTIES AS WELL AS TESTING METHODS!'

'THERE ARE SPECIAL PROCE­ DURES FOR THESE ACTIVITIES!'

"Not to mention a description of uses both as a methylating agent and a

catalyst carrier. And this Methyl Chloride handbook is available right now to people who request it." ΊΤ IS FREE. AND TO USE IT IS ETHVLOGICAL'

Write to:

Ëthyl Corporation (By) Industrial Chemicals

\ 5 Λ

ETHYL TOWER, 451 FLORIDA, BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA 70801

IB

3:15—Intermission. 3:25—16. Gross Organics Measurements in Water and Wastewater. M. Michail, E. Idelovitch. 3:50—17. UV Multiwavelength Absorbance Measurements for Monitoring Trace Organics in Water. W. J. Maier, L. E. Conroy. 4:15—18. Determination of Carbohydrates and Primary Amines in River Water. Lawrence E. Conroy, W. J. Maier, Y-T Shih. 4:40—Discussion.

ENVR DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Forum (2nd Floor) General V. D. Adams, Presiding

L. B. Laird, Chairman R. L. Jolley, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry and Chemical Analysis of Water/Wastewater Intended for Reuse General F. M. Middleton, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. W. J. Cooper 9:30—1. An Evaluation of the Published Lit­ erature in the Water Reuse/Recycle Area. E. F. Rissmann, E. F. Abrams, R. J. Turner. 9:55—2. Steady-State Mass Balance Rela­ tionships in Wastewater Recycle and Reuse. J. B. Andelman. 10:20—Intermission. 10:30—3. The Effectiveness of an European Surface Water Treatment System Espe­ cially in Removal of Organics. M. Schalekamp. 10:55—4. Identification of the Partial Oxida­ tion Products of Monomethyl Hydrazine and Unsymmetrical Dimethyl Hydrazine from Ozonation. W. F. Cowen, R. A. Sierka, J. Zirrolli. 11:20—5. Survey of Industrial Applications of Carbon Adsorption. C. S. Parmele, R. J. Turner. 11:45—Discussion. Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Forum (2nd Floor) General R. L. Jolley,

Presiding

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—6. Trace Elements in Saltwater Fish from the Atlantic Coast of South Carolina. A. K. Koli, R. Whitmore, W. Conyers, H. A. Beckford, B. Walden. 9:30—7. Half-Life of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (Aroclor 1254) in Fish from an Alabama Reservoir and Stream. C-i P. Lo, M. W. Vitter, R. S. Reimers, G. E. Gunning, A. C. Anderson. 9:55—8. Solubility of Some Organotin Antifoulants in Aqueous Solutions. M. Ôzcan, M. L. Good. 10:20—9. A Study of Organotin Compounds in Aqueous Solutions Using Extraction Techniques. C. P. Monaghan, V. I. Kulkarni, M. Ozcan, M. L. Good. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—10. Biotransformation of the Pesticide Sodium Arsenate. Shariatpanahi, A. C. Anderson, A. Abdelghani. 11:15—11. Evaluation of Acid Rain at Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Results from a Dense Sampling Network. B. C. Madsen. 11:40—12. Complexing Capacity of Fulvic Acid and Natural Waters. R. E. Truitt, J. H. Weber. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry and Chemical Analysis of Water/Wastewater Intended for Reuse, Monitoring and Control R. J. Davenport, Presiding 2:00—13. Control and Measurement of Organic Micropollutants in South African Water Reclamation Plants. J. F. J. van Rensburg, A. J. Hassett, S. J. Theron. 2:25—14. Applications of Thermal Desorption—Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to Monitor Dynamic Adsorption in Activated Carbon. K. Alben, E. Shpirt. 2:50—15. Development of a TOC/COD Analyzer for Reuse Applications. R. J. Davenport, J. B. Lantz, R. A. Wynveen, W. J. Cooper.

2:00—19. Detection and Trapping of Epoxides with Nucleophiles. S. C. Agarwal, B. L. Van Duuren. 2:25—20. Effect of Hydrocarbon and NOx on Photochemical Smog Formation Under Simulated Transport Conditions. W. A. Glasson. 2:50—21. The Effect of Temperature on Ozone Formation in the Propene/Nitrogen Dioxide/Air System. R. J. Countess, G. T. Wolff, M. R. Whitbeck. 3:10—22. Coaxial Air Injection for Anaerobic Metabolism Suppression and Odor Control in Wastewater Force Mains M. A. Vivona. 3:35—Intermission. 3:45—23. Determination of Polycyclic Aro­ matic Hydrocarbons in Airborne Particu­ lates at Various Locations in Taipei City by GC/MS and Glass Capillary GC. P. H. Chen, H. Shieh, J. Gaw. 4:10—24. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions from Aqueous Solution with Treated Leather. D. A. Nelson. 4:35—25. Kinetics of Sediment Oxygen De­ mand. W. Wang. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry and Chemical Analysis of Water/Wastewater Intended for Reuse. Quality Assurance J . A. Winter, Presiding 8:30—26. Quality Assurance for Water and Wastewater Analyses. J. A. Winter. 8:55—27. The Use of Log-Normal Statistics in Environmental Monitoring. R. B. Dean. 9:20—28. Quality Assurance/Quality Control Strategy for Industrial Wastewater Analysis. D. Neptune. 9:45—29. Quantitation of the Quality of En­ vironmental Data. B. J. Fairless, J. R. Dias, R. D. Kleopfer. 10:10—Intermission. 10:20—30. NBS Outputs for Data Quality Assurance in Water Measurements. L. T. McClendon. . 10:45—31. Nuclear Activation Techniques Used for the Determination of 18 Trace Elements in New Standard Reference Water. R. Zeisler, R. B. Greenberg, T. E. Gills, R. M. Lindstrom. 11:10—32. Quality Assurance in the Evalua­ tion of Pollution Control Technology: Ex­ periences at the USEPA's Industrial Envi­ ronmental Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH. P. E. Mills. 11:35—Discussion. Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A (2nd Floor) ACS Award Symposium for Creative Ad­ vances in Environmental Sciences and Technology in Honor of James J. Morgan R. F. Christman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—33. Award Address. (ACS Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology sponsored by Air Products and Chemicals, lnc.)Aquatic Chemistry. J. J. Morgan. 9:50—34. Chemical Models: Equilibrium vs. Steady State (Sillen Revisited). F. M. M. Morel, R. E. McDuff, J. J. Morgan. 10:20—35. Trace Metal Catalysis and the Activation of Molecular Oxygen in the Aquatic Environment. M. R. Hoffman. 10:50—Intermission. 11:00—36. Aquatic Surface Chemistry: Some Aspects of Surface Coordination at Hydrous Oxides. W. Stumm.

11:30—37. Aquasols: An Introduction to Small Particle Behavior in Aquatic Sys­ tems. C. R. O'Melia. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry and Chemical Analysis of Water/Wastewater Intended for Reuse. Concentrating Organics for Toxicty Testing

F. C. Kopfler, Presiding 2:00—38. Concentrating Organics for Toxcity Testing—The Challenge. F. C. Kopfler. 2:25—39. Concentration of Organics for Toxicity Testing Using Membrane Pro­ cesses. J. K. Smith, S. C. Lynch. 2:50—40. Considerations Relevant to the Use of XAD Resins in Concentrating Organics for Toxicity Studies. R. L. Malcolm, Ε. Μ. Thurman, G. R. Aiken. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—41. A High Performance Macroporous Resin Concentration System for Trace Organic Residues in Water. R. B. Baird, J. P. Gute, C. A. Jacks. R. L. Jenkins, L. Neisess, B. Scheybeler. 3:50—42. Recovery of Mutagens from Water by the Parfait/Distillation Method. J. B. Johnston, M. K. Verdeyen. 4:15__43. Concentration of Nonvolatile Or­ ganic Compounds from Wastewater. H. F. Walton. 4:40—Discussion.

10:45—57. Removal of PCB'S from Water by Activated Carbon in the Presence of Humic Acids. M. Pirbazari, W. J. Weber, Jr. 11:10—58. Removal of Specific Organic Contaminants from Wastewater by Activated Carbon Adsorption. B. A. Baeudet, E. M. Kellar, L. J. Biello, R. J. Turner. 11:35—Discussion.

Sheraton-Houston, Forum (2nd Floor) Symposium on Virus Removal in Wastewater Treatment

M. M. Reddy, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—59. The Relationship Between Poliovirus Adsorption and Soil Properties. D. H. Taylor, G. W. Fuhs, M. M .Reedy, R. S. Moore. 9:35—60. Reovirus Adsorption by Soils Suspended in a Synthetic Freshwater Medium at pH 7 and 4°C. R. S. Moore, D. H. Taylor, M. Chen, L. S. Sturman, M. M. Reddy. 10:05—61. The Role of Cyanophage in Water Treatment Evaluation. M. P. Kraus. 10:35—Intermission. 10:40—62. Detection of Rotavirus in Raw and Treated Wastewater. E. M. Smith, C. P. Gerba. 11:10—63. Removal of Virus from Waste­ water During Land Disposal. D-S. Wang, J. C. Lance, C. P. Gerba. WEDNESDAY

General

R. F. Moseman, Presiding 2:00—44. A Study of the Conversion of Se­ lected Aromatic Amines to Mutagens by Procine Hepatocyte Microsomal Fraction. S. V. Doctor, J. Bond. 2:20—45. Light Activated Reduction of Chemicals (LARC). W. E. Jones, III, J. F. Kitchens, R. S. Wentsel. 2:40—46. Investigation of a Rotating Biolgoical Contactor for Treatment of Industrial Wastewaters. J. F. Kitchens, R. G. Hydë, D. A. Price, W. E. Jones, III, R. S. Wentsel, W. M. Scott. 3:00—47. Accelerated Restoration of Hazardous Spill Damaged Lands. R. S. Wentsel, W. E. Jones, III, M. J. Wilkinson, R. H. r outch, J. F. Kitchens. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—48. A' Rapid Coliphage Analysis Technique (ARCT™). W. M. Scott, P. E. O'Neill, J. F. Kitchens. 3:50—49. The Use of Absorbents in the Cleanup of Chemical Spills. D. D. Hedberg, J. Jensen. 4:10—50. The Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effect in the Oxidation of Methane by Hydroxyl. F. Rust, C M . Stevens. 4:30—51. Effect of A l 3 + and F~ on Desulfurization Reaction in the Limestone Slurry Scrubbing Process. T. Mori, S. Matsuda, F. Nakajima, T. Nishimura, Y. Arikawa. WEDNESDAY MORNING

AFTERNOON Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry and Chemical Analysis of Water/Wastewater Intended for Reuse. Toxic Chemicals: Removal by Membrane Processes G. Belfort, Presiding 2:00—64. Removal of Chemical Carcinogens from Water/Wastewater by Reverse Os­ mosis. W. G. Light. 2:25—65. The Demonstration of a Cross-Flow Microfiltration System for the Removal of Toxic Heavy Metals from Battery Manuf­ acturing Wastewater Effluents. H-L. Liu, N. I. Shapira, J. E. Santo, D. Fruman, C. Darvin, J. Baranski, K. Mihalik. 2:50—66. Removal of Various Toxic, Heavy Metals and Cyanide from Water by Mem­ brane Processes. L. J. Kosarek. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—67. Coupled Transport Membranes for Removal of Chromium from Electroplating Rinse Solutions. W. C. Babcock, R. W. Baker, M. G. Conrod, H. K. Lonsdale, K. L. Smith. 3:50—68. The Potential of Reverse Osmosis for the Recycling and Reuse of Sewage Effluents. B. A. Winfield, P. A. Stead. 4:15—69. Alternate Disinfectants for Reverse Osmosis Membrane Maintenance. Κ. Ε. Longley, C. A. Sorber, R. F. Williams, Β. Ε. Moore. 4:40—Discussion.

Section A

Section Β

Sheraton-Houston, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry and Chemical Analysis of Water/Wastewater Intended for Reuse. Carbon Adsorption: Competative Models G. Belfort, Presiding

Sheraton-Houston, Forum (2nd Floor) Symposium on Virus Removal in Wastewater Treatment

8:30—52. Experimentally Observed Anomalies in Competitive Adsorption and ReExamination of Some Available Models. W. H. Frye, F. A. DiGiano, P. A. HoganHamm. 8:55—53. The Net Adsorption Energy Concept as an Estimate of Equilibrium Capacity in Competitive Adsorption Systems. M. J. McGuire, I. H. Suffet. 9:20—54. Selective Adsorption of Organic Homologues onto Activated Carbon From Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Solvophobic Interaction Approach—II. G. Belfort. 9:45—55. Comparison of Activated Carbon and Coal Gasification Char Adsorbents Using Mathematical Models. W. E. Thacker, V. L. Snoeyink, J. C. Crittenden. 10:10—Intermission. 10:20—56. Competitive Activated Carbon Adsorption of Selected Organic Priority Pollutants in an Industiral Wastewater. J. K. Smith, S. C. Lynch, C. J. Upton. F. Dryden.

sm

Section Β

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A (2nd Floor)

m

M. M. Reddy, Presiding 2:00—70. Virus Removal During Primary Sedimentation of Raw Sewage. V. C. Rao, S. B. Lakhe, S. V. Waghmare, V. Raman. 2:30—71. The Influence of Fulvic Acid on Bacteriophage Adsorption and Complexation in Soil. R. L. Bixby, D. J. O'Brien. 3:00—72. The Effect of Wastewater Treat­ ment on Solids-Associated Viruses. T. W. Hejkal, F. M. Wellings, A. L. Lewis, P. A. LaRock. 3:30—73. The Role of Electrophoretic Mo­ bility in Understanding the Adsorption of Reovirus by Allophane. D. H. Taylor, A. R. Bellamy, H. B. Bosmann, A. T. Wilson. THURSDAY MORNING Sheraton-Houston, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry and Chemical Analysis of Water/Wastewater Intended for Reuse. Treatment Techniques R. D. Heaton, Presiding

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

61

11

3 til III

TO 3d

Tjj

tjj is

id Hi f§2| i »

SSl

3

8:30—74. Diffused-Air Stripping of Ammonia in Advanced Wastewater Treatment. E. Shpirt. 8:55—75. Feasibility of Utilizing Iron (VI) Ferrate for Reuse of Secondary Effluents. T. D. Waite. 9:20—76. Tertiary Wastewater Treatment by the Application of Vascular Aquatic Plants. S. Tridech, A. J. Englande. 9:45—77. Removal of Priority Pollutants with a Combined Powdered Activated CarbonActivated Sludge Process. D. G. Hutton. 10:10—Intermission. 10:20—78. Treatment of Phenol and Substi­ tuted Phenols with an Anaerobic-Activated Carbon Filter. M. T. Suidan, W. H. Cross. 10:45—79. Safe Reuse of Water and Wastewater. D. D. Woodbridge. 11:10—80. Study of Ozone Reactions with Organic Compounds in Water. M. K. Lee. 11:35—81. Treatability of Extended Aeration Effluent by Chemical Clarification and Pressure Ozonation. A. G. Hill, J. B. Howell. 12:00—Discussion.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Sheraton-Houston, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry and Chemical Analysis of Water/Wastewater Intended for Reuse. Analytical Methods and Character­ ization J. P. Mieure, Presiding 2:00—82. Survey of Procedures for Deter­ mining Volatile Organics In Water. J. P. Mieure. 2:25—83. Characterization of Organic Ma­ terials in Advanced Treated Wastewater. M. Reinhard, E. T. Everhart, J. W. Graydon, P. L. McCarty. 2:50—84. Development of Volatile Organic Analysis Technique for the Orange-Los Angeles County Reuse Study. S. W. Krasner, C. J. Hwang, R. S. Cohen, M. J. McGuire. 3:15—Intermission. 3:25—85. Determination of Total Organic Halides (TOX) and Purgeable Organic Halides (POX) in Water. Y. Takahashi, R. T. Moore, R. J. Joyce. 3:50—86. Total Organic Halogen Measure­ ments for the Characterization of Re­ claimed Waters: Occurrence, Formation, and Removal. M. R. Jekel. P. V. Roberts. 4:15—87. Determination of Organically Combined Chlorine in High Molecular Weight Aquatic Organics. M. P. McCahill, L. E. Conroy, W. J. Maier. 4:40—Discussion.

FRIDAY MORNING Sheraton-Houston, Florentine Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry and Chemical Analysis of Water/Wastewater Intended for Reuse. Disinfection

J. D. Johnson, Presiding 8:30—88. Rational Approaches in the Anal­ ysis of Chemical Disinfection Kinetics. C. N. Haas. 8:55—89. Insoluble Polymeric Contact Dis­ infectants—An Alternative Approach to Water Disinfection. G. E. Janauer, C. P. Gerba, W. C. Ghiorse, M. Costello, E. M. Heurich. 9:20—90. Biological Evaluation of the Meth­ ods for the Determination of Free Available Chlorine. V. P. Olivieri, M. C. Snead, W. H. Dennis. 9:45—91. Chlorine Dioxide Chemistry: Gen­ eration and Residual Analysis in Waste­ water. E. M. Aieta, P. V. Roberts. 10:10—92. Decontamination of Parasitic Contaminated Domestic Waste. D. B. Leftwich, R. S. Reimers, A. J. Englande. 10:35—Discussion. 11:00—Concluding Remarks. W. J. Cooper

10:15—13. Catalytic Upgrading of H-Coal Syncrudes. D. J. O'Rear, R. F. Sullivan, B. E. Stangeland. 10:50—14. Hydrotreatment and Biological Test of SRC-II Coal Liquid. D. Sutterfield, W. C. Lanning, R. E. Royer. 11:25—15. Catalyst Deactivation in Hydrotreating Coal-Derived Liquids. R. Sivasubramanian, J. H. Olson, J. R. Katzer.

FUEL

Section Β

DIVISION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY

Sheraton-Houston, Ridge Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Environmental Control in Synfuels Processes M. L. Lee, Presiding

H. R. Appell, Chairman K. S. Vorres, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Liquid Fuels from Coal L. W. Vernon, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Novel Approach to Coal Liquefac­ tion Utilizing Hydrogen Sulfide and Carbon Monoxide. M. B. Abdel-Baset, C. T. Ratcliffe. 9:40—2. Pilot Unit Evaluation of Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) Program Coals. G. H. An­ derson, S. J. Hsia, K. L. Trachte. 10:15—3. Effects of Solvent Hydrogen Content in the SRC Process. R. W. Skinner, E. N. Givens. 10:50—4. Continuous Hydroliquefaction Tests on Australian Brown Coal. N. V. P. Kelvin, B. P. K. Lim, P. W. Fredrickson. 11:25—5. Disposable Catalysts for Coal Li­ quefaction. E. C. Moroni, R. H. Fischer Section Β Symposium on Novel Methods of Metal and Heteroatom Removal Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc. (see page 75) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Liquid Fuels from Coal

L. W. Vernon, Presiding 2:00—6. The Mechanism of Hydrogen Transfer from Dialin Donors. D. H. Bass, P. S. Virk. 2:35—7. Comparison of Methods for the Determination of Asphaltenes, Oils and Insolubles—Part II. H. Schultz, M. J. Mima. 3:10—Intermission. Symposium on Coal Liquids Upgrading Joint with Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

R. F. Sullivan, Presiding 3:20—Introductory Remarks. 3:25—8. The Composition of Liquids from Coals of Different Rank. G. P. Sturm, Jr., J. E. Dooley, J. S. Thomson, P. W. Woodward, J. W. Vogh. 3:55—9. Chemical Composition of Raw and Upgraded Anthracene Oil and the Chem­ istry of Coal Liquids Upgrading. S. E. Scheppele, G. J. Greenwood, R. J. Pancirov, T. R. Ashe. 4:25—10. Liquid Sulfur Dioxide—As an Agent for Upgrading Coal Liquid. C. V. Philip, R. A. Zingaro, R. G. Anthony.

Section Β Symposium on Novel Methods of Metal and Heteroatom Removal Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Coal Liquids Upgrading Joint with Petroleum Chemistry Inc.

Β. Μ. Harney, Presiding The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

62

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—11. Hydrodesulfurization of Dibenzo: thiophene Catalyzed by Sulfided CoOM0O3/7-AI2O3: The Reaction Kinetics. D. H. Broderick, B. C. Gates. 9:40—12. Hydrogénation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons Catalyzed by Sulfided CoOM0O3/7-AI2O3: Reactivities, Reaction Networks, and Kinetics. A. V. Sapre, B. C. Gates.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—16. Biologically Important Compounds in Synfuels Processes. B. R. Clark, C.-h. Ho, W. H. Griest, M. R. Guerin 9:45—17. The Elemental Composition of Shale Oils. J. P. Fox. 10:25—18. Analysis of Energy Waste Ef­ fluents for Organic Chemicals Using the Master Analytical Scheme. L. Sheldon, S. Yung, R. Wiseman, L. Michael, E. Pellizzari. 11:05—19. Trace Element Behavior In the Solvent Refined Coal Processes. R. H. Filby, S. R. Khalil, M. L. Hunt. 11:45—20. Characterization and Mutageni­ city of Shale Oil Fractions. D. S. Sklarew, D. M. Schoengold, R. A. Pelroy, S. P. Downey, B. A. Vieux, J. T. Crèsto. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Coal Liquids Upgrading Joint with Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

R. F. Sullivan, Presiding 2:00—21. Refining of Coal and Shale Derived Syncrudes. R. H. Fischer, R. E. Hildebrand. 2:30—22. Application of LC-Fining Technology for Upgrading SRC in Two-Stage Liquefaction Concept. J. D. Potts, Κ. Ε. Hastings, R. S. Chillingworth, H. Unger, E. M. Phillips. 3:00—23. Catalyst Assessment for Upgrading Short Contact Time SRC to Low Sulfur Boiler Fuels. S. S. Shih, P. J. An­ gevine, R. H. Heck, S. Sawruk. 3:30—24. Hydrotreatment of SRC I Prod­ uct—Optimization of Process Variable Space. D. Garg, A. R. Tarrer, J. A. Guin, J. M. Lee. 4:00—25. A Comparison of the Hydro­ desulfurization and Hydrodenitrogenation Activities of Monolith Alumina Impregnated with Co and Mo and Nalcomo 474 Cata­ lysts. D. S. Soni B. L. Crynes. 4:30—26. The Thermal Cracking of CoalDerived Materials. R. S. Bernhardt, W. R. Ladner, J. O. H. Newman, P. W. Sage. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting, (see Section Β for location.)

9:00—-Introductory Remarks. 9:05—31. Western Low-Rank Coal Devel­ opment Analysis. G. H. Gronhovd, J. A. Kotowski, G. A. Wiltsee, E. A. Sondreal. 9:30—32. Current Research on the Inorganic Constituents in N. D. Lignites and Some Effects on Utilization. D. K. Rindt, F. R. Karner, W. Beckering, Η. Η. Schobert. 9:55—33. Analysis of the Inorganic Con­ stituents in American Lignites. Μ. Ε. Mor­ gan, R. G. Jenkins, P. L. Walker, Jr. 10:20—Intermission. 10:35—34. Removal of Sodium from Lignite by Ion Exchanging with Calcium Chloride Solutions. L. E. Paulson, J. R. Futch. 11:00—35. Laboratory Batch Liquefaction of Low Rank Coals. A. M. Souby, T. C. Owens, D. E. Severson. 11:25—36. Characterization of Light Oils from Liquefaction of Lignite. S. A. Farnum, E. S. Olson, B. W. Farnum, W. G. Willson. 11:50—Discussion. 12:00—Divisional Luncheon. SheratonHouston, Laredo Room.

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Ridge Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Environmental Control in Synfuels Processes D. K. Fleming, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—37. Environmental Health and Safety Aspects of Synfuels Processing—An Ov­ erview. E. J. Salmon, H. Perry. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—38. Observations on the Potential Environmental Effects on Synfuels Pro­ duction. T. K. Janes. 10:10—Discussion. 10:15—39. Environmental Impact of the Formation of a Synfuels Industry. M. J. Reilly. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—40. Risk Analysis of Coal Utiliza­ tion—Synfuels vs. Direct Combustion. H. Inhaber. 11:20—Discussion. 11:25—41. The Impact of "No Action". J. G. Seay. 11:55—Discussion. 12:00—Divisional Luncheon, (see Section A for location.) WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Utilization of Peat and Lig­ nite

D. M. White, Presiding 2:00—42. Organic Structural Studies of Lignite Coal Tars. D. J. Miller, J. K. Olson, Η. Η. Schobert. 2:25—43. The Dissolution of Lignite in An­ hydrous Liquid Ammonia. J. J. Lagowski, R. L. Harris, L. H. Simons.

D. V. Punwani, Presiding Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Ridge Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Environmental Control in Synfuels Processes

M. L. Lee, Presiding 2:00—27. Comparison and Contrast of Trace Elements in Crude Shale Oils and Petrole­ um. C. L. Wilkerson, D. S. Sklarew, J. C. Evans, J. S. Fruchter. 2:40—28. Environmental Organic Chemistry: The Isolation and Identification of Organic and Organometallic Compounds from Oil Shale Retort Waters. R. H. Fish, M. J. Kland. 3:20—29. Interlaboratory Comparison of Environmental Analyses Associated with Synfuel Production. W. E. May, J. M. Brown, S. N. Chesler, F. R. Guenther, H. S. Hertz, L. R. Hilpert, R. M. Parris, K. L. Ritchie, S. A. Wise. 4:00—30. Analysis of Sulfur Heterocycles in Coal-Derived Products and Shale Oils. C. Willey, M. Iwao, T. A. Broadbent, R. N. Castle, M. L. Lee. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Utilization of Peat and Lig­ nite D. M. White, Presiding

2:50—Introductory Remarks. 2:55—44. Peat Beneficiation and Its Effects on Dewatering and Gasification Charac­ teristics. M. J. Kopstein, M. C. Mensinger, S. A. Weil, D. V. Punwani. 3:20—45. Kinetics and Correlations for Peat Hydropyrolysis. S. A. Weil, D. V. Punwani, M. J. Kopstein, A. M. Rader. 3:45—46. Experimental Investigation of Peat Hydrogasification. W. S. Hines, L. P. Combs, F. D. Raniere. 4:10—47. Developments in Peat Biogasification. M. G. Buivid, D. L. Wise, A. M. Rader, M. J. Kopstein. 4:35—48. Enhanced Reactivity of Metal Im­ pregnated Peat Semicoke During Gas Phase Hydrogenolysis. E. Chornet, H. T. Tarki, A. Kiennemann.

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Ridge Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Environmental Control in Synfuels Processes

D. K. Fleming, Presiding 2:00—49. Environmental Considerations in Coal Gasification Plant Design. R. J. Feldman, C. B. Fogman, N. R. Passow. 2:30—Discussion. 2:40—50. Environmental and Health Aspects of Coal Liquefaction Plant Design. C. R. Moxley.

3:10—Discussion. 3:20—51. Assessment of the Water Balance in Coal Conversion Plant Design. H. Takash, C. S. Kelley, W. G. Atkins. 3:50—Discussion. 4:00—Discussion.

THURSDAY MORNING Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room (28th

Floo) Symoosium on Catalytic Reactions Involving Synt iesis Gas joint with Division of Petroleum Che, nistry Inc.

H. Wise, Presiding 9:00 —Introductory Remarks. 9:05—52. Transportation Fuels from Synthesis Gas. R. H. Fischer, R. E. Hildebrand. 9:25—53. Evidence for Adsorbed Hydrocarbon Intermediates During the Initial Sages of CO Hydrogénation on Iron. H. P. Bmzel, H. J. Krebs. 9:55 —54. Catalytic Hydrogénation of CO on Rhodium and Iron: The Effect of Surface Sructure and Composition. R. L. Blackailar, D. G. Castner, G. A. Somorjai. 10:25—Intermission. 10:4 0—55. Catalytic Methanation Over S ngle Crystal Nickel and Ruthenium: Reaction Kinetics on Different Crystal Planes. R D. Kelley, D. W. Goodman, T. E. Ivadey. 11:· 0—56. The Effects of Potassium Promotion on the Characteristics of Iron F scher-Tropsch Catalysts. H. Arakawa, A. T.Bell. 11:4-0—57. Deactivation by Carbon of Nickel a id Nickel-Molybdenum Methanation Cata ysts. A. D. Moeller, C. H. Bartholomew. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

9:00—69. Evaluation of Oxydesulfurization Processes for Coal. The Effect of the Ames Process on Model Organosulfur Com­ pounds. L. W. Chang, W. F. Goure, T. G. Squires, T. J. Barton. 9:30—70. High Performance Liquid Chro­ matography Separation of Olefin, Saturate, and Aromatic Hydrocarbons in High-Boiling Distillates and Residues of Shale Oil. J. F. McKay, D. R. Latham. 10:00—71. Low Temperature Cleavage Reactions of Illinois No. 6 Coal. F. R. Mayo, D. H. Buchanan, L. A. Pavelka. 10:30—72. Oxydesulfurization of Coal Treated with Methyl Iodide—Implications for Removal of Organic Sulfur. R. Marcuszewski, C.-K. Wei, T. D. Wheelock. 11:00—73. Mass Spectrometry of Molecular Components of Coal. A. Marzec

11:25—6. Chemical and Isotopic Composition of Natural Gases in Offshore Gulf of Mexico. D. D. Rice. 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—7. The Use of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes for Identifying Early Diagenetic Environments in Limestone Sequences. J. R. Allan. 2:30—8. Stable Isotope Anomalies in Surface Rocks and Helium Anomalies in Soil Gas Over Oil Fields: Causes and Correlations. T. J. Donovan, A. A. Roberts. 3:05—9. A Sulfur Isotopic Study of Anhydrites from the Eastern Gulf Coast Buckner and Smackover Formations. F. T. Price, C. T. Feazel. 3:25—Intermission. 3:30—10. Stable Isotope Correlations Be­ tween Tertiary Oils from the Los Angeles Basin. R. E. Sweeney, L. J. Pandolfi. 3:55—11. Use of 13 C/ 1îf C Ratio in Oil-Source Correlations: Examples from the Canadian Arctic. H. R. Krouse, D. Birk.

THURSDAY MORNING

GEOC

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room #112 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Stable Isotopes in Gas and Petroleum: Exploration and Correlation I. R. Kaplan, Presiding

DIVISION OP GEOCHEMISTRY (PROBATIONARY) T. F. Yen, Chairman E. W. Baker, Secretary-Treasurer

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—12. The Use and Possible Misuse of the Isotopic Composition of Diagenetic Carbonates for Source and Reservoir Potential. M. L. Coleman. 9:40—13. Isotopic Composition of Coal Seam Gases. K. W. Gould, D. Rigby, J. W. Smith. 10:10—Intermission. 10:15—Divisional Business Meeting.

Section A

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room (28th Floor)

MONDAY MORNING

Symposium on Catalytic Reactions Involving Synthesis Gas Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc. A. T. Bell, Presiding

Symposium on the Chemistry of Clay-Or­ ganic-Metal Ion Interactions Joint with Divi­ sion of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 54)

2:00—58. Further Results on the Reaction of H2/CO on Fused Iron by the Transient Method. J. P. Reymond, P. Meriaudeau, B. Pommier, C. O. Bennett. 2:30—59. Synthesis Gas Reactions Using Catalysts Formed by Oxidizing Ni-Containing Intermetallic Compounds. H. Imamura, W. E. Wallace. 3:00—60. Catalytic Aspects of High Temperature Methanation. K. Pedresen, A. Skov, J. R. Rostrup-Nielsen. 3:30—Intermission. 3:45—61. Applied Fischer-Tropsch Kinetics for a Flame Sprayed Iron Catalyst. W. J. Thomson, J. M. Arndt, K. L. Wright. 4:15—62. Synthesis Gas Conversion to Gasoline Range Hydrocarbons Over Zeolite Catalysts Containing 3d-Metals and Bimetallics. V. U. S. Rao, R. J. Gormley, H. W. Pennline, L. C. Schneider, R. Obermyer. 4:45—63. The Hydrogénation of Carbon Monoxide Over Unsupported Iron-Manganese Catalysts for the Production of Low-Molecular Weight Olefins. Y. S. Tsai, A. G. Oblad, F. V. Hanson.

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Ridge Room (28th Floor) General

P. C. Scott, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—64. A Model for the Isothermal Plastometric Behavior of Coals. W. G. Lloyd, H. E. Francis, M. R. Yewell, Jr., R. O. Kushida, V. Sankur. 2:35—65. Pitch Residues from Upgrading of Bitumen and Heavy Oils as Additives in Cokemaking: Influence of Pitch Properties. K. Belinko, L. A. Ciavaglia, B. N. Nandi, J. M. Denis. 3:05—66. Synthetic Fuels—Pitfalls and Promise. F. Shulman. 3:35—67. Development of a Simulated Catalyst Aging Technique. J. F. Kriz, M. Ternan 4:05—68. Removal of Organic Sulfur from Coal: The Use of Liquid Sulfur Dioxide. D. F. Burow, Β. Μ. Glavincevski. FRIDAY MORNING Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room (28th Floor) General P. C. Scott, Presiding

Section A

Section Β Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry and Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Symposium on the Chemistry of Clay-Or­ ganic-Metal Ion Interactions Joint with Divi­ sion of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (see page 55)

Section Β Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemisty and Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69)"

TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 112 (Lobby Level) General

D. S. Montgomery, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—14. Incorporation of the Various Chlorophylls into Marine Sediments and Terrestrial Peats. J. W. Louda, E. W. Baker. 2:30—15. The Porphyrins of United States Humic Coals. S. E. Palmer, L. Charney, E. W. Baker. 2:55—16. The Evolution of Low Molecular Weight Compounds on the Pyrolysis of Asphaltenes. I. Rubinstein, O. P. Strausz, D. S. Montgomery. 3:20—Intermission. 3:25—17. Examination of Organic Pollutants and Particulates in Natural Waters by Thermal Distillation-Pyrolysis. J. K. Whelan, M. Fitzgerald. 3:55—18. Confirmation of an Aquifer Model for the Argo Tunnel Drainage in Colorado. T. R. Wildeman, T. Huston. 4:25—19. Kinetic Inhibition of Mineral Formation: Magnesium Ion Reduction of Calcite Crystallization at pH 8.8 and 25°C. M. M. Reddy.

Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry and Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69)

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 112 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Stable Isotopes in Gas and Petroleum: Exploration and Correlation I. R. Kaplan, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Carbon-13 Heterogeneity in Natural Materials. H. M. Chung, P. L. Grizzle. 9:35—2. Geochemistry Exploration by Carbon Isotope Measurements. E. Faber, W. Stahl. 10:00—3. Geochemistry of Crude Oils in the Michigan Basin. S. W. Brand, Η. Μ. Chung, P. L. Grizzle. 10:30—Intermission. 10:35—4. Head-Space Gas Analysis: A New Tool in Oil Exploration. S. Neglia. 11:00—5. Sources of Methane and Ethane in a Well by Isotopic Ratios. R. H. Reitsema.

9:00—1. Symposium Introductory Re­ marks. 9:15-2. Observations on a Proposed Institute for the History of Chemistry. R. P. Multhauf. 9:40—3. Sources for History of Modern Science: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. J. T. Edsall. 10:10—4. The Edgar Fahs Smith Collection and the Center for the History of Chemistry: Context, Mission and Plan. A. Thackray. 10:35—5. What the History of Chemistry Can Learn From the History of Pharmacy. J. Parascandola. 11:00—6. Why Physicists Have a History. S. R. Weart. 11:40—7. Workshops on Historicaljvlethods: One Contribution of a Center for the History of Chemistry. M .M. Sokal.

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 111 (Lobby Level) Symposium on the Chemistry Profession Needs a Center for the History of Chem­ istry

J. H. Wotiz, Presiding 2:00—8. Chemistry, Clio and Cleopatra's Nose. D. A. Davenport. 2:15—9. Writing "A Century of Chemistry" H. Skolnik. 2:35—10. Datelines and Datalines for a His­ tory of Chemistry Data Base. W. J. Wiswesser. 2:50—11. A Center for the History of Chem­ istry. D. S. Tarbell, A. T. Tarbell. 3:10—12. Reflections of an Apprentice His­ torian: The Value of a Center for the History of Chemistry. L. Gortler. 3:30—13. Preserving American Chemistry's Achievements: A Challenge to the ACS. N. D. Heindel. 4:00—Panel Discussion. Section Β Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of Geo­ chemistry (Probationary) and Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 1.11 (Lobby Level) General Ο. Β. Ramsay, Presiding 9:00—14. Chemisches Zentralblatt and its Importance in thé History of Chemistry. G. Siemiencow. 9:25—15. The "Metric System" (SI); A Case Study of the Interaction Between Science and Politics. G. Gorin. 9:50—16. Pigment Analysis of the Gladzor Gospel Book of U.C.L.A. M. V. Orna. 10:20—17. Homeopathic Patent Medicines: Their Roots in 19th Century Commercial Pharmacies. N. M. Foster, N. D. Heindel.

Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of Geo­ chemistry (Probationary) and Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69) TUESDAY AFTERNOON

DIVISION OF THE HISTORY OF CHEMISTRY J. H. Wotiz, Chairman Ν. Μ. Foster, Secretary-Treasurer

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 111 (Lobby Level) Symposium on the Chemistry Profession Needs a Center for the History of Chem­ istry

Χ

Section Β Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of Geo­ chemistry (Probationary) and Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69)

Section Β

HIST

δ

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 111 (Lobby Level) Symposium on History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of Or­ ganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly­ mer Chemistry, Inc., and Rubber Division Inc.

C. H. Fisher, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. R. B. Sey­ mour. 2:05—18. Coming to an Age of Polymers in Science and Technology. H. Mark. 2:30—19. The Conformations of Bipolymers. C. A. J. Hoeve. 2:55—20. History of Natural Fibers. C. H. Fisher.

J. H. Wotiz, Presiding

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

63

•8

ni 3

.IL;

3:25—21. History of Synthetic Fibers. P. W. Morp^n. 3:50—22. History of Coatings Science and Technology. R. R. Meyers. 4:15—23. History of Adhesives. I. Skeist, J. Miron. 4:40—24. History of Science and Technology of'Polymeric Foams. K. C. Frisch.

Section Β

151

|if|j

Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of Geo­ chemistry (Probationary) and Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69)

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 111 (Lobby Level) Symposium on History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of Or­ ganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, Poly­ mer Chemistry, Inc., and Rubber Division Inc.

R. B. Seymour, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—25. History of the Development and Growth of Thermosetting Polymers. R. B. Seymour. 9:30—26. History of Natural Rubber. P. E. Hurley. 10:00—27. History of Synthetic Rubber. M. Morton. 10:30—28. History of Reinforced Plastics. J. V. Mileweski, D. V. Rosato. 11:00—29. Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers. J. E. Sheats. 11:30—30. The History of Heat-Resistant Polymers. P. E. Cassidy.

R. D. Deanin, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—31. History of Engineering Thermo­ plastics. R. D. Deanin. 2:30—32. History of Polymer Education. C. E. Carraher, Jr. 3:00—33. The History of Crystalline Poly­ mers. L. Mandelkern. 3:30—34. History of Polyolefins. H. R. Sailors, J. P. Hogan. 4:00—35. History of Styrene and Polystyrene. R. F. Boyer. 4:30—36. History of Vinyl Chloride Polymers. W. L. Semon, G. A. Stahl.

INDE DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY Ν. Ν. Li, Chairman K. C. Taylor, Secretary

SUNDAY EVENING 8:00—Chemistry Industry Hospitality Event. (Admission by Division Membership or join at door.) Sheraton-Houston, Timberline Room.

MONDAY MORNING Sheraton-Houston, San Antonio Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on New Applications for Plastics Cosponsored with Division of Organic Coat­ ings and Plastics Chemistry

11:30—5. Art: The Making of Monumental Sculpture in Fiberglas-Reinforced Plastic Through Adapting Industrial Fabrication Techniques. P. A. Renick. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, San Antonio Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on New Applications for Plastics Cosponsored with Division of Organic Coat­ ings and Plastics Chemistry

D. F. Lawson, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—6. Development of Thermoplastics for Blood-Contacting Biomedical Devices. R. S. Ward, Jr. 2:40—7. Sealants for Solar Collectors. M. A. Mendelsohn, R. M. Luck, F. A. Yeoman, F. W. Navish. Jr. 3:15—Intermission. 3:20—8. Piezoelectric and Pyroeléctric Applications of Plastics. M. G. Broadhurst, S. Edelman, G. T. Davis. 3:55—9. Plastics Applications in Optical Fibers for Telecommunications. L. L. Blyler, Jr. 4:30—10. New Applications for Polymers in Energy Storage Systems. G. F. Pezdirtz. 8:30- Divisional Social Hour. SheratonHouston, Abilene Room.

64

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

WEDNESDAY MORNING

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, San Antonio Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Monohydric Alcohols— Manufacture, Applications, and Chemistry Joint with Division of Chemical Marketing and Economics

E. J. Wickson, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—11. Chemistry of Monohydric Alcohols. J. A. Monick. 9:40—12. Application of Isopropyl Alcohol and sec-Butyl Alcohol as Chemical Inter­ mediates. S. J. Storfer. 10:10—13. Higher Oxo Alcohols Manuf­ acture. R. E. Vincent. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—14. Higher Straight Chain Alcohols Manufacture. P. H. Washecheck. 11:20—15. Applications of Higher Alcohols in Household Surfactants. T. P. Matson. Section Β

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, San Antonio Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Monohydric Alcohols— Manufacture, Applications, and Chemistry Joint with Division of Chemical Marketing and Economics

E. J. Wickson, Presiding 9:00—20. Methanol—Manufacture and Uses. T. F. Kennedy. 9:30—21. Ethanol—Its Near and Intermediate Future. A. J. Reid, I. B. Margiloff. 10:00—Intermission. 10:10—22. Ethanol in Motor Gasoline. T. D. Tarr. 10:40—23. Methanol from Wood in Brazil. V. B. Filho, A. J. A. Zagatto. 11:10—24. Panel Discussion. Lower Alcohols as Fuels—J. H. Marten, R. Irwin, I. B. Margiloff, T. D. Tarr, A. J. A. Zagatto. 12:00—Divisional Award Reception. Shera­ ton-Houston, Mesa Room. 12:30—Divisional Award Luncheon. Shera­ ton-Houston, Mesa Room.

Sheraton-Houston, Floor)

Abilene

Room

I. Wender, Presiding d:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—25. Reactions of Synthesis Gas Lead­ ing to Fuels and Chemicals. I. Wender. 9:40—26. Homogeneous Catalysts for Re­ duction with CO and with CO + H 2 0. R. Pettit. 10:15—27. Asymmetric Catalysts. W. S. Knowles. 10:50—28. Award Address: (E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry sponsored by Exxon Research and Engineering Company) Hydridocobalt Tetracarbonyl, the Quintessential Transition Metal Catalyst. M. Orchin. 12:00—Divisional Award Reception, (see Section A for location.) 12:30—Divisional Award Luncheon, (see Section A for location.)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

M. Chang, G. T. Tsao, Presiding

E. J. Wickson, Presiding 2:00—16. Secondary Alcohol Ethoxylates—Physical Properties and Applica­ tions. N. Kurata, K. Koshida, H. Yokoyama, T. Goto. 2:30—17. Monohydric Alcohols in the Flavor and Fragrance Industry. J. Dorsky. 3:00—Intermission. 3:10—18. Synthetic Lubricant Base Stocks from Monohydric Alcohols. J. B. Boylan, B. J. Beimesch, Ν. Ε. Schnur. 3:40—19. Monohydric Alcohol Esters as PVC Plasticizers in the 80's. E. J. Wickson. 8:30—Divisional Social Hour. SheratonHouston, Abilene Room.

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

INOR

JE. V. Murphree Award Symposium Honoring Milton Orchin: Homogeneous Catalysis of Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide Reactions Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

Sheraton-Houston, San Antonio Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Chemicals from Cellulosic Materials

Section A

I. Cabasso, Presiding 2:00—39. Comparison—Aqueous vs. Solvent Based Ethylcellulose Films. H. Hall, K. Lillie, R. Pondell. 2:30—40. Use of Osmotically Active Thera­ peutic Agents in Monolithic Systems. R. Gale, S. K. Chandrasekaran, D. Swanson, J. Wright. 3:00—41. Control of Release Kinetics of Macromolecules Such As Insulin From Polymers. R. S. Langer, W. D. Rhine, D. S. T. Hsieh, J. Folkman. 3:40—42. Slow Delivery of Aprotinin for Control of Intrauterine-Device-lnduced Hemorrhage. R. W. Baker, M. E. Tuttle, H. K. Lonsdale.

(3rd

Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Divisions of Inorganic Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75)

Sheraton-Houston, San Antonio Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Monohydric Alcohols— Manufacture, Applications, and Chemistry Joint with Division of Chemical Marketing and Economics

10:10—36. Biodegradable, Implantable Sustained Release Systems Based on Glutamic Acid Copolymers. K. R. Sidman, A. D. Schwope, W. D. Steber, S. E. Ru­ dolph, S. B. Poulin. 10:30—Intermission. 10:50—37. Drug Release from Hydrogel Devices with Rate Controlling Barriers. E. S. Lee, S. W. Kim, S. H. Kim, J. R. Car­ dinal. 11:20—38. Microcapsules for Controlled Release via Donnan Dialysis. I. Cabasso.

Section Β

Section Β Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Divisions of Inorganic Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75)

B. Mead, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Organic Coatings for Plastics. R. R. Koch. 9:40—2. Concepts in Design with Structural Foam—The Inside Story. J. R. Yanarella, Jr. 10:15—Intermission. 10:20—3. Architectural Fabric Roofs. B. Mead. 10:55—4. Composite Wheels. J. E. Gieck, W. D. Noll.

Section Β Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Divisions of Inorganic Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75)

2:00—Introductory Remarks. M. Chang. 2:05—29. Reaction Sequences in Pyrolysis of Cellulosic Materials. W. E. Franklin. 2:40—30. Methane Production from Agri­ cultural Residues. Y. R. Chen, V. H. Varel, A. G. Hashimoto. 3:10—31. Prediction of Growth and 2,3 Butanediol Yields from a Hemicellulose Hydrolysate in a Multistage Continuous Culture System. M. C. Flickinger, G. T. Tsao. 3:40—Intermission. 3:50—32. Production of 2,3 Butanediol from Xylose by Klebsiella pneumoniae in Batch and Fed-Batch Culture. N. B. Jansen, M. C. Flickinger, G. T. Tsao. 4:20—33. Economic Evaluation of the Acetone-Butanol Fermentation. T. G. Lenz, A. R. Moreira.

THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Sheraton-Houston, San Antonio Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Controlled Release Mem­ branes H. K. Lonsdale, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—34. Modelling of Drug Diffusion Through Swellable'Polymeric Systems. N. A. Peppas, R. Gurny, P. Buri. 9:40—35. Diffusional Release of a Solute from a Polymeric Matrix-t-Approximate Analytical Solutions. P. I. Lee.

DIVISION OF INORGANIC CHEMISTRY L. F. Dahl, Chairman L. V. Interrante, Secretary/ Treasurer

SUNDAY NOON

MORNING AND AFTER­

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 102 (Lobby Level) Tutorial Session on Homogeneous Catalysis

R. H. Grubbs, Presiding 10:00—Fundamental Mechanisms in Catal­ ysis. R. G. Bergman. 1:30—Catalytic Processes Involving Olefins, Hydrogen, and Carbon Monoxide. R. H. Grubbs. 3:30—Processes Related to Catalysis on Transition Metal Clusters. H. D. Kaesz. 6:00—Social Hour, Organometallic Subdivi­ sion, Sheraton-Houston, Ridge Room. MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 114 (Lobby Level) Awards Symposium

L. F. Dahl, Presiding 9:00—Introduction of the Distinguished Ser­ vice in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry Award Winner. F. A. Cotton. 9:05—1. Award Address. (ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Mallinckrodt, Inc.) Stabilities and Reactivities of Dioxygen Complexes. A. E. Martell. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—Introduction of the Inorganic Chem­ istry Award Winner. J. P. Flackler. 10:05—2. Award Address. (ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Mon­ santo Company.) Organic Synthesis and Reactivity Promoted by Metal Ions. A. M. Sargeson. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—Introduction of the Alpha Chi Sigma Pure Chemistry Award Winner. L. F. Dahl. 11:05—3. Award Address. (ACS Award in Pure Chemistry sponsored by Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity.) Reduction of Molecular Nitrogen and Carbon Monoxide with Group IV Metallocenes. J. E. Bercaw. 11:55—Discussion.

Section B State of the Art Symposia for Chemical Ed­ ucators. I. Solid State Chemistry in the Un­ dergraduate Curriculum Joint with the Divi­ sion of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 52) MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 114 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Heterophase Attached Ho­ mogeneous Catalysis Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. J. Stille, Presiding 2:00—4. Polymer-Supported Transition Metal Compounds and Their Application to Ca­ talysis of Organic Reactions. C. H. Brubaker, Jr. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—5. Supported f-Element Organometallic Complexes: Surface Chemistry and Ca­ talysis. R. G. Bowman, R. Nakamura, P. J. Fagan, R. L. Burwell, Jr., T. J. Marks. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—6. Layered Silicate Intercalation Cat­ alysts. T. J. Pinnavaia. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—7. Thermal and Photolytic Activation of Immobilized Carbonyl Complexes. D. A. Hucul, T. Arnold, A. Brenner. 4:35—Discussion.

3:00—23. μ-lmidazolato Binuclear IronCopper Complexes as Models for the Cy­ tochrome Oxidase Active Site. C. L. Merrill, S. E. Dessens, Β. R. Welch, R. J. Saxton, L. J. Wilson. 3:00—24. Exchange Coupling in Diamminecopper(ll) Carbonate. A. K. Gregson, R. R. Weller, W. E. Hatfield. 3:00—25. Binuclear, Trinuclear, Tetranuclear and Hexanuclear Copper(ll) Complexes. R. J. Butcher, C. J. O'Connor, G. M. Mockler, E. Sinn. Section D State of the Art Symposium for Chemical Educators I. Solid State Chemistry in the Undergraduate Curriculum Joint with Division of Chemical Education Inc. (see page 52) Section Ε Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Môssbauer Spectroscopy Joint with Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69) Section F Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Divisions of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75) TUESDAY MORNING

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 204 (2nd Level) Symposium on the Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry of Sulfur Complexes D. Coucouvanis, Presiding 2:00—8. Biologically Related Metal-Sulfur Chemistry. R. H. Holm. 2:45—Discussion. 2:50—9. Reactions of Simple Mercaptide Complexes and the Synthesis of Fe-Mo Heteronuclear Complexes. D. Coucouva­ nis, N. C. Baenziger, E. Simhon, P. Stremple, D. Swenson, A. Simopoulos, A. Kostikas. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—10. Multi-Sulfur Molybdenum Sites: New Complexes and Their Relevance to Molybdenum Enzymes and Catalysts. E. I. Stiefel, K. F. Miller. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—11. Sulfur Ligation in Copper(ll) Con­ taining Proteins. R. D. Bereman. 5:15—Discussion. Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Registration Area (Lobby Level) Poster Session C. J . O'Connor, Presiding 2:00—12. Syntheses of Complexes of Rhodium(lll): A Photochemical Approach. L. Torres, M. M. Muir, L. A. Paguaga. 2:00—13. Investigation of the Isomerization of Alkyls and Substituted Alkyls Sigma Bonded to a Transition Metal. D. L. Reger, P. J. McElligott. 2:00—14. Nucleophilic Reactions of Silylaminophosphines. D. W. Morton, R. H. Neilson. 2:00—15. Binuclear Molybdenum Carbonyl Complexes with Bridging Heterocyclic Ligands. L. L. Garber. 2:00—16. Detection of "Tension" and Elec­ tronic Asymmetry in Imidazole-Appended Iron Porphyrins by NMR Spectroscopy. H. Goff. 2:00—17. Reaction of Dioxygen with Iron and Cobalt Complexes of Pentadentate Ligands Bearing Imidazole and Pyridine Moieties. J. A. Trantham, R. J. Saxton, L. J. Wilson. 2:00—18. Hammett-Type Correlations in Organometallic Compounds Having a Non-Fused Substituted Phenyl Ring. C. V. Senoff. 3:00—19. Oxygenation of Indoles Catalyzed by Metalloporphyrins and Related Com­ plexes: Comparison of the Efficiency of the Various Catalysts. C. Bied-Charreton, M. N. Dufour, G. A. Johnston, F. Gaudemer, A. Gaudemer. 3:00—20. Molybdenum(IV) and (V) Com­ plexes of o-Phenylenebis(dimethylarsine). E. C. Alyea, R. D. Feltham. 3:00—21. NMR of Iron(lll) Porphyrin Oxyanion Complexes. M. Phillippi, H. Goff. 3:00—22. Polymeric Ferromagnetic Insula­ tors: X-ray Structure and Low Temperature Magnetic Properties of Mono-Bipyridyl Cobaltous Chloride. G. A. Eisman, H. Wong, W. M. Reiff, W. Rode, B. Foxman.

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 213 (2nd Level) General—Organometallic Κ. Η. Pannell, Presiding 8:30—Introduction of the Ipatieff Prize Award Winner. J. Roth. 8:35—26. Ipatieff Prize Award. Investigations into the Mechanisms of Homogeneously Catalyzed Reactions. D. Forster. 9:20—Discussion. 9:30—27. Synthesis and Characterization of Polynuclear Metal Complexes Containing Organophosphides as Bridging Ligands. D. W. Meek, P. E. Kreter, Jr., R. Waid. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—28. Coordinatively-Unsaturated Mo(O) and W(O) Complexes, M(CO)3(PCy3)2, which Reversibly add N 2 , H2, and Other Small Molecules. G. J. Kubas, R. R. Ryan. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—29. Thermochemical and Kinetic Study of Five-Coordinated Iridium(lll) Acyl Complexes. A. Vinson, D. M. Blake. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—30. Monomers and Dimers of Ruthenium(ll) Containing "Bidentate" Bridging Ligands. D. P. Rillema, K. B. Mack, R. W. Callahan, T. J. Meyer. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—31. Selective Reductions of Ammineruthenium(lll) Complexes by Hydrogen Sulfide. S. E. Diamond, B. S. Tovrog, F. Mares. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—32. Oxygen Atom Transfer Processes Involving Coordinated Nitrite. D. T. Doughty, G. Gordon, R. P. Stewart, Jr. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—33. Iron Carbonyl Derivatives of Cycloalkeno-Selena(thia)diazoles. A. J. Mayr, K. H. Pannell, R. Hoggard, R. C. Pettersen, G. J. Long. 11:45—Discussion. 11:50—34. Activation of S-0 Bonds in Tran­ sition Metal-Sulfur Dioxide Complexes. D. C. Moody, R. R. Ryan, G. J. Kubas. 12:05—Discussion.

10:50—37. Development of Heterogeneous Photosensitizers and Catalysts for a Photochemical Energy Storage System. C. R. Kutal, R. R. Hautala, R. B. King. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—38. Polymer-Supported Group VIII Metal Clusters: Synthesis and Catalysis. D. Milstein, B. C. Gates. 12:05—Discussion.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 204 (2nd Level) Symposium on the Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry of Sulfur Complexes L. H. Pignolet, Presiding 9:00—39. Complexes of Dithiocarbamate, Redox and Ligand Reactions. J. J. Steggerda. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—40. New Aspects of the Chemistry of Transition Metal Complexes and Clusters with Simple Sulfur Containing-Ligands. A. Miiller. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—41. Synthesis, Structure and Reactivity Properties of Dithiocarbamato Complexes of Ruthenium and Osmium. L. H. Pignolet. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—42. The Formation and Structures of Metal-Thiolate Cluster Complexes. I. Dance. 12:15—Discussion.

Section D Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 102 (Lobby Level) General—Photochemistry

M. D. Rausch, Presiding 9:30—43. Excited State Geometry Changes and Photochemistry of Co(CO)3NO. W. Evans, J. I. Zink. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—44. Charge Transfer Photochemistry of Mono- and Binuclear Chromium(lll) Ammine Complexes. R. R. Ruminski, W. F. Coleman. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—45. Photochemical Studies of Alkyl Derivatives of Group V-B Metallocenes. D. F. Foust, M. D. Rausch. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—46. Lifetimes and Photoaquation Quantum Yields of Polypyridyl Chromium(lll) Complexes. N. Serpone, M. A. Jamieson, M. Z. Hoffman, R. Sriram. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—47. Photoconversion of Norbornadiene to Quadricyclene in the Presence of a Copper(l)-Carbonyl Compound. R. F. Sterling, C. Kutal. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—48. The Photochemistry of Homoieptic Tetraalkyl Complexes of First Row Transition Metals. H. B. Abrahamson. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—49. The Influence of the Central Metal Ion in the Rate of Photodecomposition of Metal Phthalocyanine Dyes. R. M. Dahlgren. 11:45—Discussion. 11:50—50. Group Theoretic Assignment of the Electronic Transitions in Ruthenium(ll) Bis Chelates. M. L. Stone, G. A. Crosby. 12:05—Discussion. 12:10—51. Solvent Effects on the Luminescing Excited States of Iridium(lll) Complexes. T. L. Cremers, G. A. Crosby. 12:25—Discussion.

Section Ε Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 214 (2nd Level) Symposium on Heterophase Attached Ho­ mogeneous Catalysis Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc.

A. Brenner, Presiding 9:30—35. Asymmetric Hydrogénation via Polymer Supported Optically Active Catalysts. J. K. Stille. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—36. Reactions Catalyzed by Polystyrene Bound 775-CpCo(CO)2. P. Perkins, K. P. C. Vollhardt. 10:45—Discussion.

State of the Art Symposia for Chemical Ed­ ucators. I. Solid State Chemistry in the Un­ dergraduate Curriculum Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 52) Section F Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Môssbauer Spectroscopy Joint with Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69) Section G Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Divisions of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75)

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 114 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Heterophase Attached Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc.

D. Neckers, Presiding 2:00—52. Catalytic Properties of Macrocyclic Ligand Anchored Polymers. J. Smid, S. Shah, M. Shirai, A. Varma. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—53. Binding of Catalyst Molecules to High Molecular Weight Polyphosphazenes. H. R. Allcock, T. L. Evans, T. J. Fuller, P. P. Greigger, P. J. Harris, R. A. Nissan, J. P. O'Brien, L. J. Wagner. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—54. Catalysis of the Reppe' Reaction with Sirotherm Polymers (Fe, Rh) and Sequential Catalysis with Anchored Catalysts. C. U. Pittman, Jr., Y. Kawabata, Y. F. Liang. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—55. Heterogénizatfon of Homogeneous Catalysts—A New Immobilization Technique. S. C. Tang, T. E. Paxson, L. Kim. 4:35—Discussion. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour, Room #215. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 204 (2nd Level) Symposium on the Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry of Sulfur Complexes J. P. Fackler, Jr., Presiding 2:00—56. Transition Metal Dithiolate Rear­ rangements. J. P. Fackler, Jr. 2:45—Discussion. 2:50—57. Anionic Complexes of Group MA Elements Derived from Ligands Containing the -CS 2 and -PS 2 Groups. J. A. McCleverty. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—58. Studies on Monothio- and DithioAcid Complexes of Various Transition Metals. T. A. Stephenson. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—59. Structure and Dynamics of Sulfur-Ligand Chelates of Early Transition Metals. R. C. Fay, A. H. Bruder, S. L. Haw­ thorne, M. E. Silver, J. R. Weir. 5:15—Discussion. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour (see Section A for location).

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 102 (Lobby Level) General—Lanthanldes and Actinides

D. L. Perry, Presiding 2:00—60. A New Probe of Chemical Dy­ namics in Equilibrium Systems: Laser-In­ duced Europium(lll) Ion Luminescence Tracks the Transfer of Excited-State Ions Between Coordination Environments. W. DeW. Horrocks, Jr., D. R. Sudnick. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—61. Thermal Lensing Spectroscopy of Nd 3 + . Y. S. Kang, J. Beitz. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—62. Di^-Aquo-Bis(dioxodinitratouranium(VI)) Di-imidazole and Uranyl Ni­ trate Hexahydrate. Spectroscopic Models for Bridged vs. Terminal Water Complexes of the Uranyl Ion. D. L. Perry. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—63.The Crystal, Molecular, and Elec­ tronic Structures of Tris-(1,3-diphenyl1,3-propanedionato)aquo Lanthanides. A. F. Kirby, R. A. Palmer. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—64. Solid State Spectroscopic Studies of the Uranyl-EDTA System. D. L. Perry. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—65. The Reaction between Pu(VI) and H202 in Aqueous Bicarbonate Media: For­ mation of a Pu(VI)-H202 Complex. J. C. Sullivan, K. L. Nash, S. Fried, M. E. Noon. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—66. Stability Constants of Some Lanthanide Cryptâtes. J. H. Burns, C. F. Baes, Jr. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—67. Bis(trimethylsilyl)amido and Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Derivatives of Diand Tri-Valent Lanthanides. T. D. Tilley, R. A. Andersen. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—68. A Spectroscopic Investigation of Reactions of Bis(cyclopentadienyl)ytterbium Chloride. A. B. Ellis, C. J. Schlesener. 4:55—Discussion.

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

65

τη TO

|ΤΪ3

laid

5:00—69. Mass Spectrometry Study of the Stabilities of the Gaseous Molecules Pt2 and PtY. S. Y. Gupta, B. Nappi, K. A. Gingerich. 5:15—Discussion. 6:00—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location.) Section D Albert Thomas Convention Center, Room 108 (Lobby Level) General—Main Group Compounds

E. R. Corey, Presiding 2:00—70. Mixed Tris-Amine Cations of Boron and Their Formation Mechanism. M. A. Mathur, G. E. Ryschkewitsch. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—71. Electron Deficient Cluster Com­ pounds: The Boron Subhalides, BnXn, X=CI, Br. T. Davan, N. J. Kutz, J. A. Mor­ rison. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—72. The Vaporization Behavior of BP. R. M. Biefeld. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—73. The Low Temperature Fluorination of Aerosol Suspensions of Hydrocarbons Utilizing Elemental Fluorine. J. L. Adcock, Ε. Β. Renk. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—74. The Decomposition of Aqueous Chlorine Dioxide in Basic Solution. D. E. Emerich, G. Gordon. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—75. Kinetics and Mechanism of Paraperiodate Dimerization Studied by Tem­ perature-Jump. K. Kustin, R. H. Simoyi. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—76. Structural Studies of Lithium Aluminate—An Ion Specific Ion Exchanger. A. Cisar, W. C. Bauman, W. W. Henslee. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—77. Physical-Chemical Studies of Concentrated Basic Aluminum Hydroxide Chloride Polymer Solutions. J. J. Fitzger­ ald, L. Johnson. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—78. Synthesis of Monomethylhydrazihe in Nonaqueous Solvents. S. R. Jain, M. A. Mathur, H. H. Sisler. 4:55—Discussion. 5:00—79. Synthesis and X-ray Structural Characterization of Two Crystalline Forms of (C6H5NH)2P(0)H. M. L. Thompson, R. C. Haltiwanger, D. E. Coons, A. D. Norman. 5:15—Discussion. 6:d0—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location.) Section Ε State of the Art Symposia for Chemical Ed­ ucators. I. Solid State Chemistry in the Un­ dergraduate Curriculum. Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 53)

Section F Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Mossbauer Spectroscopy Joint with Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 69)

Section G Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Divisions of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry and Petroleum Chemistry, Inc. (see page 75)

Section H Symposium on Metalations in Synthesis Joint with Division of Organic Chemistry (see page 71) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 213 (2nd Level) General—Silicon Chemistry

J. J. Zuckerman, Presiding 8:30—Introduction of the Frederic Stanley Kipping Award Winner. J. J. Zuckerman. 8:35—80. A ward Address: (Frederic Stanley ' Kipping Award in Organosilicon Chemistry sponsored by Dow Corning Corp.) Molec­ ular Geometry of Some Simple Silyl Com­ pounds. E. A. V. Ebsworth. 9:20—Discussion. 9:30—81. Structural Studies of Silicon Ana­ logs of Psychotropic Drugs: The Dibenzazasilepine Tricyclic Framework. E. R. Corey, M. A. Leiber.

9:45—Discussion. 9:50—82. Some Recent Results in the Chemistry of Carbosilanes. G. Fritz, W. Himmel, S. Wartanessian, E. Matern. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—83. Investigations of Silaallyl Sys­ tems. P. R. Jones, K. R. Pope, W. D. Snyder. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—84. Steric and Solvent Effects on the Reactions of Alkyllithium Reagents with Vinylhalosilanes. P. R. Jones, R. A. Pierce, K. R. Pope, D. D. White. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—85. Formation and Properties of Silylphosphanes. G. Fritz, R. Uhlmann, U. Braun, H. Hônle, H. G. v. Schnering. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—86. Poly(dimethylphosphazene), (Me2PN). P. Wisian-Neilson, R. H. Neilson. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—87. The Synthesis and 13C NMR of Alkali Metal Tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)mercurates. E. A. Sadurski, J. P. Oliver. 11:45—Discussion. 11:50—88. Triorganotin Azides. D. Cunningham, K. C. Molloy, J. J. Zuckerman. 12:05—Discussion.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 214 (2nd Level) Symposium on Heterophase Attached Ho­ mogeneous Catalysis Joint with Division of Petroleum Chemistry, Inc.

T. J. Pinnavaia, Presiding 9:30—89. New Preparations and Uses of Polymer Support Systems. D. C. Neckers. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—90. Polymer Activated Homogeneous Catalysts. D. E. Bergbreiter, M. S. Bursten, G. L. Parsons. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—91. Polystyrene-Based Triphasé Catalysis. S. L. Regen, J. J. Besse, C. Barcelon, D. Bolikal, N. O. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—92. Facile Hydrogénation Using Nitrogen-Anchored, Polymer-Bound Catalysts. N. L. Holy.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 204 (2nd Level) Symposium on the Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry of Sulfur Complexes

T. B. Rauchfuss, Presiding 9:30—93. Reactions of Organometallic Complexes of Sulfur. D. L. Lesch, T. B. Rauschfuss. 10:00—Discussion. 10:05—94. Synthesis, Structure and Properties of Complexes Containing Organometallic Cluster Ligands. P. J. Vergamini, G. J. Kubas. "Ό:35—Discussion. 10:40—95. Structural Systematics of Mo(V) and Mo(VI) Complexes of Polydentate N,S-Donor Ligands. J. Zubieta, P. Dahistrom, J. Hyde, P. Vella. 11:10—Discussion. 11:15—96. General Chemistry of Coordinated Sulfur. E. Deutsch. 11:45—Discussion. 11:50—97. Synthetic Mo-Fe-S Clusters. B. A. Averill, R. H. Tieckelmann, H. C. Silvis, B.-K. Teo, T. A. Kent, Β. Η. Huynh. 12:20—Discussion. 12:25—98. The Effects of Polythiaether Ligation Upon Copper Electrochemistry and Electron Transfer Kinetics. D. B. Rorabacher, M. J. Martin, M. Malik, J. F. Endicott, R. R. Schroeder, L. A. Ochrymowycz. 12:55—Discussion.

9:45—Discussion. 9:50—100. A Manganese(lll) Spin Crossover System. P. G. Sim, E. Sinn. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—101. Spin-Crossover Systems. A Far-Infrared Investigation of Fe(lll)(dialkyldithiocarbamate)3 Complexes. B. Hutch­ inson, P. Neill. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—102. Optical Studies of Mixed Va­ lence Systems. M. Albin, H. H. Patterson, W. L. Smith. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—103. Crystal Structure and Polarized Electronic Spectra for Diruthenium Tetra­ acetate Chloride. D. S. Martin, R. A. New­ man, L. M. Vlasnik. 11:05—Discussion. 11:1.0—104. A Polarized Single-Crystal Study of the Intense Quartz-Ultraviolet Transitions of Dibromo(ethylenediamine)Platinum(ll) and its Palladium Analog. B. G. Anex, W. P. Peltier. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—105: Reduced Halides of Yttrium with Strong Metal-Metal Bonding: Yttrium Monochloride, Monobromide, Sescjuichloride, and Sesquibromide. H. J. Mattausch, R. Eger, A. Simon, J. B. Hendricks, J. D. Corbett. 11:45—Discussion. 11:50—106. Investigations of Anode Coatings Based on Cobalt Spinels. W. W. Henslee, C. P. Christenson, H. L. S'pell, R. E. Guerra. 12:05—Discussion. 12:10—107. The Relationship Between Stress and Aluminum for Quartz Crystals. A. F. Armington, J. A. Bruce, L. A. Halli­ burton, M. Markes. 12:25—Discussion. Section Ε Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 105 (Lobby Level) General—Theoretical Calculations L. L. Lohr, Jr., Presiding 9:30—108. Quantitative Estimates of the Energetics of Metal Atom-Water Interac­ tions in Matrices at Low Temperatures. J. L. Margrave, R. H. Hauge. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50 —109. REX: Relativistically Parameter­ ized Extended Huckel Theory. L. L. Lohr, Jr., P. Pyykko. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—110. The SC-MEH M.O. Method and its Relativistic Counterpart in Inorganic Chemistry. E. A. Boudreaux, T. P. Carsey, P. H. Reggio. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—111. Quantum Mechanical Calcula­ tions of the Spin Paired Species in Metal Ammonia Solutions. N. R. Kestner, B. K. Rao. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—112. A Theoretical Study of Bond Distances, X-ray Spectra and Electron Density Distributions in Borate Polyhedra. A. Gupta, J. A. Tossell. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—113. Calculation of Metal X-ray Emission Energies and Intensities in P 0 3 3 and CI0 4 ~. J. A. Tossell. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—114. Photoelectron Study of the In­ teraction of CO with ZnO. R. R. Gay, E. I. Solomon, V. E. Henrich, H. J. Zeiger. 11:45—Discussion. 11:50—115. Tris(glycinato)chromium(lll). P. E. Hoggard, W. M. Wallace. 12:05—Discussion. Section F Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Mossbauer Spectroscopy Joint with Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 70)

Section D

Section G

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 102 (Lobby Level) General—Solid State Chemistry

Symposium on Metalations in Synthesis Joint with Division of Organic Chemistry (see page 71)

B. Hutchinson, Presiding 9:30—99. Highly Conducting Polymers: Par­ tially Oxidized Fluoroaluminum- and Fluorogallium Phthalocyanines. P. M. Kuznesof, K. J. Wynne, P. G. Siebenmann, R. S. Nohr, M. E. Kenney.

WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 114 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Unusual Synthetic Tech­ niques in Solid State Chemistry J. D. Corbett, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Murphy.

66

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

Remarks.

D.

W.

2:10—116. Synthesis and Properties of Metastable Beta Aluminas. B. C. Tofield. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—117. Preparation of Transition Metal Phosphides and Suicides from Metal Flux­ es. A. Wold, R. Kaner. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—118. Synthesis Through HydrogenDriven Disproportionation Reactions in Sealed Tantalum Containers. The Zircon­ ium Clusters Zr 6 X 12 and Zr6CI12«K2ZrCl6 from the Zirconium Monohalide Hydrides. H. Imoto, J. D. Corbett. 3:50—Discussion. 3:55—119. Hydrothermal Preparation of So­ dium Zirconium silicophosphates. A. Clearfield, R. N. Cotman. 4:25—Discussion. 4:30—120. The Versatility of Fused Salt Electrolysis in the Synthesis of Complex Oxides of Molybdenum. W. H. McCarroll, G. B. Bandel, G. Moscovitis. 4:50—Discussion.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 204 (2nd Level) Symposium on New Quantum Methods in Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis

D. L. Lichtenberger, Presiding 1:45—Introductory Remarks. Μ. Β. Hall. 1:50—121. Structure and Electronic Proper­ ties of Metal Clusters. An Ab Initio and Pseudopotential SCF Study. C. Bachmann, J. Demuynpk,' H. Veillard, A. Veillard. 2:20—Discussion. 2:25—122. Chemisorption Theory for Metallic Surfaces. J. L. Whitten. 2:50—Discussion. 2:55—123. Thé Electronic Structure and Bonding of Silicon Compounds and Cluster Complexes. J. W.. Moskowitz, L. C. Snyder, S. Topiol. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—124. Transition Metal Clusters, Cluster Compounds, and Bulk Metals: A Molecular Orbital View. J. W. Lauher. 3:40—Discussion. 3:45—125. Spin-Orbit Coupling in Excited States of Transition-Metal Complex Ions. J. W. Richardson, L. Pueyo. 4:05—Discussion. 4:10—126. Ionic and Covalent Metal—Support Interactions. J. A. Horsley, S. J. Tauster. 4:30—Discussion. 4:35—127. New Ways to Understand Solids. J. K. Burdett. 4:55—Discussion. 5:00—128. Modified Electron Gas Calculation of Bond Distances and Cohesive Energies in Metal Halides and Hydroxides. J. A. Tossell. 5:10—Discussion.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 101 (Lobby Level) General—Sulfur Containing Compounds

C. G. Pierpont, Presiding 2:00—129. Studies of the M(S2CNR2)2 (M=Mo or W) Fragment as an Extremely Versatile Metal Moiety. B. C. Ward, J. L. Templeton. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—130. Characterization of Reversible Reactions of Isocyanides with Dithiolate Ligands in Molybdenum Complexes. D. J. Miller, M. R. DuBois. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—131. Stable Diazoalkane Complexes of Molybdenum and Tungsten. G. L. Hillhouse, B. L. Haymore. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—132. Reaction Studies of Dimeric Molybdenum Complexes with -S, -SH, and -SHR Ligands. M. R. DuBois, D. L. DuBois, M. C. VanDerveer, R. C. Haltiwanger. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—133. Substitution of Sulfur in the Mo 6 CI 8 4+ Cluster: Synthesis and Structure of Two Compounds with the Mo 6 CI 7 3+ Cluster Unit. J. B. Michel, R. E. McCarley. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—134. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Aqueous Sulfite with Diaquo2,2',2//-tri-aminotriethylaminecobalt(lll) Ion. A. A. El-Awady, G. M. Harris. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—135. Metal Ion Induced Paramagnetism in a Diamagnetic Chelating Agent. C. T. Shirkey, C. R. Lishawa, E. L. Blinn.

1153 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—136. Adduct Formation Between 2 Formylpyridine Monothiosemicarbazonato Copper(ll) and GSH. W. E. Antholine, D. H. Petering. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—137. Intramolecular Metal-Ligand Electron Transfer for Catecholate Com­ plexes of Cobalt and Copper. C. G. Pierpont, R. M. Buchanan. 4:55—Discussion.

4:15—Discussion. 4:20—154. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reactions of Macrocyclic Tetrathiaether Ligands with the. Tetraaminepalladium(ll) Ion. T. E. Jones, A. Nicholson, B. Nusser, W. Yu. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—155. Metalloporphyrins Catalyze Photoreduction of H20 to H2. G. McLendon, D. Miller, T. Guarr. 4:55—Discussion.

11:20—Discussion. 11:25—168. Covalent-Anchored Layered Compounds. M. B. Dines, P. M. DiGracomo. 11:55—Discussion. 12:00—169. Novel Graphite Salts of High Oxidizing Potential. E. M. McCarron III, N. Bartlett. 12:20—Discussion.

Section D

Section F

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 104 (Lobby Level) General—Main Group Metal Complexes

Symposium on Metalations in Synthesis Joint with Division of Organic Chemistry (see page 72)

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 204 (2nd Level) Symposium on New Quantum Methods in Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis

J. A. Morrison, Presiding 2:00—138. Inorganic and Organotin Deriva­ tives of the Potentially Bidentate Sulfur Ligands Based Upon Dithio Phosphorous Acids. K. C. Molloy, M. B. Hossain, D. ver der Helm, J. J. Zuckerman. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—139. Reduction of Metal Stannylene Complexes by Hydridic Reducing Agents. B. A. Sosinsky, R. G. Shong, J. Shelly. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—140. THF-Sn[Mo(CO)3C5H5]3. Syn­ thesis of a New Organometallic Tin(ll) Compound Formed by the Addition of the BF3-Stannocene Adduct to (h5-Cyclopentadienylmolybdenum Tricarbonyl Hydride). T. S. Dory, K. C. Molloy, J. J. Zuck­ erman. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—141. Ligand Exchange Reactions of the Group 2B Trifluoromethyl Compounds, (CF3)2M. L. J. Krause, J. A. Morrison. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—142. Matrix Isolation Infrared Studies of Reactions of Lead, Tin and Germanium Atoms with Water. R. H. Hauge, J. Kauffman, J. L. Margrave. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—143. The Crystal and Molecular Structure of Dimethyl^-Cyclopentadienyl)Aluminum Polymer. B. Teele', P. Corefield, J. Oliver. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—144. Structural Studies of Novel Complexes (C6H6)2Cr[(CH3)3MI] (M = AI, Ga): The X-Ray Structure of (C6H6)2Cr[(CH3)3AII]. R. Shakir, C. J. Doumit, J. L. Atwood. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—145. Alkalimetal Alkylhydridogallates: Preparations, Properties, Possible Utility. R. A. Kovar, M. Parman, R. Schneider, B. Burke, T. Krafft, D. Pringle. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—146. The Chemistry of Gold(lll) Ylide Complexes. J. Stein, C. Paparizos, J. P. Fackler, Jr. 4:55—Discussion.

Section Ε Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 105 (Lobby Level) General—Macrocycles

T. E. Jones, Presiding 2:00—147. An Electrochemical Investigation of Several μ-Nitrido Iron Porphyrin Dimers. K. M. Kadish, L. A. Bottomley. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—148> Redox Behavior of Iron(lll) Tetraphenylporphyrin in DMF. Κ. Μ. Kadish, L. A. Bottomley, D. Schaeper. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—149. Oxovanadium(IV) Complexes of Tetraaza Macrocyclic Ligands: Synthesis and Physical Characterization. J. A. Ladd, V. L. Goedken. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—150. A Direct Measurement of the Resonance Energy due to Intramolecular Electron Transfer in a Mixed-Valent, Cu(ll)Cu(l)-Macrocyclic Ligand Complexes. R. R. Gagne, C. L. Spiro. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—151. Spectroelectrochemical Studies of Zinc(ll) Tetraphenylporphyrin. R. K. Rhodes, L. R. Shiue, L. A. Bottomley, Κ. Μ. Kadish. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—152. The Deuterium Kinetic Isotope Effect in Porphyrin Metalation Reactions. D. K. Lavallee, G. M. Onady. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—153. Binding of Pyridine to a Zinc Tetraphenylporphin in Various Solvents. N. Datta-Gupta, D. Malakar, R. Glover.

Section G Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Mossbauer Spectroscopy Joint with Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 70)

WEDNESDAY EVENING Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Mossbauer Spectroscopy Jount with Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (see page 70) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 110 (Lobby Level) General—Organometallic Cluster Com­ pounds W. D. Horrocks, Jr., Presiding 8:30—Introduction of the First Nobel Laureate Signature Award Winner. W. D. Horrocks, Jr. 8:35—156. Award Address. (Nobel Laureate Signature Award for a Graduate Student in Chemistry sponsored by J. T. Baker Chemical Co.) Synthesis and Reactivity of Mixed-Metal Clusters. W. L Gladfelter. 9:20—Discussion. 9:30—157. Optically Derived Rate Predictions for Thermal Electron Transfer in Mixed Valence Ion-Pairs. J. C. Curtis, T. J. Meyer. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—158. Composition of Polynuclear Metal Complexes in Aqueous Solutions. A. Avdeef, J. A. Brown. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—159. Rates of Deprotonation and pKa Values of Transition Metal Carbonyl Hy­ drides in Methanol. H. -Walker, R. G. Pear­ son, P. C. Ford. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—160. Oxidative Addition of Hydroxalkynes to Ru and Os Carbonyl Clusters. S. Aime, D. Osella, A. J. Deeming. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—161. Multinuclear Rhodium Com­ plexes of Elongated Cyclic Hexaamines. J. E. Bulkowski, A. E. Martin. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—162. New Synthetic Routes to the Rectangular Molybdenum Cluster Deriva­ tives Mo4CI8L4. T. R. Ryan, R. E. McCarley. 11:25—Discussion. 11:30—163. Studies of Novel Polyoxoanions which Contain Organic and Organometallic Groups. V. W. Day, M. R. Thompson, M. F. Fredrich, R. K. C. Ho, R. S. Liu, W. Shum, W. G. Klemperer. 11:45—Discussion. 11:50—164. A Novel Methylene Bridged Dicobalt Compound: Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Οο2(^5-05Μβ5)2(μ-ΟθΧμ-ΟΗ2). T. R. Halbert, M. E. Leonowicz, D. J. Maydonovitch. 12:05—Discussion.

Section B Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 114 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Unusual Synthetic Tech­ niques in Solid State Chemistry

Section C

T. A. Albright, Presiding 9:30—170. Theoretical Studies of Chemisorption and Model Organometallic Com­ pounds. H. F. Schaefer, III. 10:00—Discussion. 10:05—171. Electronic Properties of Metal Clusters: Ligand, Size, and Chemisorptive Effects. R. C. Baetzold. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—172. Analysis of Core Level Shake-up Satellites of CO Chemisorbed on Metals and in Transition Metal Carbonyls. R. P. Messmer. 10:50—Discussion. 10:55—173. The Hartree-Fock-Slater Method in Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis. E. J. Baerends. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—174. Generalized Molecular Orbital Theory. M. B. Hall. 11:40—Discussion. 11:45—175. Methods for Bonding Studies in Transition Metal Complexes. R. F. Fenske. 12:10—Discussion.

Section D Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 104 (Lobby Level) General—Bioinorganic Studies

A. L. Crumbliss, Presiding 9:30—176. Conformational Effects on Cyto­ chrome C Reactivity and Specificity. G. McLendon, M. Smith. 9:45—Discussion. 9:50—177. Kinetics of Catalyzed Iron Release from a Siderophore Complex. B. Monzyk, A. L. Crumbliss. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—178. Complexation of Th(IV) by the Iron Transport Protein Transferrin. W. R. Harris, C. J. Carrano, V. L. Pecoraro, K. N. Raymond. 10:25—Discussion. 10:30—179. Studies on the Polymerization Equilibria of the Cu(ll) and Zn(ll) Chelates of L-DOPA and ATP. K. S. Rajan, S. Mainer, J. M. Davis. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—180. Trace Metal Levels in Glomer­ ular Basement Membrane (GBM) and Their Possible Involvement in Membrane Dam­ age. K. S. Rajan, P. Freedman, E. Smith, R. D. Wiehle. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—181. Chemical and Spectroscopic Comparison of the Binuclear Copper Active Site of Mollusc and Arthropod Hemocyanins and Tyrosinase. R. S. Himmelwright, N. C. Eickman, C. D. LuBien, E. I. Solomon. 11:25—Discussion. 11:35—182. Crystal and Molecular Struc­ ture and Anticancer Activity of [(C6H5)3CH3P][Pt(caffeine)Cl3]. R. E. Cramer, D. Ho, T. Norton, M. Kashiwagi, W. Van Doorne, J. A. Ibers. 11:45—Discussion. 11:50—183. Synthesis, Characterization and Biomedical Applications of Mercuric Complexes of Amines, Amino Acids and Nucleosides. J. E. Sheats, W. McCarroll, D. Tabb, J. Pendergrass. 12:05—Discussion. THURSDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

A. G. MacDairmid, Presiding 9:30—165. Novel Techniques in the Synthe­ sis of the Quasi One-Dimensional Con­ ductors, (SN)X, Hg3_5AsF6 and (CH)X. A. G. MacDiarmid, A. J. Heeger. 10:10—Discussion. 10:15—166. Preparation and Properties of Amorphous and Poorly Crystalline Transi­ tion Metal Sulfides. R. R. Chianelli. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—167. Synthesis and Reaction of Amorphous Transition Metal Sulfides. A. J. Jacobson.

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 110 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Unusual Synthetic Tech­ niques in Solid State Chemistry

A. Clearfield, Presiding

2:00—184. New Method for Preparation of Aerogels of Inorganic Oxides and Some Properties of these Materials. S. J. Teichner, G. A. Nicolaon, G. Pajonk. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—185. Melt Quenching as a Preparatory Technique. K. Nassau. 3:10—Discussion. 3:15—186. Morphology of Freeze-Formed Silica. W. Mahler, M. F. Bechtold. 3:40—Discussion.' 3:45—187. Vapor Deposition of Organome­ tallic Materials. S. B. Miller. 4:10—Discussion. 4:15—188. A Low Temperature Route to Pyrochlores in Pb-Ru-0 System. H. S. Ho­ rowitz, J. T. Lewandowski, J. M. Longo. 4:40—Discussion.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 114 (Lobby Level) Symposium of New Quantum Methods in Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis

P. J. Hay, Presiding 2:00—189. Unusual Geometries and Nucleophilicity in Electron Deficient Transition Metal Carbene Complexes. R. Hoffmann, R. J. Goddard, E. D. Jemmis. 2:30—Discussion. 2:35—190. Theoretical Chemistry of Some Main-Group Compounds. A. H. Cowley, S. G. Baxter, M. Lattman, M. L. McKee. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—191. Theoretical Study of the Chlorotris(triphenylphosphine)rhodium(l)—Cat­ alyzed Hydrogénation of Olefins. A. Dedieu. 3:20—Discussion. 3:25—192. Recent Theoretical Investigations of Organometallic and Cluster Compounds. D. M. P. Mingos. 3:50—Discussion. 3:55—193. Molecular Orbital Calculations and Valence Ionization Energies of Organometallic Complexes. D. L. Lichtenberger, D. C. Calabro. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—194. Intramolecular Rearrangements of Polyene-MLn Transition Metal Complexes. T. A. Albright. 4:40—Discussion. 4:45—195. Conformational Preferences and Rotational Barriers Associated with Metal-Acetylene and Metal-Pyridine Bonds. P. B. Winston, B. C. Ward, J. L Templeton. 4:55—Discussion.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 101 (Lobby Level) General—Organometallic

L. S. Liebeskind, Presiding 2:00—196. Crystal Structures of Two Monohapto Cycloheptatrienylidene Complexes of Iron. P. E. Riley, R. E. Davis. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—197. Investigations into the General Chemistry of Bis(benzene)-chromium(0). T. J. Lenert, J. J. Lagowski. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—198. 1 7 0 NMR Spectroscopy of Enriched Metal Carbonyl Compounds. R. L Kump, L. J. Todd. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—199. A Synthesis of Metalla-(2)-lndane,1,3-Diones. L S. Liebeskind, S. L. Baysdon, J. F. Blount. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—200. Chemistry of Low-Valent Group IV Complexes with Tertiary Phosphine Ligands. R. P. Beatty, S. Datta, M. B. Fischer, S. S. Wreford. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—201. Structural and Spectroscopic Evidence of a Distortion of the Cyclopentadienyl Ligand in (r/5-C5H5)M(CO)3 (M = Mn, Re) Complexes. P. J. Fitzpatrick, J. Sedman, I. S. Butler, Y. LePage. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—202. The Dynamic Structures of (η5C5H5)2MCI2 (M = Ti.Zr.Hf) in the Solid State and in the Free Molecules. D. F. R. Gilson, P. J. Fitzpatrick, G. Gomez, I. S. Butler. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—203. Preparation, Properties, and Structure of Some Tienyl Complexes of Early Transition Metals. C. J. Doumit, R. Shakir, J. L. Atwood. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—204. Synthesis of Alkyl-Substituted Malonic and Aceto-Acetic Esters Using Organocobalt Complexes. A. Gaudemer, K. N. V. Duong,. M. Veber. 4:55—Discussion.

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

67

iKfti

Section D Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 104 (Lobby Level) General—Kinetics and Mechanism

L. E. Erickson, Presiding

I

2:00—205. Intramolecular Electron Transfer Induced Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Dissocia­ tion in Methyl Substituted 1,10-Phenanthroline Complexes of Bis(7]5-cyclopentadienyl)Titanium. D. R. Corbin, W. S. Willis, E. N. Duesler, G. D. Stucky. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—206. An Oxoporphinatochromium(V) Complex. Characterization by ESR Spec­ troscopy. J. T. Groves, R. C. Haushalter, W. J. Kruper, Jr. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—207. Chromium(lll) Products From the Cr(ll)-1,4-Benzoquinone Reaction. R. A. Holwerda. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—208. The Nature of Amine Deprotonation in Basic Solutions of Bis-(2-Aminomethylpyridine) Cobalt(ll). D. H. Huchital, E. Debesis. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—209. Gold Recovery By Reduction of Solvent-Extracted Au(lll) Chloride Complex. A Kinetic Study. G. F. Reynolds, S. G. Baranyai. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—210. The Stereochemistry of the Re­ action of Amino Acids with Olefin Com­ plexes of Platinum(ll). L. E. Erickson, D. C. Brower. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—211. Oxidation of Hexachloroiridate(lll) by OH: Evidence for Inner Sphere Elec­ tron-Transfer Process. N. Selvarajan, N. V. Raghavan. 4:15—Discussion. FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 110 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Unusual Synthetic Tech­ niques in Solid State Chemistry

D. W. Murphy, Presiding 9:00—212. Multilayer Semiconductor Syn­ thesis with Molecular Beams. A. C. Gossard. 9:40—Discussion. 9:45—213. Growth of High-Pressure, HighTemperature Polymorph of Rh 2 0 3 by Chemical Transport with HCI. K. R. Poeppelmeier, G. Ansell. 10:15—Discussion. 10:25—214. Preparation of High Density Bi­ nary and Ternary Alloys by the Reduction of Mixed Oxide Ceramic Preforms. M. Robbins, M. L. Green, R. C. Sherwood, A. Staudinger. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—215. The Low Temperature Synthesis of Alloys. A. K. Cheetham.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 114 (Lobby Level) Symposium on New Quantum Methods in Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis

A. H. Cowley, Presiding 9:00—216. SCF-Xa-SW Calculations on Molecules with Metal Atom Clusters and Multiple Metal-Metal Bonds. B.E. Bursten, F. A. Cotton, G. G. Stanley. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—217. Ab Initio Studies of TransitionMetal and Actinide Compounds Using Ef­ fective Core Potentials. P. J. Hay, J. O. Noell. 10:05—Discussion. 10:10—218. A Core Valence Approximation Scheme for Large Molecular Calculations. I. H. Hillier, J. C. Campbell, V. R. Saun­ ders. 10:35—Discussion.. 10:40—219. Χα-SW Calculations of MetalMetal Dimers and Peroxo Complexes J. G. Norman, Jr., L. Noodleman. 11:05—Discussion. 11:10—220. Ab Initio MO-SCF and CI Cal­ culations on Binuclear Complexes and the Nature of the Metal-Metal Bond, M. Bénard. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—221. Projected Xa and GMO-CI Studies of the Bonding in Dimetal Units. B. E. Bursten, F. A. Cotton, M. B. Hall. 12:00—Discussion.

MEDI DIVISION OF MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY J. Montgomery, Chairman J. Dice, Secretary

SUNDAY EVENING 8:00—Divisional Business Meeting and Mixer. Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A

MONDAY MORNING Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 109 (Lobby Level)

Symposium on Novel Approaches to Fertility Control M. J. Karten, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—1. The Pharmacology of LH-RH Analogoues. A. Corbin, F. J. Bex. 9:55—2. Regulation of Reproductive Functions by GnRH and Synthetic Agonists and Antagonists. W. Vale, C. Rivier, M. Perrin, J. Rivier. 10:40—3. The Effectiveness of a Superactive LRF-Agonist as a Contraceptive Agent. S. Yen, R. Casper, K. Sheehan, A. Hsueh, G. Erickson. 11:25—4. Present Status of LH-RH and its Stimulatory and Inhibitory Analogs. A. V. Schally, D. H. Coy, E. Pedroza, M. V. Nekola, I. Mezo, A. M. Comaru-Schally, A. J. Kastin, A. Zarate, E. Canales, J. Zanartu, D. Gonzalez-Barcena.

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

TUESDAY MORNING Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 109 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Drugs for the Treatment of Hypertension

W. T. Comer, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—19. Current Approaches to the Treat­ ment of Hypertension. D. Shand. 9:40—Discussion. 9:50—20. A New Generation of β-Adrenergic Blocking Agents. W. L. Matier. 10:25—Discussion. 10:35—21. Catecholamine Receptor Profiles for Understanding Alpha Agonist Speci­ ficity. H. Sheppard. 11:10—Discussion. 11:20—22. Opportunities for Improved Di­ uretics. J. E. Baer. 11:55—Discussion.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 109 (Lobby Level) Symposium on the Mechanism of Action of Antitumor Agents

MONDAY AFTERNOON

S. M. Hecht, Presiding

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 109 (Lobby Level) General

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—23. Molecular Pharmacology of Sev­ eral Antitumor Antibiotics. S. T. Crooke, V. H. DuVernay, C. H. Huang, C. Mirabelli, A. W. Prestayko. 2:55—Discussion. 3:05—24. DNA Modification by Antitumor Drugs. W. A. Haseltine. 3:50—Discussion. 4:00—25. Studies of the Mechanism of Action of cis-Dichlorodiammine-platinum (II), An Anti-Cancer Drug. W. R. Bauer, S. J. Lippacd. 4:45—Discussion.

M. J. Karten, Presiding 1:30—5. Biological Activities of Prostaglandins Constrained to Particular Side-Chain Alignments by 1 (aM)-Macrolide Formation. N. H. Andersen, N. Subramanian, S. Imamoto, R. P. Robertson, Ch. V. Rao. 1:45—6. Studies of Steroid Structure and Affinity for Rat Androgen Binding Protein and Rat Cytoplasmic Androgen Receptor. T. J. Lobl, J. A. Campbell, A. R. Means, D. J. Tindall, G. R. Cunningham, P. L. Kemp. 2:00—7. The Synthesis and Affinity of A-Ring Fused Heterocyclic Steroids to Rat Androgen Binding Protein and Rat Cytoplasmic Androgen Receptor. T. C. Britton, T. J. Lobl, J. A. Campbell, D. J. Tindall, G. R. Cunningham, A. R. Means. 2:15—8. An Interesting Class of Male Antifertility Agents. l-(Substituted-benzyl)Indazole Carboxylic Acids. T. J. Lobl, B. Silvestrini. 2:30—9. The Application of Computer Graphics to the Design of a Suicide Substrate for the 3a,20p-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase from Streptomyces Hydrogenans. D. F. Covey, R. C. Strickler, B. Tobias. 2:45—10. A Comparison of the Biological Activity of Some Methylated Derivatives of Trilostane. R. G. Christiansen, H. C. Neumann, U. J. Salvador, M. R. Bell, H. P. Schane, J. E. Creange. 3:00—11. Synthesis of 11-Substituted 9(10 -»- 19)abeo-1,3,5-estratiene Analogs. J. G. Johansson, D. F. Crowe, M. Tanabe. 3:15—12. Antiinflammatory Steroids: A Pro-Drug Approach to Increasing the Therapeutic Index. Κ. Β. Sloan, S. Selk, L. Caldwell, N. Bodor, R. Little. 3:30—13. New Bioabsorbable Contraceptive Pellet Implants: Sustained Release of 3H-Norethindrone and 3H-d-Norgestrel in Rhesus Monkeys. G. N. Gupta, B. B. Saxena, D. V. Amin and S. J. Segal.

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

68

3:45—14. Methods for Ovulation Predic­ tion—An Overview. J. H. Berg, J. J. Brennan. 4:00—15. Ether Bridge Substitution in Thy*· roxine: Crystal Structures of 3,5-Diiododiphenyl-NH2, CO, CHOH Bridged Analogues. V. Cody. 4:15—16. Oral Gold: Auranofin, A Novel Antiarthritic Agent, Its Mossbauer Spectrum and X-Ray Crystal Structure Determination. D. T. Hill, B. M. Sutton, P. J. Sadler, G. H. M. Calis, J. M. Trooster. 4:30—17. Synthesis of (-)-4-Hydroxy-6keto-N-formylmorphianan, A Versatile In­ termediate for the Synthesis of 3-Deoxyopiods. M. D. Rozwadowska, F. Hsu, A. E. Jacobson, K. C. Rice, A. Brossi 4:45—18. Synthesis and Opioid Activity of Precursors of Hybrid Enkephalins, 1- and 3-Carboxamidometazocines. K. Ramakrishnan, W. Groutas, A. E. Takemori, P. S. Portoghese.

WEDNESDAY MORNING Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 106 (Lobby Level) Alfred Burger Award Symposium M. E. Wolff,' Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—26. Chemotherapy of Herpes Virus Infections. G. B. Elion. 9:40—Discussion. 9:45—27. Interactive Three Dimensional Computer Graphics in Studies of Molecular Structures and their Interactions. R. Langridge. 10:20—Discussion. 10:25—28. Chemical Aspects of the Metab­ olism of Cyclophosphamide. C. Fenselau, M. Colvin. 11:00—Discussion. 11:05—29. Award Address. (Alfred Burger Award in Medicinal Chemistry sponsored by SmithKline Corporation). Towards More Selective Antiarthritic Therapy. T. Y. Shen. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 109 (Lobby Level) General

J. G. Cannon, Presiding 1:30—30. A Structure-Function Relationship for Cardio-Active Steroids. D. C. Rohrer, D. S. Fullerton, K. Yoshioka, K. Ahmed, A. H. L. From. 1:45—31. Synthesis and Pharmacology of the Seven Isomeric Ring Hydroxylated Propranols. J. E. Oatis, Jr., D. R. Knapp, T. Walle, M. P. Russell.

2:00—32. New Ring Hydroxylated Metabolites of Propranolol—Species Differences and Stereospecific 7-Hydroxylation. T. Walle, J. E. Oatis, Jr., U. K. Walle, D. R. Knapp. 2:15—33. New Hydrazino-pyridazino (4,5-b) indoles as Antihypertensive Agents. Syn­ thesis and Preliminary Pharmacology. A. Monge, I. Aldana, E. Fernandez-Alverez, J. A. Fuentes. 2:30—34. Cardioselectivity of β-Adrenoceptor Blockers. Uniqueness of 3,4-Dimethoxyphenethyl Substituent? W. J. Rzeszotarski, R. E. Gibson, D. A. Simms, J. N. Vaughn. 2:45—35. Antiarrhythmic Activity of Cyproheptadinium Methiodide in Conscious Dogs after Myocardial Infarction. J. D. Hender­ son, R. D. Wilkerson. 3:00—36. A Model for the Molecular Mech­ anism of Anticoagulant Activity of 3-Substituted-4-hydroxycoumarins. R. B. Sil­ verman, B. O. Lim, W. G. Ward. 3:15—37. Preparation and Uptake by Muscle Tissues of Radiolabeled Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors. G. L. Kramer, K. L. Lorenz, J. N. Wells. 3:30"—38. Optically Active Imidazolines and Their Interactions with α-Adrenergic Re­ ceptors. D. D. Miller, A. Hamada, P. J. Rice, P. N. Patil. 3:45—39. Interaction of Sulindac and its Metabolites with Phospholipid Membrane. S. S. Fan, M. Driscoll, T. Y. Shen. 4:00—40. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of 5,7-Dihydroxy-2-aminotetralin Derivatives. A. N. Brubaker, J. G. Cannon. 4:15—41. Synthesis and Pharmacological Studies of 5-Hydroxy-6-methyl-2-aminotetralin Derivatives. D. L. Koble, J. G. Cannon. 4:30—42. Anticonvulsant Activity in a Series of Isatin Derivatives. F. D. Popp, R. Parson. 4:45—43. The Stereochemistry of the Acidcatalyzed Reaction of 4-Cyano-1, 4-dihydronicotinamides. N. J. Oppenheimer. THURSDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 109 (Lobby Level) General D. E. Butler, Presiding 8:30—44. The Synthesis and Stereospecific Analgesia of Nantradol—A Potent, NonOpiate Analgetic. M. R. Johnson, G. M. Milne. 8:45—45. 5-Aryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-7-carbolines, A New Class of Tranquilizers. C. A. Harbert, J. J. Plattner, W. M. Welch, A. Weissman, B. K. Koe. 9:00—46. Cis- and trans-4-Aryloxy-3-arylpiperidines: Synthesis, Antidepressant and Analgesic Properties, S. S. Klioze, F. J. Ehrgott, Jr. 9:15—47. Synthesis and Receptor Binding Activity of p-Bromo-spiperone. C. C. Huang, A. M. Friedman, R. So, M. Simonovic, H. Y. Meltzer, H. Kulmala, R. Dinerstein. 9:30—48. Investigations of the Ν,Ο-Acyltransferase Activity of o-Hydroxyarylamides, N-Arylglycolamides and Related Compounds. P. E. Hanna, R. B. Banks, T. J. Smith. 9:45—49. On the Role of Metals in the Anti­ tumor Activity of Bleomycin. W. E. Antholine, E. A. Rao, D. H. Petering. 10:00—50. Anticoccidial Derivatives of 6Azauracil. 3. Synthesis and Activity of Sulfonamides Derived from 2-Phenyl-astriazine-3,5(2H,4H)-diones. M. W. Miller, B. L. Mylari, H. L. Howes, Jr., M. J. Lynch, J. E. Lynch, R. C. Koch. 10:15—51. The Use of N1-Oxides to Prevent Intramolecular Cyclization during Nucleophilic Displacements on the Sugar Moiety of Adenosine Derivatives. M. MacCoss, E. K. Ryu, R. S. White, R. L. Last. 10:30—52. A New Potent Cytidine Deami­ nase Inhibitor. V. E. Marquez, P. S. Liu, J. A. Kelley, J. J. McCormack, J. S. Dris­ coll? 10:45—53. Synthesis of 5'-Substituted Che­ lating Nucleosides as Analogues of Nu­ cleoside Phosphates. E. J. Delaney, P. W. Morris, D. L. Venton. 11:00—54. Potential Radiosensitizing Agents. 4. 2-Nitroimidazole Nucleosides. M. Sakaguchi, M. W. Webb, K. C. Agrawal. 11:15—55. Inhibitors of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine Decarboxylase. M. M. AbdelMonem, M. C. Pankaskie.

11:30—56. 1-(/3-D-Xylof uranosyl)-5-f luorocytosines with a Leaving Group on the 3' Position. "Double-Barreled" Masked Pre­ cursors of Anticancer Nucleosides. K. A. Watanabe, U. Reichman, D. H. Hollenberg, C. K. Chu, J. J. Fox. 11:45—57. Inhibition of IMP Dehydrogenase by Substituted Purine Nucleotides. R. B. Meyer, Jr., E. B. Skibo, M. J. Tanga, C. G. Wong. R. V. Smith, Presiding

10:30—4. Isotope Abundances and Anoma­ lies and the Measurement of Geologic and Solar System Time. G. J. Wasserburg. 11:05—5. Radioisotope Dating with Accel­ erators: Present Status and Future Pros­ pects. R. A. Muller. 11:35—6. Progress in the Mass Spectro­ metry Study of Life and Extinct Time­ pieces. K. Marti.

1:30—58. Microbiological N-Dealkylation of Lergotrile. R. V. Smith, P. J. Davis, J. C. Glade, A. M. Clark. 1:45—59. Replacement of the γ-Carboxyl Group of Methotrexate with Reactive Groups. A. Gangjee, T. I. Kalman, T. J. Bardos. 2:00—60. Estrogen-Vinca Alkaloid Conju­ gates. K. Gerzon, R. T. Blickenstaff. 2:15—61. DNA Binding and Dissociation Ki­ netics of Biosynthetic Analogs of Actinomycin D. P. A. Mirau, R. H. Shafer. 2:30—62. 2-Methyl Anthraquinone Deriva­ tives as Potential Bioreductive Alkylating Agents. T.-S. Lin, B. A. Teicher, A. C. Sartorelli. 2:45—63. Synthesis and Antitumor Activity of Aporphine Mustards. S.-J. Law, J. L. Neumeyer, F. E. Granchelli, C. N. Filer, A. H. Soloway. 3:00—64. Novel Derivatives of Cyclophos­ phamide. E. R. Talaty, L. M. Pankow. 3:15—65. QSAR by Distance Geometry: Systematic Analysis of Dihydrofolate Re­ ductase Inhibitors. G. M. Crippen. 3:30—66. Analogs of 8-(6-Diethylaminohexylamino)-6-methoxy-4-methylquinoline as Candidate Antileishmanial Agents. M. P. LaMontagne, D. Dagli, M. S. Khan, P. Blumbergs. 3:45—67. Synthesis of N-Unsubstituted β-Lactams. J. Vincent, K. Gala, I. F. Fer­ nandez, A. K. Bose. 4:00—68. β-Lactam Synthesis by the DEADCAT-TPP Reaction. M. S. Manhas, D. P. Sahu, A. K. Bose. 4:15—69. Analogs of Chloramphenicol: Cir­ cular Dichroism Spectra and Inhibition of Ribosomal Peptidyltransferase. P. Bhuta, H. L. Chung, J. S. Hwang, J. Zemlicka. 4:30—70. Potential Scanning Agents for Es­ trogen-Dependent Malignancy. G. C. Wolf. 4:45—71. Photoinactivation of Thymidylate Synthase by 5-lodo-2'-deoxyuridylate. A. R. Bapat, H. H. Daron, J. L. Aull.

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 105 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Reactions in the Intermediate Energy Region with Nuclear and Mesonic Projectiles I P. E. Haustein, Organizer, Presiding

Section Β

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—7. The (R) evolution of Nucleus-Nucleus Interactions Between 10 and 200 MeVV Nucléon. C. K. Gelbke. 10:05—8. Nuclear Collisions above 10 MeV per Nucléon. J. Randrup. 11:00—Intermission. 11:10—9. The Energy Dependence of Nucleon-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Total Reaction Cross Sections. J. C. Peng, R. M. DeVries, N. J. DiGiacomo. Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 214 (2nd Level) Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of Geochemistry {Probationary) and The History of Chemistry

C. Ponnamperuma, Presiding 1:30—10. Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy for Low-Level Counting. G. S. Hurst, S. D. Kramer, B. Lehmann. 2:00—11. Ion Microprobe Measurements of Mg Isotopes in Allende Inclusions. I. D. Hutcheon. 2:30—12. Track Geochronology. R. M. Walker. 3:00—13. State-of-the-Art of Obsidian Hydration Dating. I. Friedman, F. Trembour. 3:30—14. Advances in Amino Acid Dating Techniques. P. E. Hare. 4:00—15. Present Status and Future Prospects for Thermoluminescence Dating. R. M. Walker. 4:30—16. Dating Ground Water. S. N. Davis, H. W. Bentley. Section Β

DIVISION OF NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY V. E. Viola, Jr., Chairman R. L. Hahn, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 214 (2nd Level) Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of Geo­ chemistry {Probationary) and The History of Chemistry R. Davis, Jr., Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. L. A. Currie. 8:35—1. Keynote Address: The Contribution of Radioactive and Chemical Dating to the Understanding of the Environmental Sys­ tem. H. Oeschger. 9:25—2. Cosmogenic Radionuclides in the 10 5 -10 7 Year Region: Results and Pros­ pects for High-Energy Ion Counting. J. R. Arnold. 9:55—3. The Application of Ultrasensitive Mass Spectrometry to Nuclear Dating. K. Purser, C. Russo, H. Gove, D. Elmore, R. Ferraro, R. Beukens, K. Chang, L. Kilius, H. Lee, A. Litherland.

M. L. Good, Presiding 3:45—26. Conversion Electron Mossbauer Spectroscopy and Its Recent Develop­ ments. M. J. Tricker. 4:30—27. The Use of Conversion Electron Mossbauer Spectroscopy to Study Ion Im­ planted Alloys and Archaeological Mater­ ials. G. Longworth. 4:50—28. Conversion Electron Mossbauer Spectroscopy of 151Eu and 169 Tm. G. K. Shenoy, D. Niarchos, P. J. Viccaro, B. D. Dunlap. TUESDAY MORNING

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 105 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Reactions in the Intermediate Energy Region with Nuclear and Mesonic Projectiles II R. S. Rundberg, Presiding

NUCL

2:10—23. Application of Molecular Orbital Calculations to Mossbauer and NQR Spectroscopy in Halide Containing Com­ pounds. R. Bias, M. Grodzicki, S. Lauer, A. Trautwein, A. Vera, J. M. Freidt. 2:55—24. Application of 197 Au Mossbauer Spectroscopy to Studies of Electronic Properties of Intermetallic, Inorganic, and Organometallic Compounds. T. K. Sham, R. E. Watson, M. L. Perlman. φ 3:15—25. Detectability of Hydrogen Bonding inCrystals by the Mossbauer Effect. O. Knop, F. W. D. Woodhams. 3:35—Intermission. Conversion Electron Mossbauer Spectros­ copy

2:00—17. Features of π~ and π+ Spectra Emitted in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions. W. Benenson, G. Bertsch, J. Bistirlich, H. Bowman, G. M. Crawley, K. Crowe, K. Frankel, O. Hashimoto, E. Kashy, M. Koike, J. A. Nolen, Jr., J. Péter, J. Rasmussen, J. Sullivan, W. Zajc. 2:45—18. Dynamics of Light Fragment Production with High-Energy Protons. L. P. Remsberg, D. G. Perry. 3:10—19. Constraints on Intermediate Energy Interactions Obtained from Fragment Emission Studies. R. G. Korteling, R. E. L. Green, D. H. Boal, K. P. Jackson. 3:35—Intermission. 3:45—20. Momentum Transfer to TargetFragmentation Products in the Reactions of 400 MeV/A 12C and 20Ne Ions with Au. S. Β. Kaufman, Ε. P. Steinberg, B. D. Wilkins. 4:10—21. Production of Gold Isotopes by Relativistic Heavy Ion Reactions with Bis­ muth, K. Aleklett, D. J. Morrissey, G. T. •Seaborg, W. Loveland. 4:35—22. Target Fragment Momenta in the Interaction of Relativistic Heavy Ions with Uranium. W. Loveland, L. Cheng, D. J. Morrissey, G. T. Seaborg.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 108 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Mossbauer Spectroscopy Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

J. G. Stevens, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. M. L. Good. Bonding Analysis J. J . Zuckerman, Presiding

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 202 (2nd Level) Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of Geo­ chemistry {Probationary) and The History of Chemistry W. R. Schell, Presiding 8:30—29. Glaciochemical Dating Techniques. M. M. Herron, C. C. Langway, Jr. 9:00—30. Tree Thermometers and Com­ modities: Historic Climate Indicators. L. M. Libby, L. J. Pandolfi. 9:30—31. Fluctuations of Atmospheric Ra­ diocarbon and the Radiocarbon Time Scale. P. E. Damon. 10:00—32. Sampling and Precise Dating Requirements for Extracting Isotopic and Chemical Records from Tree Rings. C. W. Stockton, W. R. Boggess. 10:30—33. Stable Isotopes: Tools for Reconstructing the Past. J. C. Lerman. 11:00—34. Absolute Radiometric Dating of Travertine from Archaelogical Sites. H. P. Schwarcz. 11:30—35. Results of a Dating A t t e m p t Chemical and Physical Measurements Relative to the Cause of the CretaceousTertiary Extinctions. F. Asaro, H. Michel, L. Alvarez, W. Alvarez. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 112 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Reactions in the Intermediate Energy Region with Nuclear and Mesonic Projectiles III

D. J. Morrissey, Presiding 9:00—36. Excitation Functions Across the (3,3) Resonance for the Pion Single Charge Exchange Reactions 27 AI ( π " , 7T°)27Mg, 65

Cu(7T-, 7r°)65Ni, and

45

SC(TT + , ΤΓ°) 4 5 ΤΙ.

R. S. Rundberg, B. J. Dropesky, G. C. Giesler, G. W. Butler, S. B. Kaufman, E. P. Steinberg. 9:30—37. Radiochemical Measurements of the 209Bi(p,7r°7)210Po and 209Bi(p,xn)21°xn Po Reactions at Ep = 60-480 MeV. T. E. Ward, D. L. Friesel, P. P. Singh, J. D'Auria, G. Sheffer, P. Jackson, A. Yavin, A. Doron, G. Aszelo. 10:00—38. Double Charge Exchange Reac­ tions on 209 Bi. J. L Clark, P. E. Haustein, J. Hudis, T. J. Ruth, A. A. Caretto, Jr. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—39. Cross Sections of Negative Pion Induced Reactions in 9 Be, 12 C, and 19F Nuclei between 0.4 and 1.0 GeV. N. Imanishi, T. Nishi, I. Fujiwara, H. Moriyama, S. Iwata, S. Hayashi, K. Otozi, R. Arakawa, S. Saita, T. Tsuenyoshi, N. Takahashi, S. Shibata, K. Yoshida, A. Kudo. 11:15—40. The 12C(p,7r+)13C Reaction to States of Quite Different Nuclear Structure. F. Soga, R. D. Bent, M. C. Green, W. W. Jacobs, T. P. Sjoreen, T. E. Ward, A. G. Drentje.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 108 (Lobby Level)

Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Mossbauer Spectroscopy—Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry Environmental Applications L. H. Bo wen, Presiding

i

9:00—41. Applications of Mossbauer Spec­ troscopy to Coal Characterization and Uti­ lization. P. A. Montano. 9:45—42. Quantitative Analysis of Pyrite in Fuel Materials with Mossbauer Spectros­ copy. D. L. Williamson, T? W. Guettinger, D. W. Dickerhoof. 10:05—43. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Iron-Bearing Minerals in Fossil Fuels and Petroleum Source Rock by 57Fe Mossbauer Spectroscopy. R. E. Karl, J. J. Zuckerman. 10:25—44. Mossbauer Spectroscopic Anal­ ysis of Iron Oxides in Soil. L H. Bowen, S. B. Weed. 10:45—Intermission. Analytical Applications C. H. W. Jones, Presiding

3

10:55—45. Quantitative Analysis Using Mossbauer Spectroscopy. R. L. Collins, T. Eakin, J. Clewlow. 11:25—46. Applications of Mossbauer Spectroscopy in the Steel Industry: I— Characterization and Processing of Ore and Coal. F. E. Huggins, G. P. Huffman. 11:40—47. Applications of Mossbauer Spectroscopy in the Steel Industry: II.— Bulk and Surface Analysis of Steel. G. P. Huffman. 11:55^-48. Oxide Identification in a Chromi­ um Steel. J. D. Cashion. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 202 (2nd Level) Symposium on High Energy Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability

E. K. Hyde, Organizer, Presiding 2:00—Remarks on Art and Science. Ε. Κ. Hyde. 2:20—49. Award Address. (ACS Award for Nuclear Chemistry sponsored by EG&G ORTEC). Central Collisions of Relativistic Nuclei. A. M. Poskanzer. 3:20—Intermission. 3:35—50. Evidence for a New Reaction Mechanism in the Interaction of 3-12 GeV/c Protons with Uranium. B. D. Wilkins, E. P. Steinberg, S. B. Kaufman, D. J. Henderson, J. A. Urban. 4:15—51. What Are We Learning from Rel­ ativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions? J. R. Nix. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting. 6:15—Divisional Social Hour. Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room #206

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 112 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Nuclear and Chemical Dating Techniques Joint with Divisions of Geo­ chemistry {Probationary) and The History of Chemistry

O. Schaeffer, Presiding 1:30—52. The Antiquity of Organic Com­ pounds. C. Ponnamperuma. 2:00—53. Problems in the Radiocarbon Dat­ ing of Bone. R. E. Taylor. 2:25—54. Counters, Accelerators and Chemistry. L. A. Currie, G. A. Klouda. 2:50—55. Dating of Recent (200 years) Events in Sediments from Lakes, Estuaries and Deep Ocean Environments. W. R. Schell. 3:15—56. Direct Measurement of Natural 10 Be and 14C with a Tandem Accelerator. J. Southon, E. Nelson, R. C. Korteling, E. Hammeren, I. Novikov. 3:40—Intermission. 3:45—Panel Discussion. Future Directions in the Light of Advances in Sampling, Mo­ deling and Measurement. P. E. Hare, C. Langway, Jr. (Chairman), J. C. Lerman, R. Muller, H. Oeschger, R. E.Taylor. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting, (see Section A for location.) 6:15—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location.)

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 201 (2nd Level) Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Mossbauer Spectroscopy—Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

Poster Session

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

69

pu*

δ

ι υ pj

2:00—57. Variable Temperature 119m Môss- Ι bauer Spectroscopy as a Guide to the Lat­ tice Structure of Tin Compounds. Κ. C. Molloy, J. J. Zuckerman. 2:00—58. Low Temperature Môssbauer Spectroscopy and Susceptibility Study of Some Hexa-Chloro-Ferrates and MonoAquo Penta-Chloro-Ferrates: Novel Antiferro-Magnetic Ordering of [Co(],2-Propanediamineh] [FeCI6] and [Co(Ethylenediamine)3] [FeCI 6 ]. N. Scoville, E. Witten, W. M. Reiff. 2:00—59. Mossbauer Studies of Iron Sulphide Minerals. V. K. Garg. 2:00—60. Effect of Heat Treatment on Natural Indian Pyrites. V. P. Gupta, A. K. Singh, K. Chandra, N. G. K. Nair. 2:00—61. Emission Mossbauer Spectroscopic Studies Applied to an Understanding of the Effect of Cobalt o'n the Corrosion Behavior of Zinc. H. Leidhesier, Jr., A. Vertes, M. L. Varsânyi, I. Suzuki. 2:00—62. Added Precision in 57Fe Mossbauer Spectroscopy. W. F. Filter, W. R. Dunham, R. M. Polichar, R. H. Sands. 2:00—63. Lorentzian-Squared and Lorentzian-Cubed Environmental Broadening in Môssbauer Spectra. E. R. Whipple. 2:00—64. Môssbauer Studies of a Four-Iron Ferredoxin. W. F. Filter,' W. R. Dunham, R. H. Sands. 2:00—65. Theoretical Interpretations of High Field Môssbauer Spectra of Deoxymyoglobin, Deoxyhemoglobin and Synthetic Analogues. T. A. Kent, K. Spartalian, G. Lang. 2:00—66. Mossbauer Studies of the IronSulfur Centers in a Ferredoxin from Azobacter Vinelandii. T. A. Kent, B. H. Huynh, E. Munck, M. H. Emptage, J. Rawlings, W. H. Orme-Johnson. 2:00—67. Mossbauer Studies of a Novel Form of Cobinamides. P. N. Venkatasubramanian, A. Richter, V. P. Koppenhagen, A. Nath. 2:00—68. The 127 l Mossbauer Spectra of Some Polyhalide Anions and [l2 + ][Sb 2 F 11 ~]· T. Birchall, R. D. Myers. 2:00—69. Mossbauer Spectroscopy of Substituted Pyridinium Bromoantimony (III) Compounds. S. W. Hedges, L. H. Bowen. 3:30—70. Structural Characterization of Gold (I) Complexes by Au-i97 Mossbauer Spectroscopy. R. V. Parish, O. Parry. 3:30—71. Matrix Isolation Studies of 12éTeH2, 125 TeD 2 and 125TeF. P. A. Montano, D. E. Newlin, G. W. Stewart 3:30—72. Low Temperature Mossbauer Study of Slow Relaxation and Low Dimensionality Exchange in a Canted Linear Chain System and Related Compounds Based on α-Ami­ no Acids. W. M. Reiff, M. M. Moreloch, M. L. Good. 3:30—73. Relaxation Effects Associated with Magnetic Phase Transitions. G. R. Hoy, M. R. Corson. 3:30—74. Solid State Dynamics of Spin Transitions in Iron(lll) Complexes. W. D. Fédérer, M. S. Haddad, M. W. Lyndh, D. N. Hendrickson. 3:30—75. TE-125 and 1-129 Mossbauer Studies of the High Pressure Phase Transition in Tellurium. V. Ladewag, K. Frank, G. Kaindl, B. Perscheid. 3:30—76. Ferroelectric Phase Transition in LiTaC"3 Studied with the 6.2 keV Môssbauer Resonance of Ta-181. G. Wortmann, M. Lôhnert, G. Kaindl, E. Solomon. 3:30—77. Môssbauer Studies on Bifunctional Medium Pore Zeolite-Fe Catalysts Used in Synthesis Gas Conversion. C. Lo, K. R. P. M. Rao, L. N. Mulay, V. U. S. Rao, R. Obermyer, R. G. Gormley. 3:30—78. Môssbauer Spectroscopic Investigations of Tin-Antimony Oxide Catalysts. F. J. Berry. 3:30—79. A Depth Selective Conversion Electron Môssbauer Investigation of Wet Corrosion of Iron. G. Belozerskii, C. Bohm, T. Ekdahl, D. Liljequist. 3:30—80. Non-stoichiometry in Perovskites and Related Structures. X. Obradors, J. Fontcuberta J. Vinaixa, J. Tejada. 3:30—81. Phase Analysis of Iron Oxides in Archaeometric and Magnetic Materials Investigations. B. J. Evans. 5:15—Divisional Business Meeting, (see Section A for location.) 6:15—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location.) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 202 (2nd Level) Symposium on High Energy Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability

G. Friedlander, Presiding

70

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

9:00—Introductory Remarks. I Energy and Catalyst Applications 9:10—82. Mass and Laser Spectroscopy of C. H. W. Jones, Presiding Isotopes Far from Stability. R. Klapisch. 3:35—102. Hydrogen Storage Materials. G. 9:50—83. Studies of Light Exotic Nuclei with K. Shenoy, B. D. Dunlap, P. J. Viccaro, D. the On-Line Mass Analysis System RAMA. Niarchos. J. Cerny. 4:00—103. Môssbauer Studies of Battery 10:20—Intermission. Materials. M. Eibschutz. 10:40—84. Experiments with Mass-Sepa4:20—104. Dissolved Complexes, Redox rated Beams of Short-Lived Nuclei Formed Reactions, and Colloid Formation Studied in High-Energy Proton Reactions. H. by Frozen Solution Mossbauer SpectrosRavn. copy. R. L. Cohen, K. W. West. 11:20—85. Beta-Delayed Nucléon Emission. 4:45—105. Characterization of Mixed Metal J. C. Hardy. Catalysts by Fe-57 and Ru-99 Môssbauer Spectroscopy. M. L. Good, M. Akbarnejad, Section Β M. D. Patil, C. P. Madhusudhan. 5:00—Concluding Remarks. Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 203 (2nd Level) Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Môssbauer Spectroscopy Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry Biological Applications L. May, Presiding 9:00—86. Novel Iron-Sulfur Clusters. E. Munck. 9:45—87. Môssbauer Studies of Intermediate Spin States in Hemes and Hemoproteins. K. Spartalian, G. Lang. 10:05—88. Mossbauer Studies of Horseradish Peroxidase Compound I. C. E. Schulz, P. G. Debrunner, R. Rutter, L. P. Hager. 10:25—Intermission. Studies with Isotopes Other than 57 Fe and 119 Sn

WEDNESDAY EVENING Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Recent Chemical Applications of Mossbauer Spectroscopy Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry Educational Aspects of Mossbauer Spectroscopy J. G. Stevens, Presiding 7:30—106. Mossbauer Spectroscopy in Undergraduate Education. L. May. 7:50—107. Inexpensive Môssbauer Spectrometers. J. J. Spijkerman. 8:10—Discussion.

G. K.Shenoy, Presiding

THURSDAY MORNING

10:35—89. 197 Au Mossbauer Spectroscopy of Gold Complexes. J. M. Trooster, T. P. A. Viegers, F. A. Vollenbroek. 11:20—90. Môssbauer Effect in Zn-67. W. T. Vetterling. 11:40—91. An 129Mossbauer Study of Organotin Iodides. C. H. W. Jones, M. Dombsky. 11:55—92. Characterization of Novel Antimony Compounds by Sb-121 Mossbauer Spectroscopy. R. V. Parish, O. Parry. 12:10—93. Covalency of Neptunium(IV) Organometallic Compounds from 2â7 Np Mossbauer Spectra. D. G. Karraker.

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 202 (2nd Level) Symposium on Short-Lived and Exotic

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 202 (2nd Level) Symposium on Short-Lived and Exotic Nuclei Session I

W. C. McHarris, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—94. The Gas Jet Recoil Transport System. J. M. D'Auria, W. Wiesehahn. 2:45—95. Helium-Jet Applications: Identification of Neutron Deficient Isotopes with Ν =* Ζ ai 40. Op Measurements. S. Delia Negra, C. Deprun, H. Gauvin, J. P. Husson, Y. Le Beyec. 3:20—96. Recent Developments at the TRISTAN On-Line Mass Separator. D. S. Brenner, R. E. Chrien, R. Gill, M. Stelts, J. C. Hill, F. K. Wohn. 3:50—Intermission. 4:00—97. Nuclear Structure Information from the Decay of Short-Lived Nuclei. J. L. Wood. 4:30—98. Rapid Separation of Rare-Earth Elements from Fission Products. J. D. Baker, R. J. Gehrke, R. C. Greenwood, D. H. Meikrantz. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 203 (2nd Level) Symposium on Recent Chemical Applica­ tions of Môssbauer Spectroscopy Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry Phase Analysis G. J. Long, Presiding 2:00—99. Recent Investigations of Spin Crossover. P. Gutlich. 2:45—100. Studies of Molecular Rotation in Salts Containing Sandwich Compound Cations. B. W. Fitzsimmons, I. Sayer. 3:00—101. A High-Pressure Mossbauer Effect Study of the Spin State in Bisfhydrotris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl) borate] iron(ll). G. J. Long, L. W. Becker, B. Hutchinson. 3:15—Intermission.

Section A

Nuclei Session II

R. A. Warner, Presiding 9:00—108. Production of Nuclei Far from Stability in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions. T. J. M. Symons. 9:45—109. Production of Nuclei Far from Stability in 56Fe-lnduced Reactions. V. E. Viola, H. Breuer, A. C. Mignerey, K. L. Wolf, B. G. Glagola, W. W. Wilcke, W. U. Schroder, J. R. Huizenga, D. Hilscher, J. R. Birkelund. 10:10-110. Production of 259 Fm in Bombardment of 248 Cm with 1 8 0 . D. C. Hoffman, D. Lee, A. Chiorso, M. J. Nurmia, J. M. Nitschke, P. L. Sommerville, K. Alekett. 10:40—Intermission. 10:50—111. Precise Mass Measurements of Nuclei Far from ^-Stability. E. Kashy. 11:25—112. Investigation of Nuclei Near N=82; Evidence for a Shell Closure at Ζ=64. K. S. Toth.

Section Β

11:20—119. Recent Radioactivity Standards for Assays of Radio-nuclides in Drinking Water. J. R. Noyce, F. J. Schima. 11:40—120. Irradiation of Selected Radioprotectant Drugs. L. May, C. R. Dobbs. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 202 (2nd Level) Symposium on Short-Lived and Exotic Nuclei Session III

R. D. Macfarlane, Presiding 2:00—121. Comparisons of Delayed Neutron Energy Spectra. R. A: Warner, P. L. Reeder. 2:30—122. Structure of Vibrational States in Californium Nuclei. I. Ahmad. 3:00—123. A New Isotope 158 Sm; Comments on the Decay of 157 Sm. R. J. Gehrke, J. D. Baker, R. C. Greenwood, D. H. Meikrantz, V. J. Novick. 3:20—Intermission. 3:30—124. Techniques for the Production, Purification, and Detection of the ShortLived Tracer 13 N. R. B. Firestone, M. K. Firestone, J. M. Tiedje. 4:i0—125. Short-Lived and Exotic Nuclei: Their Production, Understanding, and Ap­ plications. W. C. McHarris. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 203 (2nd Level) General—II V. E. Viola, Presiding 2:00—126. Recoil Tritium Reactions with Fluoroethylenes. E. E. Siefert, Y.-N. Tang. 2:20—127. Interphase Transfer Kinetics of Thorium Using the Single Drop and the Lewis Cell Techniques. D. E. Horner, J. C. Mailen, J. R. Coggins, S. W. Theil, T. C. Scott, N. Pih, R. G. Yates. 2:40—128. Purification of Dihexyl N,N-diethylcarbamylmethylene-phosphonateby Mercury(ll) Precipitation. N. C. Schroeder, L. D. Mclsaac, J. F. Krupa. 3:00—129. The Solvent Extraction Behavior of Ruthenium Nitrosyl Nitrate in Nitric Acid-Tri-n-butyl Phosphate Systems. D. J. Pruett. 3:20—Intermission. 3:40—130. Radiocesium Behavior on Mixed Bed Ion-Exchangers in Nuclear Power Plants. A. C. Stalker, S. T. Croney. 4:00—131. Radionuclide Transport in a Liquid Waste System. J. S. Eldridge, T. W. Oakes. 4:20—132. The Apparent Solubility Product of Europium Fluoride. M. P. Menon.

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 203 (2nd Level) General—I

M. N. Namboodiri, Presiding 9:00—113. Structural Properties of EvenMass Transitional Nuclei from Inelastic Neutron Scattering Reaction Spectroscopy. S. W. Yates, A. J. Filo, A. Khan, M. A. Mirzaa, D. F. Coope, J. L. Weil, M. T. McEllistrem. 9:20—114. Light Particle Evaporation from Aligned Nuclei Produced in the Reactions of 240 MeV 40 Ar with nat Se and 124 Sn. L. Adler, J. B. Natowitz, M. N. Namboodiri, H. Ho, S. Simon, P. L. Gonthier, A. Khodai, R. Terry. 9:40—115. Ghoshal Experiments for Strongly Damped Collisions. J. B. Natowitz, M. N. Namboodiri, L. Adler, S. Simon, P. Gonthier, H. Ho, A. Khodai. 10:00—116. Double-Beta Decay of Tellurium-130. R. G. Downing, O. K. Manuel, M. A. Purcell, J. F. Richardson, B. Sinha, B. Srinivasan. 10:20—Intermission. 10:40—117. Tellurium Isotopes in the Allende Meteorite. L. L. Oliver, R. V. Ballad, J. F. Richardson, Ο. Κ. Manuel. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—118. Comparison of Nuclear Tech­ niques for the Determination of Thorium in Geological Samples. W. C. Parker, J. J. La Brecque, D. Adames.

ORGN DIVISION OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY R. E. Ireland, Chairman P. Beak, Secretary-Treasurer

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 107 (Lobby Level) James Flack Norris Award Symposium

E. Wasserman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Theoretical Studies of Some Antiaromatic Annulenes. W. T. Borden. 9:45—2. Energy Surfaces of Sigmatropic Shifts. J. J. Gajewski, L. T. Burka, M. J. Chang, R. J. Weber, C. N. Shih, J. Salazar, N. D. Conrad. 10:25—3. Molecular Recognition of Nucleic Acid by Polyintercalators. P. B. Dervan, M. M. Becker.

11:05—4. Award Address. (The James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry sponsored by the Northeastern Section, ACS.) Physical Organic Chemistry—The Creation and Study of Novel Compounds and Reactions. R. Breslow.

11:35—Discussion. 11:40—22. Methylenation by a TitaniumAluminum Carbenoid Complex-The Prep­ aration of Enol Ethers from Esters. S. H. Pine, R. Zahler, D. A. Evans, R. H. Grubbs. 11:55—Discussion.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 106 (Lobby Level) General—Natural Products, Peptides, and Nucleosides S. W. Schneller, Presiding 9:00—5. Isolation, Characterization, and Chemical Modifications of Trichothecenes. B. B. Jarvis, G. P. Stahly, G. Pavanasasivam, J. 0. Midiwo, T. DeSilva, C. E. Holmlund, E. Mazzola, R. Geoghegan. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—6. The Isolation and Structure Deter­ mination of a Tumor Inhibitory Siderophore From Epicoccum Purpurascens. C. B. Frederick, P. J. Szaniszlo, M. D. Bentley, W. Shive. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—7. New Terpenoids From Marine Coelenterates: Comparative Biochemistry of Gorgonian Species. Y. Gopichand, F. J. Schmitz, L. S. Ciereszko, M. B. Hossain, D. van der Helm, P. Schmidt. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—8. Structure Determination of the Active Sulfhydryl Reagent in Gill Tissue of the Mushroom, Agaricus Bisporus. P. D. Mize, C. W. Anderson, P. W. Jeffs, K. Boekelheide, D. G. Graham. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—9. Synthesis of Several Growth Tripeptides. B. Weinstein, W. J. Loker, S. M. Lovejoy, E. Y. Kwa. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—10. Hexafluoro-2-propyl Esters in Peptide Synthesis. L. S. Trzupek, A. Go, K. D. Kopple. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—11. A Reinvestigation of the Reaction Between m-Chloro-perbenzoic Acid and Nucleosides. E. K. Ryu, M. MacCoss. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—12. Phosphorylation of Nucleosides in Amide Solvents with Dihydrogen Phos­ phate. A. M. Schoffstall. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—13. The Synthesis of Linear-Benzolumazine (A Stretched-Out Analog of Lumazine) and its 7,8-Dimethyl Derivative. W. J. Christ, S. W. Schneller. 11:55—Discussion.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 110 (Lobby Level) General—Stereochemistry and Synthetic Methodology

G. Stacy, Presiding 9:00—14. Resolution of Enantiomers on Chiral Stationary Phases; Examples of Resolutions on a Preparative Scale. J. M. Finn, W. H. Pirkle. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—15. The Resolution of Dextro- and Levomethorphan Via Their Quaternary Am­ monium Salts. Part I. The Stereoselectivity of the Quaternization. E. B. Sheinin, I. W. Wainer, M. A. Tischler. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—16. Asymmetric Induction in Imine Alkylation. R. E. Lyle, J. R. Maloney. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—17. Synthetic Applications of Enolate Anions of Amino Acid Derivatives. L. N. Moreno, K. E. Harding, V. M. Nace. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—18. New C-Alkylation Reactions of Nitro Compounds. P. A. Wade, S. D. Mor­ row, S. A. Hardinger, H. R. Hinney, M. S. Saft, P. D. Vail. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—19. Thallium (I) Promoted Alkylation of α-Formylesters. E. S. Stratford, R. W. Curley, Jr. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—20. An Investigation of the Scope of the Thallium (III) Nitrate Oxidation of 2Pyrazolin-5-ones to o-./S-Acetylenic and -Allenic Esters. I. J. Turchi, E. C. Taylor, R. L. Robey, E. C. Bigham, A. McKillop 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—21. A New Method for a-Methylenation of Lactones. B. A. Clement, Κ. Ε. Harding.

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 107 (Lobby Level) General—Synthesis—Alkaloids J. Whitsell, Presiding 2:00—23. Total Synthesis of (±) Sesbanine. A. S. Kende, T. P. Demuth. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—24. Total Synthesis Refutes the Pos­ tulated Structure of Leucogenenol. R. G. Salomon, M. F. Salomon, M. G. Zagorski, J. M. Reuter, D. J. Coughlin. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—25. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Pumiliotoxin-A Alkaloids From L-Proline. K. L Bell, L. E. Overman. 3:00—26. Regioselective Reversal; Intra- Vs. Intermolecular (4 + 2) Cycloaddition Re­ actions of N-Carbethoxydienamide With «.^-Unsaturated Esters. K. Tomita, D. T. Witiak. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—27. Novel Intramolecular (4 + 2) Cycloaddition Reactions of Enamines and Enamides. C. Tu, S. F. Martin, T. Chou. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—28. Synthesis of Dehydrosecodine Analogs. R. M. Wilson, R. A. Farr, D. J. Burlett. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—29. A General Synthesis of 6-H-Pyrido(4,3-b)Carbazole Alkaloids. R. B. Miller, T. Moock. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—30. Synthesis and Reactions of the Ellipticine Reissert Compound. S. Veeraraghavan, F. D. Popp. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—31. Total Synthesis of (±)-Chelidonine. M. Cushman, T.-C. Choong, J. T. Valko, M. P. Koleck. 4:55—Discussion.

Section B Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 106 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Phase Transfer Catalysis C. L. Liotta, Presiding 2:00—32. Effects of Catalyst Structure in Phase Transfer Catalysis. C. M. Starks. 2:45—33. Polyethers and Other Multidentate Ligands for Phase Transfer Catalysis of Aryldiazonium Salt Reactions. R. A. Bartsch. 3:30—34. Synthetic Applications of Potas­ sium Phosphides. B. A. O'Brian, C. L. Lotta. 4:00—35. Unusual Reactions of Dichlorocarbene Under Phase Transfer Catalysis Conditions. W. P. Weber. 4:30—36. Some Industrial Applications of Phase Transfer Catalysis. H. H. Freedman, A.T. Au.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 110 (Lobby Level) General—Reaction Mechanics M. A. Fox, Presiding 2:00—37. The Effect of an α-Cyano Group on Solvolytic Reactivity. P. G. Gassman, J. J. Talley. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—38. Mechanism of the Acid Catalyzed Cis-trans Isomerization of 1,2-Diarylcyclopropanes. L. A. Flippin, C. H. DePuy. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—39. Preparation and Reactions of Propargyl Silanes. P. E. Peterson, A. Despo, S. K. Chiu, T. Flood. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—40. Mechanism of Reaction of Dimethylsilylene with «.^-Unsaturated Ep­ oxides. D. Tzeng, W. P. Weber. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—41. Oxidation of Alkyl Iodides. R. I. Davidson, P. J. Kropp.

3:35—Discussion. 3:40—42. The Cleavage of Organometallics With Methanesulfonyl Peroxide. R. V. Hoffman, D. D. Davis, F. U. Ahmed. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—43. Diacylation of Olefins and Cyclopropanes Catalyzed by Pt(IV) Compounds. Comparison With Other Catalysts. D. Fârcasiu, R. V. Kastrup, C. S. Hsu, D. B. Brown, Β. Μ. Cushman. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—44. An Organic Analogy for Organoiron Cations. W. C. Herndon, I. Agranat. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—45. Dihydrofurans From Hydroxyallenes and Dicarbonyl-?75-Cyclopentadienyl-772-lsobutylene Iron Cation. D. F. Marten. 4:55—Discussion. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 107 (Lobby Level) ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry Symposium

P. G. Gassman, Presiding 9:00—46. Sigmatropic Rearrangements: Applications to Natural Products Syntheses. F. E. Ziegler, J. J. Piwinski. 9:40—47. Studies Directed Toward the Total Synthesis of Antibiotics. S. Hanessian. 10:20—48. Studies on the Synthesis of Boromycin. J. D. White. 11:00—49. Award Address. (ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry sponsored by Aldrich Chemical Co., Inc.). Recent Developments in the Chemistry of Natural Products. Y. Kishi. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 114 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Phase Transfer Catalysis C. L. Liotta, Presiding 9:00—50. Application of Phase Transfer and Related Phenomena in Synthetic Trans­ formations. G. W. Gokel. 9:45—51. Synthesis of Hindered Amines from Phase-Transfer Catalyzed Reactions. J. T. Lai, P. N. Son, J. C. Westfahl. 10:30—52. Triphasé Catalysis. S. L. Regen, J. J. Besse, C. Barcelon, D. Bolikal, N. Otani, S. Quici. 11:15—53. The Role of the Polymer in Polymer-Supported Phase Transfer Catalysis. W. T. Ford, M. Tomoi.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 110 (Lobby Level) General—Physical Organic

W. Herndon, Presiding 9:00—54. H-D Isotope Effects in Addition Reactions to 1,1-Disubstituted Aliènes. D. J. Pasto, S. E. Warren. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—55. Regio- and Stereoselectivity in the Ene Reaction of N-Pheny 1-1,2,4-Triazoline-3,5-Dione with α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Substrates. T. R. Hoye, K. J. Bottorff, A. J. Caruso, J. F. Dellaria. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—56. Thermal Isomerization of trans1-lsopropenyl-4-Methylene-sp/ro(2.x)AIkanes to 1-Methylene-2-(3'-Methylbut2'-enyl)-Cycloalk-2-enes. Homodienyl Hy­ drogen Shift Favored Over Cope Reactions. S. Sarel, A. Schlossman, M. Langbeheim. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—57. The Chemistry of Malonic Anhy­ drides. C. L. Perrin, S. Elliott, T. Arrhenius, J. Roque, J. Rosenberg. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—58. Reaction of the Diboroacetates of Amino- and Hydroxy-1,4-Disubstituted Anthraquinones with Five- and Six-Membered Ring Dienes. A. J. H. Mercer, A. M. Birch, C. W. Greenhalgh. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—59. Mechanism of Amine Catalyzed Fragmentation of 2,3-Dioxabicyclo(2.2.1)Heptane, The Prostaglandin Endoperoxide Nucleus. M. G. Zagorski, R. G. Salomon. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—60. On the Question of Carbonyl Oxide Versus Dioxirane Intermediates in the Thermal Transformations of Furan Endoperoxides. A. Rodriguez, W. Adam. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—61. Synthesis and Structure of (1: 2,9:10)Bismethano(2.2) Paracyclophanes. E. A. Truesdale, &. S. Hutton, J. Bern­ stein.

11:35—Discussion. 11:40—62. Microwave Structure of Spiro(2.4)Hepta-4,6-Diene. Evidence for a Significant Cyclopropyl Donor Effect. S. W. Staley, A. E. Howard, M. D. Harmony, S. N. Mathur, M. Kattija-Ari, J. I. Choe. 11:55—Discussion. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 107 (Lobby Level) General—Synthesis—Terpenes

A. Ter nay, Presiding 2:00—63. An Efficient Synthetic Approach to Modhephene: A Novel Sesquiterpene. A. B. Smith, III, P. J. Jerris. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—64. Total Synthesis of (±)-lsocomene. M. C. Pirrung. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—65. Studies Directed Toward the Total Synthesis of Pentalenolactone. F. Plavac, C. H. Heathcock. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—66. The Synthesis of Obtusilactones and Related a-Alkylidene-/3-Hydroxybutyrolactone Natural Products. S. W. Rollinson, J. A. Katzenellenbogen. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—67. A Method for the Rapid Construc­ tion of Readily Functionalizable Tetrahydrofurans. J. E. Semple, M. M. Joullié. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—68. Studies on the Synthesis of Analogues of Daunomycinone. D. M. S. Wheeler, D. J. Crouse, S. L. Hurlbut, S. K. Basu. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—69. Synthesis of Acorenone Via Arene Chromium Complexes. A. Yamashita, M. F. Semmelhack. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—70. Synthesis of 11a-Carbathromboxane A2. K. M. Maxey, G. L. Bundy. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—71. Prostaglandin Macrolides. N. Subramanian, N. H. Andersen, S. Imamoto. 4:55—Discussion. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 106 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Metalations in Synthesis Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

H. W. Gschwend, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—72. Directed Metalation of Aromatic Systems. D. W. Slocum, D. Sugarman, P. Gierer, W. Ackermann, I. Herod. 2:55—73. Ortho-Lithiated Tertiary Benzamides in Organic Synthesis. V. Snieckus, S. O. de Suva, M. Watanabe. 3:45—74. Locoselective Lithiations of Vinylic, Alkyl, and Cyclopropyl Groups Proximate to the Sulfone Linkage. J. J. Eisch, J. E. Galle.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 110 (Lobby Level) General—Physical Organic

R. V. Hoffman, Presiding 2:00—75. Determination of the Relative Reactivities of Hydroxide Ion and Water in Adding to an Aryne to Give the Same Phe­ nolic Product. J. F. Bunnett, M. Zoratti. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—76. Evidence for a Hydroxyl Directing Effect in the Dichlorocarbene Addition to 2-Cycloalkenols. R. H. Ellison. 2:35—Discussion. »2:40—77. Ion Pair Acidities of Sulfones. G. W. Schriver, A. Streitwieser, Jr. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—78. The System: Alkehyde-ThiolMonothiohemiacetal in Acetic Acid. J. A. Walsh, R. J. Valus. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—79. Equilibrium Studies of Thiol and Water Addition to Ketones. T. J. Burkey, R. C. Fahey. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—80. Conformational Analysis of 1,4Dihydrobenzenes and Related Compounds. L. E. Hardee, D. J. Raber. 3:55—Discussion.

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

71

I

4:00—81. Conformational Influence of Nonacyl Groups in X = C — Y Carboxylic Acid Derivative Systems (X = 0 or S; Y = 0, S, or Ν). J. P. Idoux, W. E. Puckett, G. R. Baker, S. K. Knudson, G. E. Kiefer. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—82. Barriers and Pathways for the Three-Methylene Bridge Inversion in Bicyclo[3.m.n]Alkanes. Empirical Force Field Calculations. D. Farcasiu. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—83. Absorption Spectral Investigation of the Molecular Association of Retinyl Polyenes. W. H. Waddell, K. Chihara. 4:55—Discussion. WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 107 (Lobby Level) Ernest Guenther Award Symposium R. M. Coates, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—84. Jatrophone, An Architecturally Interesting Synthetic Target. A. B. Smith, III. 9:40—Discussion. 9:45—85. Thermal Rearrangement of 1,2Divinylcyclopropane Systems: Applications to Organic Synthesis. E. Piers. 10:20—Discussion. 10:25—86. Terpene Synthesis. E. Wenkert. 11:00—Discussion. 11:05—87. Award Address. (The Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Es­ sential Oils and Related Products sponsored by Fritzsche Dodge & Olcott Inc.). Aspects of Longifolene, Isolongifolene Chemistry. S. Dev.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 114 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Metalations in Synthesis Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry

P. Magnus, Presiding 9:00—88. Synthesis via Palladocyclic Inter­ mediates. R. A. Holton. 9:50—89. α-Alkoxycarbanions for Organic Synthesis. W. C. Still. 10:45—90. Dipole Stabilized Carbanions: Novel and Useful Metalations of Esters, Thioesters, and Amines. P. Beak. 11:35—91. The Synthesis of Tropolones—A Study in the Ortho Functionalization of Aryl Carbonyls. H. R. Rodriguez, J. McKenna, L. Barsky.

Section D I 3:15—Discussion. Symposium on Teaching Laboratory Tech­ niques for Organic Chemistry in Honor of Louis Fieser Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 53) WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 107 (Lobby Level) General—Heterocycles

A. Schoffstall, Presiding 2:00—101. Allosteric Effects in Binding and Transport of Alkali Metal Ions. J. Rebeck, R. V. Wattley. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—102. Nicotinic Acid Crown Ethers: Macrocyclic Lactones From Halonicotinic Acids. G. R. Newkome, T. Kawato. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40-^103. The Reaction of Quinazolines With Phosphorus Nucleophiles. D. M. Mulvey. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—104. Novel Rearrangement of 3-arylamino-1,2,4-Oxadiazoles to 2-Aryl1,2,4-Triazolin-3-ones. S. S. Jones. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—105. Heterocycles From Substituted Amides. IX 4,5-Dihydro-1,2,4-Triazin6(1H)ones From 2-lsocyanoacetates and Hydrazine. K. L. Leschinsky, J. P. Chupp. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—106. The Synthesis of 6-Amino-1HPyrrolo[3,2-c]Pyridin-4(5H)-one (3,7-Dideazaguanine) and its N-1 Benzyl and N-1 Methyl Derivatives. S. W. Schneller, J.-K. Luo, R. S. Hosmane, R. Durrfeld, M. W. Rapp. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—107. Diphosphines Derived from Phosphole Oxide Dimers and their Unusual NMR Properties. K. A. Mesch, L. D. Quin. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—108. Phosphidolin-3-one. A Useful In­ termediate for Phosphindole Synthesis. T. M. Balthazor. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—109. Carbon-Phosphorus Heterocy­ cles. Structural Analysis of 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-4-Dimethyl-1-Phenylphosphinolinium Hexafluorophosphate and 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-1 -Ethyl-4-Methyl-1 -Pheny Iphosphinolium Hexafluorophosphate. A Novel Co-Crystallization of the Former. K. D. Berlin, R. Fink, D. van der Helm. 4:55—Discussion.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 110 (Lobby Level) General—Synthetic Methodology

S. K. Chung, Presiding 9:00—92. Synthesis of Diethyl Allylmalonates From Olefins. S. Pardo, R. G. Salomon. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—93. Synthesis of 2-Substituted Acrylates and ix-Methylene-7-Butyrolactones via Claisen Ortho Ester Rearrangement. S. Raucher, K.-J. Hwang, J. E. Macdonald. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—94. Palladium Catalyzed Preparation of 1-aza-spirocycles. S. A. Godleski. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—95. Ring Closures Via Olefin Capture of Positive Nitrogen. R. E. Gawley, E. J. Termine. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—96. Stereospecific 2H-Azirine For­ mation From the Modified Neber Reaction of Oxime Carbamates. H. G. Corkins, L. Storace, E. Osgood. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—97. Remarkable Solvent Control of Functional Group Selectivity in Complex Metal Hydride Reductions. S. Krishnamurthy. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—98. Rapid Reaction of Trialkylboranes With Lithium Aluminum Hydride in the Presence of Triethylenediamine. Facile and Quantitative Synthesis of Lithium Trialkylborohydrides Including Derivatives With Exceptionally Large Steric Requirements. J. L. Hubbard, H. C. Brown, B. Singaram. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—99. L-Selectride Reduction of Uracil and Orotic Acid Derivatives. N. G. Kundu, S. J. Hannon, R. P. Hertzberg, R. S. Bhatt, C. Heidelberger. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—100. A Simple and Convenient Syn­ thesis of /3-lodoketones. J. N. Marx. 11:55—Discussion.

72

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 106 (Lobby Level) Symposium on Metalations in Synthesis Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry H. W. Gschwend, Presiding 2:00—110. Selectivities in Transformations of Highly Reactive Organometallic Com­ pounds. D. Seebach. 3:00—111. Applications of Metalated Vinyl Ethers to Organic Synthesis. R. K. Boeckman, Jr. 3:50—112. New Methods for New Molecules. P. D. Magnus, D. Gange, G. Roy, Ε. Ehlinger. Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 110 (Lobby Level) General—Physical Organic

C. Venier, Presiding 2:00—113. Orientation Effects on Intramo­ lecular Catalysis by Carboxylate. R. D. Gandour, S. R. Mani, R. J. Blanco, F. L. Wiseman, B. J. Williams. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—114. The Transamination of 9-Fluorenone-1-Carboxylic Acid and Benzylamines. C. A. Panetta, A. S. Dixit. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—115. Dehydrohalogenation by Complex Base. Preferential Loss of "Poorer" Leaving Groups. R. A. Bartsch, J. G. Lee. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—116. A Kinetic and Carbon-14 Isotope Effect Study of the Base Promoted Dehydrochlorination of Substituted 1-Phenylethyl Chlorides. A. Fry, T. Hasan.

3:20—117. Transition State Structures in Imine-Forming Eliminations. E. L. Belfoure, R. V. Hoffman. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—118. Transmission of Substituent Ef­ fects in Thiophenes. Infrared and Carbon13 NMR Studies. D. W. Boykin, M. Janda, A. Perjessy. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—119. Tautomerisation of Heterocyclic Ketones. R. A. M. O'Ferrall, G. Fukata, M. Murphy. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—120. A Study of the Structures of Some Leuco-1,4-Diaminoanthraquinones by 13C NMR Spectroscopy. A. J. H. Mercer, A. M. Birch. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—121. γ-Substituent Effects for Vicinal Spin-Spin Coupling Constants Involving 13 C: Non-Bonded Interactions. J. L. Mar­ shall, E. D. Canada, Jr., M. Barfield. 4:55—Discussion. THURSDAY MORNING

10:15—Discussion. 10:20—135. The Facile Reaction of Dibenezenesulfenimide and Benzoyl Perox­ ide. D. F. Church, W. A. Pryor. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—136. Radicals Produced From Thermochemical and Photochemical Decom­ position of Nitroaromatics. L. P. Davis, J. S. Wilkes, H. L. Pugh, R. C. Dorey, R. M. Guidry. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—137. Free Radicals In Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reactions. E. J. Fendler, S. N. Rosenthal, D. C. Borg, J. J. Elmore, Jr. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—138. Reduction and Substitution in the Reaction of 4-Chloronitrobenzene With Alkoxides. G. Scorrano, A. Bassani, M. Prato, P. Rampazzo, U. Quintily. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—139. Solvent Modified Reactivity of Dimethylsilylene. K. P. Steele, W. P. Weber. 11:55—Discussion.

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 107 (Lobby Level) General—Organometallics

J. Rebek, Presiding 9:00—122. Competitive Syn and Anti Deprotonation of Dimethylhydrazones by Lithium Amide Bases. J. W. Ludwig, D. E. Bergbreiter, M. Newcomb. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—123. Stabilities of Stereoisomeric Imine Anions. K. N. Houk, R. W. Strozier, N. G. Rondan, R. R. Fraser, N. ChuaquiOffermans. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—124. Metallation of 1,3-Dithiolanes: Mercaptan Synthesis and Carbonyl Trans­ position. S. R. Wilson, G. M. Georgiadis, H. N. Khatri, J. E. Bartmess. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—125. Reductive Lithiation of Some Thioketals Using Lithium 1-(Dimethylamino)Naphthalenide. T. Cohen, J. R. Matz. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—126. Reductive Cleavage of 9,9Disubstituted Fluorenes by Potassium in Dimethoxyethane. T. D. Walsh, T. L. Megremis. 10:35—Discussion 10:40—127. Conjugate Addition of AlkylCalienni. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—128. Six-Membered Ring Formation Via Conjugate Addition/Alkylation of Functionalized Aryllithium Reagents. Syn­ thesis of Tricyclic Systems. J. Ponton, P. Helquist, P. L. Fuchs. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—129. A Facile Synthesis of 8-Substituted Quinolines. J. W. Suggs, G. D. N. Pearson. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—130. The Synthesis and Reactions of Some α-Carbo-Functional Organosilanes. G. L. Larson, S. Sandoval, R. Argiielles, I. Montes, R. Seda. 11:55—Discussion.

Section C Symposium on Teaching Laboratory Tech­ niques for Organic Chemistry in Honor of Louis Fieser Joint with Division of Chemical Education, Inc. (see page 53) THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 107 (Lobby Level) General—Photochemistry

M. Newcomb, Presiding 2:00—140. Photochemical Reactions of Benzene and Simple Derivatives With Furans and Cyclic 1,3-Dienes. T. S. Cantrell. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—141. Photochemical Preparation of a [3.1]Metacyclophane and [3.2]Metaparacyclophane. C.-l. Lin, P. Singh, E. F. Ullman. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—142. The Photoalkylation of s-Triazolo [4,3-6] Pyridazine With Alcohols and Glycols. J. S. Bradshaw, D. H. Bown. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—143. Photocycloadditions to Activated Indoles. P. D. Davis, D. C. Neckers. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—144. Synthesis of the Alleged Genipic Acid by Photoannelation. S. W. Baldwin, M. T. Crimmins. 3:35—Discussion. 3:40—145. The Reductive Photoalkylation of Anthracene. M. A. Fox, I. M. Madany. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—146. Carbanion Photochemistry. Kinetic Control of Product Formation in Reactions of Radicals With Carbanions. L. M. Tolbert. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—147. Novel Photoaddition Reactions of 2-Aryl-1-Pyrrolinium Perchlorates. A. A. Leone, P. S. Mariano. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—148. Mechanistic and Exploratory Aspects of Alcohol and Ether Photoadditions to Imminium Salts. E. Bay, J. Stavinoha, A. Leone, P. S. Mariano. 4:55—Discussion.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 106 (Lobby Level) General—Radicals

R. Gandour, Presiding 9:00—131. 2,3-Benzobicyclo(2.2.2)Oct2-ene-5,7-Diyl Diradical as Common In­ termediate in the Di-7r-Methane Rear­ rangement of 6,7-Benzobicyclo(3.2.1)Octa-2,6-Diene and the Denitrogenation of the Corresponding Tricycloazoalkane. N. Carballeira, W. Adam, O. de Lucchi. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—132. Photochemistry of 2,3-Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-enes. P. S. Engel, C. J. Nalepa. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—133. The Stability of Cis-Bridgehead Diazenes. J. W. Timberlake, P. S. Engel. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—134. Reduction Mechanism of Aryl and Vinyl Bromides With LiAIH4: Evidence for Radical Intermediates. S. K. Chung, F.-F. Chung.

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 106 (Lobby Level) General—Organometallics and Ylids T. Cohen, Presiding 2:00—149. Masked Acyl Carbanion. Reac­ tions of Lithium Aldimine. M. J. Marks, H. M. Walborsky. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—150. Dimethyl Diazomethylphosphonate: A Novel Formyl Anion Equivalent. J. C. Gilbert, U. Weerasooriya. 2:35—Discussion. 2:40—151. Rotational Barriers in 9-Naphthylmethylenecyclooctatrienyl Anions. C. K. Dustman, G. E. Linkowski, S. W. Staley. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—152. Electrochemistry of 1-Phenylallene (1-Phenylpropadiene). D. G. Peters, T. R. Chen, M. R. Anderson, S. Grossman. 3:15—Discussion. 3:20—153. Synthesis of (2,4,6-Cycloheptatrien-1-ylidene) Methyl Triphenylphosphonium Tetrafluoroborate: A Strongly Stabi­ lized Ylide? G. Guadiano, G. Cavicchio, P. P. Ponti. 3:35—Discussion.

5 3:40—154. Thermal Reactions of Carbonyl Ylides Derived From Oxabicyclopentanes. T. H. Kinstle, D. E. Hazlett. 3:55—Discussion. 4:00—155. The Electronic Structure of the Simplest Ylides of Nitrogen, Oxygen, Phosphorus, and Sulfur. D. A. Dixon, R. A. Eades, P. G. Gassman, T. H. Dunning, Jr. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—156. Reaction of O-Diiodobenzene With Alkynes and Nickel Carbonyl. Syn­ thesis of Substituted Indenones. L. S. Liebeskind, M. S. South. 4:35—Discussion. 4:40—157. The Reaction of Molybdenum Atoms With Tetrahydrothiophene and Thietane. S. S. Yun, A. Reid, T. R. Webb, P. B. Shevlin. 4:55—Discussion. FRIDAY MORNING

11:15—Discussion. 11:20—173. Reductive Methylation of Polycyclic Aromatic Quinones. M. Konieczny, R. G. Harvey. 11:35—Discussion. 11:40—174. Synthesis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Via a Novel Two-Step Annealation Method. K. B. Sukumaran, R. G. Harvey. 11:55—Discussion.

ORPL

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 107 (Lobby Level) General—Excited States and Oxidations

M. Willcott, Presiding 9:00—158. The Photolysis of 1-Benzyloxy1,2,3-Benzotriazole. M. P. Serve, W. A. Feld, R. J. Paessun. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—159. Exciplexes Vs. Excited Charge Transfer Complexes. Photoproducts From Selective Production of Both Species. W. R. Cherry. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—160. Fluorescer-Enhanced Chemiluminescence of a Cyclic Peroxalate Via Electron Exchange. C. Cadilla, W. Adam, O. Cueto, L. O. Rodriguez. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—161. On the Mechanism of the Photoreaction of Acylsilanes With Alcohols and Phenylsilane. P. D. Davis, R. A. Bourque, J. C. Dalton. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—162. Substituent and Solvent Effects on the Photooxidation of Aryl Substituted Disilanes. R. E. Swaim, W. P. Weber. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—163. Singlet Oxygenation of Ketene Acetals: Formation of 1,2-Dioxetanes and Their Thermal Rearrangement to cx-Peroxy Esters. F. Yany, W. Adam, J. Del Fierro, F. Quiroz. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—164. The Oxidative Carbonylation of Methanol Using Quinone Oxidants. R. J. Radel, J. M. Sullivan. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—165. Pulse Radiolysis of Solid Poly1-Vinylnaphthalene. R. Liang, A. Gupta, S. Di Stefano, J. Moacanin. 11:35—Discussion.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 106 (Lobby Level) General—Benzeneoid Aromatics

H. L. Kohn, Presiding 9:00—166. Intramolecular Friedel-Crafts Alkylations. I. An Efficient Synthesis of Bi­ ologically Active 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinolines. C. B. Spainhour, Jr. W. L. Mendelson, S. S. Jones, B. L. Lam, K. L. Wert. 9:15—Discussion. 9:20—167. Highly Regio- and Stereospecific Friedel-Crafts Alkylations of Epoxides Via Transannular Ring Closure. S. K. Taylor, D. L. Clark, K. J. Heinz, P. A. McCoy, G. L. Olivier, C. D. Westermann. 9:35—Discussion. 9:40—168. Friedel-Crafts Dealkylations of Secondary Heptylbenzenes. R. M. Roberts, L. W. Elrod. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—169. Reorientation and Transalkylation Reactions of Ethylbenzene-1-13C and Ethylbenzene-8-d-|. R. M. Roberts, S. Roengsumran. 10:15—Discussion. 10:20—170. Synthesis and NMR Studies of Phenyl Picryl Ethers. E. J. Fendler, S. N. Rosenthal, E. P. Mazzola. 10:35—Discussion. 10:40—171. Regiospecific Synthesis of Bromojuglone Derivatives. S. W. Heinzman, J. R. Grunwell. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—172. Synthesis of Methoxydibenz[A,H] Anthracene-7,14-Diones Methoxydibenz[A,J] Anthracene-7,14-Diones and Their Hydrocarbon Analogs. G. M. Muschik, T. Kelly, W. B. Manning.

DIVISION OF ORGANIC COATINGS AND PLASTICS CHEMISTRY J. L. Gardon, Chairman M. J. Bowden, Secretary

Section C Hyatt Regency, Cottonwood Suite (3rd Floor) Symposium on Biomedical and Dental Ap­ plications. Session I—Cardiovascular Ap­ plications

C. G. Gebelein, Co-Chairman F. F. Koblitz, Co-Chairman J. M. Anderson, Presiding 9:00—13. The Scope, Problems and Promise of Biomedical Polymers. C. G. Gebelein. 9:15—14. Progressand Problems in Blood Compatible Polymers. R. I. Leininger. 9:55—15. Biolized Intrathoracic Left Ven­ tricular Assist Device for Chronic Human Use. Y. Nose, S. Murabayashi, R. Sukalac, H. Harasaki, K. Ozawa, S. Suwa, R. J. Kirâly. 10:35—16. Elastomeric Vascular Prostheses. D. J. Lyman, K. B. Seifert, H. Knowlton, D. Albo, Jr. 11:00—17. Cell-Lined Materials for Cardiovascular Prostheses. S. G. Eskin, L. T. Navarro, H. D. Sybers, W. O'Bannon, M. E. DeBakey. 11:30—18. Plastic Materials Used for Fabrication of Blood Pumps. M. A. Drummond, T. Akutsu, N. Yamamoto. Section D

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Suite (3rd Floor) Symposium on Interfacial Synthesis. Session I—New Frontiers and Recent Applica­ tions—I

C. E. Carraher, Chairman J. Preston, Co-chairman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Comments on the Status and Future of Interfacial Polycondensation. P. W. Morgan. 9:45—2. Polymerization of Lipid and Lysolipid Like Diacetylenes in Monolayers and Li­ posomes. B. Hupfer, H. H. Hub, H. Ringsdorf. 10:15—3. Interactions of and Regulatory Aspects of Microcapsules for New Animal Drugs. R. G. Arnold. 10:45—4. Interfacial Synthesis in the Prep­ aration of Reverse Osmosis Desalination ' Membranes. J. E. Cadotte, R. J. Majerle, R. S. King, R. J. Petersen. 11:15—5. Synthesis of Titanium Polyoximines Using the Interfacial Technique. C. E. Carraher, Jr., (.. P. Torre. 11:40—6. Titanium Polydyes Derived from Phenylsulfophthalein Dyes, and Nigrosine, Eriochrome Black Τ and Indigo Carmine. C. E. Carraher, Jr., R. A. Schwarz, M. Schwarz, J. A. Schroeder.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Suite (4th Floor) Borden Award Symposium Honoring J. W. Vanderhoff: Polymer Colloids—Session I G. W. Poehlein, Chairman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—7. Award Address. (ACS Award in the Chemistry of Plastics and Coatings spon­ sored by Borden Foundation, Inc.) WellCharacterized Monodisperse Polystyrene Latexes as Model Colloids. J. W. Vand­ erhoff. 9:45—8. Surface Characterization of Poly­ meric Latexes by Gas Adsorption. F. J. Micale, J. W. Vanderhoff, M. S. El-Aasser, A. C. Ying, N. A. Marshall. 10:10—9. Surface and Colloidal Properties of Vinyl Acetate—Butyl Acrylate Copoly­ mer Latexes. M. S. El-Aasser, C. Pichot, T. Makgawinata, J. W. Vanderhoff. 10:35—Intermission. 10:45—10. Studies of Film Formation in Latex Coatings. G. P. Bierwagen. 11:10—11. Factors Influencing the Drying Rate of Latex Films. N. Pramojaney, G. W. Poehlein, J. W. Vanderhoff. 11:35—12. Use of Electron Microscopy in the Characterization of Latexes. Ε. Β. Brad­ ford.

Symposium on Biomedical and Dental Ap­ plications of Polymers. Session II—Dental Applications—I

C. G. Gebelein, Co-chairman F. F. Koblitz, Co-chairman, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. F. F. Koblitz. 2:05—32. Dental Polymers. J. F. Glenn. 2:30—33. Limiting Hardness of Polymer/ Ceramic Composites. D. T. Turner, A. Abell, M. A. Crenshaw. 2:55—34. New Monomers for Use in Den­ tistry. J. M. Antonucci. 3:20—35. The Synthesis of Fluorinated Acrylics via Fluoro Tertiary Alcohols. J. R. Griffith, J. G. O'Rear. 3:45—36. The Nature of the Cross-linked Matrix Found in Dental Composite Filling Materials and Sealants. G. F. Cowperthwaite, J. J. Foy, M. A. Malloy. 4:10—37. Ionic Polymer Gels in Dentistry. A. D. Wilson. 4:35—38. Adsorption and Ionic Crosslinking Phenomena in Polyelectrolyte-based Biomaterials. S. I. Stupp, D. Belton.

Section D Symposium on New Applications for Plastics cosponsored with Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 64) TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Symposium on New Applications for Plastics Cosponsored with Division of Indiictrial and Engineering Chemistry (see page 64)

Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Suite (3rd Floor)

MONDAY AFTERNOON

C E . Carraher,

Symposium on Interfacial Synthesis Session III—Phase Transfer Catalysis

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Suite (3rd Floor) Symposium on Interfacial Synthesis. Session II—New Frontiers and Recent Applications—II

C. E, Carraher, Chairman J. Preston, Co-chairman S. Huang, Presiding 2:00—19. Regular Copolyoxamides by Solution and Liquid-Liquid Interfacial Polymerization. S. Grossman, O. Vogl. 2:30—20. Synthesis of Organosiloxane Block Copolymers via Interfacial. J. S. Riffle, A. Banthia, D. C. Webster, J. E. McGrath. 2:55—21. Synthesis and Characterization of Polyaryl Ether Containing Block Copolymers. A. K. Banthia, D. C. Webster, J. E. McGrath. 3:20—22. Colloid and Interface Effects of Additives in Interfacial Polycondensation. E. Z. Casassa. 3:40—23. Cationic Surfactants in Interfacial Synthesis of Linear Aromatic Polyester. E. Z. Casassa, D-Y Chao, M. Henson. 4:05—24. The Reaction of Vinyl Monomers with Trapped Free Radicals. R. B. Seymour, G. A. Stahl. 4:30—25. N-Methylated Polyamides and Copolyamides. S. J. Huang, J. Kozakiewicz.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Suite (4th Floor) Borden Award Symposium Honoring J. W. Vanderhoff. Session II—Polymer Colloids

G. W. Poehlein, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:35—26. A Theoretical and Experimental Examination of Axial Dispersion in Hydrodynamic Chromatography (HDC). C. A. Silebi, J. P. Viola. 2:00—27. Cationic Structured Particle La­ texes. R. A. Wessling, L. D. Yats, V. E. Meyer. 2:25—28. The Photoinitiated Emulsion Poly­ merization of Styrene—A Feasibility Study. E. D. Sudol, M. S. El-Aasser, F. J. Micale, J. W. Vanderhoff. 2:50—29. Electron Injection from Water into Polymers and Oil Droplets. F. M. Fowkes, F. H. Hielscher. 3:15—Intermission. 3:30—30. Acid-Base Interactions Between Siliceous Fillers and Polymeric Matrixes. J. A. Manson, J. T. Williams. 3:55—31. Emulsifiers and Latexes Charac­ terized by Partial Specific Volumes— Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Polystyrene. F. J. Bonner. Section C Hyatt Regency, Cottonwood Suite (3rd Floor)

J. Preston, W. Feld,

Chairman

Cochairman

Presiding

9:00—39. Syntheses of Some Condensation Polymers by Phase-Transfer-Catalyzed Polycondensation. Y. Imai. 9:40—40. Polymers Containing Crown Ethers. Polyureas from Diisocyanates and 1,10Diaza-18-Crown-6. L. J. Mathias, K. AlJumah. 10:15—41. Chemical Modification of Poly­ mers in Two or Three Phase Systems Through Phase-Transfer Catalysis. J. M. J. Fréchet. 10:50—42. The Phase-Transfer Catalyzed Alkylation of 1-Hydroxybenzotriazole I. Scope. W. A. Feld, R. Paessun, M. P. Serve. 11:20—43. "Homogenizing" Heterogeneous Cataiysts. Preparation, Characterization* and Application of Hydrocarbon-Miscible Metal Oxides. C. U. Pittman, Jr., E. Bak, M. M. Habib, C. H. Holloway, E. A. Lewis. 11:45—44. Ultracentrifugation Studies of the Particle Size Distribution of the "Homogenized" Heterogeneous Catalysts. E. A. Lewis, E. Bak, C. H. Holloway, M. M. Habib, C. U. Pittman, Jr.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Suite (4th Floor) Symposium on Mechanisms of Film Forma­ tion From Powders, Melts and Solutions— Session I J. H. Lupinski, Chairman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—45. The Alignment of Polymers During the Solvent Coating Process. W. M. Prester Jr., D. J. Luca. 9:45—46. Some Aspects of Amine Loss From Water-Soluble Polymer Solutions. P. Kamarchik. 10:15—47. Mechanism and the Mathematical Model of Solvent Cast Film Formation. M. G. Dodin. 10:45—48. A Capillary-Fed Meniscus Coating Technique. C. S. Herrick. 11:15—49. Film Formation from Solutions and Dispersions. C. M. Hansen.

Section C Hyatt Regency, Cottonwood Suite (3rd Floor) Symposium on Biomedical and Dental Ap­ plications of Polymers Session III—Dental Applications—II C. G. Gebelein, Cochairman F. F. Koblitz, Cochairman K. L. DeVries, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. K. L. DeVries. 9:05—50. Polymer Developments in Organic Dental Materials. B. D. Halpern, W. Karo.

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

73

Ι

UJ

fs mm

HI isi|||

È3I [€lyll

9:30—51. Initiator-Accelerator Systems for Acrylic Resins and Composites. G. M. Brauer. 9:55—52. The Application of Photochemistry to Dental Materials. R. J. Kilian. 10:20—53. The Dental Plastics in the Future of Fixed Prosthodontics. J. A. Cornell. 10:45—54. Wear of Dental Restorative Res­ ins. J. M. Powers, P. L. Fan, R. G. Craig. 11:10—55. Friction and Wear of Dental Polymeric Composite Restoratives. K. L. DeVries, M. Knutson, R. Draughn. 11:35—56. Compressive Fatigue of Com­ posite Restorative Materials. R. A. Draughn. Section D

Section D Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structures of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session I: Molecular Charge States in Polymers and Molecular Crystals Cosponsored with Division of Poly­ mer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 79) Section Ε Symposium on History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry and Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 63) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structures of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session I: Molecular Charge States in Polymers and Molecular Crystals Cosponsored with Division of Poly­ mer Chemistry, Inc. {see page 78)

Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Suite (3rd Floor) International Symposium on Photodegradation, Photooxidation and Photostabilization of Organic Coatings. Session I F. H. Winslow, Cochairman S. P. Pappas, Cochairman, Presiding

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

9:00—Introductory Remarks. S. P. Pappas. 9:05—71. UV-Stabilization of Polyamides— Photophysical Studies of UV-Stabilizers, Particularly in the 2-Hydroxyphenyl-Benzotriazole Class. H. E. A. Kramer, T. Wer­ ner, G. Wossner. 9:55—72. Preparation of Polymeric Ultraviolet Stabilizers from Salicylate Esters, Hydroxybenzophenones, a-Cyano-jS-Phenylcinnamates arid Hydroxyphenylbenzotriazoles. D. A. Tirrell. 10:30—73. Photoenolization in Polymers. J. C. Scaiano, J. P. Bays, M. V. Encinas. 11:20—74. Photochemistry of UltravioletStabilizers and Stabilized Polymers. A. Gupta, G. W. Scott, D. Kliger.

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Suite (3rd Floor) Symposium on Interfacial Synthesis Session IV—New Polycondensation Systems C. E. Carraher, J. Preston,

Chairman

Cochairman

D. Karl, Presiding 2:00—57. Polycondensation of Long-chain Esters of «-Amino Acids in Monolayers at Air/Water Interface and in Multilayers on Solid Surface. K. Fukuda, Y. Shibasaki, H. Nakahara. 2:35—58. Polymerization of Substituted Bu­ tadienes at the Gas-Water-Interface. H. Schupp, H. Ringsdorf. 3:10—59. Gas-Liquid Polymerization for the Preparation of Polyoxamides. W. Deits, O. Vogl. 3:45—60. Interfacial Polycondensation in Aqueous and Non-Aqueous Systems. N. Ogata, K. Sanui, T. Onozaki, S. Imanishi. 4:20—61. Polymerizations in Multimolecular Layers. B. Tieke, V. Enkelmann, H. Kapp, G. Lieser, G. Wegner.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Suite (4th Floor) Symposium on Mechanism of Film Formation from Powders, Melts and Solutions. Session II

J. H. Lupinski, Chairman, Presiding 2:00—62. Time Dependent Changes in Some Surface Properties of Polymer Films. H. P. Schreiber, Y. Marineau. 2:30—63. Copolymer Structure Through Charge Injection and X-Ray Photoemission. T. J. Fabish, H. R. Thomas. 3:00—64. Polydimethylsiloxane-Poly(Alkylene Oxide) Block Copolymers as Flow-out Ad­ ditives for Epoxy Resin Powder Coatings. M. J. Owen, M. P. L. Hill. 3:30—65. Chemorheological Studies of Thermosetting Powder Coatings. R. R. Eley, W. H. Guthrie, A. F. Kah. Section C Hyatt Regency, Cottonwood Suite (3rd Floor) Symposium on Biomedical and Dental Ap­ plications of Polymers Sessions IV—Medical Applications C. C. Gebelein, F. F. Koblitz, J. M. Whiteley,

Cochairman Cochairman Presiding

2:00—66. Polymeric Derivatives of 5-Fluorouracil and 6-Methylthiopurine. Chemotherapeutic Polymers. IX. C. G. Gebelein. 2:30—67. Organometallic Polymers as Chemotherapeutic Drug Delivery Agents. C. E. Carraher, Jr. 3:00—68. Antimicrobial and Antiparasitic Polymers. L. G. Donaruma, J. A. Brierley, S. Lockwood, R. Mercogliano, S. Kitoh, R. J. Warner, J. V. Depinto, J. K. Edzwald. 3:45—69. Hydrolytic Degradation of Poly dl-(Lactide). N. S. Mason, C. S. Miles, R. E. Sparks. 4:15—70. Therapeutic Implications of Con­ trolled Drug Delivery. A. Zaffaroni.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Regency Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on New Concepts in Coatings and Plastics Chemistry Session I—Poly­ mer Synthesis and Evaluation R. H. Lalk, Chairman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—75. Effects of Molecular Structures on the Mechanical Properties of Phthalocy-. anines. R. Y. Ting, R. L. Cottington. 9:45—76. An Evaluation of an Acetylene Terminated Sulfone Oligomer. S. Eddy, M. Lucarelli, T. Helminiak, W. Jones, L. Picklesimer. 10:15—77. Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Radiation Polymerized Urethane-Acrylates. L. H. Wadhwa, W. K. Walsh. 10:45—78. Effects of Catalysts on the Rela­ tive Reactivity of Isocyanates. J. E. Kresta, Κ. Η. Hsieh. 11:15—79. The Effect of Solvents on the Copolymerization of Acrylic Acid and Methyl Methacrylate. G. A. Stahl. Section-C Hyatt Regency, Cottonwood Suite (3rd Floor) Symposium on Biomedical and Dental Ap­ plications of Polymers Session V—Biologi­ cally Active Polymers C. G. Gebelein, Cochairman, Presiding F. F. Koblitz, Cochairman 9:00—80. Polymeric Analogs of Nucleic Acids and Nucleosides. J. Pitha. 9:45—81. Biological Properties of High Molecular Weight Carrier Bound Metho­ trexate. J. M. Whiteley. 10:15—82. Solvolysis of p-Nitrophenyl Esters Catalyzed by Polyethylenimine Derivatives. J. A. Pavlisko, C. G. Overberger. 11:00—83. Covalent Bonding of Collagen and Acrylic Polymers. D. R. Lloyd. 11:30—84. Biomedical Applications of Poly(Amido-Amines). P. Ferruti, M. A. Marchisio.

Section D Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structure of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session II: Fundamentals of XPS, UPS, and MO Theory Applied to Polymers Cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 79)

Section Ε Symposium qn History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry and Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64)

74

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Suite (3rd Floor) International Symposium on Photodegradation, Photooxidation and Photostabilization of Organic Coatings. Session II

F. H. Winslow, Cochairman S. P. Pappas, Cochairman, Presiding 2:00—85. Polypropylene Photo-Stabilization by Tetramethylpiperidine Species. D. J. Carlsson, K. H. Chan, D. M. Wiles. 2:40—86. Hindered Amine Light Stabiliz­ ers—A Mechanistic Study. F. Sitek, B. Felder, R. Schumacher. 3:30—87. Interrelationships of the Primary Photophysical Processes and Primary Photodegradative Steps in Some FiberForming Polymers. J. A. Dellinger, P. S. R. Cheung, W. C. Stuckey, C. W. Roberts. 4:00—88. Differential Ultraviolet Spectros­ copy as an Aid in Studying Polycarbonate Photodegradation. J. E. Moore. 4:30—89. Energy Transfer, Photodegradation andPhotoconductivity of Polymers. R. F. Cozzens. 5:00 Divisional Business Meeting. 5:30 Divisional Social Hour (Joint with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc.). Hyatt Regency, Cottonwood Suite. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Regency Room (2nd Floor) Symposium on New Concepts in Coatings and Plastics Chemistry. Session II—Elec­ trically Conductive Polymers and Other Polymer Properties R. H. Lalk, Chairman, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—90. Polymeric Coatings Effect on En­ ergy and Sensitivity of High Explosives. C. O. Pruneda, J. K. Bower, J. R. Kolb. 2:45—91. A New Conjugated Network Poly­ mer as an Electrical Conductor and Ther­ mally Stable Plastic. T. R. Walton. 3:15—92. Effects of Oxygen Upon the Con­ ductivity of Polyacetylene. H. W. Gibson, J. M. Pochan. 3:45—93. New Free-Standing Conductive Substituted Polyacetylene Film. H. W. Gibson, F. C. Bailey, J. M. Pochan, A. J. Epstein, H. Rommelmann. 4:15—94. Analysis of the Gaseous Degra­ dation Products of Electrically and Ther­ mally Stresses Polyethylene. K. D. Wolter, J. Tanaka, J. F. Johnson. 5:00— Divisional Business Meeting, (see Section A for location). 5:30—Divisional Social Hour. Joint with Di­ vision of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see Section A for location). Section C Hyatt Regency, Cottonwood Suite (3rd Floor) Symposium on Biomedical and Dental Ap­ plications of Polymers. Session V I — Biomaterials C. G. Gebelein, F. F. Koblitz, R. I. Leininger,

Cochairman

Section Ε Symposium on History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry and Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64) % THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Suite (3rd Floor) International Symposium on Photodeg­ radation, Photooxidation and Photostabilization of Organic Coatings. Session III F. H. Winslow, Cochairman, S. P. Pappas,

Presiding

Cochairman

9:00—100. Photostabilization of Bisphenol A-Epichlorohydrin Condensation Polymers. Fluorescence and Model Compound Stud­ ies. S. P. Pappas, E. L. Breskman, L. Gatechair, R. M. Fischer, U. K. A. Klein. 9:30—101. Photochemistry of N-Arylcarbamates. C. E. Hoyle, T. B. Garrett, J. E. Herweh. 10:20—102. Effect of Metal Salts on the Photoactivity of Titanium Dioxide: Stabili­ zation and Sensitization Processes. G. Irick, Jr., G. C. Newland, R. H. S. Wang. 10:50—103. The Chemical Nature of Chalk­ ing in the Presence of Ti0 2 Pigments. H. G. Volz, G. Kaempf, H. G. Fitzky, A.' Klaeren. 11:30—104. Degradation of Urethane Coat­ ings Exposed to Accelerated and Natural Weathering Conditions. R. D. Baker. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Suite (4th Floor) Symposium on New Concepts in Coatings and Plastics Chemistry. Session III—Polymer Studies at Transition Temperatures R. H. Lalk, Chairman, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—105. Influence of the Braid on Transi­ tion Temperatures as Obtained by Torsional Braid Analysis. S. Hedvat. 9:45—106. A Molecular Interpretation of TN, the Rubbery-Viscous "Transition" Tem­ perature of Amorphous Polymers. S. Hedvat. 10:15—107. Dependence of T^ (T < Tg) and Tu Relaxation Strengths and Temperatures on Tacticity of PMMA's. R. F. Boyer, L. R. Denny, H-G. Elias, J. K. Gillham. 10:45—108. Effect of Thermal History and Solvent on the Τ < Tg Relaxations in Poly(Bisphenol-A Carbonate). K. Varadarajan, R. F. Boyer. 11:15—109. On the Use of Kinetic Equations to Describe Relaxational Characteristics of Quenched Amorphous Polymers. J. P. Ibar.

Section C Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structure of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session III: Applications of Polymer-Surface Analysis Cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (seepage 79)

Cochairman Presiding

2:00—95. The Biocompatibility of Human Implants. J. M. Anderson. 2:45—96. The Status of Olefin-S0 2 Copoly­ mers as Biomaterials. D. N. Gray. 3:15—97. Morphology of Block Copolyurethanes. II. FTIR and ESCA Techniques for Studying Surface Morphology. K. Knutson, D. J. Lyman. 3:45—98. Characterization of a Dextran Hydrogel Wound Dressing. P. Y. Wang, N. Samji. 4:15—99. Glow Discharge Polymer Coated Oxygen Electrodes for Biomedical Appli­ cations. E. W. Hellmuth, A. W. Hahn, M. F. Nichols, A. K. Sharma. 5:00—Divisional Business Meeting, (see Section A for location) 5:30—Divisional Social Hour. Joint with Di­ vision of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see Section A for location)

Section D Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structure of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session II: Fundamentals of XPS, UPS, and MO Theory Applied to Polymers. Session III: Applications of Poly­ mer Surface Analysis Cosponsored with Di­ vision of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 79)

THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Suite (3rd Floor) International Symposium on Photodeg­ radation, Photooxidation and Photostabili­ zation of Organic Coatings. Session IV

F. H. Winslow, Cochairman, Presiding S. P. Pappas, Cochairman 2:00—110. Singlet Oxygen as an Intermediate in the Catalytic Fading of Dye Mixtures. H. E. A. Kramer, M. W. Rembold. 2:30—111. Oxygen Effect on UV-Curing and Photodegradation of Organic Coatings. C. Decker, M. Fizet, J. Faure. ,; 3:00—112. Photodegradation of Polyvinyl Chloride): A Survey of Recent Studies. W. H. Starnes, Jr. 3:40—113. Photochemical and Thermal Re­ actions of Polyene Sequences Produced During the Degradation of Poly(vinylchloride). E. D. Owen, I. Pasha. 4:10—114. Photochemical Studies of Methacrylate Varnishes for the Conserva­ tion of Museum Objects. R. L. Feller, M. Curran, C. Bailie.

Section B Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structure of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session IV: Spectroscopic Characterization of Molecular Structure at Polymer Interfaces by Optical and Infrared Spectroscopy Cosponsored with Division of Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 80) FRIDAY MORNING Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Suite (3rd Floor) International Symposium on Photodegradation, Photooxidation and Photostabilization of Organic Coatings. Session V F. H. Winslow, Cochairman S. P. Pappas, Cochairman,

Presiding

9:00—115. Photoisomerization of Azo Chromophores as a Probe of Main Chain Motions in Polymeric Solids. L Lamarre, C. S. Paik Sung. 9:30—116. Reflectance Infrared Analysis of Polystyrene Photooxidation. E. Otocka, S. Curran, S. Siggia, R. Porter. 10:00—117. Strain-Enchanced Photodegradation of Polyethylene. D. Benachour, C. E. Rogers. 10:30—118. On the Photodegradation of Poly(MethylMethacrylate-CO-3-Oximino2-Butanone Methacrylate). E. Reichmanis, C. W. Wilkins, Jr., E. A. Chandross. 11:00—119. Halogenated Polymethacrylates for X-Ray Lithography. A. Eranian, A. Couttet, E. Datamanti, J. C. Dubois.

PETR

MONDAY AFTERNOON Section A Sheraton-Houston, Statesman C (2nd Floor) Symposium on Novel Methods of Metal and Heteroatom Removal Joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry

TUESDAY

J. E. Sobel, Presiding

Sheraton-Houston, Statesman C (2nd Floor) Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Divisions of Industrial and Engi­ neering Chemistry and Inorganic Chemistry J. R. Norton, Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—11. Characterization of Heteroaromatics in Coals and Coal Products. R. E. Winans, R. G. Scott, R. L. McBeth, R. Hayatsu. 2:35—12. Characterisation of Vanadium Porphyrins in Petroleum Residues. A. J. G. Barwise, E. V. Whitehead. 3:05—13. Kinetic Studies on Demetallization of Trivalent Metal Porphin Complexes. W. L. Reynolds, D. Dittenhafer. 3:35—14. Oxidative Demetallization of Pe­ troleum Asphaltenes and Residua. K. A. Gould. 4:00—15. Investigation of the Influence of the Cumene Hydroperoxide on the Decrease of the Metal Contents in the Fractions of Crude Oil. A. Bukowski, E. Gurdzinska.

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A (2nd Floor) Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Divisions of Industrial and Engi­ neering Chemistry and Inorganic Chemistry R. H. Grubbs, Presiding 2:00—16. Conversion of Carbon Monoxide and Hydrogen to Ethylene Glycol. L. Ka­ plan. 2:40-17. Carbon-Carbon Bond Forming Pro­ cesses Mediated by Binuclear OrganoTransition Metal Complexes. R. G. Bergman. 3:20—18. Bridging Methylene Complexes and Their Possible Role in the Fischer-Tropsch Reaction. R. Pettit, C. Sumner. 4:00—19. Carbenoids from Methanol. L. Kim, M. M. Wald, S. G. Brandenberger. 4:20—20. Hydroâcylation and Related Reactions Based on C-H Bond Activation. J. W. Suggs, S. D. Cox.

DIVISION OF PETROLEUM CHEMISTRY INC.

Section C

R. H. Lindquist, Chairman W. V. Bush, Secretary

Symposium on Heterophase Attached Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry {see page 65)

MONDAY MORNING

Section D Symposium on Coal Liquids Upgrading Joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 62)

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Statesman C (2nd Floor) Symposium on Novel Methods of Metal and Heteroatom Removal Joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry J. E. Sobel, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—1. Transition Metal-Mediated Desulfurization of Aromatic Sulfur Compounds. J. J. Eisch, K. R. Im, L. E. Hallenbeck. 9:35—2. Removal of Heteroatoms from the Products of Oil Refinery by Complex For­ mation with Iron Carbonyls. N. S. Nametkin, V. D. Tyurin. 10:05—3. Elimination of Sulphur by Plasma Techniques. H. Suhr. 10:35—4. The Catalytic Desulfurization of Organic Sulfur Compounds over Zeolite Catalysts. M. Sugioka, K. Aomura. 11:05-5. The Effect of Phosphorus and Other Promoters on Cobalt-molybdenum and Nickel-molybdenum Hydrotreating Cata­ lysts. J. J. Stanulonis, L. A. Pedersen. 11:35—6. Removal of Organic Sulfur from Coal. R. A. Meyers. Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A (2nd Floor) Lubrizol Award Symposium Honoring William A. Pryor P. D. Bartlett, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05-7. Award Address. (ACS Award in Pe­ troleum Chemistry sponsored by The Lubizol Corporation). Reactions that Make Radicals, or Even Molecules Split Out Odd Parts. W. A. Pryor. 9:45—8. Electron Isomers in Radical Chain Reactions Succinimidyl and Carboxylate. P. S. Skell, D. D. May. 10:40—9. Structural Factors Influencing Stability in Compounds of Hypervalent Carbon, Silicon, Phosphorus, Sulfur, and Iodine. J. C. Martin. 11:20—10. Thermolysis of Partial Coal Structures: Bibenzyl and Naphthols. M. L. Poutsma.

TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Statesman C (2nd Floor) Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis Joint with Divisions of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry and Inorganic Chemistry

J. W. Suggs, Presiding 9:30—21. Reduction of Acetonitrile on the Face of a Tri-lron Cluster Complex; Excursions into Tri-ruthenium and Tri-osmium Systems. H. D. Kaesz, M. A. Andrews, C. B. Knobler, G. Van Buskirk, R. Szostak, Y. C. Lin, C. E. Strouse. 10:10—22. Chemistry of Metal-Metal Multiple Bonds in Group VI Complexes. M. D. Curtis. 10:50—23. Scope of the Pd-Catalyzed Cyclocarbonylation of Unsaturated Alcohols to α-Substituted Lactones. J. R. Norton. 11:30—24. Hydrocyanation of Cyclopentadiene and Dicyclopentadiene. C. Y. Wu, H. E. Swift. Section Β Symposium on Heterophase Attached Ho­ mogeneous Catalysis Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 65)

Section C Symposium on Coal Liquids Upgrading Joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 62)

AFTERNOON

1:45—Divisional Business Meeting Section A

2:00—25. The Preparation and Character­ ization of Nb, Ta, and W Olefin Matahesis Catalysts. R. R. Schrock, S. Rocklage, J. Wengrovius. 2:40—26. Some d° Organoimido Complexes of the Early Transition Metals. W. A. Nug­ ent, R. L. Harlow. 3:10—27. Oxidative Addition and Reductive Elimination of Carbon-Hydrogen Bonds for Alkyl, Olefin, and Hydride Derivatives of Group IV Metallocenes. J. E. Bercaw. 3:50—28. Novel Anionic Phosphine Transition Metal Hydride Complexes and Their Ap­ plication to the Catalytic Hydrogénation of Polar Organic Compounds. R. A. Grey, G. P. Pez. 4:30—29. A Mechanistic Study of Metallocarborane Catalysis. M. F. Hawthorne.

Section Β Symposium on Heterophase Attached Ho­ mogeneous Catalysis Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 65)

Section C Symposium on Coal Liquids Upgrading Joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 62) WEDNESDAY MORNING Section A Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A (2nd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry for Octane Im­ provement

L. D. Rollmann, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—30. Catalytic Processes Using C 4 Streams for Octane Improvement: Hydroisomerization and MTBE. R. Heck, R. G. McClung, M. P. Witt, O. Webb. 9:30—31. Alcohol Based Fuels for Automo­ tive Engines. H. Menrad. 10:00—32. Gasoline from Alcohol. C. R. Morgan, J. P. Warner, S. Yurchak. 10:25—33. Coproduction of Tertiary Butyl Alcohol and Caustic at a Depolarized Cathode. H. B. Johnson, R. B. Simmons. 10:45—34. A New Class of Non-Metallic Antiknocks. R. J. Hartle, G. M. Singerman.

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Statesman C (2nd Floor) Symposium on Advanced Instrumentation for Analysis of Combustion Products Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry D. L. Hartley, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—35. Molecular Scattering Techniques for Combustion Products Analysis. D. A. Stephenson. 9:35—36. Advanced Laser Methods for Combustion Analysis. R. L. Byer. 10:05—37. Coherent Raman Combustion Diagnostics. P. L. Mattern, L. A. Rahn. 10:35—38. Laser Applications to Combustion Product Analysis: Review of Research at General Motors Research Laboratories. J. C. Tracy. 11:15—39. Magnetically Tunable Atomic Line Molecular Detector: Application to In-Situ Real Time Measurement. T. Hadeishi. 11:45—40. Elemental Analysis of Combustion Products by Neutron Activation. R. E. Heft, R. F. Koszykowski.

Section C E. V. Murphree Award-Symposium Honoring Milton Orchin: Homogeneous Catalysis of Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide Reactions Joint with Division of Industrial and Engi­ neering Chemistry (see page 64)

Section D

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Symposium on Heterophase Attached Ho­ mogeneous Catalysis Joint with Division of Inorganic Chemistry (see page 66)

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A (2nd Floor) Symposium on Chemistry for Octane Im­ provement

L. D. Rollmann, Presiding 2:00—41. The Hydrogénation of Aromatics in the Presence of Sulfur. S. M. Kovach, R. A. Kmecak, G. D. Wilson. 2:25—42. Octane Boosting Potential of Catalytic Processing of Reformate Over Shape Selective Zeolites. W. E. Garwood, Ν. Υ. Chen. 2:55—43. Processes for Gasoline-Blending Ethers: TAME and MTBE. J. D. Chase, Β. Β. Galvez. 3:25—44. Octane Improvement Synergism with Alcohol Mixtures. B. C. Davis, W. H. Douthit. 3:55—45. Ethyl Fuel. H. Beuther, T. P. Kobylinski, G. M. Singerman. 4:20—46. Ethanol—The Octane Improver That Does Not Hurt the Economy. P. Jawetz. 6:30—Divisional Reception. Rice University, Faculty Club. 7:30—Divisional Dinner, Rice University, Faculty Club.

Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Statesman C (2nd Floor) Symposium on Advanced Instrumentation for Analysis of Combustion Products Joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry

P. Hutchinson, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—47. Technique for Measuring the Total Concentration of Gaseous Fixed Nitrogen Species. J. E. Hardy, J. J. Knarr. 2:35—48. An Instrumented Engine for PreKnock Studies. I. L. Goldblatt, N. D. Spaltro., W. H. King Jr. 3:05—49. Diagnostics for the Study of Spray Combustion. M. G. Brown. 3:35—50. Optical Instrumentation for In Situ Particle and Droplet Measurements. W. D. Bachalo, C. F. Hess. 4:05—51. A New Real-Time Monitoring In­ strument for Suspended Particulate Mass Concentration: The TEOM. H. Patashnick, G. Rupprecht, J. C. F. Wang. 4:35—52. In-Situ Real-Time Optical Light Scattering Techniques for Particle Size Measurements in Combustion Exhausts. J. C. F. Wang. 6:30—Divisional Reception, (see Section A for location.) 7:30—Divisional Dinner, (see Section A for location.) THURSDAY MORNING Section A Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A (2nd Floor) Symposium on Surface Studies Related to Petroleum Chemistry Joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry

M. J. Dreiling, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—53. Surface Raman and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy: Applications in Ca­ talysis. G. L. Schrader, B. J. Streusand. 9:35—54. A Simultaneous IR/Kinetic Study of Pt Methanation Catalysts. M. A. Vannice, S. H. Moon, C. C. Twu. 10:05—55. EXAFS Study of Impregnated Ni-Mo/-Alumina Hydrotreating Catalysts. D. W. Blakely, I. Kohatsu, H. F. Harnsberger. 10:35—56. EXAFS Studies of Supported Metal Catalysts. G. H. Via, J. H. Sinfelt, F. W. Lytle. Section Β Symposium on Catalytic Reactions Involving Synthesis Gas Joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 63) THURSDAY AFTERNOON Section A Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A (2nd Floor) Symposium on Surface Studies Related to Petroleum Chemistry Joint with Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry

M. A. Vannice, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—57. Defect Structure and Catalysis— An Update. T. J. Gray. 2:35—58. Sulfur Poisoning of H2 and CO Adsorption on Supported Nickel. C. H. Bartholomew, R. B. Panned. 3:05—59. Regeneration of Metallic Catalysts. H. Windawi, J. R. Katzer. 3:35—60. The Oxidation of Ethylene, Ethane, and Acetylene by Atomic Oxygen on Silver.

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

75

m*- <

ïïm,

S a as

LU

|§î

m

ÏÏM

fil



^Γ3

TO

ir •ι·

i:

Ι. Ε. Wachs, S. R. Keleman. 4:05—61. Surface Studies of the Interaction of Nickel and Antimony on Cracking Cat­ alysts. G. D. Parks, A. M. Schaffer, M. J. Dreiling, C. M. Shiblom. Section Β Symposium on Catalytic Reactions Involving Synthesis Gas Joint with Division of Fuel Chemistry (see page 63)

hi

PHYS

GS he

DIVISION OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY W. A. Lester, Jr. Chairman A. L. Kwiram, SecretaryTreasurer

MONDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 205 (2nd Level) Symposium on Structure of Large Drugs and Biomolecules: Experimental and Theoreti­ c a l — I—Ab Initio Quantum Chemical Meth­ ods for Large Molecules E. Clementi, Presiding 9:00—1. A More Realistic Approach to Computations in Pharmacology. E. Clem­ enti. 9:30—2. Quantum Mechanical Investigations of the Excited Electronic States of Chloro­ phyll and Related Species. G. M. Maggiora. 10:00—3. Ab Initio Computations of MetalPorphine Complexes. H. Kashiwagi, S. Obara, K. Ohno. 10:30—4. Supermolecular Approach to Intermolecular Interactions. A. Pullman. 11:00—5. Ab Initio Studies of the Structure of Metal Porphyrins. A. Dedieu, M. M. Rohmer, A. Veillard. 11:30—6. Non-Empirical Ab-initio MODPOT/VRDO/MERGE Calculations on Car­ cinogens and Other Large Molecules of Biological Significance. J. J. Kaufman, P. C. Hariharan, W. A. Sokalski, H. E. Popkie.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 207 (2nd Level) Symposium on Modern Developments in Spectroscopy—I M. Berry, Presiding 9:00—7. Far Infrared Laser Magnetic Reso­ nance Spectroscopy of Free Radicals. K. M. Evenson, R. J. Saykally. 10:00—8. The Laser Pump-and-Probe Tech­ nique: Spectroscopic Study of Radiationless Transitions. R. N. Zare. 11:00—9. Angular Distribution Effects in Photoemission from Solids. D. A. Shirley. MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 205 (2nd Level) Symposium on Structure of Large Drugs and Biomolecules: Experimental and Theoreti­ cal—II Nucleotides: Intercalation, Stacking, Reactions

B. Pullman, Presiding 2:00—10. Macromolecular Electrostatic Ef­ fects on the Reactivity of Polynucleotide Systems. B. Pullman. 2:35—11. Sequence Specificity of Interca­ lation. R. Rein, R. Garduno, R. L. Ornstein. 3:10—12. Recent Advances in Understanding Nucleic Acid Structure and Function. A. H.-J. Wang, G. J. Quigley, A. Rich. 3:45—13. DNA Dynamics and Drug Interca­ lation. Η. Μ. Sobell.

76

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

4:20—14. Nucleotide Conformations and the Anatomy of Transfer RNA. M. Sundaralingam. 4:50—15. Conformational Behavior of Inter­ calation Complexes with RNA and DNA Fragments. H. M. Berman, H. S. Shieh, S. Neidle.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 207 (2nd Level) Symposium on Modern Developments in Spectroscopy W . Woodruff, Presiding 2:00—16. Pulsed Optical-Optical Double Resonance of the Gerade Excited States of Li 2 . R. A. Bemheim, L. P. Gold, P. B. Kelley, T. Tipton, C. A. Tomczyk, D. K. Veirs. 2:20—17. Three-Level Polarization Spec­ troscopy in Solutions and Vapors. J. R. Andrews, R. M. Hochstrasser. 2:40—18. Time Dependence of CN Internal Energy Distribution Following IR Multiphoton Dissociation of Vinyl Cyanide. C. M. Miller, R. N. Zare. 3:00—19. Laser Induced Fluorescence Studies of the Spgctroscopy.and Photodynamics of C 2 0 (Α 3 Π, and X 3 2 " ) . W. M. Pitts, V. M. Donnelly, A. P. Baronavski, J. R. McDonald. 3:20—20. Hydrodynamic Expansion of Re­ fractory Metals Characterized by Laser Spectroscopy. J. L. Gole, G. J. Green, D. R. Preuss, S. A. Pace. 3:40—21. Non-Equilibrium Product Distribu­ tions and Rapid Energy Transfer Routes Observed in "Multiple Collision" Chemilui minescent Reactions. J. L. Gole, S. A. Pace, A. Hanner. 4:00—22. Structure, Dynamics, and Intra­ molecular Potential Function for Ar«03 and . Ar«S02. J. S. Muenter, R. L. DeLeon, and A. Yokozeki, A. A. Muenter. 4:20—23. Collison-Free Vibrational Redis­ tribution within Si States of Fluorobenzenes. R. A. Coveleski, D. A. Dolson, C. S. Parmenter, Β. Μ. Stone. 4:40—24. Time Delayed Optical Double Resonance in BaO, Accessing States Through Weak Transitions. Ν Furio, J. G. Pruett.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 207 (2nd Level) Symposium on Modern Developments in Spectroscopy—II Irving Langmuir Award Symposium R. Curl, Presiding 9:00—34. Award Address. (The Irving Lang­ muir Award in Chemical Physics sponsored by the General Electric Foundation.) Rota­ tional Spectroscopy of Weakly Bound Molecular Complexes. W. Klemperer. 10:00—35. A New Method for Observing the Rotational Spectra of Weak Molecular Complexes. W. H. Flygare. 11:00—36. Spectroscopic Measures of Vi­ brational Relaxation in Jet-Cooled Polyatomics. R. E. Smalley.

Symposium on Structure of Large Drugs and Biomolecules: Experimental and Theoreti­ cal—IV—Panel Discussion—Structural Data Bases and Drug Design

O. Kennard, Presiding 2:00—55. The Wider Utilization of Crystallo­ graphy Information. O. Kennard. 2:30—56. Design and Application of the Merck Molecular Modeling System (MMMS). G. M. Smith, P. Gund. 3:00—57. Use of the Chemical Information System, CIS, in Drug Design Calculations. A. J. Hopfinger. 3:30—58. Crystallographic and Quantum Chemical Evidence for the Mode of Binding in Radiopharmaceutical Bone Imaging Agents. B. L. Barnett. 4:00—Discussion. 7:00—Divisional Social Hour. Room #208

Section C

Section Β

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 219 (2nd Level) Symposium on Biological Effects of NonIonizing Radiation—I—Molecular Dynamics in Aqueous Solution H. Frôhlich, Presiding

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 207 (2nd Level) Symposium on Modern Developments in Spectroscopy J. Muenter, Presiding

2:00—59. Q Enhancement in the Transient Emission from a Fapry-Perot Cavity. T. J. Balle, W. H. Flygare. 2:20—60. Analysis of Lineshapes from a Fabry-Perot Microwave Spectrometer. E. J. Campbell, L. W. Buxton, T. J. Balle, M. R. Keenan, W. H. Flygare. 2:40—61. Rotational Spectra and Molecular Structure of ArHBr and KrHBr. M. R. Keenan, E. J. Campbell, T. J. Balle, L. W. Buxton, T. K. Minton P. D. Soper, W. H. Flygare. 3:00—62. Photoacoustic Overtone Spec­ troscopy: A Probe of Intramolecular Dy­ Section D namics. K. V. Reddy and M. J. Berry. 3:20—63. Color Center Laser Spectroscopy Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, of Small Free Radicals. G. Litfin, R. F. Curl, Room 220 (2nd Level) Jr., W. Dillenschneider, P. Carrick, C. R. Symposium on Current Topics in Solid State Pollock, F. K. Tittel. 3:40—64. Laser Spectroscopy of Molecular Chemistry—II Ions. T. A. Miller, V. E. Bondybey, T. J. M. Thomas, Presiding Sears. 9:00—41. Excited State Dynamical Processes 4:00—65. Experimental Determination of the in Mixed Molecular Crystals: Picosecond Jahn-Teller Distortion of Symmetrically Photon Echo Experiments. M. D. Fayer. Substituted Benzene Radical Cations. T. 10:00—42. Solids, Spectra and Strain. C. J. Sears, T. A. Miller, V. E. Bondybey. Eckhardt. 4:20—66. Chemiluminescent Reaction Section C 11:00—43. Triboluminescence. J. I. Zink. Channel Opened by Photon Absorption Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, During Collision. P. Hering, P. R. Brooks, R. Room 219 (2nd Level) J Section Ε ! F. Curl, Jr., R. S. Judson, R. S. Lbwe. 4:40—67. Laser Spectroscopy of Small Metal Symposium on Current Topics in Solid State Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Clusters. V. E. Bondybey Chemistry—I Registration Area (Lobby) 7:00 Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for C. J . Eckhardt, Presiding Poster—General—I location.) 9:00—44. Absojute Rate Constant for the 2:00—25. Fractional Charge Transfer, Mott Reaction Ο + 0 2 + M - * 0 3 + M. C. L. Lin, Transition, and Principles of Cohesion in Section C M. T. Leu. Conducting Molecular Crystals. A. N. 9:00—45. Proton Transfer Rates in Nona­ Bloch. Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, queous Solvents Such as Methanol, Ace3:00—26. New Organic Polymeric Metals. R. Room 219 (2nd Level) tonitrile, and Xenon. D. B. Marshall, F. H. Baughman, A. F. Preziosi, D. M. Ivory, Symposium on Biological Effects of NonStrohbusch, Ε. Μ. Eyring. G. G. Miller, L. W. Shacklette, R. R. Ionizing Radiation—II Dielectric and Spec9:00—46. The Kinetics of Vibrational^ Ex­ Chance. ! troscopic Properties of Membrane Systems cited NO Created in Electron Irradiated 4:00—27. Survey of Chemical Phenomena and Biological Tissue N 2 /0 2 Mixtures. B. D. Green, G. E. Cale­ Involving Optical Surface Electromagnetic Ε. Η. Grant, Presiding donia, K. L. Wray. Waves. M. R. Philpott. 9:00—47. Model Calculations on the Moder­ 2:00—68. Dielectric Properties of Biological ated Nuclear Recoil Technique for Mea­ Tissue and Biophysical Mechanisms of TUESDAY MORNING Section A suring Thermal Rate Constants. L. D.. SpiEM-Field Interaction. H. P. Schwan. cer, J. Chang. Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, 2:45—69. Experimental Dielectric Properties 10:00—48. Rate Constants for the Reaction Room 205 (2nd Level) of Membrane Systems. S. Takashima. of Atomic Oxygen with Ethane from 416 to 3:30—70. Experimental Determination of Symposium on Structure of Large Drugs and 1048K Using the DF-RF and FP-RF Tech­ Natural and Model Membrane Dynamics in Biomolecules: Experimental and Theoreti­ niques. T. Tanzawa, R. B. Klemm. the Presence, of External EM Fields by cal—Ill—Crystallography and Theoretical | 10:00—49. A Direct Kinetic Study of the 0(3P) Raman Spectroscopy. J. Sheridan. Calculations + CH4 Reaction over the Temperature 4:15—71. Hodgkin-Huxley Perturbation Model B. Barnett, Presiding Range 474K to 1156K. R. B. Klemm, T. for EM-Field Interaction with Excitable Tanzawa, E. G. Skolnik, J. V. Michael. 9:00—28. Conformational Energy Calcula­ Cellular Membranes. C. A. Cain 10:00—50.Oxidation Mechanism of Small tions on Oligopeptides in the Solid State 7:00—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A Hydrocarbons. W. C. Gardiner, Jr., T. and in Solution. H. A. Scheraga. for location.) Koike, Y. Hidaka. 9:35_29. Molecular Mechanics and Crystal 10:00—51. Kinetics of the Reaction OH + Structure Studies in Drug Design. D. J. Section D Duchamp. H 2 0 2 -* H0 2 + H 2 0. L. F. Keyser. 10:10—30. Some Aspects of Combining Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, 11:00—52. XPS Studies of Species Prepared Theoretical Calculations and Structure Room 220 (2nd Level) on Oxide Surfaces by Silanation and By Analysis. J. Karle. Symposium on Current Topics in Solid State Further Reaction. S. Muralidharan, S. 10:45—31. Carbohydrates: Crystal Structural Becker, N. C. Saha, R. G. Hayes. Chemistry—III and Theoretical Studies. G. A. Jeffrey. 11:00—53. Chemiluminescent Spectra of D. Y. Curtin, Presiding 11:20—32. Molecular Orbital Structures and Group VI Halides. W. G. Thorpe, F. J. Seiler, Comparisons with Experimental Data. J. A. 2:00—72. Growing Points in Solid-State S. J. Davis Pople. Chemistry. J. M. Thomas. 11:00—54. Identification and Atomization 11:50—33. Molecular Orbital Study of Sul­ 3:00—73. Molecular Conformation and Energies of Gaseous Molecules ScC2, fur-Nitrogen and Sulfur-Carbon Conjuga­ Crystal Forces: Quantitative Study by ScC , ScC , ScC and ScC by High Tem­ 3 4 5 6 tion: Mode of Bonding in (SN)x and Related Conformational Polymorphism. J. Bern­ perature Mass Spectrometry. R. Haque, K. Materials. R. C. Haddon, S. R. Wasserman, stein. A. Gingerich. M. L. Kaplan, F. Wudl, G. R. J. Williams. 9:00—37. Dielectric Properties of Water in the Free and Bound State. E. H. Grant, N. R. V. Nightingale, R. J. Sheppard, S. Szwarnowski. 9:45—38. Electrical Response of Polymers in Solution. R. H. Cole. 10:30—39. Dynamics of Peptides and Proteins. M. Karplus. 11:15_40. Experimental Determination of the Vibrational Dynamics of Bipolymers. L. Genzel.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 205 (2nd Level)

4:00—74. The Application of High Resolution 13 C N.M.R. Spectroscopy using "Magic Angle" Spinning Techniques to the Study of Organic Solids. C. A. Fyfe. 7:00 Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location.) Section Ε Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Registration Area (Lobby) Poster-General—II 2:00—75. Interconversion of Ionic Structures: Nitromethane and Methylnitrite Ions. T-C Hsieh, M. J. Weiss, G. G. Meisels. 2:00—76. Localized Atomic Orbitals. Κ. Η. Aufderheide, A. C. Phillips. 2:00—77. Comparison of Fluorescence Be­ havior with CNDO/S Predictions for the Protonation of 2-Aminopyridine. A. C. Testa. 2:00—78. Structural Studies by Combined Quantum Mechanical and Experimental Procedures. L. Schafer. 3:00—79. Parameters for the Methyl Group in Molecular Orbital Calculations. C. Pàrkànyi, W. C. Herndon, A. S. Shawali. 3:00—80. The Overlap Between NMR Theory and the Theory of Interactions in Magnetic Clusters. T. H. Siddall, III, R. L. Flurry, Jr. 3:00—81. Pseudopotential Model Calculations of the Spectrum of Trapped Electrons in Molten Alkali Halides. C. W. Finley, N. R. Kestner. 3:00—82. Derealization of π Bonds in Cyclopentadiene, Furan, and Thiophene. F. R. Corded, J. E. Boggs. 4:00—83. Accurate Computed Structures of Arabinose and Ribose. H. Sellers, J. E. Boggs. 4:00—84. How Reliable are Computed Molecular Structure Determinations at the Hartree-Fock Level? J. E. Boggs. 4:00—85. Inversion Barriers of Molecules of General Formula AX3. D. S. Marynick. 7:00—Divisional Social Hour, (see Section A for location) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section D Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room #220 (2nd Level) Symposium on Current Topics in Solid State Chemistry—IV

R. Silbey, Presiding 9:00—104. Some Recent Developments in Solid State Organic Chemistry. D. Y. Curtin. 10:00—105. Single-Crystal Reactions and Polymorphism in Transition-Metal Phosphine Complexes. K. Cheng, Β. Μ. Foxman, S. W. Gersten, H. Mazurek. 11:00—106. Structure, Extended Defects, and Mechanisms in Inorganic Solid State Re­ actions. L. Eyring.

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 205 (2nd Level) Symposium on Structure of Large Drugs and Biomolecules: Experimental and Theoreti­ cal—V—Structural Correlations in Classes of Significant Molecules . I . Karle, Presiding 9:00—86. Çyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes. W. Saenger. 9:30—87. Chemical-Structural Properties of Tetracycline Derivatives. J. J. Stezowski, R. Prewo. 10:00—88. X-ray Crystallographic Studies of Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and their Derivatives. J. P. Glusker. 10:30—89. Model Systems and the Heme Site in Heme Proteins. J. A. Ibers. 11:00—90. The Molecular Conformation, Receptor Binding, and Activity of Natural, Synthetic and Environmental Estrogens. W. L. Duax. 11:30—91. Conformational Features in Cyclic Peptides in the Crystalline State. I. L. Karle.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 207 (2nd Level) Symposium on the Role of the Electrostatic Potential in Chemistry—I

P. Politzer, Presiding 9:00—92. Molecular Electrostatic Potential of Nucleic Acids. A. Pullman, B. Pullman. 10:00—93. The Role of Molecular Electro­ static Potentials in Understanding the Ver­ satility of Metal Binding to Cytosine and Guanine Derivatives. T. J. Kistenmacher. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—94. Electrostatic Potentials as De­ scriptors of Molecular Reactivity: An Analysis of Some Correct Predictions. H. Weinstein, R. Osman, S. Topiol. 11:45—Discussion.

Section C Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 219 (2nd Level) Symposium on Modern Developments in Spectroscopy

T. Malloy, Presiding

9:00—95. Vibrational Spectra of Boat-Twist Cyclohexane. J. L. Offenbach. 9:20—96. The C-H Stretching Modes of Hy­ drocarbon-Urea Clathrates. R. A. MacPhail, R. G. Snyder, H. L. Strauss. 9:40—97. Overtone Spectra of Cycloalkanes. J. S. Wong, R. A. MacPhail, C. B. Moore, H. L. Strauss. 10:00—98. Direct Observation of Vibrational Resonance Raman Spectra of Electroni­ cally Excited States in Fluid Solution. W. H. Woodruff, R. F. Dallinger, M. A. J. Rodgers. 10:20—99. Spectroscopic Studies of Ozone IR Chemi-Excitation. W. T. Rawlins, G. E. Caledonia. 10:40—100. Electronic Spectroscopy of Vibrationally Excited Polyatomics. D. M. Brenner, K. Brezinsky, P. M. Curtis. 11:00—101. Gas-Phase Band Profiles for High-Resolution Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Spectra. J. Laane, H. Fietz, A. Beckmann, W. Kiefer. 11:20—102. Applications of Raman Differ­ ence Spectroscopy. J. Laane, W. Kiefer. 11:40—103. Interactions of the Ring-Puck­ ering and P-H Inversion Vibrations in 3Phospholene. P. W. Jagodzinski, L. W. Richardson, M. A. Harthcock, J. Laane

Section Ε Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) Symposium on Biological Effects of NonIonizing Radiation—III—Dielectric and Spectroscopic Properties of Non-equilibrium Systems

R. H. Cole, Presiding 9:00—107. Efficiency and Oscillations in Non-equilibrium Chemical and Biological Systems. P. Richter, J. Ross. 9:45—108. Macroscopic Electric Field Effects on Threshold Instabilities and the FieldInduced Selection of Coherent Nonequilibrium Modes in Complex Reaction Sys­ tems. A. D. Nazarea. 10:30—109. Coherent Processes in Biologi­ cal Systems. H. Frôhlich. 11:15—110. Ionic Nonequilibrium Phenomena in Brain Cell Interactions with EM Fields. W. R. Adey.

Section F

11:00—119. Molecular Dynamics of Ferrocytochrome c. S. H. Northrup, M. R. Pear, J. A. McCammon, M. Karplus. 11:00—120. Photoelectron Spectra of Monothio and Dithiooxamides. J. L. Meeks, T. J. Melton, A. Wahlborg, S. P. McGlynn. 11:00—121- On the Question of Mode Specificity in Laser-Induced Reactions. T. G. Anderson, J. Francisco, C. Reiser, J. I. Steinfeld. 11:00—122. Studies on the Ultraviolet Photo Destruction Mechanism of Purine Free Base in Aqueous Solutions at 77K and 298K. R. Arce, E. Rivera.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON Section A Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 205 (2nd Level) Symposium on Structure of Large Drugs and Biomolecules: Experimental and Theoretical—VI—Interactive Graphics and Energetics

4:00—143. (e,2e) Spectroscopy. J. H. Moore, J. A. Tossell, D. S. Hench. 4:20—144. Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy of Silver Electrodes. Halide Adsorption. J. G. Gordon. 4:40—145. Rate Equation Modeling of Multiphoton Ionization: Multiple Ionization Channels. G. J. Fisanick. Section D Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 212 (2nd Level) Symposium on Biological Effects of NonIonizing Radiation—IV—A Prototype Central Nervous Systems Effect. Safety Standards R. Adey, Presiding 2:00—146. The Microwave Acoustic Effect. J. C. Lin. 3:00—147. Criteria for and the Development of Safety Standards for Non-Ionizing Ra­ diation. A. W. Guy. 4:00—Discussion.

G. Marshall, Presiding

Section Ε

2:00—123. Interactive Aids in Three-Dimensional Structure-Activity Studies. G. R. Marshall, M, Zyda, C. Humblet, C. D. Barry, R. A. Dammkoehler. 2:15—124. Macromolecular Surface Graphics; A Tool for Studying the Interaction of Substrates with Proteins or Nucleic Acids. R. J. Feldmann. 2:30—125. Substrate + Receptor Interactions, Cont. G. Cole, E. F. Meyer, Jr. 2:45—126. Interactive Modelling of Homologous Molecules. G. Cole, E. F. Meyer, Jr. 3:00—127. Crystallography Can be Fun. N. Van Opdenbosch, S. M. Swanson, E. F. Meyer, Jr. 3:15_128. An Interactive Molecular Graphics and Energetics Study of Intermolecular Complexes with Peptides. V. Madison, R. J. Feldmann. 3:30—129. The Effect of Geometry and Substitution on the Energies of the Virtual Orbitals of Dit >. J. C. Giordan, J. H. Moore. 3:45—130. Analysis of Noncovalent Interactions Between Peptides as Modelled by Dimers and a Trimer of Formamide. E. L. Mehler. 4:00—131. Opiate Receptor Modeling Based on the Conformational Properties of 4Phenylpiperidine Derivatives. C. M. Humblet, G. R. Marshall. 4:15—Discussion.

Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 207 (2nd Level) Symposium on the Role of the Electrostatic Potential in Chemistry—II

J. A. Pople, Presiding 2:00—132. Energy Component Analysis of Molecular Interactions. K. Morokuma. 3:00—133. Relationships Between Electro­ static Potentials and Other Atomic and Molecular Properties. P. Politzer. 3:30—134. Energies from Electrostatic Po­ tentials at Nuclei. M. Levy, Y. Tal. 4:00—135. Electrostatic Potentials for Elec­ tron Scattering: Test of Theoretical Models Against Experiment. D. G. Truhlar. 4:30—136. Mapping Electrostatic Potentials in Crystals. R. F. Stewart.

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 201 (2nd Level) Poster—General—III 9:00—111. Electronic Transitions in Single Crystals of Hexahelicene. M. E. Jordan, C. J. Eckhardt. 9:00—112. Modulated Piezoreflection Studies Section C of the First Singlet Exciton Transition in Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Crystalline Anthracene. T. E. Anderson, C. Room 219 (2nd Level) J. Eckhardt. 9:00—113. Spectroscopic Investigation of Symposium on Modern Developments in Exciton Polaritons in the Incipient Metallic Spectroscopy Reflector Pararosaniline Perchlorate. J. R. B. Wiseman, Presiding Merski, C. J. Eckhardt. 2:00—137. Evidence for a Metal to Non-Metal 9:00—114. Spectroscopic Study of TTFTransition in Solid Lithium-Cryptate Pow­ TCNQ in the Visible and Ultraviolet. M. E. ders and Films. J. S. Landers, J. L. Dye. Jordan, C. J. Eckhardt. 2:20—138. Picosecond Time and Wavelength 10:00—115. Electronic Spectra of Single Resolved Fluorescence in Salicylidene Crystals of High and Low Temperature Aniline (1). P. F. Barbara, P. M. Rentzepis, Polymorphs of the Anthracene-1,2,4,5L. E. Brus. Tetracyanobenzene (TCNB) 7r-Molecular 2:40—139. Optical Hole-Burning and Fluo­ Complex. K.-H. Brose, C. J. Eckhardt. rescence Line-Narrowing Studies in a 10:00—116. Reflection Spectra of Single Positively Charged Dye. A. R. Gutierrez. Crystals of a Squarylium Dye Used in Or3:00—140. Low-Frequency Vibrational ganic Solar Cells. M. G. Tristani, C. J. EcSpectra of Δ2—Phospholene and khardt. A^Phospholene-l-dv J. Laane, M. Har­ 10:00—117. Studies of the Dipole Moments thcock, J. Villarreal. of Photochemical Transients. R. W. Fes3:20—141. NMR Studies of Acid-Catalyzed senden, P. M. Carton, H. Shimamori, J. C. Proton Exchange in Amidinium Ions. C. L. Scaiano. Perrin, E. R. Johnston. 10:00—118. Vacuum-Ultraviolet (147nm) 3:40—142. The Photoelectron Spectra of Photodecomposition of CF2CICHCI2 and Some Iron Tricarbonyl Complexes of CF3CHCI2. Evidence for Chlorine Atom 4lI-Electron Donor Ligands. S. D. Worley, I Reactions. T. Yano, K. H. Jung, E. I T. R. Webb, D. H. Gibson. Tschuikow-Roux.

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 201 (2nd Level) Poster—General—IV 2:00—148. Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling In­ volving Nitrogen-15. W. S. Brey, P-l Yang, H. J. Jakobsen. 2:00—149. Spectroscopy of MagnesiumAmmonia Matrices. W. K. Dennard, J. J. Lagowski. 2:00—150. ESR Studies of Ion Pair Formation with the Triphenylene Anion Radical. M. T. Jones, R. H. Ahmed. 2:00—151. Matrix Isolation Studies of Pentacoordinate Silicon Anions. B. S. Ault. 2:00—152. Interpretation of Molecular Motion in Polymers by ESR Study of g-Anisotropy. L. Kevan, S. Schlick. 3:00—153. Electron Spin Echo Modulation Study of the Geometry of Solvated Elec­ trons in Ethanol Glass: An Example of a Molecular Dipole Oriented Solvation Shell. M. Narayana, L. Kevan. 3:00—154. Electron Spin Resonance Studies of Silver Atom Solvation in Ethanol-Water Mixtures. A. Li, L. Kevan. 3:00—155. On the Mechanism of CO Pro­ duction from the Reaction of 0(3P) Atoms with Propargyl Chloride and Bromide. G. T. Fujimoto, M. C. Lin, Μ. Β. Umstead. 3:00—156. Iron-Oxygen Interactions in an Argon Matrix. G. Blyholder, S. Chang, J. Fernandez. 3:00—157. Mobilities of Gaseous Ions and Ion-Molecule Interaction Potentials. C. W. Polley, Jr., A. J. lilies, G. G. Meisels. 4:00—158. Detection of Labile Organic Compounds by Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. D. L. Turner, Jr., D. C. Conway. 4:00—159. Electrochemistry of Metal Anions. G. Worley, J. J. Lagowski. 4:00—160. Cooperative Binding and Ionic Effects in the Interaction of Intercalating Ligands with DNA. W. D. Wilson, R. L. Jones, A. N. Gough, I. G. Lopp. 4:00—161. Binding of Alkali Halide Ions to Nucleosides in Mixed Solvents. A. C. Plaush, R. R. Sharp. THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 205 (2nd Level) Symposium on the Role of the Electrostatic Potential in Chemistry—III

A. Pullman, Presiding 9:00—162. Electrostatic Molecular Potential Contour Maps Around Carcinogens, Their Metabolites, Suspected Teratogens and Other Biologically Significant Molecules. J. J. Kaufman, P. C. Hariharan, W. A. Sokalski. 10:00—163. The Use of Electrostatic Po­ tentials to Analyze Hydrogen Bond Strengths and Directionality. P. A. Kollman. 10:30—Intermission. 10:45—164. Use of the Electrostatic Potential as a Guide to Understanding Molecular Properties. J. Tomasi. 11:00—Discussion.

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

77

I ζ

1

Section B

g

I S 03

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 201 (2nd Level) Poster—General—V 9:00—165. The Vibrational Spectra and Structure of Pyruvic Acid. W. J. Ray, J. E. Katon. 9:00—166. Electron Impact Fragmentation and Attachment Cross Sections for 1,1, I-C2CI3F3 and 1,1,2-C2Cl3F3. |. Sauers, L. G. Christophorou, L. C. Frees, D. L. McCorkle. 9:00—167. Vaporization Chemistry and Thermodynamics of the Lead-Indium-Sulfur System. R. Haque, A. S. Gates, J. G. Edwards. 9:00—168. Sublimation of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Coal Fly Ash. D. R. Kalkwarf, S. R. Garcia. 10:00—169. The Influence of Macrocyclic Complexing Agents on Ionic Equilibria in Liquid Ammonia. M. A. Hands, W. J. Peer, J. J. Lagowski. 10:00—170. Mechanical Characteristics of Triboluminescence. B. P. Chandra, J. I. Zink. 10:00—171. Electrochromism of Small Cyclic Sulfides. D. AKenloh, B. R. Russell. 10:00—172. Pressure Effects and Electrochromism: Influence of SF6 on Excited State Properties. G. C. Causley, D. Altenloh, B. R. Russell. 11:00—173. The Effect of Intermolecular Interactions on Vapor Phase Absorption Intensities. J. C. Schander, B. R. Russell. 11:00—174. Heterogeneous Hydrogénation and Hydrogenolysis of Fluorocarbons. Y.-N. Tang, E.-C. Wu, S. D. Witt. 11:00—175. Second-Stage Dissociation of N,N-Bis(2-Hydroxyethyl)-2-Aminoethane Sulfonic Acid (BES) in 10,30 and 50 Mass % Tertiary-Butanol-Water from 5 to 55°C. J. J. Gibbons, R. N. Roy, S. Faszholz, K. Buechter. 11:00—176. Application of Pitzer's Equations on the System HCL + MGCL2 + H 2 0 at Several Different Temperatures. R. N. Roy, · J. J. Gibbons, D. Bliss, R. Casebolt, B. Baker. 11:00—177. Thermodynamic Study of Hydrobromic Acid in 10 and 30% Aqueous Methanol from 5 to 55°C. D. A. Johnson, R. N. Roy, J. J. Gibbons. THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 205 (2nd Level) Symposium on the Role of the Electrostatic Potential in Chemistry—IV—Poster 2:00—178. Polarization Model Applied to Hydrogen Fluoride. C. W. David. 2:00—179. Polarization Model Applied to Peptides. C. W. David. 2:00—180. Adiabatic Polarization Potentials and Polarizabilities for the Water Molecule. Basis Set Dependence. C. H. Douglass, Jr., D. A. Weil, P. A. Charlier, R. A. Eades, D. G. Truhlar, D. A. Dixon. 2:00—181. Nature, Origin and Extent of the Perfluoro and π-Fluoro Effects. D. C. Rosen, P. Politzer, J. F. Liebman. 2:00—182. Effect of Polarization on Atomic Charges when Perturbed Ab Initio Molec­ ular Electrostatic Potentials are Obtained. F. A. Momany. 2:00—183. Polarization Model Applied to Ammonia. P. Turner, C. W. David. Section Β Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 201 (2nd Level) Poster-General—VI 2:00—184. Solubility of Methane in Aqueous Solutions of Triethylenediamine. W.-Y. Wen, J. A. Muccitelli. 2:00—185. Calorimetric Investigations into Liquid Clathrate Behavior. R. D. Rogers, E. A. Lewis, J. L. Atwood. 2:00—186, Huntington's Disease: Evidence of a Cell Membrane Surface Defect. D. A. Butterfield, P. F. Doorley, W. R. Markesbery. 2:00—187. Ultrasonic Absorption in p-Dioxane-Water Mixtures at 11° and 25°. G. Atkinson, S. Rajagopalan, B. L. Atkinson. 3:00—188. Kinetics of Free Radical Decay in Irradiated Polycrystalline L-Leucine. M. Dole, N. Gvozdic, M. Mahdavi, J. Salik. 3:00—189. Interactions of Polar and Nonpolar Molecules with Aromatic Solvents. R. Fuchs, L. A. Peacock. 3:00—190. Solvation Effects on the Basicity of Amines. R. M. Scott, A. Reyes.

78

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

3:00—191. Excess Volumes in the HOHHOD-DOD and the HOH-HOD-DOD-NaCI Systems. W. A. Van Hook, M. K. D. Chaoudhury. 4:00—192. Copper Atom Chemistry. Reac­ tions of Atomic Copper with Molecular Ni­ trogen. R. L. Mowery, D. E. Tevault, and R. R. Smardzewski. 4:00—193. Structure and Thermodynamics of Divalent Cation-Anion Radical Ion Pairs. I. Nieves, L. Echegoyen, G. R. Ste­ venson. 4:00—194. Hydrogen Abstraction from Phe­ nols by ferf-Butoxy Radical and Carbonyl Triplets. P. K. Das, M. V. Encinas, J. C. Scaiano, S. Steenken.

POLY

MONDAY AFTERNOON

DIVISION OF POLYMER CHEMISTRY INC. Ε. Μ. Pearce, Chairman J. E. McGrath, Secretary

MONDAY MORNING

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—10. Acetylene Terminated Imide Oli­ gomers and Polymers Therefrom. P. M. Hergenrother. 9:30—11. High Temperature Enyne Polyimides. B. A. Reinhardt, F. E. Arnold. 9:50—12. Thermal Properties of Wholly Ar­ omatic Polyamides. A. K. Chaudhuri, Β. Υ. Min, E. M. Pearce. 10:10—13. Triaryl-s-triazine Ring Crosslinked High Temperature Polymers—A Status Review. L.-C. Hsu. 10:30—14. Synthesis of Articulated All-Para Benzbisoxazole Polymers. R. C. Evers, F. E. Arnold, T. E. Helminiak. 10:50—15. Fluoroalkyleneether Silicate/ Viton GLT Blends, An Approach Toward Improved Low Temperature Flexibility. A. A. Shaffer, R. E. Cochoy. 11:10—16. The Effect of a High Explosive Environment on Polycarbonate Degrada­ tion. D. M. Hoffman, L. P. Althouse. 11:30—Discussion.

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) International Symposium on Anionic Poly­ merization T. E. Hogen-Esch, Presiding 8:45—Introduction to the Symposium. J. E. McGrath. 9:00—Introductory Remarks. T. E. HogenEsch. 9:05—1. Living and Dormant Polymers. M. Szwarc. 9:50—Discussion. 10:05—2. Ion Pairs and Their Complexes with Ion Coordinating Agents. J. Smid. 10:45—Discussion. 11:00—3. Ion Pair Structure and Stereo­ chemistry in Anionic Oligomerization and Polymerization of Some Vinyl Monomers. T. E. Hogen-Esch, R. Smith. 11:30—Discussion. 11:40—4. Dynamics of Ionic Processes in Low Polar Media. A. P. Persoons. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 3 and 4 (2nd Floor) WHco Award Symposium—Symposium on Polymer Synthesis and Properties K. D. Berlin, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—5. Divinyl Ether-Maleic Anhydride Co­ polymer: Its Structure and Biological Properties. D. S. Breslow. 9:30—Discussion. 9:35—6. The Spontaneous Alternating Copolymerization of 4-Phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione with AZ-Vinylcarbazole and β-Λ/^Carbazolyethyl Vinyl Ether. S. R. Turner. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—7. Circular Dichroism of Polyethylenimine Containing Optically Active Thy­ mine Derivatives as Grafted Pendant. C. G. Overberger, Y. Morishima. 10:20—Discussion. 10:25—Intermission. 10:35—8. Some Recent Studies on High Temperature Polyesters. S. N. Lee, B. J. Lo, B. '. Bulkin, Ε. Μ. Pearce. 10:55—Discussion. 11:00—9. Award Address. (ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry sponsored by Witco Chemical Corporation Foundation). Recent Developments in Cyclopolymerization. G. B. Butler. 11:50—Discussion. Section C Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 5 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Polymers for Unusual Service Conditions Session A—Aerospace Applications P. E. Cassidy, Presiding

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) International Symposium on Anionic Poly­ merization L. J . Fetters, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—17. NMR Characterization of Ion Pair Structures. D. J. Worsfold. 2:35—Discussion. 2:45—18. 13C NMR Study of the Propagating JJve End in the n-BuLi Polymerization of 1,3-Butadiene. A. F. Halasa, V. D. Mochel, G. Fraenkel. 3:15—Discussion. 3:25—19. Photoisomerisation of Allylic Carbanions. R. N. Young. 3:55—Discussion. 4:05—20. Mechanism of Living Anionic Stereospecific Polymerization of 2-vinyl Pyri­ dine. M. Fontanille, A. Soum. 4:35—Discussion. 4:45—21. Use of Cryptâtes in Anionic Polymerization of Heterocyclic Compounds. S. Boileau.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 3 and 4 (2nd Floor) Witco Award Symposium—Symposium on Polymer Synthesis and Properties K. D. Berlin, Presiding 1:30—22. Polymerization of Unsaturated Spiro Ortho Esters by a Free Radical Mechanism. W. J. Bailey, N. Yamazaki, T. Endo. 1:50—Discussion. 1:55—23. Transesterification of Syndiotactic Poly(phenyl methacrylate) with Sodium Methoxide. H. J. Harwood, T. K. Chen. 2:15—Discussion. 2:20—24. Chemical Dynamics in Crosslinked Polystyrenes. W. T. Ford. 2:40—Discussion. 2:45—25. Crystallization and Orientation of Zinc Stéarate in Sulfonated EPDM Elastomers. K. B. Wagener, I. Duvdevani. 3:05—Discussion. 3:10—Intermission. 3:20—26. Solution Properties of Ampholytic lonomers. J. C. Salamone, C. C. Tsai, A. P. Olson, A. C. Watterson. 3:40—Discussion. 3:45—27. Mechanism of Stereoregular Anionic Vinyl Oligomerization. T. E. HogenEsch, C. F. Tien. 4:05—Discussion. 4:10—28. Synthesis and Cure of Phenylated Polyimides Containing Pendent Ethynyl Substituents. F. W. Harris, S. M. Padaki, S. Varaprath 4:30—Discussion. Section C Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 5 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Polymers for Unusual Service Conditions— Sesstion B—Geothermal Applications P. E. Cassidy, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—29. Formulation Development Program for a Geothermal Packer. J. E. Goodson, Jr.

2:40—30. Effect of Monomeric Mixtures on the Properties of Polymer Concrete. A. Zeldln, L. Kukacka, N. Carciello. 3:10—31. Use of Glow Discharge Polymerization to Improve the Environmental Resistance and Lubricity of Elastomers For Use in Deep Sour Gas Wells. C. Arnold, Jr., K. W. Bieg. 3:40—32. Compatibility of Elastomers and Dichlorotetrafluoroethane in Geothermal Energy Conversion Application. B. Toekes. 4:10—33. Dextran-g-Acrylamide Copolymers for Potential Utilization as Displacement Fluids in Enhanced Oil Recovery. C. L. McCormlck, L. S. Park, K. C. Lin. TUESDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) International Symposium on Anionic Polymerization P. Teyssie, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—34. Current Status of Anionic Polymerization. M. Morton. 9:50—Discussion. 10:05—35. Synthesis of Model Macromolecules of Various Types of Means of Anionic Polymerization. P. Rempp, E. Franta, J. Herz. 10:35—Discussion. 10:45—36. The Relationship between Ion-Pair Structure and Stereospecificity of Polymerization. S. Bywater. 11:15—Discussion. 11:25—37. Anionic Polymerization VII Polymerization and Copolymerization with Lithium-Nitrogen Bonded Initiator. T. C. Cheng. 11:55—Discussion.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 3 and 4 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structures of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session I: Molecular Charge States in Polymers and Molecular Crystals Cosponsored with Division of Organic Coat­ ings and Plastics Chemistry

T. J. Fabish, Presiding 8:45—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—38. Resonant Electron Scattering and Anion States in Polyatomic Molecules. K. D. Jordan, P. D. Burrown. 9:35—39. Negative Ion States of Polyatomic Molecules. L. G. Christophorou. 10:10—Intermission. 10:25—40. Electronic States and Excitations in Polymers. J. J. Ritsko. 11:00—41. Exciton States and Exciton Transport in Molecular Crystals. R. Silbey, R. Munn. 11:35—42. Percolation in Molecular Solids. R. Kopelman.

Section C Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 5 (2nd Floor) ACS Award for Creative Invention—Sym­ posium on Polymers with Unusual Proper­ ties

J. R. Schaefgen, Presiding 8:40—Introductory Remarks. 8:45—43. Polymerization of 2,6,7-Trioxabicyclo[2.2.2]octanes with Expansion in Volume. W. J. Bailey, K. Saigo. 9:10—44. Morphology of Thermotropic Polymers. S. B. Warner. 9:35—45. Eiectrohydrodynamic Instabilities in Thermotropic Nematic Polymers. W. R. Krigbaum, H. J. Lader, A. Ciferri. 10:00—46. Orientation Development in Flow and Fiber and Film Formation from Liquid Crystalline Polymer Solutions. J. F. Fetters, J. L. White, Y. Onogi, J. Flood, H. Aoki, T. A. Hancock, J. E. Spruiell. 10:25—47. Poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) Morphology. P. Avakian, R. C. Blume, T. D. Gierke, H. H. Yang, M. Panar. 10:50—48. Kevlar®49 Aramid Fiber in Rein­ forced Plastics—Some Aspects of Dura­ bility. M. W. Wardle. 11:15—49. Award Address. (ACS. Award for Creative Invention sponsored by the Cor­ poration Assoc.) Liquid Crystalline Poly­ mers. S. L. Kwolek. TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) International Symposium on Anionic Poly­ merization

S. Bywater, Presiding

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—50. Functionally Terminal Polymers via Anionic Methods. D. N. Schulz. 2:35—Discussion. 2:45—51. The Influence of Ethers on Chain End Association of Styryl and 1,1-Diphenyl Methylenyllithium in Benzene. L. J. Fetters, R. N. Young. 3:15—Discussion. 3:25—52. Present View of the Anionic Poly­ merization of Methyl Methacrylate and Related Esters in Polar Solvents. Α. Η. Ε. Miiller, R. Kraft, F. J. Gerner, H. Hocker, G. V. Schultz. 3:55—Discussion. 4:05—53. Anionic Processes as Key-Reac­ tions in New Multistep Methods for Tailoring Polymeric Materials. Ph. Teyssie. 4:35—Discussion. 4:45—54. Solvation of Alkyllithium Com­ pounds. Heats of Interaction of Bases with Poly-(isoprenyl)lithium and Poly(styryl)lithium. R. P. Quirk. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 3 and 4 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structures of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session I: Molecular Charge States in Polymers and Molecular Crystals Cosponsored with Division of Organic Coat­ ings and Plastics Chemistry T. J . Fabish, Presiding 2:00—55. Localization of Electronic States in Polymers and Molecular Solids. C. B. Duke. 2:35—56. Electronic Structure of Some Simple Polymers and of Highly Conducting and Biopolymers. J. Ladlk, S. Suhai, M. Seel. 3:10—57. Optical Properties of Small Poly­ enes. M. Karplus. 3:45—58. Spectroscopic Studies of Polydiacetylenes. D. Bloor. 4:20—59. Bond Length Alternation and For­ bidden Energy Gap in Conjugated Periodic Polymers. M. Kertesz, J. Koller, A. Azman. 4:55—Concluding Remarks. Section C Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 5 (2nd Floor) Poster Session R. M. Ikeda, Presiding 2:00—60. Model Networks of End-Linked Polydimethylsiloxane Chains. VII. Networks Designed to Demonstrate Non-Gaussian Effects Related to Limited Chain Extensib­ ility. A. L. Andrady, M. A. Llorente, J. E. Mark. 2:00—61. Investigation of the Electrical Conductivity of lodinated Polyphenylacetylene. P. Cukor, J. I. Krugler, M. F. Rubner. 2:00—62. Recent Developments of Dynamic Fourier Transform IR (FTIR) Spectroscopy in Polymer Research. H. W. Siesler. 2:00—63. Effect of Free Volume on the UCFT of Sterically Stabilised Nonaqueous Dis­ persions. M. D. Croucher, M. L. Hair. 2:00—64. Morphology and Phase Relation­ ships of Polystyrene/Poly(alkyl Methacry­ late) Systems. Low-Molecular-Weight Polystyrene in Poly(ethyl Methacrylate). E. V. Thompson, K. A. Nicolai, D. J. Shaw. 2:00—65. The Use of Tetrachloroethane as a Solvent System for High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography of Poly­ ethylene Terephthalate). L. H. Ponder. 2:00—66. Viscosity Studies of Acrylamide Random Copolymers. H. H. Neidlinger, G. S. Chen, C. L. McCormick. 2:00—67. Gel Permeation Chromatography. A New Calibration Procedure. P. H. Mit­ chell, R. D. Hester. 2:00—68. Application of the Southern Method of GPC Calibration to Aqueous Polymer Systems. P. H. Mitchell, C. L. McCormick, R. D. Hester. 2:00—69. The Transport Properties of Alco­ hols in Isoprene-Methyl Methacrylate Co­ polymers. A. Sfirakis, C. E. Rogers. 2:00—70. Small Angle Neutron Scattering From Polystyrene-Sulfonate lonomers. T. R. Earnest, Jr., J. S. Higgins, W. J. MacKnight. 2:00—71. Structural and Mechanical Prop­ erties of Polybutadiene-Containing Polyurethanes. C. Brunette, W. J. MacKnight, S. L. Hsu, N. S. Schneider. 2:00—72. Low Temperature Structural Transitions and Polyethylene Structure. L. Y. Zlatkevich, Ν. Τ. Crabb.

3:00—73. High Molecular Weight Macrocyclic Polycarbonates. A. Horbach. 3:00—74. Thermoplastic Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (IPN's) of a Thermo­ plastic Elastomer and an lonomeric Plastic: Characterization of Rheological and Mor­ phological Properties. D. L. Siegfried, D. A. Thomas, L. H. Sperling. 3:00—75. Interaction of Soluble Synthetic Polymers with the Human Erythrocyte Membrane: A Calorimetric Study. P. M. Boyd, D. A. Tirrell. 3:00—76. Polyesterimide from Rosin. S. Maiti, S. Das. 3:00—77. The Stereospecific Polymerization of (R)-Penta-2,3-Diene. M. lobai, G. Ingrosso, R. Rossi, L. Porri. 3:00—78. Characterization of Ion Containing Polymer Structures with Rare Earth Metal Probes. Y. Okamoto, Y. Ueba, E. Banks. 3:00—79. Radiative Stability of the Hetero­ cyclic Polymer BBB. W. H. Waddell, U. E. Younes. 3:00—80. Polyoxymethylene: A Study of the Crystal Growth Parameters During the Homopolymerization of Trioxane. A. Lucke, G. Wegner.

Section D Symposium on History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry and Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page 63) WEDNESDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) International Symposium on Anionic Poly­ merization D. N. Schulz, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—81. Synthesis of Controlled Polymer Structures. R. Milkovich. 9:45—Discussion. 10:00—82. Industrial Applications of Anionic Polymerization—Past, Present, Future. A. F. Halasa. 10:30—Discussion. 10:40—83. The Influence of Molecular Ge­ ometry on the Mechanical Properties of Homopolymers and Block Polymers of Hydrogenated Butadiene and Isoprene. Y. Mohajer, G. L. Wilkes, M. Martin, I. C. Wang, J. E. McGrath. 11:10—Discussion. 11:20—84. Anionic Polymerization: Some Commercial Applications. H. L. Hsleh, R. C. Farrar, K. Udipi. 11:50—Discussion. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 3 and 4 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structure of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session II: Fundamentals of XPS, UPS and MO Theory Applied to Polymers Cosponsored with Division of Or­ ganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry H. R. Thomas, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:45—85. Electronic Relaxation Effects in Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Molecular Solids: Molecular-Ion States in Aromatic Pendant Group Polymers. W. R. Salaneck. 9:15—86. Models of Radical Cation States in Molecules, Molecular Solids and Polymers. C. B. Duke. 9:45—Intermission. 10:00—87. Potentialities of Photoelectron Spectroscopy Applied to Polymer Valence Band Studies. J. J. Pireaux. 10:30—88. Band Structure Calculations and Their Relations to Photoelectron Spec­ troscopy. J. M. André, J. Delhalle. 11:00—89. Identification of Chemical States by Spectral Features in XPS. C. D. Wagner. 11:30—90. Metal-Polymer Interfaces: Studies with X-Ray Photoemission. J. M. Burkstrand.

Section C Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 5 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Advances in Polymeric Controlled Release Formulations

F. W. Harris, Presiding 8:50—Introductory Remarks. 9:00—91. Release of Ethynyl Estradiol from Microcapsules. D. L. Gardner, D. J. Fink. 9:25—Discussion. 9:30—92. Hydrogels for the Controlled Release of Prostaglandin E2. N. B. Graham, M. E. McNeill, M. Zulfiqar, M. P. Embrey. 9:55—Discussion. 10:00—Intermission. 10:20—93. A Controlled Release Micropump for Insulin Delivery at Variable Rates. M. V. Sefton, K. J. Burns. 10:45—Discussion. 10:50—94. Synthesis and Hydrolysis of Hydrogels Containing Pendent Herbicide Substituents. F. W. Harris, C. O. Arah. 11:15—Discussion. 11:20—95. Biodegradable Polysaccharides for Controlled Release of Pendent Herbicides. K. W. Anderson, J. A. Pelezo, D. K. Lichatowich, C. L. McCormick. 11:45—Discussion.

Section D Symposium on History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry and Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page 64) WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON Section A

Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) International Symposium on Anionic Polymerization R. N. Young, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—96. Anionic Polymerization Involving Alkaline Earth Cations. B. Francois. 2:35—Discussion. 2:45—97. Anionic Polymerization of the Strontium Salt of One-Ended Living Polystyrene in Tetrahydrofuran and Tetrahydropyran. M. Van Beylen, C. DeSmedt. 3:15—Discussion. 3:25—98. Anionic Polymerization of Lactones for the Block-Copolymer Syntheses. Y. Yamashita. 3:55—Discussion. 4:05—99. Lometoes of Anionic Polymerization of Lactones. St. Penczeck. 4:35—Discussion. 4:45—100. Kinetics and Mechanism of Anionic Polymerization of Ethylene Oxide. S. Entellis. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour. (Joint with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry). Hyatt Regency, Cottonwood Suite.

Section Β Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 3 and 4 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structure of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session II: Fundamentals of XPS, UPS and MO Theory Applied to Polymers Cosponsored with Division of Or­ ganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry H. R. Thomas, Presiding 1:30—101. Use of Chemical Labels to Dis­ tinguish Between Surface Functional Groups Using X-Ray Photoelectron Spec­ troscopy (ESCA). C. D. Batich, R. W. Wendt. 2:00—102. X-ray Photoelectron Spectros­ copy for the Investigation of Polymer Sur­ faces. A. Dilks. 2:30—103. Conditions Affecting Surface Fluorination of Low Density Polyethylene in a Fluorine Glow Discharge. M. Anand, R. E. Cohen, R. F. Baddour. 3:00—104. Plasma Modification of Resists: Electron Spectroscopy Studies. N. S. Viswanathan, M. Takacs, R. Flitsch, A. V. Patsis. 3:30—Intermission. Session III: Applications of Polymer-Surface Analysis Cosponsored with Division of Or­ ganic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry D. W. Dwight, Presiding

The Committee on Meetings and Expositions requests that there be no smoking in meeting rooms

3:45—Introductory Remarks. 3:50—105. Interactions of Ion Beams with Organic Surfaces Studied by XPS, UPS, and SIMS. J. W. Rabalais.

4:20—106. Surface Studies on Multicomponent Polymer Systems by X-ray Photo­ electron Spectroscopy. H. R. Thomas, J. J. O'Malley. 4:50—107. ESCA Studies of Polyimides and Modified Polyimide Surfaces. H. J. Leary Jr., D. S. Campbell. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour. (Joint with Di­ vision of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry), (see Section A for location.)

Section C Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 5 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Advances in Polymeric Controlled Release Formulations F. W. Harris, Presiding 2:00—108. Polyphosphazenes as Carrier Molecules for Controlled Release Systems. H. R. Allcock, T. J. Fuller, K. Matsumura, P. E. Austin. 2:25—Discussion. 2:30—109. Knox Out® 2 FM Insecticide: A New, Microencapsulated Formulation of Diazinon.® J. R. Lowell, Jr., Ο Β. DeSavigny, G. D. Curl. 2:55—Discussion. 3:00—Intermission. 3:20—110. Controlled Release of Polymeric Organometal Toxicants. M. Kronstein. 3:45—Discussion. 3:50—111. Release Mechanism of Reaction Products of Organotins with Amino Acids from Rubber Matrices. S. V. Kannakkanatt. 4:15—Discussion. 4:20—Concluding Remarks. 5:30—Divisional Social Hour. (Joint with Di­ vision of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry), (see Section A for location.)

Section D Symposium on History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry and Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry (see page 64) THURSDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) International Symposium on Anionic Poly­ merization D. J . Worsfold, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—112. Preparation of Polymeric Free Radical Initiators by Anionic Synthesis Polymeric Azo Derivatives. Q. Riess, R. Reeb. 9:35—Discussion. 9:45—113. Coupling Reactions of Carbanionic Polymers by Elemental Compounds such as Oxygen and Sulfur. J. Brossas. 10:15—Discussion. 10:25—114. Studies on the Anionic Poly­ merization of Methyl Methacrylate Initiated with Butyllithium by Using Perdeuterated Monomer. K. Hatada, T. Kitayama, K. Fu­ jikawa, K. Ohta, H. Yuki. 10:55—Discussion. 11:05—115. Anionic Polymerization of Triphenylmethyl Methacrylate. Y. Okamoto, K. Ohta, K. Hatada, H. Yuki. 11:35—Discussion. 11:45—116. Synthesis of Copolymers Using Ionic Techniques. D. H. Richards. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 3 and 4 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structure of Polymers by Photon, Electron and Ion Probes—Session III: Applications of Polymer-Surface Analysis Cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry D. W. Dwight, Presiding 8:30—Introductory Remarks. 8:45—117. The Modification, Degradation and Synthesis of Polymer Surfaces Studied by Means of ESCA. D. T. Clark. 9:15—118. Enhanced XPS of Polymers Using Chemical Derivatization Techniques. J. S. Hammond. 9:45—119. Ion Beam Profiling and Subsur­ face Structure in Polymer/Filler Systems. D. E. Williams. 10:15—Intermission. 10:30—120. ESCA and SEM Studies on Polyurethanes for Biomedical Applications. B. D. Ratner. 11:00—121. Surface Analysis of LTI Carbon and Polystyrene Surfaces. R. N. King, G. K. Iwamoto, J. D. Andrade, A. D. Haubold, H. Shim.

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

79

m

pli

te M HÉ

m

îο

m

11:30—122. Surface Chemical Composition-Depth Profile of Polyether Polyurethaneureas as Studied by FT-IR and ESCA. C. B. Hu, C. S. P. Sung.

-j

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

i

Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) International Symposium on Anionic Polymerization D. H. Richards, Presiding

m.

s ο

1 m •mm m m m m. m. LL m m.

s

Section A

2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:05—123. Polymerization of Methacrylate Initiated by t-Butyl and Phenyl Magnesium Compounds; Factors Influencing the Nature of the Active Centres. P. E. M. Allen, M. C. Fisher, C. Mair, E. H. Williams. 2:35—Discussion. 2:45—124. Anionic Polymerization of Acrolein Reactions of initiation. Possibility of Block Polymers Syntheses. J. Golé, D. Gulino, J. P. Pascault. 3:15—Discussion. 3:25—125. Anionic Copolymerization of Butadiene and Isoprene. I. C. Wang, J. E. McGrath. 3:55—Discussion. 4:05—126. Control of the Cyclotrimerization of Isocyanates by Novel Anionic Initiators. J. E. Kresta, K. H. Hsieh, 0. S. Shen, K. C. Frisch. 4:45—127. Anionic Chain Transfer Copolymerization-A Critical Study of the System MMA/Poly (Disulfide). M. L. Hallensleben. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 3 and 4 (2nd Floor) Symposium on Characterization of Molecular Structure of Polymers by Photon, Electron and ton Probes—Session IV: Spectroscopic Characterization of Molecular .Structure at Polymer Interfaces by Optical and Infrared Spectroscopy Cosponsored with Division of Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry D. L. Allara, Presiding 1:30—Introductory Remarks. 1:45—128. Comparison of Crystallinity and Molecular Orientation Between Surface and Bulk of Some Polymers by FTIR-ATR and Transmission Spectroscopy. M. K. Tse, C. S. P. Sung. 2:15—129. Selective Chemical Modification of Polyethylene Single Crystals. A. HiHner, M. Eguiluz. 2:45—Intermission. 3:00—130. IR Studies of Organic Silanes and Titanates Adsorbed on Single crystalline Aluminum Oxide and Glass Fibers. Ν. Η. Sung, S. Ni, C. S. P. Sung. 3:30—131. The influences of Metal Surfaces on Epoxide Degradation—An FT/IR Study. B. J. Bulkin. 4:00—132. Total Internal Reflection Fluo­ rescence Studies of Albumin Adsorption onto Quartz. R. Van Wagenen, B. J. Zdasiuk, J. D. Andrade. 4:30—133. FT-IR Studies of Blood-Polymer Interfaces. R. J. Jakobsen, R. I. Leininger, R. M. Gendreau. 5:00—Concluding Remarks. FRIDAY MORNING

Section A

Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 and 2 (2nd Floor) International Symposium on Anionic Poly­ merization

J. E. McGrath, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:05—134. NMR Analysis of Anionically Synthesized Poly(N,N-Dimethylacrylamide). H.-b.-GIa, J. E. McGrath. 9:35—Discussion. 9:45—135. Naphthalene Chemistry IV: Studies of the Metallation of Polystyrene Terminated with Naphthalene Unit by Po­ tassium in Tetrahydrofuran. H.-b.-GIa, Ph. Teyssie, R. Jerome. 10:15—Discussion. 10:25—136. Reactivity of Polydiene Anions with Divinylbenzene. M. K. Martin, J. E. McGrath. 10:55—Discussion. 11:05—Concluding Remarks. Section Β Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 3 and 4 (2nd Floor)

Special Topics O. Vogl, Presiding

80

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

8:40—137. Synthesis and Properties of an Acetylene Containing Aryl-Sulfone Resin. G. A. Loughran, F. E. Arnold. 9:00—138. Ethyl-4-Vinyl-a-Cyano-/3-Phenylcinnamate and Its Polymers. Y. Sumida, S. Yoshida, O. Vogl. 9:20—139. Polymers of 2-(Vinyl-2-Hydroxyphenyl)benzotriazoles. 2-(2H-Benzotriazole-2-yl)-Ethenyl-Phenol. S. Yoshida, O. Vogl. 9:40—140. Effects of Side Group Bulk in Trihaloacetaldehyde Polymers. L. S. Corley, P. Kubisa, B. Yamada, O. Vogl. 10:00—141. Laser Photolysis Studies of Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Poly(NVinylcarbazole) and N-lsopropylcarbazole with Dimethylterephthate. U. Lachish, R. W. Anderson, D. J. Williams. 10:20—142. Rigid Backbone Polymers. IX: NMR Studies. S. M. Aharoni. 10:40—143. Rigid Backbone Polymers, X: Behavior of Phases in Concentrated Solu­ tions of Polyisocyanates. S. M. Aharoni. 11:00—144. Synthesis, Tensile Moduli and Swelling Ratios of Model Multifunctional Silicone Elastomers. K. O. Meyers, E. W. Merrill. 11:20—145. Vibro-Molding: A new Process to Mold Polymeric Materials. J. P. Ibar. 11:40—146. Non-Newtonian Flow Charac­ teristics of Amorphous Polymers in the (T > Tg) Temperature Range: a New Analysis of the Data according to the Double Shift Procedure. J. P. Ibar. 12:00—147. Non Linear Relaxational Be­ havior of Amorphous Polymers in the Rubbery State: a New Analysis of the Data According to the Double Shift Procedure. J. P. Ibar.

9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:15—7. Preparing for Re-entry. N. Roscher. 9:40—8. Realistic Problems Facing Re-Entry Women: A View from a Counseling Center Director and Advocate. I. Iscoe. 10:05—9. Training for New Directions—A Crystal Ball for the Eighties. E. Webster. 10:30—10. What Industry Expects of Women. A. L. McClelland. 11:30— Women Chemists Committee Social Hour and Luncheon, Hyatt Regency, Re­ gency Room (2nd Floor).

F. H. Owens, Presiding 2:00—Panel Discussion. In addition to Tuesday Morning speakers, J. Caltanan, C. J. Cavender, M. Ryan, M. B. Thomas, M. Prouty, J. Hayes, K. Morse. 7:00—Divisional Social Hour (Joint with Council Committee on Professional Rela­ tions), Stouffer's Greenway Plaza, 6 Greenway Plaza East. 7:30—Divisional Dinner (Joint with Council Committee on Professional Relations), Stouffer's Greenway Plaza, 6 Greenway Plaza East.

RUBB RUBBER DIVISION INC.

PRFR

R. S. Graff, Chairman T. Jones, Secretary-Program Chairman

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

DIVISION OF PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS

Symposium on History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastic Chemistry, and Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 63)

M. M. Joullié, Chairman M. W. Wadley, Secretary

WEDNESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON MONDAY AFTERNOON

Section A

Sheraton-Houston, Abilene Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Education for a Professional Life Joint with the Council Committee on Professional Relations

Symposium on History of Polymer Science and Technology Joint with Divisions of The History of Chemistry, Organic Coatings and Plastics Chemistry, and Polymer Chemistry, Inc. (see page 64)

Ε. Ν. Garcia, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—1. A Career Development Course for the Chemist. D. J. Runser. 2:35—2. Performance Appraisals—From the Employee's Side of the Desk. Β. Μ. Abler. 3:00—Intermission. 3:05—3. Some Aspects of Professional Em­ ployment Agreements. H. M. Peters, H. Levy. 3:30—4. Safety—What Do We Really Mean? H. H. Fawcett. 3:55—5. Learning to Live with our Chemicals. J. Y. Tong. 4:20—Concluding Remarks. 4:30—Open Meeting of the Council Com­ mittee on Professional Relations, Shera­ ton-Houston, Mesa Room. Section Β Sheraton-Houston, Ridge Room (28th Floor) Symposium on Chemists' Salaries. Poster Session D. R. Baker, Presiding 2:00—6. Chemists' Salaries. B. Jones, H. Foxwell. TUESDAY MORNING AND AFTERNOON Sheraton-Houston, Abilene Room (3rd Floor) Symposium on Employment Re-Entry, Issues and Options Joint with Women Chemists Committee M. L. Good, Presiding

SChB DIVISION OF SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESSES (PROBATIONARY) E. A. Fike, Chairman A. C. Melnyk, Secretary & ViceChm. II

MONDAY AFTERNOON The Whitehall, Concourse D (2nd Level) General

H. J. Wahlborg, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. 2:10—1. Forming a Small Chemical Com­ pany. A. G. Heinel. 2:40—2. Opportunities for Chemical Entre­ preneurs in USA. M. Martinez, Jr. 3:05—3. Small, High Technology Business and the Department of Defense. H. C. Felsher. 3:35—Intermission. 3:40—4. Opportunities for Small Chemical

Entrepreneurs in Developing Countries. E. Simon. 4:05—5. The Wave of the Future. Η. Ν. Dunning. 4:35—6. The Impact of Large Computerized Chemical Information Systems on the Small Chemical Business. A. E. Fein. 5:00—Concluding Remarks. TUESDAY

MORNING

The Whitehall, Concourse D (2nd Level) Symposium on Innovation In Small Chemical Businesses A. C. Melnyk, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. 9:10—7. Three Perspectives on Industrial Innovation. A. S. Obermayer. 9:45—8. Innovation—A Key Word for Small Business. J. A. Pattison. 10:15—9. An Enterprise in Biomedical Inno­ vation. A. Zaffaroni, M. S. Gerstel. 10:50—Intermission. 10:55—10. Innovation in the Development of Commercially Viable Discharge Lamps. J. L. Meyer. 11:25—11. The Exaggerated Requirement of Technical Innovation.*R. Jang. 11:50—Concluding Remarks. TUESDAY

AFTERNOON

The Whitehall, Concourse D (2nd Level) Symposium on Concerns of Consulting Chemists and Chemical Engineers. Part II. Cosponsored with Association of Consulting CHemists and Chemical Engineers M. J . Curry, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. K. W. Greenlee. 2:10—12. Referrals and the Consulting Game. E. N. Garcia, D. L. Dyer. 2:40—13. Patent Law. E. J. Berry. 3:10—14. Building R & D Capability: A Con­ cern of Consultants and Small Business. B. D. Halpern. 3:45—Intermission. 3:50—15. Duties and Compensation of Con­ sulting Chemists. G. E. F. Brewer. 4:20—16. International Investment Op­ portunities for the Small Chemical Com­ pany, or Keeping the Olive and Ethanol Business Off the Rocks. R. W. Temple. 4:50—Concluding Remarks. 7:00—Divisional Social Hour. 7:30—Divisional Dinner. WEDNESDAY

MORNING

The Whitehall, President's Room (2nd Level) Symposium on Taxation and Survival J . L. Gray, Presiding 9:00—Introductory Remarks. K. W. Greenlee. 9:05—17. Tax Considerations in Establishing Small Chemical Businesses. S. Jones. 9:35—18. Operating the Business: Com­ pensation of Owner Executives. G. P. Amaon. 10:05—19. Operating the Business. Estate Planning for Owner/Executives. J. R. Pitts. 10:35—Intermission. 10:40—20. Operating the Business. Sale and Licensing of Inventions. J. L. Gray. 10:50—21. Tax Considerations in Disposing of the Business. W. D. Hoops. 11:20—22. Some Possible Changes in Tax Law That would Affect Small Chemical Businesses. J. L. Gray. 11:35—Discussion. 11:55—Concluding Remarks. WEDNESDAY

AFTERNOON

The Whitehall, President's Room (2nd Level) Symposium on True Stories of Small Chemical Businesses H. Kaye, Presiding 2:00—Introductory Remarks. K. W. Greenlee. 2:10—23. The Story of Southwest Chemical and Plastics Company. J. Magliolo. 2:40—24. The Story of Pearsall Chemical Corporation. M. Pearsall. 3:10—25. The Story of Rectorseal Corpora­ tion. A. Norman. 3:40—Intermission. 3:45—26. The Story of Dixie Chemical Company. R. L. Pelley. 4:15—27. The Story of Merrichem Company. J. T. Files. 4:50—Concluding Remarks.

zoe newman trawl inc. 111 High Ridge Road Stamford,Connecticut 06905 TEL. STAMFORD (203) 327-1781

NEW YORK (212)893-4455

ACS HOUSTON MEETING FLIGHT PROGRAM We at Zoe Newman Travel, Inc. are pleased to be working with the ACS to offer reduced group airfares to the Houston Meeting, Since there is no individual airfare which offers a reduction below coach fare for persons leaving on Sunday and staying for less than a week, group fares offer the least expensive air travel to Houston.

Airfares listed are valid as of January 3, 1980. it is suggested that you make your reservations as soon as possible. If your reservation is accompanied by a credit card number or a check, you will be ticketed immediately to avoid any subsequent fare increase. Once tickets have been written the fare is guaranteed.

Seats have been reserved on the flights listed below departing Sunday, March 23 and returning on Wednesday March 26 or Thursday, March 27; however, travelers may return anytime between March 24 and April 22, so long as they use the same airline on which they departed.

If you wish to leave on an alternative date, or from a city not listed below, please contact our office regarding your needs. We shall be consolidating alternative requests and reserving additional group flight space as neeôeo.

PARTIAL LIST OF CITIES City

Right #

March 23 Departure

Arrival Houston

Group Fare

Economy Fare

Boston EA57 11:40 am ($438) 3:45 pm $297 Chicago DL153 1:15 pm 3:36 pm ($276) $193 Cleveland DL801 2:25 pm ($328) $230 6:42 pm** Detroit DL233 12:05 pm 3:43 pm** ($308) $216 Los Angeles NA42 1:25 pm $284 6:10 pm ($406) Minn/St. Paul EA673 9:10 am ($314) $220 2:28 pm** New Orleans NA201 4:15 pm ($148) 5:17 pm $95 Newark EA57 1:10 pm 3:45 pm $279 ($398) New York-LGA EA53 2:50 pm 5:32 pm ($398) $279 Philadelphia EA531 11:35 am 2:00 pm ($378) $265 Pittsburgh EA347 1:00 pm ($334) 5:01 pm $232 Rochester, NY EA767 2:25 pm ($382) $267 6:22 pm** San Francisco NA38 12:45 pm ($444) 6:14 pm $301 Seattle C0288 12:00 pm 7:20 pm $336 ($496) St. Louis DL251 3:25 pm 1:10 pm ($234) $164 WashingtonEA555 4:55 pm 7:15 pm ($354) $248 Dulles * * Designates connecting flights Times shown represent departure first flight, arrival second flight.

Flight # Depart

EA56 OL1064 DL268 DL440 NA155 EA244 NA192 EA56 EA52 EA550 EA244 EA578 NA117 G0989 DL648 EA554

Depart

5:00 pm 10:10 pm 5:05 pm 7:16 pm 3:25 pm 8:40 pm** 6:15 pm 9:48 pm 5:55 pm 7:18 pm 3:00 pm 8:05 pm** 7:00 pm 7:55 pm 5:00 pm 8:51 pm 4:10 pm 8:03 pm 3:55 pm 7:44 pm 3:00 pm 9:40 pm** 3:00 pm 8:38 pm** 5:50 pm 7:27 pm 4:55 pm 8:40 pm 2:15 pm 5:27 pm 5:55 pm 9:49 pm

Please make the following reservations for me: on Ma rri h

I wish to depart from

and return on

Namfi(ft)

Mailing Address City Phone (Business)

ZIP

State. ACS Local Section

Home

Enclosed please find my check, or charge to my credit card: Type of Credit Card Expiration Date

Number_ Name on credit card_

RETURN TO: ACS Houston Meeting Flight Program Zoe Newman Travel, Inc. 111 High Ridge Road Stamford, Connecticut 06905 TELEPHONE: (203) 327-1781 or (212) 893-4455

Arrive

NOTE: Please do not contact ACS Headquarters about travel arrangements. Full responsibility has been delegated to Zoe Newman Travel, Inc.

m « :

m m-

f

General Program

§ DC

t

IB

•ΚΙ

•ρ

1 1»:::

ΐβ IIP IE""

IT? h\vAUJr>S) J. I wyKvJ March 23. The council meets at 8:30 AM on 179th ACS National MeetingWednesday, March 26. It is hoped that members The Houston ACS meeting offers chemists much more than just a fine technical program. Chemicals are a major part of Houston's booming economy, and tours of several petrochemical facilities are scheduled from Monday through Wednesday. The Houston Ship Channel and the port of Houston can be toured Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday aboard the 98-foot MV/Sam Houston. On Wednesday, a tour of NASA's Johnson Space Cen­ ter is offered. Both the ACS Council, the main deliberative body of the society, and the ACS Board of Directors meet during the national meeting, and space will be available for observers. The board meets from 11 AM to noon and from 1:30 to 5:30 PM on Sunday,

will take advantage of this opportunity to learn firsthand of the society's operation. There will be an award reception and dinner Monday evening, March 24, followed by a general meeting. At this meeting Milton Harris will present his Priestley Medal address. More than 25 other award recipients will present addresses during the meeting. Other highlights of the meeting include a fine chemical exposition with about 100 exhibitors of books, equipment, and supplies; the ACS mixer featuring a margarita party and three-piece mariachi band; a western barbecue sponsored by the Southeastern Texas local section; and the National Employment Clearing House.

payment to: Department of Meetings & Divisional Activities, American Chemical Society, 1155—16th St., N.W, Washington, D.C. 20036. Registration cards and checks re­ Registration ceived after March 7 cannot be pro­ cessed. If registering in advance, check the Advance Registration. Persons planning to attend the Houston meeting are appropriate category on the reverse of encouraged to register in advance. Fill the registration card and enter the in one registration card and coupon amount due on the coupon. Both card on page 95 for each person (additional and coupon must be completed and sets available upon request—photo­ returned. Please allow at least two copies are not acceptable). As an in­ weeks to process your registration. centive for advance registration, ap­ The meeting badge will be prepared preciable discounts in the fees are in and mailed to the address shown on effect. The current scale of fees for the card. If a registrant's affiliation registration is shown at right. Either and address are not available, use a payment in full or authorization to home address. charge your registration materials Advance registrants' cards will be to a credit card (Master Charge or posted in the visible file in the ACS VISA only) must accompany your registration area, lobby level, Albert order. Purchase orders cannot be Thomas Convention & Exhibit Cen­ honored. ter. No check-in prior to attendance Mail completed materials with at technical sessions will be required.

KKMïW

84

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

Classification of registrants

MEMBERS ACS member or national affiliate Emeritus member Student member and student affiliate VISITORS Non-U.S. resident, nonchemist or nonchemical engineer, chemical technician Family of registrant NONMEMBERS U.S. resident nonmember chemist or chemical engineer ONE-DAY-SESSION TICKETS One-day-session tickets for students

OnAdvance site

$50

$60

25 10

30 10

50

60

10

10

75

90

25 5

30 5

«Il

ni

Ρ m 11 β!

fl' ζ

m 111 β ι

•ι

Ill

IP II

Ρ «III:

β!

11 «III

•I Am

mm

Is

One-Day-Session Tickets. $25 in ad­ vance; $30 on-site. Send your request for the advance one-day-session tickets to the Department of Meet­ ings & Divisional Activities, ACS, and specify which day(s) of the meeting you would like to attend. One-day-session tickets will be sold in the registration areas during the hours announced for registration and in the Whitehall lobby, from 8:30 AM to 11:30 AM and 1 PM to 3:30 PM, Monday through Thursday. They can be converted later to full registration at the Albert Thomas Convention & On-Site Registration. Registration fa­ Exhibit Center, lobby level; and the cilities at the meeting will be located Hyatt Regency Houston, Esplanade in the Albert Thomas Convention & foyer, third floor. Exhibit Center, lobby level; and the Hyatt Regency Houston, Esplanade Refunds. Refunds of registration will foyer, third floor. Hours for registra­ be honored if requests are received, tion are: Sunday, March 23, 3 PM to together with the return of the badge 8 PM; and from 8 AM to 4 PM, and a copy of the receipt, by March Monday, March 24, through Thurs­ 10. No refunds will be honored after that date. day, March 27.

However, your copy of the booklet program will be available in the reg­ istration areas. Please note on your registration card where you will be staying, so that in the event of an emergency, the proper information can be relayed. If this information is not known prior to leaving for the meeting, please call the information center and have the staff mark your registration card, or come to the convention center, locate your card in the alphabetical file, and mark the appropriate space.

ΪΜΪΪΜΜΪ Local Arrangements Information Center. The center will be operating in the Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, lobby level, 3 to 8 PM on Sunday, March 23, and 8 AM to 5:30 PM, Monday, March 24, through Thursday, March 27. The hours on Friday, March 28, will be from 8 AM to noon. Personal messages in writing may be ex­ changed and a lost-and-found service will be provided. Mail and telegrams should be addressed to the hotel in which you are staying. Communica­ tions addressed in care of ACS cannot be delivered but will be held at the Information Center. No one will be paged in divisional meetings. The society accepts no responsibility for Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

85

Β m

the delivery of mail, telegrams, or telephone messages, but is glad to be of as much service as possible.

Éfe ce

Room Reservations. All housing re­ quests for the official hotels at the meeting must be submitted to the Department of Meetings & Divisional Activities, ACS, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Please use the official housing form shown on page 88. Deadline for re­ ceipt of housing requests is March 7. Reservations received after the deadline cannot be processed and will be returned. Reservations will be confirmed directly to the individuals, by ACS, indicating the hotel assigned and a guaranteed rate. Please allow at least three weeks for processing. If registrants are sharing a twin- or double-bedded room, use only one form listing both names. Incomplete information on the housing form will result in a delay in processing your request. If the type of accommodation requested has been sold out, the next closest type will be assigned, accord­ ing to your preference listed on the housing form. One night's deposit is required on all rooms. Send your check directly to your assigned hotel after receiving your confirmation from ACS. Do not send your check to ACS. Changes in arrival/departure times or dates should be sent directly to the hotel; cancellation before March 7 to ACS. All unassigned rooms will be released to the hotels on March 7. After that date, all correspondence concerning housing matters, includ­ ing reservations, cancellations, and changes, should be made directly to the hotels. A map showing hotel locations in Houston appears above. Do not be disappointed; submit your housing requests as early as possible.

m

S 1 luii

ifil p lie

I Iff ïlï

The cooperation of the ACS South­ eastern Texas Section in handling local arrangements is acknowledged grate­ fully. Through the efforts of its com­ mittees, many interesting activities have been planned for registrants. G. W. Smith, general chairman J. L. Margrave, cogeneral chairman Rae Royle, general interest program chairman William Miles, Kenneth Shores, Charles Templeton, plant tours cochairmen Linda Lee Lewis, public relations chairman Marcile Hollingsworth, student per­ sonnel chairman Charles Huang, international activities chairman

86

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

|

*%*dP

Ο ! if

0 0 Φ

°

Hotel List. For the convenience of reg­ istrants, area hotels not participating as official hotels for the meeting are shown on page 89. The ACS Housing Bureau recommends that you contact them directly. Rates shown for these hotels are estimated, not guaranteed by ACS. Shuttle service cannot be provided for these hotels. Handicapped Services. Persons at­ tending the Houston meeting who require special services should con­ tact the ACS Operations Office in the Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center or the Hyatt Regency during the meeting. Conferences with ACS Staff. Discussions with society staff members may be arranged through the executive of­ fices in the Hyatt Regency, Suite 739, Monday through Thursday, 8 AM to 5 PM. Telephone for an appointment if you would like to discuss ACS ac­

' Φ

tivities in any of the following areas: awards, chemistry and public affairs, constitution and bylaws, divisional activities, educational activities, local section activities, meetings and ex­ positions activities, membership in ACS, nominations and elections, Pe­ troleum Research Fund, professional relations, professional training, public relations, regional meetings and conferences, and special projects. ACS Offices. Following is a list of ACS offices at the meeting: • ACS News Service and Press Room, Whitehall, Jackson Suite • Books & Journals, Hyatt Regency, Suite 839 • Chemical Abstracts Service, Hyatt Regency, Suite 739 • Chemical & Engineering News, Hyatt Regency, Suite 839 • Chemistry & Public Affairs, Hyatt Regency, Suite 939 • Controller, Albert Thomas Con-

\

only, please address your request to Special Issues Sales, ACS.

Hotel rates in Houston Hotel

Single

Double

1. ALLEN PARK INN 2121 Allen Pkwy., 77019 (713)521-9321 2. HOLIDAY CENTRAL 4640 South Main St., 77002 (713)526-2811

Sold out

$33

$36

3. HOLIDAY INN DOWNTOWN 801 Calhoun at Travis, 77002 (713)659-2222

44

54

4. HYATT REGENCY 1200 Louisiana St., 77002 (713)654-1234 5. LAMAR HOTEL Main at Lamar Ave., 77002 (713)658-8511

Sold out

70-76

Sold out

60

6. HOLIDAY INN MEMORIAL PLAZA 2100 Memorial Dr., 77007 (713)869-8261

Sold out

7. HARLEY OF HOUSTON 101 Main St., 77002 (713)225-1781 8. RAMADA INN-GREENWAY PLAZA 2929 Southwest Frwy., 77098 (713)528-6161 9. SAVOY HOUSTON 1616 Main St., 77024 (713)659-1141 10. SHERATON-HOUSTON 777 Polk Ave., 77002 (713)651-9041 11. TRAVELODGE TOWER AT HOUSTON SOUTHWEST 2828 Southwest Frwy., 77043 (713)526-4571 12. WARWICK 5701 South Main St., 77001 (713)526-1991 13. WHITEHALL 1700 Smith St., 77002 (713)659-5000

40

40

44

50

61

66-72

50

56

90

105 84-94

Suite 1 Bedroom 2 Bedrooms

I

$100-135 $185

68

150-250

76-122

46

32

52

Twin

66-72

258-315

138

140-146

180-192

125

175

125-150

150-190

I

150-200

I

Note: All rooms are subject to 7 % sales tax. One night's deposit is required for all hotels. Send check directly to the hotel after confirmation is received. Do not send your check to ACS.

vention & Exhibit Center, Ticket Office, lobby level; Hyatt Regency, Cypress Room • Emergency after hours, A. T. Winstead, Hyatt Regency • Employment Clearing House, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, East Exhibit Hall • Executive Director's Office, Hyatt Regency, Suite 739 • Hospitality Center, Hyatt Regency, Magnolia Room • International Hospitality Center, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, lobby • Information Center, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, lobby • Operations Offices, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Show Offices, second floor; Hyatt Regency, Cypress Room • Ticket Sales, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Ticket Office, lobby level

Shuttle Bus Service. A complimentary shuttle bus service will be available from 8 AM to 6 PM, Monday through Thursday. Limited service will be available on Friday, 8 AM to noon. The service is free to registrants displaying their badges and to persons with one-day-session tickets. Buses will be marked "ACS Shuttle." Details of the shuttle bus route will appear in the booklet program. Group Air Fares. Please refer to the advertisement on page 83 for detailed information about group air fares which are being coordinated by Zoe Newman Travel Inc. for the Houston meeting.

105 80

Divisional Membership. Divisional membership is evidence of your interest in that particular field of chemistry or chemical engineering and in the work of the division. Division members are granted at least one special privilege, a reduced rate on the purchase of abstracts. Most divisions offer additional services. Members of the society may become members of one or more divisions during the meeting by filling out a divisional membership form and paying the required dues. This can be done in the registration areas, or upon request to the divisional secretary.

Poster Sessions. Posters will be displayed for the entire morning or afternoon of their assigned days. Authors will be with their posters during the times indicated in the program.

Visual Aids Offices. Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Show Manager's Office, West Hall lobby; Hyatt Regency, Cypress Room; Sheraton-Houston, Mirror Room.

œiUMMQMÏ

Abstracts of Papers. Abstracts may be ordered in advance or purchased in the registration areas during the meeting. For advance orders, abstracts will be mailed upon completion, about March 5, to the address indicated on the registration card. An opportunity is provided for you to have your abstracts mailed first class to ensure prompt delivery—note the slight additional charge. For the Houston meeting, unless the additional charge is paid, registrants will receive an on-site pickup card to be turned in at either of the two registration areas. Please be sure to bring this card to exchange for your abstract books. If ordering abstracts

The following schedule of social events has been arranged for the Houston meeting. Where purchase of tickets is necessary, the event has been numbered to assist in ticket ordering. Ticket prices are shown, or events coded as follows: NT—no ticket required; L or D—included in cost of meal; Ρ—partially subsidized; COD—cash bar; M—divisional membership. Tickets should be purchased as early as possible, either in advance using the registration coupon on page 95 or on-site in the registration areas. The final deadline for the sale of tickets during the meeting will be 48 hours before the event, after which

Social Events

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

87

J:

ί

S

3

ι ι

Ι

* SE

® Hi *Ί1|

time only a few tickets will be avail­ able at the door of the event.

"•a EU

SATURDAY, MARCH 22 Reception, 6:30 P M

g

Divisional Officers Group, Shera­ ton-Houston, Summit D

Ι

Dinner, 7:30 PM 1 Divisional Officers Group, Sheraton-Houston, Summit $17.00

il?]! M

SUNDAY, MARCH 23 Social H o u r , 6 P M

Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry Subdi­ vision, Sheraton-Houston, Ridge Room COD Social Hour, 6:30 PM American Institute of Chemists, Whitehall, President's Room NT

Dinner, 7:30 PM 2 American Institute of Chemists, Whitehall, President's Room $16.00 Mixer, 8 PM Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Chemical Industry Hospitality Event, SheratonHouston, Timberline Room M

Social Hour, 4 PM Association of Harvard Chemists, Hyatt Regency, Ponderosa Room COD Social Hours, 5:30 PM Iowa State University, Hyatt Regen­ cy, Holly Room COD Society of Columbia Chemists, Hyatt Regency, Cedar Room COD

Mixer, 9 PM Division of Medicinal Chemistry, Sheraton-Houston, Statesman A Ρ

Reception, 6:30 PM Recognition of 1980 ACS Award Re­ cipients, Hyatt Regency, Imperial Ballroom D

MONDAY, MARCH 24 Reception, Noon

James T. Grady Award, SheratonHouston, Laredo Room L Luncheon, 12:30 PM 3 James T. Grady Award: "The Joys of Science Writing," E. Edelson, Sheraton-Houston, Laredo Room $11.00

Dinner, 7:30 PM 4 Recognition of 1980 ACS Award Recipients, Hyatt Regency, Imperial Ballroom $20.00 Hospitality Suite, 8:30 PM Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Sheraton-Houston, Abilene Room M

Use this form only for ACS participating housing/session hotels. Please read information on room reservations before completing all blank spaces on this form. DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT AT ACS: MARCH 7. REQUESTS RECEIVED AFTER THIS DATE CANNOT BE PROCESSED. Hotels: INDICATE BELOW ORDER OF PREFERENCE (Choices 1st, 2nd, 3rd) INDICATE RATE PREFERENCE 1st-

.2nd_

.3rd_

_Allen Park Inn

JHyatt Regency

-Travelodge

_Harley of Houston

_Lamar Hotel

-Warwick Hotel

-Holiday Inn Central

-Ramada Inn

-Whitehall

-Holiday Inn Downtown

-Savoy Houston

-Holiday Inn Memorial Plaza

-Sheraton-Houston

Check one: If my preferred rate is not available, I am more concerned with location-

, rate_

ROOM(S) WILL BE OCCUPIED BY: Name(s) AddressCity & State. Arrival date:. Single (1 person) Double (2 persons, 1 bed) Twin (2 persons, 2 beds)

.ZIP.

. Telephone-

_ Departure date:_ Double/double (3 or 4 persons, 2 double beds) Suite, 1 bedroom (1 or 2 persons) Suite, 2 bedroom (3 or more persons)

One night's deposit is required for all hotels. IMPORTANT: Changes in arrival/departure time or dates should be made directly to the hotel. Cancellations only to ACS before March 7; after March 7 all housing matters should be directed to the hotel. Mail confirmation to: NameAddress. City & State-

.ZIP_

. Telephone.

The name of each hotel guest must be listed for doubles/twins. Reservations cannot be made unless two names are given. Room assignments will be made in the order received. Incomplete information will result in a delay in processing your request.

88

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

teste

is m

TUESDAY, MARCH 25

Social Hour, 11:30 AM Women Chemists, Hyatt Regency, Regency Room COD Luncheon, 11:30 AM 5 Division of Chemical Health & Safety, Buffet, Holiday Inn Downtown, Big Annie's Res­ taurant, Longhorn Room $7.00 (At door only) Reception, Noon Division of Colloid & Surface Chem­ istry, Petroleum Club, 800 Bell St. NT Luncheons, Noon 6 Corporation Associates, Hon­ oring Recipient of ACS Award for Creative Invention, Whitehall, Concourse Β $7.00 7 Division of Chemical Informa­ tion, Albert Thomas Conven­ tion & Exhibit Center, Room 209 $10.00 8 High School-College Interface, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, Room 206 $5.00 9 Women Chemists, Hyatt Re­ gency, Regency Room $12.00 Luncheon, 12:30 PM 10 Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Petroleum Club, 800 Bell St. $10.00 Social Hours, 5 PM Association of Indiana University Chemists, Hyatt Regency, Holly Room COD Illinois Institute of Technology, Hyatt Regency, Ponderosa Room COD Johns Hopkins University, Hyatt Regency, Pecan Room COD Social Hours, 5:30 PM Northwestern University, Hyatt Re­ gency, Cedar Room COD Ohio State University, SheratonHouston, San Antonio Room COD University of California, Los Ange­ les/Berkeley, Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Β Room COD University of Florida, Hyatt Regency, Dogwood A Room COD University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Hyatt Regency, Mesquite Room COD University of Notre Dame, Hyatt Regency, Dogwood Β Room COD University of Wisconsin, Madison, Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 5 COD Social Hours, 6 PM Division of Chemical Information, Albert Thomas Convention & Ex­ hibit Center, Room 218 COD Division of Inorganic Chemistry, Al­

bert Thomas Convention & Ex­ hibit Center, Room 215 Ρ Lone Star State colleges and univer­ sities, Sheraton-Houston, States­ man Β COD Michigan State University, Hyatt Regency, Raintree Room COD Princeton University, Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood A Room COD Texas Women's University, Texas Women's University, Houston Center, North Dormitory, Recre­ ation Lounge, 1130 M.D. Anderson Blvd. (Transportation departs ACS shuttle stop, Convention Center, at 6 PM.) NT University of Illinois, Urbana-

Champaign, Whitehall, President's Room NT Social Hour, 6:15 PM Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, Albert Thomas Con­ vention & Exhibit Center, Room 206 Ρ Social Hours, 6:30 PM Division of Analytical Chemistry (joint with Division of Computers in Chemistry), San Jacinto Inn, Battleground Rd. off LaPorte Freeway. (Buses depart ACS shuttle stop, Hyatt Regency, at 5:45 PM.) COD

Nonparticipating hotels» Houston Hotel

Single

Double

ASTRO VILLAGE HOTEL 2350 South Loop West, 77054 (713) 748-3221 CENTER CITY MOTOR INN 1015 Texas Ave., 77002 (713)224-4511 GALLERIA PLAZA HOTEL 5060 West Alabama, 77056 (713)960-8100 GUEST QUARTERS HOTEL 2929 South Post Oak Rd„ 77056 (713)877-8100

$33-39

$41-47

25-32

29-32

53*63

66-76

HILTON SOUTHWEST

Suite

Twin

$115-up

$32

66-68

66-76

145-650

49-64

(1 bedroom) 88-08 (2 bedrooms) 160-246

68-66

39-54

49-64

36-3$

41-43

31-33

34-36

53-63

66-76

65

78

Suites available

24

26

45

46-56

56-66

56-66

60-300

52-70

62-80

62-80

80-240

23-25

29-32

6780 Southwest Frwy., 77036 (713)977-7911 HOLIDAY INN-MEDICAL CENTER 6701 South Main, 77030 (713)797-1110 HOLIDAY INN-WEST LOOP/ GALLERIA 3131 West Loop South, 77027 (713)621-1900 HOUSTON OAKS HOTEL 5011 Westheimer, 77056

(713) 623-4300 HOUSTONIAN INN

44-120

66-76

145-375

4 Post Oak Circle, 77024 (713)961-7750 LAOUINTA MOTOR INNGREENWAY 4015 Southwest Frwy., 77027

(713)623-4750 MARRIOTT HOTEL AT THE ASTRODOME 2100 South Braeswooet at Greenbriar, 77030 (713)797-9000 MARRIOTT HOTEL-WEST LOOP 1750 West Loop South, 77027 (713)960-0111 RAMADA INN-ASTRODOME 8700 South Main, 77025 (713)666-0346 RAMADA INN-SOUTHWEST/ SHARPSTOWN 6855 Southwest Frwv., 77074 (713)771-0641 SHAMROCK HILTON 6900 South Main, 77002 (713)688-9211

29.50-35 34.50-40

-57

51-69

42.50-85

51-69

125-uf»

Note; The above prices will be increased 10-1$% prior to the Houston meeting.

Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN 89

t·, h si

S

%^

m

SI M m

a

3

ιι

Division of Computers in Chemistry (joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry), San Jacinto Inn, Bat­ tleground Rd. off LaPorte Free­ way. (Buses depart ACS shuttle stop, Hyatt Regency, at 5:45 PM.) COD Social Hours, 7 PM Council Committee on Professional Relations (joint with Division of Professional Relations), Stouffer's Greenway Plaza, 6 Greenway Plaza Ε COD Division of Chemical Education Inc., Sheraton-Houston, Summit. COD Division of Professional Relations (joint with council Committee on Professional Relations), Stouffer's Greenway Plaza, 6 Greenway Plaza Ε COD Division of Small Chemical Busi­ nesses (Probationary), Whitehall, Concourse D COD University of Maryland, Hyatt Re­ gency, W. J. Bailey's suite NT Dinner, 6 PM 11 Iota Sigma Pi, Heritage Society Tea Room (Yesteryear Shop), llOOBagbySt. $10.00 Dinners, 7:30 PM 12 Division of Analytical Chemistry (joint with Division of Com­ puters in Chemistry), San Ja­ cinto Inn, Battleground Rd. off LaPorte Freeway. (Buses depart ACS shuttle stop, Hyatt Regency, at 5:45 PM.) $15.50 Adv. 17.50 On-site 12 Division of Computers in Chemistry (joint with Division of Analytical Chemistry), San Jacinto Inn, Battleground Rd. off LaPorte Freeway. (Buses depart ACS shuttle stop, Hyatt Regency, at 5:45 PM.) $15.50 Adv. 17.50 On-site 13 Council Committee on Profes­ sional Relations (joint with Division of Professional Relations), Stouffer's Green­ way Plaza, 6 Greenway Plaza Ε $8.00 Div. Mbr. 12.00 Nonmbr. 13 Division of Professional Rela­ tions (joint with council Committee on Professional Relations), Stouffer's Green­ way Plaza, 6 Greenway Plaza Ε $8.00 Div. Mbr. 12.00 Nonmbr. 14 Division of Small Chemical Businesses (Probationary), Whitehall, Concourse D $15.00 Dinner, 8 PM 15 Division of Chemical Education Inc., Sheraton-Houston, Summit $13.00 90

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

Mixer, 7 PM Division of Physical Chemistry, Al­ bert Thomas Convention & Ex­ hibit Center, Room 208 NT Hospitality Suite, 8:30 PM Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Sheraton-Houston, Abilene Room M Mixer, 9 PM 16 ACS Margarita Party, Albert Thomas Convention & Ex­ hibit Center, East Exhibit Hall Badge or $3.00 ticket

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 Reception, Noon

Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, E. V. Murphree Award, Sheraton-Houston, Mesa Room NT Luncheon, Noon 17 Division of Fuel Chemistry, Sheraton-Houston, Laredo Room $10.00 Luncheon, 12:30 PM 18 Division of Industrial & Engi­ neering Chemistry, E. V. Murphree Award, SheratonHouston, Mesa Room $10.00 Social Hours, 5 PM Cornell University, Hyatt Regency, Ponderosa Room COD Florida State University, Hyatt Re­ gency, Holly Room COD

University of Iowa, Sheraton-Hous­ ton, Florentine Room COD University of Kansas, SheratonHouston, Timberline Room COD University of Minnesota, Hyatt Re­ gency, Raintree Room COD Social Hour, 6:30 PM Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc., Rice University, Faculty Club. (Buses depart ACS shuttle stop, Convention Center at 6 PM; Hyatt Regency at 6:15 PM.) D Dinners, 6:30 PM Division of Environmental Chemis­ try. (See GP-14.) Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry. (See GP-14.) Dinner, 7 PM 19 Chinese-American Chemists, Golden Bo Restaurant, 8655 Southwest Freeway, at South Gessner $18.00 Dinner, 7:30 PM 20 Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc., Rice University, Faculty Club. (Buses depart ACS shuttle stop, Convention Center at 6 PM; Hyatt Re­ gency at 6:15 PM.) $18.00 Social Hour, 8 PM Massachusetts Institute of Technol­ ogy, Hyatt Regency, Raintree Room COD

iKttraôMî

Social Hours, 5:30 PM Alpha Chi Sigma, Hyatt Regency, Redbud Room Ρ Awards Division of Colloid & Surface Chem­ istry, Hyatt Regency, Sandalwood Suite Ρ Division of Organic Coatings & Plas­ The awards reception, dinner, and tics Chemistry (joint with Division general meeting will be held the eveof Polymer Chemistry Inc.), Hyatt ning of March 24, in the Hyatt ReRegency, Cottonwood Suite COD Imperial Ballroom—reception, Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc. gency, 6:30 PM, dinner, 7:30 PM, general (joint with Division of Organic 8:30 PM. There will be adCoatings & Plastics Chemistry), meeting, seating for those wishing to Hyatt Regency, Cottonwood Suite ditional attend only the general meeting. At COD the general meeting, Milton Harris, Duke University, Hyatt Regency, 1980 recipient of the Priestley Medal, Mesquite Room COD will speak on "Science and Technology in the Eighties—the Hopes and Reception, 5:30 PM the Hindrances." President's Reception for New Members, Hyatt Regency, Arbo­ ACS Award Addresses retum 5 NT Alfred Burger Award in Medicinal Chemistry sponsored by Social Hours, 6 PM Chinese-American Chemists, Golden SmithKline Corp. received by Bo Restaurant, 8655 Southwest Tsung Ying Shen. Address to be preFreeway at South Gessner D sented before Medicinal Chemistry, Texas A&M University, Sheraton- Wednesday, March 26, at 11 AM (see Houston, Abilene Room COD page 68).

mm

1 ACS Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology sponsored by Air Products and Chemicals Inc. received by James J. Morgan. Address to be presented before Environmental Chemistry, Tuesday, March 25, at 9 AM (see page 61).

III





I il • •

ACS Award for Creative Invention sponsored by the Corporation Associates received by Stephanie L. Kwolek. Address to be presented before Polymer Chemistry, Tuesday, March 25, at 11:15 AM (see page 78). ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry sponsored by Aldrich Chemical Co. Inc. received by Yoshito Kishi. Address to be presented before Organic Chemistry, Tuesday, March 25, at 11 AM (see page 71). ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Mallinckrodt Inc. received by Arthur E. Martell. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, March 24, at 9 AM (see page 64). ACS Award for Nuclear Chemistry sponsored by EG&G ORTEC received by Arthur M. Poskanzer. Address to be presented before Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, Tuesday, March 25, at 2:20 PM (see page 69). ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry sponsored by Fisher Scientific Co. received by J. Calvin Giddings. Address to be presented before Analytical Chemistry, Thursday, March 27, at 9 AM (see page 50). ACS Award in Chemical Education sponsored by Union Carbide Corp. received by Henry A. Bent. Address to be presented at the dinner meeting of Chemical Education Inc., Tuesday, March 25, at 8 PM (See Social Event No. 15). ACS Award in Chromatography sponsored by SUPELCO Inc. received by James E. Lovelock. Address to be presented before Analytical Chemistry, Monday, March 24, at 9 AM (see page 49). ACS Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry sponsored by Kendall Co. received by Howard Reiss. Address to be presented before Colloid & Surface Chemistry, Tuesday, March 25, at 11 AM (see page 55). ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Monsanto Co.

n • lu

Miller Outdoor Theater is the site concerts and events year-round

received by Alan M. Sargeson. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, March 24, at 10 AM (see page 64). ACS Award in Petroleum Chemistry sponsored by Lubrizol Corp. received by William A. Pryor. Address to be presented before Petroleum Chemistry, Monday, March 24, at 9 AM (see page 75). ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry sponsored by Witco Chemical Corp. Foundation received by George B. Butler. Address to be presented before Polymer Chemistry, Monday, March 24, at 11 AM (see page 78). ACS Award in Pure Chemistry sponsored by Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity received by John E. Bercaw. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Monday, March 24, at 11 AM (see page 64). ACS Award in the Chemistry of Plastics and Coatings sponsored by Borden Foundation Inc. received by John W. Vanderhoff. Address to be presented before Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry, Monday, March 24, at 9 AM (see page 73). Arthur C. Cope Award will be presented to Gilbert Stork at the ACS fall meeting in San Francisco. James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching sponsored by Ethyl Corp. received by Evelyn R. Bank. Address to be presented before Chemical Education Inc., Tuesday, March 25, at 10 AM (see page 52).

Garvan Medal sponsored by W. R. Grace & Co. received by Helen M. Free. Address to be presented before Analytical Chemistry, Tuesday, March 25, at 9:45 AM (see page 49). James T. Grady Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public received by Edward Edelson. Address to be presented at the Grady Luncheon, Monday, March 24, at noon. See Social Event No. 3. Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Essential Oils and Related Products sponsored by Fritzsche Dodge & Olcott Inc. received by Sukh Dev. Address to be presented before Organic Chemistry, Wednesday, March 26, at 11 AM (see page 72). Ipatieff Prize received by Denis Forster. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Tuesday, March 25, 8:35 AM (see page 65). Frederic Stanley Kipping Award in Organosilicon Chemistry sponsored by Dow Corning Corp. received by E. A. V. Ebsworth. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Wednesday, March 26, at 8:30 AM (see page 66). Irving Langmuir Award in Chemical Physics sponsored by the General Electric Foundation received by William A. Klemperer. Address to be presented before Physical Chemistry, Tuesday, March 25, at 9 AM (see page 76). E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry sponsored by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. received by Milton Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

91

<

I i I

Orchin. Address to be presented before Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Wednesday, March 26, at 10:50 AM (see page 64).

6. Reserve policy and the goals for net returns from operations. 7. 1981 dues escalator. 8. Cost implications of petitions for council consideration.

Nobel Laureate Signature Award for a Graduate Student in Chemistry sponsored by J. T. Baker Chemical Co. received by Wayne L. Gladfelter. Address to be presented before Inorganic Chemistry, Thursday, March 27, at 8:30 AM (see page 67).

William J. Bailey, chairman; Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742

James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry sponsored by the Northeastern Section, ACS received by Ronald Breslow. Address to be presented before Organic Chemistry, Monday, March 24, at 11 AM (see page 71).

1. ACS program for small college packages of CAS services. 2. Other topics resulting from the executive session.

CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE

Open Meeting Monday, March 24, 3-5 PM Hyatt Regency, Cedar Room

Executive Session Priestley Medal received by Milton Harris. Address to be presented at the General Meeting, Monday, March 24, 8:30 PM (see page 90).

IKKMQMÎ Committee Agenda Open committee sessions provide an opportunity for ACS members to express their views on matters of importance to the society before these matters are acted on by the board or council. Members are urged to look over the agenda and to make known any opinions or ideas that may arise. If you cannot attend the committee sessions involved, you can write to the officers listed or ask someone attending to speak for you. Most executive sessions are open to councilors. For more information, contact the officers listed. BUDGET & FINANCE

Pauline Newman, chairman; FMC Corp., 2000 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19103 Executive Session (open to councilors) L Financial status report: a. Year-end 1979. b. Review of 1980 general fund budget. 2. Reports from treasurer, Investments Committee, controller. 3. Review of the audit of national meetings operations. 4. Evaluation of proposed new 1981+ programs. 5. Criteria for programs included in the dues-supported area. 92 C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

1. Reports from ad hoc subcommittees. 2. Contracts and grants. 3. Financial status. 4. Status reports on new ventures. 5. Publications and services. 6. International relationships and reports from agreement countries. CHEMICAL EDUCATION

I. Dwaine Eubanks, chairman; Department of Chemistry, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Okla. 74074 Open Meeting (combined with executive session) Sunday, March 23,1:30-5:30 PM Hyatt Regency, Arboretum 1 1. Discussions with Education. Commission. 2. Proposal for ACS history of chemistry office. 3. Report of the Department of Educational Activities. 4. Actions of the board of directors. 5. Subcommittee reports: a. Symposia Planning. b. Graduate Education. c. Undergraduate Education. d. Precollege Education. 6. Liaison reports. 7. Discussion of items before the council. 8. Items from the floor. CHEMICAL SAFETY

George J. O'Neill, chairman; Research Laboratories, Tennessee Eastman Co., Kingsport, Tenn. 37660 Open Meeting Monday, March 24, 2-4 PM Albert Thomas Center, Room 202 Same as below plus topics from floor.

Executive Session 1. Tribute to outgoing chairman, Phillip S. Landis. 2. Legal consideration of committee members providing advice on chemical health and safety matters. 3. Definition of committee objectives and responsibilities. 4. Laboratory safety and health criteria for ACS approval of chemistry curricula. 5. Proposal for publication of chemical safety data sheets. 6. Breakage of laboratory glassware. 7. Response to the Committee on Professional Relations' statement on hazardous substances. 8. Consideration of a symposium on scientific information on hazardous substances. 9. ACS Safety Manual. CHEMISTRY & PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Herman L. Finkbeiner, chairman; Materials Science Engineering, General Electric, Box 8,1 River Rd., Schenectady, N.Y. 12306 Open Meeting Monday, March 24,10 AM-noon Hyatt Regency, Ebony Room 1. Report of board actions on committee recommendations. 2. Subcommittee and task force reports: Federal R&D Funding; HEW Guidelines and Related Matters; Legislative Matters; Regulatory Practices. 3. Report on congressional fellowship program. 4. ACS public issue/problem study program: Chemistry & the Food System. 5. Other ACS public affairs and legislative activities. 6. ACS members are invited to give short presentations on issues of concern to the society. Such presentations should not be more than five minutes. Please send a copy of a proposed presentation to the Department of Public Affairs before March 4 to ensure placement on the open meeting schedule. COMMITTEES

Gary Z. Zimmerman, chairman; Vice President for Academic Affairs, Seattle University, Seattle, Wash. 98122 Open Meeting Monday, March 24, 2-3 P M Hyatt Regency, Live Oak Room 1. Comments from visitors. 2. Review of council petitions. 3. Discussion of recognition councilor service.

for

a Executive Session

sm

...Λ

1. Bilateral copying trial. 2. CAS library document copy ser­ vice. 3. Register of Copyrights' Five-Year Review and regional hearings. 4. Other activities in government and private sectors relevant to the com­ mittee's interests.

•j 3 m

d «

a

i COUNCIL POLICY

Edwin R. Shepard, chairman; Lilly Research Laboratory, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 46206 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 25, 9:30 AM-4:30 PM Hyatt Regency, Redbud Room

NASA's Johnson Space Center is nerve center for manned space flights

Executive Session 1. Subcommittee reports. 2. Recommendations for 1981 com­ mittee chairmanships (closed). 3. Special liaison objectives for 1980 review. 4. Recognition of service—details of implementation. 5. Staff liaison report. CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS

Seymour Siegel, chairman; Director, Chemistry & Physics Lab, Aerospace Corp., P.O. Box 92957, Los Angeles, Calif. 90009 Open Meeting A Sunday, March 23, 9 AM-12:30 P M and 1:30-5 P M Hyatt Regency, Dogwood A See executive session agenda. ACS members, particularly petitioners, are invited to consult with the committee on matters likely to come up in the council meeting. Open Meeting Β Wednesday, March 26, starting two hours after council meeting ends. Hyatt Regency, Cedar Room See comments under A above. Executive Session 1. Review of petitions to amend the ACS constitution and bylaws that will be acted upon by council at the Houston meeting: a. Balancing geographic regions. b. Designation of immediate past president as an officer of the so­ ciety.

c. Change in method for calculat­ ing the dues. d. Privileges of affiliates. e. Funds apportionment to local sections. f. Yearly allotments to local sec­ tions (urgent action requested). g. Waiver of initial membership dues for student affiliates. h. Allotment of funds to divi­ sions. 2. Review of petitions to amend the ACS constitution and bylaws that are on the agenda for consideration only at the Houston meeting: a. Fair election procedures. b. Redefinition of membership requirements. 3. Reports of subcommittees: a. Change in number of council votes required to approve consti­ tutional amendments. b. Bylaw amendments to provide for ACS association or affiliation with other organizations. c. Eligibility for membership on board and society committees and on standing committees of the council. 4. Proposed amendments to local section and division bylaws. COPYRIGHTS

Madeline M. Henderson, chairman; 5021 Alta Vista Rd., Bethesda, Md. 20014 Open Meeting Monday, March 24,10-11 AM Hyatt Regency, Live Oak Room Same as below plus topics from floor. ACS members are invited to attend to review progress in application of the new copyright law.

1. Report of interim actions. 2. Reports of officers. 3. Report of CPC vice-chairman: re­ port on the ADL Task Force. 4. Reports of subcommittees. 5. Schedule of business sessions, fall 1980. 6. Reports of committees and ex­ perimental commissions. 7. Review of council agenda. DIVISIONAL ACTIVITIES

Barbara A. Montague, chairman; R.D. 2, Box 26A, Hockessin, Del. 19707 Open Meeting Sunday, March 23, 3-5 PM Sheraton-Houston, El Paso Room Reports from executive session plus topics from floor. Executive Session 1. Science Commission report. 2. Subcommittee reports and rec­ ommendations: a. New division formation: guide­ lines for formation, coalescence, and dissolution; status of proba­ tionary Divisions of Geochemistry and Small Chemical Businesses; Chemistry & the Law—petition for probationary status. b . Division financial support: council petition for action—"Al­ lotment of Funds to Divisions." c. Long-Range Planning Task Force on National Meetings: fre­ quency, number of sessions per meeting, formula for budgeting meeting room needs, effect of in­ ternational meeting participation, other methods of presenting sci­ entific information. d. Division annual reports review: financial reporting guidelines, performance awards. Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN 93

1 I η

û lifts

%

m mil

II

ni ζ

m

m

Si

• ii

1 1

e. Guidelines for presenting sensitive material at society meetings. f. Constitution & bylaws: petitions for council action and consideration assigned for DAC review. g. Division officers conferences: long-range planning workshop, orientation for incoming officers joint with M&E's program coordination conference. 3. Division of History of Chemistry: Proposed Center for the History of Chemistry, division historians. EDUCATION COMMISSION

Joint with board Committee on Education, board-council Committee on Professional Training, council Committee on Chemical Education, Division of Chemical Education. Chairmen: Peter E. Yankwich, Patricia A. Figueras, J. Arthur Campbell, I. Dwaine Eubanks, Lloyd N. Ferguson. Open Meeting Wednesday, March 26, 4:30-5:30 PM Sheraton-Houston, Laredo Room All ACS members are cordially invited to attend this joint open meeting of the Education Commission and its constituent bodies. The openended agenda will cover all questions that relate in any way to chemical education. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT

Daniel MacDougall, chairman; Dow Pharmaceuticals—Canada, 380 Elgin Mills Rd. East, Richmond Hill, Ont., Canada L4C5H2 Open Meeting Monday, March 24, 2-3 PM Hyatt Regency, Ebony Room Same as below plus any related topics. ACS members are invited to give short presentations on issues of concern to ACS. Such presentations should not be more than five minutes. Please send copy of a proposed presentation to the Department of Public Affairs before March 6, 1980, to ensure placement on the open meeting schedule. Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. Division and local section activities. 3. Consideration of priority list of environmental issues. 4. Subcommittee reports: a. Environmental analytical chemistry. b. Educational courses on environmental topics. c. Air, monitoring and analysis, 94

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

Council, board meetings The ACS Council meeting will begin at 8 AM, Wednesday, March 26, in the Imperial Ballroom Center of the Hyatt Regency. It will be preceded by a continental breakfast for councilors beginning at 7:30 AM in the center. Councilors are asked to check in beginning at 7 AM and proceed to the breakfast area, keeping in mind that the meeting starts promptly at 8 AM. Space will be available for ACS members and nonmembers to observe the council in action. It is hoped that many will take advantage of this opportunity to learn firsthand of the society's operations. Alternate councilors and division and local section officers particularly are urged to attend. The ACS Board of Directors meeting, open to members who wish to observe, will be in the Regency Room in the Hyatt Regency from 11 AM to noon, and from 1:30 to 5:30 PM, on Sunday, March 23.

pesticides, radiation, solid wastes, toxicology, and water. d. Symposium on energy/environmental conflicts. INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES

Glenn T. Seaborg, chairman; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 94720 Open Meeting Monday, March 24, 2:30-4:30 PM Hyatt Regency, Redbud Room 1. Science/technology exchange projects: Egypt, India, Sri Lanka, other countries. 2. Formation of an international society for chemists. 3. Cases of alleged violations of scientific freedom and/or human rights. 4. Education orientation guide. 5. Possible dues subsidies for members in developing countries. 6. Books and back issues of journals for developing countries. 7. Reduced international air mail rates for journals. 8. Proposed Center for the History of Chemistry. 9. Topics from the floor. Executive Session Same as above plus new business to be considered.

Open Meeting Monday, March 24,1:30-2:30 PM Sheraton-Houston, Laredo Room Report from executive session plus topics from floor. Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. Petitions for council action: funds apportionment; allotments to local sections; allotments of funds to divisions; balancing geographic regions; privileges of affiliates. 3. Petitions for council consideration: fair election procedures. 4. Change in local section territory—Dallas-Ft. Worth Section. 5. Reports of subcommittees: a. Annual reports review: annual reporting form and procedures; critique program; local section recognition. b. Program development fund: review of guidelines, evaluations, budget; loan fund. c. Speaker service: status report; financial review; international speaker experiment; consideration of computer-based files. d. New ventures: visitation program; councilor survey; long-range planning position paper; annual theme. e. Current local section issues: leadership; recognition. f. Secondary school education: proposal for Corporation Associates. g. Fulfillment services: bimonthly roster system; demographic analyses; computer services; local section dues collection. h. Staff/committee budget and finance: status of request for additional staff; review of the 1980 budget. i. Local section finances: budget code system; accounting manual; ACS Cash and Investment Pool participation. j . Constitution and bylaws: review of pending petitions; charter bylaws. k. ad hoc new section formation: guidelines. 6. Reports from committee liaisons. 7. Report on local section officers conferences. 8. Report from OLSA staff. MEETINGS & EXPOSITIONS

Jack H. Stocker, chairman; Chemistry Department, University of New Orleans, Lake Front, New Orleans, La. 70122

LOCAL SECTION ACTIVITIES

C. Marvin Lang, chairman; Chemistry Department, University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, Wis. 54481

Open Meeting Sunday, March 23, 3-5 PM Sheraton-Houston, Abilene Room

Same as below plus topics from floor. Executive Session 1. Sites for future meetings: a. Board directive for Pacific international meeting—1986. b. Bids for fall 1986 site. c. Invitations to bid for 1987 meetings. 2. Registration fees. 3. Chairman's report—Science Commission activities. 4. Subcommittee reports: western councilors' resolution, meetings sites and international meetings, C&EN program format, exposition guidelines, finance, membership questionnaire. 5. Travel arrangements to national meetings. 6. Request from the Division of Chemical Education. 7. Long-range planning workshop for regional meetings. MEMBERSHIP AFFAIRS

William M. Tuddenham, chairman; 1828 Lincoln St., Salt Lake City, Utah 84105 Open Meeting Monday, March 24, 4-5 PM Hyatt Regency, Ebony Room Same as below plus items from floor. Executive Session 1. Amendments for council action and consideration. 2. Redefinition of membership requirements. 3. Modification of membership structure (possible future amendment to bylaws). 4. Proposed amendment concerning criteria for removal from membership. 5. Alternate dues structures (possible future amendments). 6. Priorities for dues-supported programs; need for dues adjustment. 7. Recommendations for action on report from Presidents' Conference on Industrial Chemists.

2. a. Consideration of costs and other factors involved in third- versus first-class ballot mailing. b. Factors influencing members' voting response. 3. Evaluation of electronic procedures for tallying votes in council. Executive Session Preparation of slates for Council Policy Committee (1981-83 term) and Committee on Committees (1981-83 term). PATENT MATTERS & RELATED LEGISLATION

William Marcy, chairman; 405 Lexington Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017 Open Meeting Monday, March 24,10-11 AM Hyatt Regency, Cedar Room Same as below plus any related topics. Executive Session 1. Compensation for employed inventors. 2. Federal government patent policy. 3. National Inventors Hall of Fame. 4. Patent legislation. 5. Professional employment guidelines. 6. Charge, goals, and objectives of the committee. 7. Future symposia at ACS national meetings. 8. Other committee activities and interests. PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS PLANNING & COORDINATING

Alan L. McClelland, chairman; Du Pont Co., Central Research Depart-

ment, Experimental Station, Wilmington, Del. 19898 Open Meeting Wednesday, March 26,1-5 PM Whitehall, Concourse D 1. Activities of units represented on PROPPACC: a. Economic Status. b. Younger Chemists Committee. c. Division of Professional Relations. d. Committee on Professional Relations. e. Membership Affairs. f. Women Chemists Committee. g. Corporation Associates. h. Chemistry & Public Affairs. i. Professional & Member Relations. j . Public Affairs & Public Relations. 2. Other activities related to professionalism: a. Employment Clearing House. b. American Institute of Chemists. c. Engineers & Scientists Joint Committee on Pensions (ESJCP). 3. Status reports: a. The operation of ACS cooperative education service. b. Goals and ranking of professional relations programs. c. Survey of starting salaries of chemists and chemical engineers. d. Survey of employed inventors. e. Subcommittee on Delaney amendment. f. Study on causes of death of chemists. 4. Suggestion for survey to measure extent of inflation indexing in pension plans. 5. Other business, including topics from the floor.

NOMINATIONS & ELECTIONS

James W. Wilson, chairman; R&D Division, F-31, SmithKline Corp., 1500 Spring Garden St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19101 Open Meeting Monday, March 24, 3-5:30 PM Hyatt Regency, Pecan Room 1. Redistricting plans (Regions I VI).

m

NASA rocket at Johnson Space Center Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN 97

m mi

SI

21

I

υ m

PUBLIC RELATIONS



Richard L. Moore, chairman; W. R. Grace & Co., 1114 Ave. of the Ameri­ cas, New York, N.Y. 10036

urn

,ι Ι

Open Meeting Monday, March 24,10 AM-noon Albert Thomas Center, Room 108

ΓΓ

rr

1. Use of commercial television: update on "The Chemical Facts of Life"—Monsanto staff. 2. Use of radio public service time: "Polishing the Chemist's Image"— ACS staff.

A»; LU!

Ξ

s U [«•

SCIENCE COMMISSION

i

Warren E. Falconer, chairman; Bell Laboratories, WB l-L-246, Holmdel, N.J. 07733 Open Meeting Tuesday, March 25, 2-4 P M Sheraton-Houston, Laredo Room

Statue of Sam Houston, first president of the Republic of Texas Extended discussion of national PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS

Phillip S. Landis, chairman; Mobil R&D Corp., Paulsboro, N.J. 08066 Open Meeting Monday, March 24, 4:30-5:30 P M Sheraton-Houston, Mesa Room 1. Report on executive session. 2. Topics from floor. Executive Session 1. Subcommittee reports: member assistance, professional standards, employment aids, licensure and re­ lated regulations, local section liaison, civil service liaison. 2. ACS-sponsored insurance plans. 3. Liaison reports: AIC, DPR, Eco­ nomic Status, and other ACS com­ mittees. PUBLICATIONS

Gordon L. Nelson, chairman; General Electric Co., 1 Plastics Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 01201 Open Meeting Monday, March 24,1:30-2:30 PM Hyatt Regency, Cedar Room Same as below. Executive Session 1. 1980 proposed budgets and fiveyear retrospective information, Books & Journals Division, Chemical & Engineering News. 2. Proposed subscription prices for 1981. 3. Reports of standing subcom­ mittees and liaisons. 4. Copyright report. 98

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

meetings, consideration of petitions, report from the executive session, topics from the floor. Executive Session (open to councilors) 1. Council agenda petitions for ac­ tion. 2. Council agenda petitions for con­ sideration. 3. Consideration of reports and rec­ ommendations from: Committee on Divisional Activities, Committee on Meetings & Expositions. 4. Report from SciCom Task Force on Scientific Recognition. 5. Member-opinion survey on inter­ national meetings. 6. Discussion of plans of the Sci­ Com Task Forces on Nonpublication Communications and Chemistry of the Future. 7. Reports and recommendations from the commission's Scientific Ac­ tivities Group, Science Policies Group, Scientific Publications Group.

b. "Modern Chemical Technolo­ gy" revision. 3. Report by Technician Symposium Subcommittee: a. Houston, March 1980. b. Future symposia—San Fran­ cisco, August 1980; Atlanta, March-April 1981. c. Discussion of instrument sym­ posium for San Francisco, August 1980. 4. Proposed constitution and bylaw changes. 5. Report by National Council of Chemical Technician Affiliates. 6. Chemical Technician Educators' newsletter. 7. Endorsement of programs for technicians by ACS officers as a re­ cruitment aid. 8. Accreditation of two-year labora­ tory technician academic programs. WOMEN CHEMISTS

Wanda Brown, chairman; U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Tex. 78234 Open Meeting Monday, March 24,10:30-11:30 AM Sheraton-Houston, Abilene Room Report from executive session plus topics from floor. Executive Session 1. Chairman's report. 2. Subcommittee reports. a. Status of women: special salary survey; women in science legisla­ tion. b. Future symposia. c. Newsletter—assignments. d. Project identification—progress report. e. Membership recruitment/de­ velopment. 3. Report on the Academic Infor­ mation Service. 4. Survey status. 5. Awards nominee canvassing.

TECHNICIAN ACTIVITIES

YOUNGER CHEMISTS

Milton Campbell, chairman; 2119 Beech St., Richland, Wash. 99352

Robert A. Pribush, chairman; Chemistry Department, Butler Uni­ versity, Indianapolis, Ind. 46208

Open Meeting Tuesday, March 25, 2:30-3:30 P M Sheraton-Houston, El Paso Room

Open Meeting Tuesday, March 25, 4-5 PM Albert Thomas Center, Room 214

Same as below. Executive Session 1. Report by Long-Range Planning Subcommittee. 2. Report by Technical Education Subcommittee: a. Film/video program on chem­ ist-technician interface.

1. Report from executive session. 2. Topics from floor. Executive Session 1. Report by YCC liaisons to other committees and by YCC members on assigned activities.

2. Proposed subcommittee struc­ ture. 3. Petitions before the council. 4. The roadshow program: reports and planning, review of "How to Run a Roadshow," roadshow videotape. 5. Report on "Young Chemists in Transition." 6. Report on the YCC "Forum on the Industrial Employment of Chem­ ists." 7. Status of survey activities. 8. Status of YCC newsletter. 9. Slide-tape programs. 10. Cooperative education confer­ ences. 11. Activities for high school chem­ istry teachers. 12. Proposals for new YCC activities; proposed booklet on "How to Attend a National Meeting at Reduced Cost."

ΠΜ§ΊΜ Tours and Plant Trips Welcome to Houston, growth city of the Southwest, where chemicals are the lifeblood of business. Special programs, plant tours, and a variety of sight-seeing trips are planned to give you an opportunity to get ac­ quainted with the Houston area. Highlighting the week's events will be a western evening with a Texas bar­ becue and rodeo. The average daily temperature for late March is 55° to 60° F. Light coats will be comfortable in the early morning or late afternoon and eve­ ning. A raincoat and travel umbrella will be good insurance. The center of activities for the tours and plant trips program will be the Hospitality Center, located in the Hyatt Regency, Magnolia Room, which will be open Sunday, March 23, from 3 PM to 8 PM; and Monday, March 24 through Thursday, March 27, from 8 AM to 5 PM. You may register in advance or in the ACS registration area adjacent to the center during the meeting. Tickets for the various events may be purchased in advance or in the Hospitality Center no later than 4 PM the pre­ ceding day. Check your ticket for bus departure location. Hostesses from the ACS South­ eastern Texas Section will be avail­ able in the Hospitality Center to welcome you and to answer questions regarding sight-seeing and shopping. Your spouse is welcome in the Hos­ pitality Center for coffee and con­ versation.

MONDAY, MARCH 24 GP-1. 8:30 AM to noon. Exxon coal liquefaction plant. Starting with a preorientation lecture in Room 102, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, the tour will continue to the Exxon plant located in Baytown, Tex. Departs from Albert Thomas Con­ vention Center. Cost: $10; limit: 50. GP-2. 10 AM to 3 PM. Galleria shopping. A shopping shuttle bus will take you to the Galleria, which fea­ tures more than 200 stores. A ceiling of glass and an ice rink are only part of the magnificence of this shopping mecca. Restaurants, boutiques, and glamour abound in Houston's "Magic Circle." Luncheon on your own and return to the downtown area on one of the scheduled shuttle buses. Departs from Hyatt Regency. Cost: $5. GP-3. 11 AM to 2:30 PM. City/As­ trodome tour. In addition to the As­ trodome, windshield tour will include: the central business district with its new buildings combining the newest concepts in construction while mir­ roring restorations of the early days, world-renowned Texas Medical Center, Rice University, a drive through Hermann Park, and the "Satin Slipper" residential area of River Oaks. Departs from Hyatt Re­ gency. Cost: $12,; limit: 94. GP-4. 1:30 PM to 7 PM, Arco Oil & Gas Co. The tour-will be held on the site of a deep oil well allowing par­ ticipants to see the equipment, tools, and techniques used in the search for oil. The site is located near the town of Columbus, Tex., about 70 miles west of Houston. On the return trip a stop will be made in the nearby com­ munity of Fulscher for a Texas bar­ becue. Departs from Albert Thomas Convention Center. Co§t: $20; limit 47.

ter complex is the University of Texas, Houston, which was estab­ lished in 1970 and has grown at a rate unprecedented in contemporary medical education. The medical school's new nine-story $49 million building is a massive teaching and research complex connecting at every level with its primary teaching affili­ ate Hermann Hospital. A specialized tour of the University of Texas will be available featuring visits to research labs dealing in areas ranging from cardiovascular work to cancer re­ search and biochemistry. Departs from Albert Thomas Convention Center. Cost: $8.00; limit: 50. GP-7. 10 AM to 2 PM. Museum Tour/Lunch. A visit to the Museum of Natural Science & Medical Science, which includes everything from space, petroleum, chemistry, minerals, wildlife, medical science, and energy to an exhibit on the American Indian. Lunch will be served at the Faculty Club on the Rice University campus. Then visit the Museum of Fine Arts, home of the Beck collection of Impressionist and Postimpressionist paintings. If time permits, a stop at the Contemporary Arts Museum. Departs from Hyatt Regency. Cost: $14.00; limit: 47. GP-8. 1:30 PM to 5 PM. Houston Port Authority. The port of Houston is the third largest port in the U.S. handling cargo and ships from many different countries. The port of Houston, Harris County Houston Ship Channel Navigation District, provides the inspection vessel, the MIV Sam Houston, affording an im­ pressive trip on the Houston Ship Channel. The tour provides a good view of the extensive industrial and

TUESDAY, MARCH 25 GP-5.9 AM to 2:30 PM. NASA tour with lunch. A visit to the training and control site. See Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo spaceships, moon rocks, space food, and other mementos of the space program. Departs from Hyatt Regency. Cost: $15; limit: 94. GP-6.9 AM to noon. Texas Medical Center. Houston's internationally recognized Texas Medical Center has 26 health care institutions, including four general hospitals and five spe­ cialized hospitals, and a host of other training and educational facilities. It boasts 249 acres and is the largest employer in Houston with 2300 em­ ployees. Located in the medical cen­

Galleria shopping mall features ice skating rink and more than 250 shops Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

99

il

s* -4 m]

&il

IS!]

mni

Es

es

1 ES

IS

1 m

I τη

TT1

I·]

i

1

9

ι

commercial facilities lining both sides of the channel and making the Houston area a worldwide chemical, petroleum, and business center. The MlV Sam Houston is a 98-foot, airconditioned ship; cameras may be taken on board. Departs from Albert Thomas Convention Center. Cost: $8.00; limit: 50. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 GP-9. 8 AM to 1 PM. Shell Westhollow Research Center. Shell's cen­ tral research facility houses R&D activities directed toward oil and petrochemical products and pro­ cesses. This includes facilities for R&D in fuels and lubricants, refining process technology, transportation, industrial chemicals, plastics, resins, elastomers, and toxicology. Sup­ porting programs are carried out in analytical research, material science, chemical engineering, and process control. Lunch will be provided to participants by Shell. Departs from Albert Thomas Convention Center. Cost: $8.00; limit: 50. GP-10. 9:30 AM to noon. Heritage Park Tour. A walking tour of five re­ stored historic houses, a small 19th century church, and a reconstructed "Long Row" of early Houston shops. The Museum shop offers a unique collection of Houston mementos. Departs from Hyatt Regency. Cost: $4.00; limit: 50. GP-11. 10 AM to 3 PM. Galleria Shopping. (See GP-2 for details.) Cost: $5. GP-12. Noon to 4 PM. Johnson Space Center. The Lyndon B. John­ son Space Center facilities of the National Aeronautics & Space Ad­ ministration, located 25 miles south­ east of Houston in Clear Lake City, are best known for their training of NASA astronauts and key role in controlling manned space flights. Personnel at the center are currently developing the technology required for manned spacecraft in present and future programs, managing medical scientific and engineering experi­ ments, and supervising private in­ dustrial involvement in the develop­ ment of spacecraft. Exhibits, displays, and films are used to show the his­ torical development of the space program as well as to educate the public about the space shuttle. Tours permit participants to visit mission control, to enter the Skylab mockup used for training during the Skylab program, and to view the flight sim­ ulators used currently in preparation for space shuttleflights.Departs from Albert Thomas Convention Center. Cost: $8.00; limit: 50. 100

C&EN Feb. 18, 1980

GP-13. 1:30 PM to 5 PM. Houston Ship Channel. This tour affords the visitor a vivid picture of the largest petrochemical port in the world and the third largest general cargo port in the U.S. Departs from Hyatt Regen­ cy. Cost: $8.00; limit: 47. GP-14. 6:30 PM to 10 PM. Western Barbecue and Rodeo. A traditional Texas party complete with western barbecue, country and western band, and a real Texas rodeo. Departs from Hyatt Regency. Cost: $22; minimum: 400. THURSDAY, MARCH 27 GP-15. 8 AM to noon. Arco Chemi­ cal—Lyondale plant. This modern petrochemical, world-scale facility has one of the world's largest thermal cracking units, and produces olefins, raw materials for plastics, and asso­ ciated aromatics. Located in Channelview, Tex., about 20 miles east of Houston, it is on 2200 acres of land. Departs from Albert Thomas Con­ vention Center. Cost: $10; limit: 47. GP-16. 8:30 AM to noon. Houston Ship Channel (See GP-13 for details.) Cost: $8.00; limit: 47. GP-17.9 AM to 4 PM. Galveston. A tour of the historic island city of Galveston, steeped in legend back to the days of the Karankawa Indians. Highlights of the city, a tour of the Bishop's Palace, and a luncheon are included. Departs from Hyatt Re­ gency. Cost: $30; limit: 47. GP-18. 11 AM to noon. Alley The­ ater. Visit backstage at one of Houston's professional theaters. De­ parts from Hyatt Regency. Cost: $2.00.

ÎHÎOMÏWI Chemical Exposition The national ACS and the society's Southeastern Texas local section are pleased to present the Chemical Ex­ position during the national meeting in Houston. Exhibits will include a wide variety of products, services, publications, and equipment that should be of particular interest to all attendees. Many firms will be intro­ ducing new chemical instrumentation at the exposition; other organizations will be similarly introducing various products and publications. The exposition will be held in the East Hall of the Albert Thomas

Convention & Exhibit Center. Ex­ position hours will be from 9:30 AM to 5 PM, Monday, March 24, through Wednesday, March 26. Admission to the exposition will be by meeting badge, one-day-session ticket, or by complimentary badge for the exposition only. Complimentary exposition badges will be available from the exposition operations office in the registration area adjacent to the exposition area. Shuttle buses will be available from all meeting hotels to the Albert Thomas complex. Exhibitors Bold numbers at end of lines are booth numbers. Academic Press, 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003. Some of the new books on display: Geoffroy and Wrighton, "Organometallic Photochemistry"; Setser, "Reactive Intermediates in the Gas Phase"; Mathur, Narang, and Williams, "Polymers as Aids in Organic Chemistry"; Brown, "Pyrolytic Methods in Organic Chemistry"; and Karr, "Analytical Methods for Coal and Coal Products. " 413 Ace Glass, 1430 N.W. Blvd., Vineland, N.J. 08360. The Ace Proportional Temperature Controller, a complete line of photochemical equipment, the Firestone Valve, solvent reflux still for oxygen-free work, and additional glass items of interest to the chemist 210,212 ACS Continuing Education Courses, Department of Educational Activities, 1155—16th St., N.W., Wash­ ington, D.C. 20036. Copies of more than 50 ACS audio courses and all of the ACS video courses will be on display. In addition, the innovative PLATO system will be here for the demonstration of computer-based courses developed by ACS. Get hands-on experience with all of these learning tools. 252,254 ACS Products and Services, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C, 20036. Membership, microforms, books and journals. Registration Area Addison-Wesley Publishing, Jacob Way, Reading, Mass. 01867. Exhibiting undergraduate chemistry textbooks. Prominently displayed, "Chemistry: The Universal Science" by Frank L. Pilar. Any questions about manuscript projects and firm's current and forthcoming texts will be discussed. 324 Aldrich Chemical, 940 W. St. Paul Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 53233. Organic and inorganic research chemi­ cals, biochemicals, borane reagents, deuterated sol­ vents, stains and dyes, and bulk intermediates. 452 Alfa Products, Thiokol/Ventron division, 152 Andover St., Danvers, Mass. 01923. .Inorganic, organic, and organometallic research chemicals and materials, ultrapure chemicals, pure metals, deuterated NMR solvents, analytical standards, research and safety equipment. 213 Allyn & Bacon, 470 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 02210. New and recently published texts and refer­ ences. 312 Anderson Laboratories, 5901 Fitzhugh St., Ft. Worth, Tex. 76112. ACS reagents and solvents, APhA and AOAC reagents, atomic absorption standards, bio­ logical stains and indicators, in-vitro diagnostic re­ agents, standard buffers, standard volumetric solu­ tions, water testing reagents. 129 Ann Arbor Science Publishers, P.O. Box 1425, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106. Publishers of scientific books for the graduate and professional levels, in the areas of air and water pollution, water and waste technology, chemistry and engineering. 457 Antek Instrument, 6005 North Freeway, Houston, Tex. 77022. Demonstrating Model 707 one gram total ni­ trogen analyzer and Model 703 total nitrogen analyzer for liquids. 460 series and 300 series chromatographs. 249 Arbor Laboratories, 3619 Dawnwood, Spring, Tex. 77380. Electronic top-loading balances. 311

Pjl iLs^ Π 5 7' ΤδΐΓ Τ53Ί



H

SESSIONS

256

L .. _254_ .252J

yil^ljlll|j^4iiJ^iij^j||fc „ _240

'"i'39""" TUT " l 3 5 :

Ί33Ι

234

232J

238

236

1HBBM

111

mY^Y~mY^^'-^i-m gisiisv.v.v.™,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

|j228j^226

i l lllllll :.vv„„..

"223'il

^LOUNGE AREA 324

Is? m 456j

' 3 5 5 " '353""

4 5 4 ^452_

Hi" "339" "337" *TW"333Ί

1

440

438

-436, 4 3 4

_432_j

ENTRANCE

eilτετl l l l l

mmtmrm

325; 424

422_

ENTRANCE

425"

rife

^^^^^^^^^^^H East Hall, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center Austin Science Associates, 7310 S. Congress, Austin, Tex. 78745. Two Mossbauer Spectrometers will be displayed. The S-600 Series provides a very wide range of options and is now equipped with a micro­ processor-based computer instead of multichannel analyzer. Data reduction including curve-fitting is ac­ complished internally. The S-700 Econ Series: A low cost version suited to educational and less demanding applications. 434 J. T. Baker Chemical, 222 Red School Lane, Phillipsburg, N.J. 08865. Highest-purity reagents for analysis and synthesis, including reagents for instru­ mental analysis and sample preparation. New products include ReAquant solvent and titrant for electrometric water determination, "Baker Instra-Analyzed" acids for trace analysis, and special purity water for HPLC and TOC work. 333,335 Bascom-Turner Instruments, 111 Chapel St., Newton, Mass. 02158. Bascom-Turner Series 8000: Data handling systems for the lab. Applications include chromatography, spectroscopy, thermocouples, strain gages, transducers, and other testing techniques. Series 8000 systems are microprocessor-based with eight channel acquisition, floppy disk storage, key­ board processing, RS232Ianalog output, software, and accessories. 205

system allows data and database management, sta­ tistical analysis, quick data plots, and contains BBN's own structured research programing language (RPL). 200 Brinkmann Instruments, Cantiague Rd., Westbury, N.Y. 11590. Electrochemical instrumentation, elec­ tronic analytical and top-loading balances, rotary evaporators, bottle-top dispensers and digital micro­ pipets. 325,327,329 B/R Instrument, P.O. Box 7, Pasadena, Md. 21122. Spinning band distillation equipment and related elec­ tronics. 256 Brooks/Cole Publishing, 555 Abrego St., Monterey, Calif. 93940. Publishers of college textbooks in chemistry and other applied sciences. New for 1980 are Morris Hein's "Foundations of College Chemistry, " alt. éd., and "College Chemistry: an Introduction to Inorganic, Organic, and Biochemistry." 232 Burgess Publishing, 7108 Ohms La., Minneapolis, Minn. 55435. Selection of introductory chemistry texts and laboratory manuals. Burgess is especially well known for two beginning texts: one directed toward nonscience majors and the other directed toward health and life sciences majors. 424

Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 43031. Battelle is an internationally recognized scientific research institute. Exhibited material will present capabilities in polymer chemistry, analytical chemistry, corrosion research, atmospheric sciences, synthetic organic chemistry, and environmental and life sciences. 347, 349

Carle Instruments, 1200 Knollwood Circle, Anaheim, Calif. 92801. New line of GC systems for process analysis in petrochemical and chemical industries. Each instrument performs specific application and uses advanced column/ valve arrangements with automatic, microprocessor-controlled operation. Plus Carle valves and special GC accessories. 426,428

Beckman Instruments, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Fullerton, Calif. 92634. On display will be the High-Performance Liquid Chromatography System, Microlab 620 MX Series Computing Infrared Spectrophotometer, and the DU-8 UV Vis Computing Spectrophotometer. 215,217

CEM Corp., P.O. Box 9, Indian Trial, N.C. 28079. Automatic volatility computer A VC Model MP combines the latest developments in microwave drying and computer technology to provide rapid and accurate determinations for food and dairy products. Digital display for moisture or solids to 0.01%. Complete determination requires only minutes. 302

Bellco Glass, 340 Edrudo Rd., Vineland, N.J. 08360. Completely new: Bellco automatic still with delayed automatic shutoff, automatic flask drain, visual indi­ cation of operating status. Biological laminar flow safety cabinet for chemical carcinogens with single point clamping of filters, front filter loading, and gastight air control valve. 209

i m i lei

β ! llllll

; : | p 5 7 f 455Ϊ453Ϊ45 1Τ4

i i

Chemical Abstracts Service, ACS, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Showing copies of all 110 topics in the CA Selects series. Each topic is a separate current-awareness publication devoted to a particular interest area of chemistry. Each is published biweekly and includes C A abstracts and bibliographic citations on recent research in the field. Free issues available. ' Registration Area

Benjamin/Cummings Publishing, 2727 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, Calif. 94025. On display will be college Chemical Data Systems, R.D. 2, Box 74, Oxford, Pa. textbooks in introductory chemistry, organic chemistry, 19363. Microcomputer-controlled Model 1000 Pyroand biochemistry. 322 probe.A GC sample processor; 120 Pyroprobe; microcomputer-controlled Model 320 GC sample conBolt, Beranek & Newman Inc., 50 Moulton St., Cam­ centrator; 310 purge and trap concentrator; microbridge, Mass. 02138. RS/ 1 is completely integrated, processor-based timer/sequencer; 820GS geological commercially supported software system designed sample organic analysis system; 800 micro pilot plant exclusively to solve research scientists ' problems. The reaction system. 346

Chemical Engineering Magazine, McGraw-Hill Inc., 1221 Ave. of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10020. Chemical Engineering will exhibit chemical engineering books, reprints, seminars, and calculator programs. 403,405 Coulter Electronics, 601 West 20th St., Hialeah, Fla., 33010. Continuous demonstrations of the Coulter industrial Kem-O-Lab water chemistry analyzer, the Coulter Counter Model TA II and Model ZBI for particle counting and sizing, and the Coulter LPP large particle processor. Also featured is the Coulter Nano-Sizer for submicron-particle sizing. 305,307,309 Delmon Craft Co., 6923 Stearns, Houston, Tex. 77021. Julabo constant temperature circulators, Burdick and Jackson high purity solvents, MCB reagents, Unimetrics, micro syringes and chromatographic supplies, and Kelvinator ultra-cold freezers and refrigerators. 103 Digilab, 237 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02139. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and GC/IR. 223 Dionex Corp., 1228 Titan Way, Sunnyvale, Calif. 94086. Ion chromatograph 16 analyzes complex mixtures containing both organic and inorganic ions at trace levels. Ion chromatography provides rapid, sequential separation of ions at sensitivity levels down to 1 ppb. Applications include air and water quality, elemental analysis, brine, power production, soil, medical research (body fluids), and foods. 247 Elsevier North-Holland, 52 Vanderbilt Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. Featured will be publisher's most recent scientific monographs, proceedings, textbooks, and journals. 316,318 Encyclopaedia Britannica USA, 425 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60611. On display will be the 30volume Encyclopaedia Britannica 3 and other related educational publications. 310 Engelhard Industries, 2655 Rte. 22, Union, N.J. 07083. Engelhard noble metal catalysts are used to synthesize fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals and to purify chemical process effluent streams. Expert consultation on how stock and custom catalysts are produced, supplied, and reclaimed will be available. 313 W. H. Freeman & Co., 660 Market St., San Francisco, Calif. 94104. College texts, reference works, and professional books in chemistry. 113 Glenco Scientific, 2802 White Oak, Houston, Tex. 77007. A complete line of products for liquid chromatography: complete HPLC systems and components. Included is the Glenco series of amino acid analyzers and the new Model 411 Microphotometer, which features a unique sampling system for EIA analysis in clinical laboratories. It will accommodate samples as small as 200 microliters. 400,420 Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN 101

ΚΙ

Π

m to t

Gulf South Research Institute, P.O. Box 26518, New Orleans, La. 70186. Company provides research services in a variety of areas including analytical chemistry, in-vivo and in-vitro toxicology, polymer science, and biomaterials. Expertise in the field of capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and in development and evaluation of analytical methods. 227

Houghton Mifflin Co., 1 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 02107. College textbooks, including Shermonl ShermonlRussikoff "Basic Concepts in Chemistry" 2nd éd., Becker! Wentworth "General Chemistry" 2nd éd., Hart!Schuetz "Organic Chemistry" 5th éd., Loebel "Chemical Problem Solving by Dimensional Analysis" 2nd éd., and Willis "Problem-Solving in General Chemistry." 208

Labindustries, 620 Hearst Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 94710. New fixed and adjustable volume micropipettors; along with Tefzel plastic Repipet II dispensers; all-Pyrex Repipet dispensers and dilutors for all reagents except HF, 0.5 ml to 100 ml; fixed-volume and adjustable-volume all-plastic dispensers and sampling systems; Labquake test tube shaker and rotator; aquametry apparatus—Karl Fischer method. 243

Haake Inc., 244 Saddle River Rd., Saddle Brook, N.J. 07662. Line of thermal liquid baths and circulators featuring the most modern temperature control technology. In addition, the standard line of high precision circulating waterbaths with and without intergrated refrigeration will be on display. 352

Industrial Scientific, P.O. Box 60002, Houston, Tex. 77205. Gulf Coast representatives for Gow-Mac Instrument, Chemical Data Systems, Wescan Instruments, FTS Systems, and Houston Instrument Omniscribe Recorders. 348

Laboratory Data Control, P.O. Box 10235, Riviera Beach, Fla. 33404. Displaying a full line of HPLC pumps, detectors, systems, and accessories. Also on display will be the LDC MiniPump instrumentation pump and ConstaMetric III pump for core flooding studies. 133,135

Hach Chemical, P.O. Box 389, Loveland, Colo. 80537. Pump-Colorimeter analyzer for on-line monitoring, the DR-EU 4 portable laboratory, test kits for water analysis, and the new nephelometric, color-compensating ratio turbidimeter will be featured. The new full-line catalog of "Products for Analysis" and other technical literature will be available. 456 Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Inc., 757 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. 141

Κ? È2

Harper & Row, Publishers, 10 East 53rd St., New York, N.Y. 10022. College textbooks. 257 D. C. Heath & Co., 125 Spring Garden St., Lexington, Mass. 02173. Titles on display include: "General and College Chemistry, " 6th éd., Nebergall, Holtzclaw, Robinson; "General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry," James, Schreck, Bemiller; "Organic Experiments," 4th éd., Linstromberg, Baumgarten; "Theory and Practice in the Organic Laboratory," 2nd éd., Landgrebe. 328 Heat Systems Ultrasonics, 38 East Mall, Plainview, N.Y. 11803. Sonicator ultrasonic cell disruptor, homogenizes emulsifier, and liquid processor; Astrason andAstramax ultrasonic laboratory cleaners; pipette washers and vapor degreasers; Mystaire scrubber for removal of difficult fumes, odors, and submicron particles; Sonimist ultrasonic spray nozzle; Fluidcontrol digital metering and blending pump systems; Fluidcontrol pH digital pH analyzer! controller systems. 323 Holden-Day Inc., 500 Sansome St., San Francisco, Calif. 94111. Texts and supplementary materials in chemistry for undergraduates, graduates, and researchers. Exhibit features books in organic chemistry and instrumental analysis, including IR and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Latest and most extensive molecular structure models now available for classroom and research use. 353 Hotpack Corp., 10940 Dutton Rd., Philadelphia, Pa., 19154. Environmental equipment. Included are ovens, sterilizers, dryers, temperature humidity chambers, environmental rooms, furnaces, and baths. 304

Ingold Electrodes, 113 Hartwell Ave., Lexington, Mass. 02173. High-quality pH electrodes. Pressurized systems with protective housings for on-line or invessel monitoring. New multipurpose ion-selective probes. Integrally bridged pH electrodes improve measurements of many samples. More than 500 electrode types available. 225

Lab Safety Supply, 3430 Palmer Dr., Janesville, Wis. 53545. Equipment and supplies for safe handling of toxic and hazardous chemicals. Featured in the display will be still control pillows; asbestos replacement; new chemical splash goggles; safety signs; safety publications. 401

Lockheed Missiles & Space, P.O. Box 504, SunnyInstitute for Scientific Information, 3501 Market St., vale, Calif. 94086. Dialog, an on-line bibliographic University City Science Center, Philadelphia, Pa. 314 19104. The Science Citation Index, Current Abstracts information retrieval service. of Chemistry and Index Chemicus, Current Chemical Macmillan Publishing, 866 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. Reactions, Current Contents! Physical, Chemical and 10022. On display will be new and recent publications Earth Sciences, the Index to Scientific and Technical in chemistry and related disciplines. New this year is Proceedings, the Index to Scientific Reviews, ASCA profiles (personalized current awareness services) and the second edition of "Chemistry: A Life Science ASCATOPICS {current awareness services based on Approach" by Stuart J. Baum and Charles Scaife. 412 standard interest profiles). 415 Instruments for Research & Industry, 108 Franklin Ave., Cheltenham, Pa. 19012. Therm-O-Watch— versatile controller; Lead Donuts—weights for lab apparatus; glove bag—inflatable, disposable dry chamber; water-flow units—for monitoring the flow of cooling water; Lab-guard—curved lead-base safety shield. 326 Ionics, 65 Grove St., Watertown, Mass. 02172. New programable wet chemical analysis system designed to perform colorimetric, titrimetric, and selective ion analysis procedures automatically. The DigiChem system complements Ionics' line of high-precision fully automatic total carbon! total organic carbon and total oxygen demand analyzers. 440 JN Co., 20 Crossways Park North, Woodbury, N.Y. 11797. Free film distribution of science series, "The Search for Solutions" made possible by Phillips Petroleum. Island C Johns-Manville, Ken Caryl Ranch, Denver, Colo. 80217. Johns-Manville chromatographic supports, packings, and adsorbents for both gas and liquid chromatography. 306 J&W Scientific, P.O. Box 216, Orangeville, Calif. 95662. Fused silica capillary columns, micro extraction devices, capillary inlet system and conversions, graphite ferrules. 234

Micromeritics, 5680 Goshen Springs Rd., Norcross, Ga. 30093. Instruments for particle technology analyses: particle size, B.E.T. surface area, pycnometers and zeta potential analyzers. Liquid chromatography instruments: 7500 HPLC system and components. 201,203 Molecular Design Ltd., 1122 Β St., Hayward, Calif. 94541. Presenting Molex, most sophisticated sub­ structure search and retrieval system available; fea­ tures full graphical input! output, explicit stereo­ chemistry, isotopes, charges; fast proprietary searching algorithm; complete data flexibility. Within seconds, the researcher is in touch with all relevant structures, data, physical constants, and associated definitive references. 240 Molecular Structure Corp., 3304 Longmire, College Station, Tex. 77840. Complete single-crystal x-ray diffraction service, including crystal mounting, data collection, structure solution and refinement, con­ struction of 3-D scale model, and production of ma­ terials for publication. Also available are experimental electron density studies and structure determinations from powder. Results are available in as little as three weeks. 101 McGraw-Hill Book Co. 1221 Ave. of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10020. Exhibit of outstanding chem­ istry texts, including new texts, current revisions, and previously published texts in every field of chemistry. 339,341 Nicolet Instrument, 5225 Verona Rd., Madison, Wis. 35703. Nicolet 7199 high-resolution, high-sensitivity Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, with accessory GC-IR and LC-IR capabilities for obtaining real-time, spectrally separated chromatograms; low-cost, easy-to-use MX-7 Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. 436,438 Parr Instrument, 211—53rd St., Moline, III. 61265. Oxygen bomb calorimeters with a new microprocessor master control system. Oxygen combustion, sodium peroxide fusion and acid digestion sample preparation bombs. Pressure reaction equipment and generalpurpose pressure vessels for laboratory use. 204 PCR Research Chemicals, P.O. Box 1778, Gaines­ ville, Fla. 32602. Synthetic reagents, organofluorine compounds, organosilanes, derivatizing agents, mass spec standards, crown ethers. 207 Pedersen Instruments, 2772 Camino Diablo, Walnut Creek, Calif. 94596. Single- and dual-pen strip-chart recorders with integrators and event markers. A re­ corder! plotter with RS232 or IEEE bus controlled and a transient recorder with high-speed, 10-bit AID, conversion rates to 200 kHz, and 4k memory capable of displaying up to 100 kHz. 206

Houston's unique Alley Theater has nine-towered keep 102

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

Pergamon Press, Fairview Pk., Elmsford, N.Y. 10523. Publisher of scientific and technical books andjour-

nais, including social and behavioral science materials. In addition, Pergamon is a micropublisher offering its own and others' publications on microform. Featured this year will be latest books in IUPAC series. 104

switching valves for chromatography, automatic trace organics concentrator, wide-range electron capture detector, permeation tubes and calibration systems, and other analytical devices. 236,238

Perkin-Elmer, 702 Main Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 06856. Island A

D. Van Nostrand Co., 135 West 50th St., New York, N.Y. 10020. Undergraduate textbooks and professional monographs in chemistry. 211

Photovolt, 1115 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10010. Aquatest IV Karl Fischer titrator with microprocessor control, new Apollo Mark XII microwave system with microprocessor control for moisture determination with automatic tare of electronic balance. 105,107 Plenum Publishing, 227 West 17th St., New York, N.Y. 10011. Abramovitch, "Reactive Intermediates"; Ladd/Palmer, "Theory and Practice of Direct Methods in Crystallography"; Berliner/Reuben, "Biological Magnetic Resonance"; Middleditch, "Practical Mass Spectrometry"; Parsons, "Atlas of Spectral Interference in ICP Spectroscopy"; Conwayl Bockris, "Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry"; Mittal, "Surface Contamination"; Ben-Haim, "Hydrophobic Interactions"; Smith, "Photochemical and Photobiological Reviews." 432 Prentice-Hall Inc., C/O College Exhibits, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. 07632. College textbooks. 202 Sadtler Research Laboratories, 3316 Spring Garden St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. Cira 101 chromatographic infrared analyzer—an inexpensive GC/IR technique; Sadtler standard and commercial spectra (IR, NMR, UV, fluorescence, Raman, DTA, 13 C NMR, IR vapor phase); audiovisual programs {math, chemistry, lab skills); technical books, analytical services. 441 W. B. Saunders Co., West Washington Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 19105. Chemistry textbooks. 226,228 Scientific Gas Products, 2330 Hamilton Blvd., South Plainfield, N.J. 07080. Ultrahigh-purity carrier and reference gases. High-accuracy gas mixtures, zerograde gases, custom-engineered gas-handling equipment. 123 SDC Search Service, 2500 Colorado, Santa Monica, Calif. 90406. On-line literature search service covering chemistry and related disciplines. 431,433 Sensorex, 9713 Bolsa Ave., Westminster, Calif. 92683. Combination pH electrodes of the latest designs will be exhibited. 337 Southwest Research Institute, P.O. Drawer 28510, San Antonio, Tex. 78284. Chemistry and chemical engineering activities at a nonprofit applied research organization. 422 Spectrametrics Inc., 204 Andover St., Ballardvale, Mass. 01820. 245 Springer-Verlag New York, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10010. G. E. SchulzandR. H. Schirmer, "Principles of Protein Structure"; C. P. Slichter, "Principles of Magnetic Resonance," Vol. 1; "Beilstein's Handbook of Organic Chemistry"; "Gmelin Handbook of Inorganic Chemistry"; "Landolt-Bornstein"; Monographs: S. M. Hecht, "Bleomycin"; A. F. Williams, "A Theoretical Approach to Inorganic Chemistry. " 308 Teknivent Corp., 10774 Trenton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63132. Data systems used with magnetic sector and quadrupole GC/MS's. They feature interactive graphics with real-time displays, library search routines, and mass fragmentograms. A Basic compiler is also available for users wishing to develop their own programs. 224 Tracor Instruments, 6500 Tracor La., Austin, Tex. 78721. Gas and liquid chromatographs and accessories. 343,345 Trustees of ACS Group Insurance Plans, 1100 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Promotional and descriptive information on the various insurance plans promoted by the American Chemical Society. 300 UTI, 325 North Mathilda Ave., Sunnyvale, Calif., 94086. New Data Link processor for computer to 100C mass spectrometer interface. Processor permits operator to program and control the mass spectrometer for multiplicity of tasks. 342,344 Valco Instrument and subsidiary, Vici Metronics, P.O. Box 55603, Houston, Tex. 77055. Sampling and

El w

i m

Varian Associates, Instrument Group, 5750 Bintliff, Ste. 202, Houston, Tex. 77036. 414,416,418

τη

Verlag Chemie International, Plaza Centre, Suite E, 1020 N.W. Sixth St., Deerfield Beach, Fla. 33441. New book series, "Dahlem Workshop Report—Physical and Chemical Sciences and Life Sciences. " Monographs: "Methods of Enzymatic Analysis," "German-English Dictionary of Chemistry," "Atlas of Polymer and Plastic Analysis, " "Handbook of Liquid Crystals," "Solvent Effects in Organic Chemistry," "Industrial Organic Chemistry." Also stencils and journals. 301,303

τη

Wadsworth Publishing, 10 Davis Dr., Belmont, Calif. 94002. "General Chemistry" by Siebring and Schaff. Appropriate for science majors, preprofessional students, and humanities and social science majors. Each topic begins at a basic level and develops step by step. Detailed work-out sample problems, end-of-section short answer questions, and discussion starter questions. A complete package of supplements. 102 Waters Associates, 34 Maple St., Milford, Mass. 01757. Complete line of analytical and preparative liquid chromatographs will be on display. Instruments, supplies, training, and methods development support. 354,355,356,357

13 Ο

H Apollo moon lander at space center

John Wiley & Sons Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 11016. Featuring both new and backlist textbooks and professional reference books from Wiley College division, Wiley-lnterscience, and Halsted Press, as well as various journals of interest to those in the field of chemistry. 315,317,319

chromatographic lab. The seminar will be held at the Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, West Hall, Room 216, on Wednesday, March 26, from 12:30 to 2 PM. Bring a sandwich. Beverages and desserts provided.

Willard Grant Press, 20 Providence St., Statler Office Bldg., Boston, Mass. 02116. Textbooks in general, organic, and biological chemistry. Also on display will be the "Modular Laboratory Program in Chemistry, " an ongoing series of separate experiments in general, organic and analytical chemistry. 222

Councilors will convene on Tuesday, March 25, from 4 to 7 PM, in the Ebony Room, Hyatt Regency.

Worth Publisher, 444 Park Ave. South, New York, N.Y. 10016. New textbooks in chemistry. "Basic Chemistry: General, Organic, and Biological" by Denis M. Callewaert and Julien Genyea. Also available in separate volumes: "Fundamentals of College Chemistry" and "Fundamentals of Organic and Biological Chemistry. " "Organic Chemistry" by Daniel S. Kemp and Frank Vellaccio. 229

RMuMtWï Special Events ACS Award Reception and Dinner. The

reception will begin at 6:30 PM and the dinner at 7:30 PM, in the Imperial Ballroom, Hyatt Regency. See Social Event No. 4. ACS Mixer. The mixer will be held on Tuesday, March 25, from 9 to 11 PM, in the Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center, East Exhibit Hall. See Social Event No. 16. Analytical Pyrolysis GC Seminar/Workshop. Members of the scientific staff of Chemical Data Systems will present an audiovisual program on modern analytical pyrolysis techniques and the applications to the

Central Region Councilors' Caucus.

Congressional Science Counselors' Caucus. Counselors will convene on Tuesday, March 25, from 4:30 to 6 PM, in the Laredo Room, SheratonHouston. Divisional Councilors' Caucus. Councilors will convene on Saturday, March 22, from 2 to 4 PM, in the San Antonio Room, Sheraton-Houston. Divisional Officers' Caucus. Officers will convene on Saturday, March 22, from 1 to 5 PM, in the Florentine Room, Sheraton-Houston. Forum: The Use of Commercial Television and Radio Public Service Time. Part I will update the "chemical facts of life" in a television campaign; part II concentrates on "polishing the chemist's image" through free air time. Monday, March 24; 10 AM to noon; Room 108, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center. Forum: The Toxic Substances Control Act.

Staff members of the Environmental Protection Agency will be available to answer questions on TSCA on Tuesday, March 25, from 3 to 5 PM, in Room 213, Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center. Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN 103

I

I1

ml

3

3 rri ni g

Θ

1

Middle Atlantic Regional Councilors' Caucus. Councilors will convene on Tuesday, March 25, from 9 to 11PM, in the Dogwood Suite, Hyatt Regency. Planetarium Show: Springtime of the Universe. Seven special performances of ACS's new show will be presented at Burke Baker Planetarium, 5800 Caroline in Hermann Park, for ACS members. Performances, sponsored by the ACS Southeastern Texas Section, will be given at 8:30 PM, March 23, and at 7 and 8:30 PM, March 24, 25, and 26. Free tickets for special shows will be distributed at meeting registration areas. Region I Councilors' Caucus. Councilors will convene on Tuesday, March 25, from 5 to 6:30 PM, in the Imperial Ballroom Center, Hyatt Regency.

M

M

M M

Region V Councilors' Caucus. Councilors will convene on Sunday, March 23, from 8 to 10 PM, in the Mesquite Room, Hyatt Regency. "The New Elements." Glenn T. Seaborg will present this talk for teachers and students of chemistry on Sunday, March 23, from 3 to 4:30 PM, in the Statesman Ballroom, SheratonHouston. Western Regional Councilors' Caucus.

Councilors will convene on Sunday, March 23, from 8 to 11 PM, in the Redbud Room, Hyatt Regency.

1PMW Preprints Preprints of the following divisions' technical sessions may be purchased at the entrance to their meeting rooms. They also may be ordered by mail. Environmental Chemistry R. B. Pojasek Publications Manager c/o Energy Resources Co. 185 Alewife Brook Pkwy. Cambridge, Mass. 02138 (617)661-3111

Vol. 20 No. 1,$5.00a

Fuel Chemistry Shirley B. Radding Director of Publications Fuel Chemistry Division 2994 Cottonwood Ct. Santa Clara, Calif. 95051 (415) 326-6200 Ext. 2875

Vol. 25 No. 1 & 2, $8.00 each

Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry John H. Lupinski Circulation Manager General Electric Co. P.O. Box 8, Bldg. K-1 Schenectady, N.Y. 12301 (518)385-8638

Vol. 42 $8.00b

104

C&ENFeb. 18, 1980

Petroleum Chemistry Inc. Jim W. Bunger Treasurer 320 Browing Bldg. University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (801) 581-8627

Vol. 24 No. 3, $8.00 Vol. 24 No. 4, $8.00 Outside U.S. $9.00

Polymer Chemistry Inc. Frederick Dammont Circulation Manager Division of Polymer Chemistry P.O. Box 20453 Newark, N.J. 07101 (201)482-5744

Vol. 21 No. 1, $10 (Houston)3 Vol. 21, No. 2, $10 (San Francisco)8

a Payment with order, b 1. For members of the division and ACS, no charge except $8.00 dues for divisional membership. 2. For affiliate members of the division, not members of ACS, no charge except $10 dues for affiliate membership of the division. 3. For libraries and individuals who are not affiliates or members, $8.00 per book or $16 per year shipped surface mail. (Airmail shipment will incur additional costs.)

RMuMïïW Employment The National Employment Clearing House will be available to members at the Houston meeting. It will be located in the Albert Thomas Convention & Exhibit Center and will be open from 8 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Thursday, March 24-27. Registration for applicants only will begin Sunday, March 23, from 3 PM to 7 PM. Members and student affiliates may submit forms in advance, which will reduce the time required to register, but no records are placed on file for review by employers until the candidate reports in Houston and completes registration requirements. The meeting registration fee may be waived for an unemployed member who wishes to use NECH. The waiver may be requested in advance or at the meeting: in advance, forward the preregistration form from this issue with your request to the ACS Employment Aids Office, 1155—16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036; at the meeting, come to the staff office in NECH in the convention center. Both candidates for employment and employer representatives must be registered and in attendance at the meeting to use the NECH facilities. One-day-session tickets are not honored. Deadline for receipt of completed forms at the national office prior to the meeting is March 7. Position Available postings received from companies will be ready for review by any person registered for the meeting after 1 PM on Monday, March 24. Copies of the postings will be available for sale for 50 cents per position listed. Employers may register beginning

Monday, March 24, at 8 AM to review applications and schedule interviews. Employer representatives must agree that no placement charges will be made and that candidates will be advised at the time of first contact the name of the employer, geographical location, and nature of the position. Employers who wish to post a notice of an opening may obtain standard forms in advance from the ACS Employment Aids Office. A separate form should be submitted for each job description. These may be returned to the national office prior to the meeting (no later than March 7) or delivered to NECH during the meeting. All completed forms must comply with all federal regulations on job discrimination in employment. If not, we will be unable to accept them. Employers who have an opening but are unable to attend may submit a listing for a fee of $25. You will be billed after the meeting. Be certain the returned form indicates that you will not be in attendance and that all interested candidates contact you directly by mail. Single-copy service of the candidates' records will be provided during the meeting at 50 cents per copy (the summary form). Personal résumés of candidates, if submitted, will be on file for review. Copies of the personal résumés will also be provided at 50 cents per copy. Orders for complete sets of the candidates' reproduced summary forms will be taken during the meeting from registered employers at $50 per set. Orders for complete sets of the candidates' reproduced summary forms from companies not in attendance will be accepted at $100 per set for 30 days following the meeting.

Houston's growing skyline

ta» $m

MuMtW ACS Officers James D. D'lanni, president Albert C. Zettlemoyer, president­ elect Mary L. Good, chairman, board of directors Raymond P. Mariella, executive director Rodney N. Hader, secretary John Κ Crum, treasurer Divisional Officers Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. R. Ory, chairman; C. J. Mussinan, secretary-treasurer, c/o International Flavors & Fragran­ ces, Research & Development, Union Beach, N.J. 07735. Division of Analytical Chemistry. F. A. Guthrie, chairman; R. F. Hirsch, secretary, Chemistry De­ partment, Seton Hall University, South Orange, N.J. 07079. Division of Biological Chemistry. L. P. Hager, chairman; R. W. F. Hardy, secretary, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Central Research Department, Wilmington, Del. 19898. Division of Carbohydrate Chem­ istry. R. W. Binkley, chairman; R. E. Harmon, secretary, Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Mich. 49001. Cellulose, Paper & Textile Divi­ sion. R. M. Rowell, chairman; T. L. Vigo, secretary-treasurer, USDA Textile & Clothing Laboratory, 1303 West Cumberland Ave., Knoxville, Tenn. 37916. Division of Chemical Education Inc. L. N. Ferguson, chairman; J. A. Bell, secretary, Department of Chemistry, Simmons College, 300 The Fenway, Boston, Mass. 02115. Division of Chemical Health & Safety. J. A. Young, chairman; D. B. Walters, secretary, National Institute of Environmental Health, Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27709. Division of Chemical Information. Ms. C. H. O'Donohue, chairman; Mrs. B. G. Prewitt, secretary, Rohm & Haas Co., P.O. Box 219, Bristol, Pa. 19007. Division of Chemical Marketing & Economics. P. J. Manno, chair­ man; F. Y. Chan, secretary, Hooker Chemical Co., P.O. Box 4289,1980 South Post Oak Rd., Houston, Tex. 77210.

Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry. J. T. Yates, chairman; E. L. Fuller, secretary, 1127 West Outer Dr., Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830. Division of Computers in Chemis­ try. C. L. Wilkins, chairman; D. Edelson, secretary, 77 Parkside Rd., Plainfield, N.J. 07060. Division of Environmental Chemistry. L. Laird, chairman; R. L. Jolley, secretary, Oak Ridge National Lab, P.O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830. Division of Fertilizer & Soil Chemistry. J. B. Sardisco, chair­ man; D. P. Day, secretary, Rte. 3, Box 468M, Beechwood Drive, Ra­ leigh, N.C.27603. Division of Fluorine Chemistry. W. B. Fox, chairman; R. J. DePasquale, secretary, 2878 NW Fourth La., Gainesville, Fla. 32601. Division of Fuel Chemistry. H. Appell, chairman; K. S. Vorres, secretary, 416 Rugeley Rd., West­ ern Springs, 111. 60558. Division of Geochemistry (Pro­ bationary). T. F. Yen, chairman; E. W. Baker, secretary-treasurer, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Division of History of Chemistry. J. H.Wotiz, chairman; Ν. Μ. Fos­ ter, secretary-treasurer, 326 Carver Dr., Bethlehem, Pa. 18017. Division of Industrial & Engi­ neering Chemistry. Ν. Ν. Li, chairman; C. M. Bartish, secretary, Air Products & Chemicals Inc., P.O. Box 538, Allentown, Pa. 18105. Division of Inorganic Chemistry. L. F. Dahl, chairman; L. V. Interrante, secretary-treasurer, General Electric Research & Development Center, P.O. Box 8, Schenectady, N.Y. 12301. Division of Medicinal Chemistry. J. A. Montgomery, chairman; J. R. Dice, secretary, Parke Davis & Co., 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48105. Division of Microbial & Bio­ chemical Technology. R. D. Tanner, chairman; R. W. Eltz, secretary-treasurer, E. R. Squibb & Sons, Georges Road, New Bruns­ wick, N.J. 08903. Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology. V. E. Viola Jr., chairman; R. L. Hahn, secretary, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830. Division of Organic Chemistry. R. E. Ireland, chairman; P. Beak, secretary-treasurer, Roger Adams Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 61801. Division of Organic Coatings & Plastics Chemistry. J. L. Gardon, chairman; M. J. S. Bowden, secre-

m

71



l i

ΤΓ

IT

1 P

m ft

ϊί m

m. le Kl

Sam Houston Park

tary, Bell Telephone Labs, Moun­ tain Avenue, Murray Hill, N.J. 07971. Division of Pesticide Chemistry. J. R. Plimmer, chairman; P. A. Hedin, secretary-treasurer, Boll Weevil Research Laboratory, Box 5367, Mississippi State, Mississippi State, Miss. 39762. Division of Petroleum Chemistry Inc. R. H. Lindquist, chairman; W. V. Bush, secretary, Shell Develop­ ment Co., P.O. Box 1380, Houston, Tex. 77001. Division of Physical Chemistry. W. A. Lester Jr., chairman; A. L. Kwiram, secretary-treasurer, Chemistry Department, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 98195. Division of Polymer Chemistry Inc. E. M. Pearce, chairman; J. E. McGrath, secretary, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, Va. 24061. Division of Professional Relations. M. M. Joullié, chairman; M. W. Wadley, secretary, 520 East Riverdale Ave., Orange, Calif. 92665. Rubber Division Inc. R. S. Graff, chairman; T. Jones, Wyrough and Loser Inc., P.O. Box 5047, Trenton, N.J. 08638. Division of Small Chemical Businesses (Probationary). K. W. Greenlee, chairman; A. C. Melnyk, secretary, Chemical Abstracts Service, Dept. 57, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Feb. 18, 1980 C&EN

105