Laboratory handbook of toxic agents - Journal of Chemical Education


Nov 1, 1982 - Laboratory handbook of toxic agents. Miriam C. Nagel. J. Chem. ... Versum, Entegris to form chemicals leader. Continuing consolidation i...
0 downloads 0 Views 1MB Size


These modules could best he used as supplementary material for a n upper level high school chemistry dam or to replace current laboratory experiments. With the possible excention of Chemical Models, they do not seem appropriate for use in general chemistry class. There is a prelaboratory assignment included in the modules. This could he used as homework or as class work. The questions are wellthought-out yet simple enough for the student to understand. Also, the postlab questions eould be used as part of a laboratory report, if one is required. They could also be used to test students' understanding of the experiment. The instructor's information sheets seem well organized, listing the equipment needed and the reagents and how to prepare them. There is no time allotment listed in the modules. However, the time is given in the Willard Grant Press Catalog, as well as a description of each experiment. According to the catalog, mast of these experiments will take two to three hours. If this is for the actual bench work, some high school teachers may have aproblem. Since I havenot done these experiments, I cannot be sure if the stated time allotment includes prelaboratory and postlaboratory questions.

a

WILLIAM ARNOLD Fairmont West High School Kenering, OH 45429

Preventions, First Aid in the Laboratory, Poisonous and Corrosive Gases, Reagents and Solvents, and Precautions Aeainst Radiations. Although the bnsic format ofthis handbook is quite good, it suffers from one major drawback-its date of publication, 1968. Unfortunately, the handbook's advice (including most of the references to safety rules and regulations) is limited to what was known and accepted in England prior to 1968. While the physical description, the acute effects, and the recommended first aid (in the majority of cases the treatment is simple and routine) would not be much different today, the legalaspects and the chronic effecta certainly might. In the early 1960's the only wmmon laboratory chemical proven t o he carcinogenic was benzidine. Today, however, several additional substances have been added to the list of known carcinogens. This reviewer also found several bits of advice which, viewed from his 1981 American perspective, are blatant understatements. The following are good examples: "It would thus seem advisable to limit smoking in laboratories, especially those in which organic chemicals and solvents are handled" and "Toxic chemicals and their solutions should never be pipetted by mouth!' Overall, given the advances in toxicological studies since 1968 and the specific legal requirements of the U S . since the advent of EPA and NIOSH, a high school teacher would, in the opinion of this reviewer, be wise to search for a more up-to-date source of safety and first aid information. THOMASO'BRIEN St. k r y High School 3024 Lawrence Drive Edgawwd, KY 41017

Laboratory Handbook of Toxlc Agents Charles Horace Gray, Franklin Publishing Company, London, 1968.

Chemistry Decoded Leonard W. Fine, Oxford University Press. New York. NY. 1976, T h e secondary school chemistry teacher who is safety-conscious $12.95, 456 pp. will want to keep a copy of Gray's "Laboratory Handbook of Toxic Agents" handy to the prep room. Following the names of over 240 Leonard W. Fine presents a nonrigorous yet challenging poisonous and corrosive chemicals, commonly used in research and appprosch to chemistry for the nonscience student in "Chemistry teaching labs, are their physical properties needed for rapid identiDecoded." Quantitative concepts and skills such as measurements, fication, warnings in bold type, cautions, acute and chronic effects, scientific notation, significant figures, percentage composition, and first-aid measures for emergencies. mole-related problems, kinetic energy, gas laws, and pH calculations Immediate treatment for inhalation. eve contad. ineestion and skin presented contact are listed for each chemical as needed ~ i n e e w a t e is r so . im. ~ are~ ~ when ~ necessary in a very straightforward fashion. Some of the problems at the end of each chapter deal with such skills, but portant to first aid, thesolubility ur reactivity i,feachchemiral with many of the problems are of a very practical nature. For example, with water is includrd in its physical rmpenies. Adequatecross referencing regards to the Law of Conservation of Mass the student is asked to of names aids in quick identification. The warning is clear that the give examples and verify this law from daily experience. This, ineiomission of a chemical from the list does not necessarily mean that dentally, is in keeping with the general tone of the text: the example it is harmless. for the Law of Conservation of Mass given in the text is that of the Other important information induded in this concise manual is a electronic flash bulb-masses are given for hefore and after the discussion of the factors that determine the effects of toxic exnosure flash. for and several unusual ease studies. There is a section on oreaniz.ine ~This tert is meant to put the nonscience student in touch with safety and one on special precautions. First-aid procedures, including science, andmost specifically, chemistry, but it might do well to put clear illustrations for artificial reaprmtion, are also given. However. the science student in touch with reality and the practicality of the serondar) ~chooiteachem s h o ~ l dhe aware of and guidrd by hral lava chemistry of everyday life. The example of the electronic flash bulb and schod policy regarding first aid. again illustrates this clearly: besides using an everyday example to There is a section in the bunk on p w u t i o n s against radiation with which the Law of Conservation of Mass can be applied, the author goes useful infurmatron on tvues ofradiation and theeffertsof radiation. on to describe the "chemistry" of this reaction: 2 Mg (solid) 0% (gas) Students might find th&aeetion interesting reading. A short glossary 2 MgO (solid) +heat light. Most beginning chemistry students of medical terms at the end of the manual may be helpful in underare introduced to this reaction in the laboratory, but few, perhaps, standing descriptions of the effects of exposure to some of the listed are reminded of its very practical significance. This text provides chemicals, although clarity is one of the outstanding features of the manv such nractical links. "Laboratory Handbook of Toxic Agents." (Ed. Note: The identifi0;her ndrewurthy features of this tert include: 11) thought-procation of carcinogens is based upon the information available in voking introductury stntcments an the beginning of each chapter 1968.) wh~cllare cnptivatingly titled "Perceptions and i)ecrptims," (2) practical illustrations throughout the text, and (3) a comprehensive MIRIAMC. NAGEL glossary. The accompanying instructor% manual not only includes Awn High School detailed solutions to the text problems but also concise chapter Avon, CT 06001 outlines which mav be conied for student use and demonstrations. some of which can be done safely in any secondary school chemist6 class. The text and manual work together in "decoding" some of the secrets of chemistry and making these "secrets" less mysterious far This is the second edition of a handbook which "is intended to be hoth the nonscience and science student alike. available an the work bench, ready for use in an emergency a t anySISTER MARGARETZALOT time" to "give general informationaboutthe toxic hazard8 associated Maria High School with the use of familiar chemicals and their acute and chronic toxic 6727 S. California Avenue efiects." Expanded from the earlier veruiun, the hnndbouk conslato Chicago. iL 60629 of five eectiom: Introduction and General I'rincipl~. Prcroutionv and ~~

~

~~

~

~

~~~~~

~~

~

~~~~~

-~~

-

984

Journal

of Chemical Education

+

+