Organic Chemistry. Sixth edition (Morrison, Robert Thornton; Boyd


The sixth edition of Morrison and Boyd's text can trace its origin back to 1958. The new edition follows in the footsteps that made the earlier editio...
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reviews Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, Sixth Edition Douglas A Skoog Donald M West and F James Holler S a ~ n d e r Colege s P ~ bsh l ng New York, hY, 1992. xv + 976 pp Ffgs and tables 20 8 A 26 cm This 1s the s x t h edttwn of a pupulur wxtbwk fur u n d e r ~ a d u a u courses of analytical chemistry. It is designed for one- or rwo-scmester courses for chemistry majors. The content of analytical chemistry courses varies substantially from institution to institution due to the diversity of instrumental resources available as well as to fundamental differences in the approach to teaching analytical chemistry. One approach emphasizes traditional (wet) analytical techniques because the study of these techniques provides the students with a solid knowledge of chemical equilibrium. In the laboratory portion of the course wet analytical techniques reouire that the students develon oractieal skills that are indeed of general importance for quantnatwe lahorstmy work. Thp iecond approach emph;wires murk thb instrumenwl a3pects ut m a Iyttcnl chemist^ due tothecurrent prcdominonceofinstrumentol techniques in the workplace. Ideally, both approaches should he represented in the curriculum, hut conflicts arise in institutions where the students are required to go through only one semester of analytical chemistry. Because of its clear focus in providing a strong background in chemical principles, this b w k is suitable for either one of the two following curriculum situations:

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a ane-semester course emphasizing traditional analytical techniaues. or a two-semester course in which a g w d portion of the second semester is devoted to instrumental techniques. ~~~

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for o rather quick survey o f m ~ t m m e n t a ltechniques, hut these rhnpters nrr nor intended 38 a replacement for a wxtbook in instrumental nnalyrical chemistry In addition, the ladt sut chapters deal with practical problems related to sampling, interferences, unit operations, analytical reagents, and standard methods of analysis. The hwk also mntains 12 appendices ranging in content from the customary tables of thermodynamic values to practical data, such as the designations and porosities of filtering crucibles. One appendix is devoted to volumetric calculations using normalitv and eauivalent weizht because the authors onlv use the concepts of k o l a r i t y an; mole far stoichiometric~caleulations throughout the book. Personally, I applaud this choice, but I do not helieve that it will be unanimously popular. Major changes from the fifth to the sixth edition are as follows: .Chapters 14 (Introduction to Electrochemistry) and 19 (Voltammetry) have been largely rewritten, Molecular fluorescence spectroscopy is now the subject of a n independent chapter, A b o u t one-third of the uroblems are new or revised. and Marginal notes, features, and biographical sketchei are now part of the book format.

An instmdor's manual and a set of 50 overhead transparencies are also available to the instructor. The book is attractive from the student's standpoint, because of the clarity of the presentation, the polished format, and the ahundance of worked-out numerical examples. Each chapter offers a large collection of end-of-chapter exercises that should also be useful to the students. Overall, this edition maintains the high quality that is already expected from these authors and should be considered i n the texthook selection prnerss hg i n t ~ c t o r s o3nalyticol f chemistry u,ursedemphasizing the tradmmal vnching npproarh. ~

The book obviously is not intended for a course in instrumental analytical chemistry. In fact, Skoog is also the author of a popular instrumental analysis textbook t h a t is now in its fourth edition. The current edition maintains the high standards of quality that were found in the previous editions. The material is clearly presented using easy-to-understand, short sentences. The first 16 chapters are devoted to the discussion of errors and statistical evaluation of exuerimental data.. eravimetric and titrimetrie methods of analysis, ~neludingall t h r newssary principles of ehen~wnlincid-base, complexatwrt, precipitatiurl, and redox cqullihria. A< a prnctirioner of the field, I wns imprmscd hy rhe cxcrll e n t , extremely clear, a n d very r e a d a b l e introduction t o electrochemistry given i n Chapter 14. The authors definitely succeed a t presenting the fundamental concepts of electrochemistry, a refreshing change from the rather obscure presentations found in many hooks. The next 12 chapters discuss the fundamentals of electroanalytieal, spectroscopic, and chromatographic techniques. As indicated before. the deoth of the oresentation here is suitable

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Angel E. Kaifer University of Miami Miami, FL 33124

Organic Chemistry, Slxth Edition Robert Thornton Morrisonand Robert Neilson Boyd. PrentlceHall: Englewood Cliffs,NJ, 1992. xxvii + 1278 pp. Figs. and tables. Thr sixth dirion ofMomson and Buyd'sOrgonre Chemzsrry can trace i t s oripln hack to 1958 The new edition fi~lluw~ in the footsteps that made the warher edmnns the standard in the field fur the sophomore one-year organic course for many years. Chapters on particular functional groups continue to include the summary

Reviewed in This Issue Reviewer Douglas A. Skoog, Donald M. West, ano F. James Holler, F~ndarnentalsof Analytical Chemistry, Sixtn Eoition

Angel E. Kaifer

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Robert Thornton Morrison and Robert Neilson Boyd, Organic Chemistry, Sixth Edition

Mel Mosher

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Titles of Interest

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Monographs

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New Volumes in Continuing Series

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Volume 69 Number 11 November 1992

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reviews lists of synthetic methods or reactions of the functional group with specific examples. These summaries are well referenced to the location i n the book where a mare detailed discussion of the reactions can be found. Thr style of wntmg i s the ramp as in earlier ed~tiuns,and even the more diflicult ronccptual ideasarc prcsentrd in a w n v ihnr ihc student enn casily follow particularly in the threechapterson stereorhemmtry. Throuch~utthe text the a u t h o r have cuntlnued the policy of rnrlier editions hy rrfcming to the people and icientists who made the d ~ c o v e n e sby name and in some case* even gimnp bnefl&graphles. As m earlter editions, thr problcmsat thecnd of the rhaprers start out r a w rhrn hreome mored~ffirult:,r; the." pnb ceed. ~ i a r g percentage e i f the problems a t the end of the chap& and those in the text are answered in the appendix. There are, however, few examples of showing how to work out prahlems i n the text. The order of chapters has been changed in the new edition. For example alcohols and ethers are now presented in one chapter, Chapter 6, while in the earlier editions they were presented in three chapten later in the text. Even with the addition of two new chapters the text has been shortened by about 200 pages. The authors have integrated a number of discussions of environmental issues with the chapters where relevant. For example, fluorochlorocarhons and the ozone layer are treated in the chapter dealinrr with free radical haloeenations. and the ereenhouse effect is covered in the chapter an aikanes. The graphics of the sixth edition are much better than in earlier editions. Many of the illustrations are muticolored to emphasize important paints or to show reaction mechanisms. The only fault of the text, in my opinion, is still the delayed treatment of functional groups until they are systematically treated in their specialized ehapten. There is no early listing or summary of functional groups to give a n overview and as a result the student will not encounter many of the important functional groups until midway through the second half of the text in Chapter 24. On the whole this text is well done and will appeal to Morrison and Boyd fans.

Mel Mosher Missouri Southern State College Joplin, MO 64801

Titles of Interest Newton to Einstein: The Trail of Li ht An Excursion to the Waveparticle Duality and the &;cia1 Theory of Relativity

iments a s lecture demonstrations. Biographical and historical sketches complement the physics. Many exercises, constructed with a n emphasis on conceptual questions, are provided.

Wiley's New Dimensions in Engineering. Nondestructive Testing Techniques Don E. Brayand Don McBride, Editors. Rodney D. Stewart. Series Editor. Wiley: New York. NY, 1992. xxxii + 765 pp. Figs. and tables. 16.5 x 24.3 cm. This is a comprehensive reference cwenng a hrond range of teehnirprs in nondesrrucfive testing. Drawing on the work of ex. pert eontrihutorr;, and a wide rnnge of sourrcs, the book encum. passes common as well as uncommon methods. Based an years of extensive research and application a t NASA and other government research facilities, the hook provides practical guidelines far selecting the appropriate testingmethods~andequipment. I t details t h e applications, limitations, and advantages for each method presented. Organized by physical testing gmups to facilitate use as a practical reference, the hook covers a broad spectrum of issues and techniques, including visual inspection, penetrant and chemical testing, nuclear radiation, sonic and ultrasonic, thermal and microwave, magnetic and electromagnetic, training and human factors. The book is heavily indexed and referenced.

Plastics Recycling: Products and Processes Raymond J Ehng. Edltor Oxfora Lnwersty Press New York, NY, 1992 289 pp Fags and taoles 17 2 r 24 6 cm $64 00 HE This book is intended to he a current source of information on plastics recycling technology. The introductory chapter is a brief overview, a historical review, and a n introduction to recycling terms, organizations involved, and university programs. The book is useful to readers because it is a comprehensive review of the technology of plastic recyclingprocesses and products over the last decade. The subject is discussed fmm the paint of view of the resin type rather than recycling technology classifications.

Chemistry of the Solid-Water Interface: Processes at the Mineral-Water and Particle-Water Interface in Natural Systems Werner Sfumm. with contributions bv Laura Sioo and Barbara

Ralph Baierlein. Cambridge University Press: New York, NY, 1992. xvi + 329 pp. Figs. and tables. 18 x 25.5 cm. $34.95 HE. This undergraduate physics text takes the reader along the trail of light from Newton's particles to Einstein's relativity. I t presents clues and encourages the reader to draw conclusions before the answers are revealed. The f i n t seven chanters describe how lieht behaves. develop Sewton; particle theory. intrudurc wares and an elcrtromagncfir wave theory of light. discovcr the photon, nnd rulmmate in the wave-part& dualxy The h u k then p w on ~ tu derelvp the Spcclal Thwry of Relativity, showmg how time dilation and lenglh conrranion are conscquenccs of rhr two simplr prmnpler on whwh the theory ir fmnded. An exten&e chapter derive,: the equatlun E=mcr clearly from lirst principles and then explores its cansequences and themisconceptions s;rraunding it. The h w k grew out of a popular one-semester course for nanscience students. No previous knowledge of physics is required; of mathematics, only high school algebra is needed. Experiments provide the motive and the testine .. mound for ohvsical theories. Soecial emphails 1 3 , theretire, Lawn tu the deskiptiun of pivotal Aperimmrs. I)rmils nrr prnvidcd on how to perfmn many of the exper-

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Journal of Chemical

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This hook explores the dynamics that exist a t various solidwater interfaces. Stressing surface chemical principles that can be applied in the geochemistry of natural waters, soils and sediments, and in water technology, the hook focuses throughout an one fundamental mechanism, the interaction of solutes with solid surfaces. Bath facets of this interaction adsorption and desorption are analyzed, in such terms as the chemical and physical pmperties of water, the solute, and the sorhent. Two basic processes in the reaction of solutes with natural surfaces are develooed: 11) farmation ofcmrdlnatwe bondr tsurface complexstlon,; and 2, hydrophohir adsorption. drlven by t h e incumpatihility of the n m p d a r compounds w t h wnter Both processes ore fundamental to understanding many processes in natural systems and the laws of geochemical processes. The dynamics of particles, especially the role of particle-partide interactions (coagulation), are also discussed. Illustrating the chemical, physical, and biological processes essential to the solid-water interface, the book reveals how, a t the miemlevel, these processes influence the major geochemical cycles.

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