Page 1 "There are two main additions to the subject matter this year


British Standards, and are based on a report of a Joint Com- mittee of the .... the identification of organic compaunds and a lengthy, but valu- able,...
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"There are two main additions t o the subject matter this year. Several tables of chemical symbols and abbreviations have been added: these symbols were recently published a s British Standards, and are based on a report of a Joint Committee of the Chemical Society, the Faraday Society, and the Physical Society. Last year, a dictionary of Raw Materials for the Paint and Allied Industries was introduced; this has been substantially augmented, and new products included. "There is included an index to the whole subject-matter of the book; the improved form of 'thnmb-index' t o the sections has been retained, as i t has proved entirely successfnl. "The inclusion of a Table of Physical Constants of Inorganic and Organic Compounds, an entirely new section of new matter specially compiled for CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES, andnever previously published as one, and the bringing of the indexes to the front of the book, including (1) the firms whose advertisements extend and complement the editorial information, and (2) the products made by these firms. were new features in 1937. "A considerable amount of care has been devoted t o the classification of the contents. The book is divided into ten sections, each one dealing with some particular phase of plant construction or manufacturing process. Thus, for example. Section I gives an account of the various materials used in plant construction, their mechanical and chemical properties, and data regarding methods of working and resistance to corrosion; whilst Section IV deals with size reduction and mixing and blending of solids, and outlines briefly the principles underlying these operations and their application as illustrated by wellknown forms of mills and mixers. . Wherever possible, quantitative relationships have been expressed in the form of simple equations or relevant tabulated data. "Owing to limitations of spsce the treatment of fundamental processes such as grinding, filtering, and evaporating has necessarily had to be condensed. I t is hoped, however, that the information given will be valuable in indicating the type of plant heat suited to carrvinr" out anv oneration and the . narticular . important points to look for when p u r r h n h g plant. Sumeruus rcfcrrncrs to current litcmture arr givrr~in the text and 3 c o n yletr bibliography of technolo~icalworks is also inrludcd.. . "

compaunds (twenty-three p a p s ) , and finally fivechaptersonspecia1 topics (ninety-eight pages). Electronic formulas are used mare freely than in the first edition, but only when it is sound pedogogy to do so. An excellent exposition of the concept of resonance is given in connection with the structure of guanidinium salts. The non-existence of electronic isomers, the shortened internuclear distances between atoms and energy relationships are used to give an experimental approach t o an understanding of the concept of resonance only in those particular cases where it is really important and useful. The chapters an special topics give the beginning student the essential information concerning vitamins, sterols, sex hormones, synthetic drugs, proteins, plant and animal pigments, and stereochemical tooics. An excellent index is orovided. The book is designed for use in a full year's course in organic chernisrryand fullill. its purpose. The textual mntter is not only well mitten technically but the prercntntion is interesting and attractive t o the student. ~~

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U - B B ~ ~ T YOR ILLINOIS URBAN&1~1.1~01s

TEXTBOOK on ORGANICCHEMISTRY.E. Werthcim. P. Blakiston's Son & Co., Inc.. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. 1939. xiv 830 pp. 15 X 23 cm. "This baok presents material for a two-semester course in the theory of organic chemistry. I t is intended t o serve the needs of students who will major in chemistry or specialize in organic chemistry, also of those who are enrolled in premedical or chemical engineering coursesm-from the author's Preface. This book has much t o commend i t as a textbook of elementary organic chemistry. I n the first place, having appeared in two previous editions (in mimeographed form) which were widely used aver a period of many years, it has behind it the test of actual use. I n hook form the value of the work is greatly enhanced by greater readability, abundant illustrations and the more liberal use of graphic formulas, and by some expansion of the material covered. Attention may be drawn particularly to the large number of half-page portraits of leading organic chemists of the past and present. Extensive use is made'bf reaction charts t o indicate inter-relationships of compounds and of diagrams t o illustrate stereochemical points. At the end of each chapter are James Bryant Con- given review questions and a short bibliography of recent literaM CHEMISTRY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS. ant, President of Harvard University, formerly Sheldon ture, the Latter including for the most part only articles published Emery Professor of Organic Chemistry. Revised with the as- in the journals of the American Chemical Society. I n order t o sistance of Max Tirhler, Research Chemist, Merck and Com- make the subject as attractive as possible t q students whose inpany. The Matmillan Company. New York City, 1939. terest in orpanic chemistrv is not for its o w n h k e h-eonent referRevised Edition. x 658 pp. 14 X 21.3 c r q W.00. a c t . is made to the newer dcvclopmcntr in industrial processes The revised edition of this excellent textbook will be welcomed and products and to cornpounds of chieEy biological or medical by all teachers of organic chemistry. It is an up-to-date treatise interest. The arrangement of subject matter is orthodox, that is to say, which will be very useful. The authors have altered the treatment of certain subjects and condensed the space devoted to a few the author begins a t once with the paraffin hydrocarbons and topics in order t o make room for recent developments in organic deals systematically with the common aliphatic types, thereafter chemistry. By this means new material on valence, resonance with aromatic types, and finally with-special types (dyes, pro~.and so forth). The onlv deviations from the arraneement and energy relationships as well as the chemistry of hormones, teins. vitamins, sugars, proteins, and other biochemical compounds have by structural types nrc that thc Grigmrd and Friedel-Crafts rebeen included without making the book unbalanced or unwieldy action~are dealt with in a separate chapter and the suhject of and with an increase of only thirty-one pages of text over the optical activity is discurscd in a w r y brief c h r p t ~ rwhich scrvcs as an introduction t o the chapter on carbohydrates. Noteearlier edition. The general order of treatment in the first half of the book is worthy additions to the usual subject content are the chapter on unchanged. Basic principles are stressed, and the experimental the identification of organic compaunds and a lengthy, but valubasis of structural formulas emphasized. The alcohols are taken able, appendix which contains among other things, industrial up first, followed by alkyl halides, esters, ethers, hydrocarbons, flow sheets, a chronological table, notes on nomenclature, and a acids, aldehydes and ketones, polyhalogen compounds, deriva- table of physical constants. The book is uncommonly lengthy for an introductory text. tives of ammonia, and polyfunctional compounds. Anidea of the general distribution of subject matter is indicated by the fact that This is partly a consequence of the wider variety of reactions this material constitutes about one-half of the baok (three hnn- dealt with, and partly a consequence of the more detailed treatdred nineteen pages out of six hundred twenty-five pages of ac- ment of the reactions. It is almost inevitable that in treating tual text) and orovides a sound foundation of reactions and svn- these reactions in more detail than usual the book should occathrses. T h e chemistry of nromatic compound.i is takcn up ncxt sionally rise above the elementary level. Thus, for example, in (one hundred forty-sevcn pages) followal by alicyclic compound> connection with the formation of primary amines by the Hafmann including terpcnes and sterols (thirty-right pager), heterocyclic degradation of amides it is pointed out (footnote, page 291), for ~

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the first time in s n elementary textbook so far as the reviewer's knowledge goes, that the reaction is limited to the amides of acids having less than five carbon atoms. So also it is indicated (page 296) that the reaction of nitrous acid with aliphatic plimary amines, as a method of replacing an amino group by a hydroxyl group, is subject t o certain limitations. The amount of material presented is, in fact, greater than could normally be covered in a two-semester course, especiallysince the instructor using this textbook will probably find it desirable t o amplify very considerably the somewhat sketchy and disconnected treatment of the theoretical aspects of the subject. However, in the matter of choosing between too muchand toolittle f a c t d c a n t e u t the author has wisely elected t o err in the direction of too much, and the final discretion is properly left with the individual instructor. WELDONG. BROWN

The authors appear t o have been unusually successful in 6nding a suitable compromise between the detailed treatment expected in a treatise and the clear-cut outlines necessary in a textbook. They have accomplished this by careful selection of the material included, by focussing attention on the present status of each problem, and by packing a large amount of valuable information into tables and graphs. The appendices add to the practical utility of the book; they include a table comparing the various notations for atomic energy states, tables of heats of reaction and bond strengths, a table of activation energies of simple reactions, and a chart far converting energy units. One feature worthy of special commendation is the treatment of photochemistry as a living, growing subject. No attempt has been made t o cover up the seamy side. "When doubt has been felt, it has been expressed. Throughout the book there have been T w Umvsasrru 0s C a r u o o emphasized not only the questions which photochemistry has Cmcnoo, ~ ~ ~ n i o r s answered but also the questions t o which i t must still provide an answer." And t o he convinced that there are still same unsnswered questions, one need only glance a t the discussion of the reUSESAND APPLICATIONS OP CHEMICAL AND RELATED MATER~ALS.action between hvdroeen . .. and oxveen. Thomas C. Grepry. Reinhold Publishing Corporation, New o he hook isattrartively hound and printed. In recommending 665pp. 14.5 X 23 cm. $10.00. York City, 1939. vi it very highly the revirwcr hopes that it may scrve to stimulate "Since 1922 there have been appearing in the pages of Oil, additional interwr in the complicnted and fundamental prohlcms Paint and Drug Reporter a series of surveys covering the uses. of reaction mechanisms and photochemistry. E. J. ROSENBAEU potential applications, and sales pmihilities of chemicals and Tae U ~ l w a s r nOF C n c ~ o o related raw materials. C ~ C * G OILLINOIS , "At first these surveys appeared under the title 'Where You Can Sell.' Subseauentlv the title was chaneed - t o 'Industrial Uses of chemicalsand ~ e k t e dMaterials.' E IN GENERALCHEMISTRY.Alexander "The early research was conducted by the late Ismar G i i - S E L E ~ N EXPERIMENTS Silverman, Sc.D., Head of the Department of Chemistry, burg; and since his death in 1933 has been continued and exUniversity of Pittsburgh, and Abraham L. Robinsa, Ph.D.. panded by Thomas C. Gregory, one of the editors of T m CONAssistant Professor of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh. DENSED C m m w DICTIONARYand a nationally known expert on D. Van Nostrand, New York City, 1939. ix 309 pp. 39 figs. chemical marketing. 25 X 28 cm. $2.50. "Recognizing the great permanent value of this information, These SELECTIVE E X P E R ~ Eare N~ designed to accompany the an arrangement was effected between the publishers of Oil, Paint and Druc Reborter and Reinhold Puhlishine Corooration freshman college course in general chemistry. I n addition to the whereby the materiil could he made available in book fo-rn after experiments found in the usual manual the followingare included: rearrangement, amplicatiou, and complete editing by Mr. T h e Quantitative Determination of Ba as BaSOh Determination of O1 in Air by Pyragallol. Deterinination of the Freezing Point Gregory. "In its present form it makes available t o sales executives, of Solutions, Quantitative Det'ermination of NHs in Ammonium research directors, manufactdrers, dealers, and all others in- Salts, Conductometric Titration, Faraday's Law by Electrolysis terested in the uses of chemical products. a mass of information of Copper Sulfate, Rate of Hydrolysis of Acetamid, Oxidation Reduction Titration, Electrolytic Preparation of Chlarates unavailable elsewhere and of tremendous practical value." and Hypachlorites, ConJact Process for Sulfuric Acid Using V ~ O Ias a Catalyst. Preparation of Guncotton, Preparation of Ethyl Alcohol, Reactions of V, Md,.-W, and U. The material CHEMICALREACTIONS. PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND THE M E U ~ ~ OSPM on the metallic elements is arranged according to periodic groupGerhrd K . Rollcfron, Ph.D., Associate pofessor of Chemistry, ine with the excention of Al. Sn. and Sb. and these are nlaced toUniversity of California, and Milton Burton. Ph.D., Instructor g&r. ~uslitaiiveanalysis isnor coo;idcred, althoudh qualitain Chemistry, New York University. Prentice-Hall, Inc., rive twts are given under the respective elements. The numher New York. 1939. xiv C 445 pp. 59 figs. 15 X 23 m. of quantitative experiments is w l l above that of the average $5.75. manual, and several require the recording of electrometric data. There h r been ~ ~ for some time a dearth of texts on photochemisA group of exercises is placed a t the end of each experiment. try written in English. I n the ten or eleven years since Kistia- About half of the pages of the book are report sheets where space kowsky wrote his monograph and Griffith and McKeown wrote is provided for a complete write up of the experiment. their textbook a great deal has been accomplished, and most of . A loose-leaf binding is used, and undoubtedly many of the this new material has been effectively inaccessible t o students. naees . .. will tear loose in actual use. Includine the reoort sheets The volume under review has been admirably designed t o fill in the same volume as the drrcriptive matcrlal subjects thcm to this gap. It is t o a high degree self-contained. If any ideas are lnbor~toryhazard$, and many of thcre must b~ in a soiled condineeded as a background t o the understanding of photochemical tion hefore the completion of the course. This also m o k r s the problems, they are presented in logical and succinct form. The book larger and more cumbersome than is warranted by the wide range of topics covered is indicated by the chapter titles, printed material. The Qnantum Theory of Spectra, Photoactivation and the PropThe number of experiments is sufficient so that the instructor erties of Photoactivated Molecules: I. Physical Effects, and may chwse those best suited for the class. T h e manual is thus 11. Chemical Effects, Reaction Kinetics, Photolysis in the Solid designed for both beginners and students who have had chemistry State, Photolysis of Vapors of Inorganic Compounds, Photolysis in hieh school. of Vapors of Carbon Compounds, Molecular Rearrangements, ~ G e ~ d ~ e c t i are o n sdear and the entire b w k is well written. Photosensitization, Typical Chain Reactions, Addition Reac- Illnstrations are plentiful, and the student should find no diffi: tions and Associated Phenomena. Polymerization, Effects in the culty inarranging his apparatus and carrying out the experiments. Liquid State, and Heterogeneous Reactions. This last chapter includes discussions on photographic processes and photosynthesis.

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