Response to Comment on Effect of Drying of Jujubes (Ziziphus jujuba


Apr 17, 2013 - Response to Comment on Effect of Drying of Jujubes (Ziziphus jujuba. Mill.) on the Contents of Sugars, Organic Acids, α‑Tocopherol,...
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Correspondence/Rebuttal

Response to Comment on Effect of Drying of Jujubes (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) on the Contents of Sugars, Organic Acids, #-Tocopherol, #-Carotene, and Phenolic Compounds Qing Han Gao, and Min Wang J. Agric. Food Chem., Just Accepted Manuscript • DOI: 10.1021/jf400098v • Publication Date (Web): 17 Apr 2013 Downloaded from http://pubs.acs.org on April 25, 2013

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Response to Comment on Effect of Drying of Jujubes

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(Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) on the Contents of Sugars, Organic

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Acids, α-Tocopherol, β-Carotene, and Phenolic

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Compounds

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Qing-Han Gao,† and Min Wang*,†

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College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F

University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, People’s Republic of China

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We are responding to comments from Dr. John S. Salter Jr. and

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Dr. Jonghoon Kang of Valdosta State University on our recently

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published paper.1 Before responding to these comments, we would

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like to restate the rationality of our work. The main objective was to

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evaluate the effect of drying of jujubes on the contents of sugars,

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organic acids, α-tocopherol, β-carotene, and phenolic compounds.

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Dr. John S. Salter Jr. and Dr. Jonghoon Kang analyzed the twelve

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variables (1: vanillic acid, 2: glucose, 3: ferulic acid, 4: fructose, 5:

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cinnamic acid, 6: rutin, 7: protocatechuic acid, 8: ABTS, 9: TPC, 10:

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malic acid, 11: citric acid, 12: succinic acid) of our data with principal

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component analysis (PCA). However, catechin and epicatechin

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were the two main phenolic compounds in our study, and vanillic

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acid, ferulic acid as well as cinnamic acid selected by Dr. John S.

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Salter Jr. and Dr. Jonghoon Kang are in a small amount.

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Furthermore, β-carotene is the most common carotenoid in fruits.2

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α-Tocopherol is the most important lipid-soluble antioxidant.3 Many

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studies have demonstrated that there are strong interactions

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between β-carotene and α-tocopherol based on their antioxidant

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effect.4,5,6 But α-tocopherol and β-carotene evaluated in our paper

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were not analyzed in their comment.

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However, we appreciate much of the comment from Dr. John S.

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Salter Jr. and Dr. Jonghoon Kang for analyzing our data with PCA. 2

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PCA is a mathematical tool which performs a reduction in data

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dimensionality and allows the visualisation of underlying structure

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in experimental data and relationships between data and

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samples.7,8 Therefore, PCA introduced in their comment may be

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applied to the evaluation of other food processing methods.

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REFERENCES

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(1) Gao, Q. H.; Wu, C. S.; Wang, M.; Xu, B. N.; Du, L. J. Effect

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of Drying of Jujubes (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) on the contents of

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sugars, organic acids, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and

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phenolic compounds. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2012, 60, 9642−9648.

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(2) Paiva, S. A.; Russell, R. M. Beta-carotene and other

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carotenoids as antioxidants. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 1999,18, 426−433.

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(3) Brigelius-Flohe, R.; Kelly, F. J.; Salonen, J. T., Neuzil, J.;

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Zingg, J. M.; Azzi, A. The European perspective on vitamin E:

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current knowledge and future research. Am. J.Clin. Nutr. 2002, 76,

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703–716.

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(4) Böhm, F.; Edge, R.; Land, E.J.; McGarvey, D. J.; Truscott, T.

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G.; Carotenoids enhance vitamin E antioxidant efficiency. J. Am.

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Chem. Soc. 1997, 119, 621−622.

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(5) Böhm, F.; Edge, R.; McGarvey, D. J.; Truscott, T. G.

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Beta-carotene with vitamins E and C offers synergistic cell

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protection against NOx. FEBS Lett. 1998, 436, 387−389.

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(6) Zanfini, A.; Corbini, G.; La Rosa, C.; Dreassi, E. Antioxidant

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activity of tomato lipophilic extracts and interactions between

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carotenoidsand alpha-tocopherol in synthetic mixtures. LWT- Food

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Sci. Technol. 2010, 43, 67–72.

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(7) Jiménez, A. M.; Sierra, C. A.; Rodríguez-Pulido, F. J.; 4

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Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

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González-Miret, M. L., Heredia, F. J., Osorio, C. Physicochemical

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characterisation of gulupa (Passiflora edulis Sims. fo edulis) fruit

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from Colombia during the ripening. Food Res. Int. 2011, 44,

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1912−1918.

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(8) Patras, A., Brunton, N. P., Downey, G., Rawson, A., Warriner,

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K.,

Gernigon,

G.

Application of

principal

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hierarchical cluster analysis to classify fruits and vegetables

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commonly consumed in Ireland based on in vitro antioxidant activity.

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J. Food Compos. Anal. 2011, 24, 250−256.

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AUTHOR INFORMATION

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Corresponding Author

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*Telephone: +86-13032938796.

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E-mail: [email protected]

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Notes

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The authors declare no competing financial interest.

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