UNION CARBIDE OLEFINS COMPANY - Industrial & Engineering


UNION CARBIDE OLEFINS COMPANY. Ind. Eng. Chem. , 1958, 50 (9), pp 88A–88A. DOI: 10.1021/i650585a766. Publication Date: September 1958. Copyright ...
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SOLVENT RECOVERY SAVES MONEY SAVE 6 5 % TO 8 0 % ON PROCESS SOLVENT COSTS Solvent recovery by the

CLEANER S A N D S . . . m o r e efficient de-sliming . . . w i t h t h e " O V E R D R A I N " Classifier T h e "Over-drain" Classifier is a completely new device in ( t h e field of mechanical wet classifiers. T h e belt, with lifting flights at­ tached b e n e a t h , moves u p w a r d l y out of t h e sand bed between two stationary side shrouds—creating t h e effect of a series of moving, closed, washing c o m p a r t m e n t s . T h e only outlet from these com­ p a r t m e n t s is via holes in t h e belt above. Surplus liquid and slimes discharge t h r o u g h these "overd r a i n " holes without mixing with the oncoming sands. T h e end re­ sult is an extremely clean sand discharge, excellent de-sliming— m a k i n g t h e " O v e r d r a i n " Classi­ fier an ideal washing device.

Write for Hardinge Catalog 39-C— 12

Section through "Overdrain" Classifier showing upward-moving, closed, washing compart inents.

CARBIDE can tell you how a solvent

recovery plant can recover your process solvents. Write now for the booklet, "Solvent Recovery by the COLUMBIA Ac­

tivated Carbon System." Address Depart­ ment B, Union Carbide Olefins Company, 30 East 42nd Street, New York 17, New York. Unretouched photograph of "Overdrain" action above the hell—water and slimes discharging upwardly.

HARDINGE C O M P A N Y ,

I N C O R P O R A T E D

YORK, PENNSYLVANIA · 2 4 0 A R C H ST. · M a i n Office a n d W o r k s New York · Toronto · Chicago · Hibbing · Houston · Salt lake City · San Francisco · Birmingham · Jacksonville Beach 88 A

COLUMBIA

Activated Carbon system is the efficient, economical way to recover solvents vapor­ ized in manufacturing processes. Thus, it saves you money. Alcohols, esters, ethers, ketones, hydrocarbons, chlorinated com­ pounds, and practically all mixtures of these solvents can be recovered and reused. And look at these facts . . . efficiency— more than 99%: cost—1 to 2i per pound of recovered solvent. Thus, you save 6 5 % to 80% on your process solvent costs. Here's how solvent recovery works. Vapor laden air is drawn from the evapo­ ration process and passed through a bed of COLUMBIA activated carbon. The solvent vapor is adsorbed on the carbon and the denuded air is discharged into the atmos­ phere. When the carbon becomes satu­ rated, the vapor laden air is switched to a second adsorber. Then, low-pressure steam drives the solvent out of the carbon bed and the steam-solvent mixture is condensed. If the solvent is insoluble in water, an auto­ matic decanter separates the mixture. If the solvent is water-soluble, distillation does the job.

INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY

UNION CARBIDE

UNION CARBIDE OLEFINS COMPANY

D i v i s i o n of U n i o n Carbide Corporation 3 0 E. 42nd Street, New York 17, Ν. Υ. "Columbia" and "Union Carbide" are registered trade marks of Union Carbide Corporation.